Israel vs Hezbollah no Libano

  • 674 Respostas
  • 110880 Visualizações
*

ricardonunes

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3564
  • Recebeu: 32 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 1 vez(es)
  • +10/-5
(sem assunto)
« Responder #195 em: Julho 25, 2006, 03:05:27 pm »
papatango, quantos operacionais do hezbollah reconhece neste video?
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 00432.html

Não estou aqui a defender o hezbollah, mas sim a condenar a politica usada por Israel para combater esses terroristas.
Potius mori quam foedari
 

*

Azraael

  • Perito
  • **
  • 413
  • +0/-0
    • http://www.bgoncalves.com
(sem assunto)
« Responder #196 em: Julho 25, 2006, 03:45:53 pm »
Citação de: "Doctor Z"
O Líbano, pelo o menos o governo, não têm poder (nem força suficiente)
para tratar do problema do Hezbollah ...
Entao porque e' que nao pediu apoio as nacoes unidas, por ex?

Citação de: "Doctor Z"
A Palestina estão contra todos e por isso, não têm nada a perder ou quase, porque não têm nada ...
Parece-me que estao agora a descobrir, depois da eleicao do Hamas, o quanto (ainda?) tem a perder...

Citação de: "Doctor Z"
Portugal não têm embaixada no Líbano, quanto mais o Hezbollah em Portugal ...
Grupos terroristas nao tem embaixadas...

Citação de: "papatango"
Quando o Hezbollah disparar contra militares, em vez de atacar zonas civis com o único objectivo de aterrorizar as pessoas, e quando deixar de se esconder no meio dos civis para atrair as bombas sobre eles, nessa altura, aqueles que objectivamente estão do lado do Hezbollah terão razão para falar.

A este proposito, e ainda referente a algo que disse antes:

Citação de: "Azraael"
Citação de: "Doctor Z"
Citação de: "Azraael"
Ataques de rockets contra Haifa nao serao violacoes dos direitos humanos?
De qualquer forma, numa guerra há violações de ambos os lados ...
Sem duvida... o que eu acho estranho e' criticarem so' um dos lados.

Parece que falei um pouco cedo de mais:

Citar
U.N. Chief Accuses Hezbollah of 'Cowardly Blending' Among Refugees


LARNACA, Cyprus  — The U.N. humanitarian chief accused Hezbollah on Monday of "cowardly blending" among Lebanese civilians and causing the deaths of hundreds during two weeks of cross-border violence with Israel.

The militant group has built bunkers and tunnels near the Israeli border to shelter weapons and fighters, and its members easily blend in among civilians.

• CountryWatch: Israel | Lebanon | Syria | Iran

Jan Egeland spoke with reporters at the Larnaca airport in Cyprus late Monday after a visit to Lebanon on his mission to coordinate an international aid effort. On Sunday he had toured the rubble of Beirut's southern suburbs, a once-teeming Shiite district where Hezbollah had its headquarters.

During that visit he condemned the killing and wounding of civilians by both sides, and called Israel's offensive "disproportionate" and "a violation of international humanitarian law."

On Monday he had strong words for Hezbollah, which crossed into Israel and captured two Israeli soldiers on July 12, triggering fierce fighting from both sides.

"Consistently, from the Hezbollah heartland, my message was that Hezbollah must stop this cowardly blending ... among women and children," he said. "I heard they were proud because they lost very few fighters and that it was the civilians bearing the brunt of this. I don't think anyone should be proud of having many more children and women dead than armed men."

"We need a cessation of hostilities because this is a war where civilians are paying the price," said Egeland, who was heading to Israel.

Hezbollah guerrillas crossed into Israel and captured two Israeli soldiers on July 12, triggering fierce fighting from both sides.

At least 384 people have been killed in Lebanon, including 20 soldiers and 11 Hezbollah fighters, according to security officials. At least 600,000 Lebanese have fled their homes, according to the World Health Organization. One estimate by Lebanon's finance minister putting the number at 750,000, nearly 20 percent of the population.

Israel's death toll stands at 36, with 17 people killed by Hezbollah rockets and 19 soldiers killed in the fighting.

During his visit to Lebanon, Egeland issued an urgent call for US$150 million (euro118.74 million) to help Lebanon through the next three months.

He said the first large U.N. convoy of humanitarian aid is expected to depart Beirut on Wednesday for the southern city of Tyre. Similar convoys will be scheduled every second day after that.


http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,205349,00.html
 

*

Azraael

  • Perito
  • **
  • 413
  • +0/-0
    • http://www.bgoncalves.com
(sem assunto)
« Responder #197 em: Julho 25, 2006, 03:54:24 pm »
Mais uma capa da Time dedicada a este conflito.

Citar
6 Keys to Peace


It isn't rocket science, but the playbook for bringing stability to the Middle East requires American commitment, Israeli restraint, Arab flexibility--and a little luck in Iraq
By MICHAEL ELLIOTT

With a few bland words -- "this Sunday I will travel to Israel and the Palestinian territories, where I will meet with Prime Minister Olmert and his leadership and with President Abbas and his team"--U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice last week linked her office not just to one summer's crisis but also to the careers and reputations of those who preceded her in high office.

Henry Kissinger, Zbigniew Brzezinski, James Baker, Madeleine Albright and others found themselves dragged into the business of trying to bring peace to the Middle East. Year after year, decade after decade, a region that is sacred to three religions and the home of sublime landscapes--yet drenched in blood and covered in the dust of bombed-out rubble--brings those who live in more comfortable neighborhoods back to its old quarrels. Canada, the saying goes, is a nation with too much geography and not enough history. The Levant is the world's un-Canada--a small sliver of land in which ancient grievances are played out again and again as if they held the key to understanding tomorrow.

Rice's trip this week marks an implicit recognition by the Bush Administration that there are some burdens that every U.S. presidency has to bear. It is not that Bush has ignored the Middle East; on the contrary, he is fighting a war there, and the commitment of the President to advance the cause of democracy in nations that have long been autocracies amounts to a policy of revolution. But in six years, Bush's team has studiously avoided the habits of the past: shuttle diplomacy, Camp David summits, special envoys. To Bush & Co., those things are naive, incremental, Clintonian. But whether he likes it or not, the President--and his Secretary of State--is deep in the Clinton woods now; the very least that well-wishers can do is point them toward pathways through the thickets.

In truth, Bush and Rice know those paths well. Everyone does. There is no mystery to the theory of peace in the Middle East; it's the practice that has proved so difficult. But it is worth setting out the keys to peace that--with time, patience and goodwill in an area where they are in chronically short supply--might one day allow people to concentrate on building a better life for their children rather than scurrying into bolt-holes and shelters. Here are six of them.

1 GET THE U.S. INVOLVED

IT IS EASY TO SEE WHY ANY U.S. administration would want to stay out of Middle East peacemaking. Those who have tried have had little to show for their pains. Jimmy Carter's successful effort to broker a peace between Egypt and Israel at Camp David in 1978 did nothing for his political fortunes. In 1983, during the presidency of Ronald Reagan, 241 members of the U.S. armed forces died after the bombing of a military barracks in Beirut--killed by a suspected Hizballah faction. And Bill Clinton left office bitterly disappointed that all his intelligence and charm were insufficient to bring about a comprehensive settlement between Israel and the Palestinians.

But Rice's trip is evidence that the U.S. is involved in the Middle East, whether it wants to be or not. That is not, for once, because it is the world's sole superpower, the policeman to which those in any tough neighborhood eventually turn. It is because the U.S. has a unique relationship with Israel and is committed to guaranteeing its security. That means Washington can talk to the Israelis and, occasionally, convince them that their best interests require them to talk to those whose motives and behavior they despise.

As the scale and ferocity of the fighting in Lebanon stunned the world, nations lined up to accuse Israel of a "disproportionate" response to Hizballah's raid two weeks ago, when it kidnapped two Israeli soldiers. But few initially were in doubt as to who started the fight, and it wasn't Israel. "I'm not any more fond of violence or the prospect of a major war than anyone else," says a French official involved in counterterrorism. "But how could Israel not respond to this provocation in a most forceful way?" Even the Saudis, never quick to grant Israel favors, disavowed Hizballah's actions in a remarkable statement that implied that Hizballah should "alone bear the full responsibility of these irresponsible acts and should alone shoulder the burden of ending the crisis they have created." King Abdullah II of Jordan and President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt likewise condemned Hizballah for "adventurism that does not serve Arab interests."

There is little mystery about why Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Jordan--all Arab states with predominantly Sunni Muslim populations--would distance themselves from Hizballah. The Lebanese organization is a Shi'ite fighting force, founded and bankrolled by Shi'ite--and non-Arab--Iran. As Tehran flexes its muscles in the region, pursuing technology that could enable it to build nuclear weapons and watching as Shi'ite forces gradually dominate Iraq, Arab powers have become worried. That gives the U.S. an opening. Administration officials say one purpose of Rice's trip is to create an "umbrella of Arab allies" opposed to Hizballah. "She's not going to come home with a cease-fire but with stronger ties to the Arab world," says a U.S. official. "What we want is our Arab allies standing against Hizballah and against Iran." It was, perhaps, the prospect of such an alliance that led Rice last week to say, "What we're seeing here, in a sense, is the birth pangs of a new Middle East."

2 DON'T FORGET THE PALESTINIANS

LIKE ANY BIRTH, THIS ONE WON'T BE EASY. The leading Sunni Arab states, if they are to join the U.S in opposition to Hizballah and Iran, are likely to ask for something in return, and it is not hard to divine what it would be: a full-hearted U.S. commitment to revive the peace process between Israel and the Palestinians.

For the Arab states, it is axiomatic that a second key for curing the ills that have plagued the region is peace between Israel and the Palestinians. Settle that, many believe, and economic development will proceed apace, extremist groups will lose their reason for being, and public support for violence will evaporate. Even if some of those claims are far-fetchedwhat, precisely, has Israel done that would explain the woeful economic performance of the Arab world for a generation?they are deeply held and widely shared. "Terrorism," British Prime Minister Tony Blair told the U.S. Congress in 2003, "will not be defeated without peace in the Middle East between Israel and Palestine. Here it is that the poison is incubated."

There is little disagreement among states in the region or outside it about what an ideal peace between Israel and the Palestinians would involve. Since before World War II, most reasonable observers have known that sooner or later, two states--one with a Jewish majority, one with an Arab one--would share the land between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean. That was the basis of the talks between Israel and the Palestinians in the last year of the Clinton Administration; it was acknowledged by the meeting of Arab states in Beirut in 2002, when they committed themselves to "normal relations" with Israel if it withdrew to its pre-1967 borders; it was the basis of the road map adopted by the U.S. and other powers in 2003; and it was accepted, finally, by Israel's old warrior Ariel Sharon, although he ultimately lost faith in negotiations and adopted a policy of unilateral "disengagement" from the Palestinians. As Sharon's heir and successor, Israel's Prime Minister Ehud Olmert also knows that one day a Palestinian state will come. The belief is nearly universal. "We know we can't wind this up with guns and tanks," Israel's Deputy Prime Minister Shimon Peres told TIME. "The final solution has to be done diplomatically."

But 2006 is not 2000, when negotiations at Camp David got mired in the devilish details of a deal--how Jerusalem would be governed, how much land Israel would retain on the West Bank, how Palestinian refugees should be handled. Since then, Israel has seen suicide bombers flock to its cities from the West Bank and watched rockets sail into its towns from Gaza and Lebanon, areas from which it had withdrawn all its soldiers--in the case of Lebanon, a full six years ago. Within that context, it isn't the details of a two-state solution that matter now; it is something much more elemental. Israel needs to know that in any deal with the Palestinians, its people will be safe.

3 GUARANTEE ISRAEL'S SECURITY

FOR THAT REASON, THE THIRD KEY TO PEACE is to find a way to convince Israelis that they and their children can sleep easy at night. And here Israel finds itself in a dilemma. The Jewish state's superb armed forces never failed when asked to fight against massed armies in conventional wars. But Israel is not fighting a standard war now; with Hamas and Hizballah, it is battling against cells of well-trained militias energized by religious fervor. Armies surrender when their leaders tell them to; guerrillas just slip back to a safe house and wait to fight another day. Worse, today's irregular foes live in villages, hide in houses and are sheltered by civilians (or force civilians to shelter them).

All that means that Israel has to fight a war that inevitably results in terrible and visible damage to towns and cities--and costs innocent lives. In the court of world public opinion, that is a fight Israel ultimately can never win. Worse, precisely because the collateral damage of such a war is so immense--witness the areas of southern Lebanon that have been turned into a wasteland of shattered masonry--Israel risks creating a new generation of Arabs that hates it with a passion. By trying to guarantee its security today, Israel may be merely threatening its security tomorrow.

In any two-state solution, Palestinians would control the West Bank. But the need to maintain Israeli security has compelled some observers to rethink how an Israeli withdrawal from the region should be handled. Dennis Ross, Middle East envoy for Presidents George H.W. Bush and Clinton, criticizes the way Israel left Gaza last year. "The withdrawal," says Ross, "should not have taken place unless the Palestinians were going to create the security force to ensure security on their side, so that there weren't attacks out of Gaza into Israel." Given all that has happened, says Ross, Olmert will be able to pull out of the West Bank only if one of two conditions are met: "Either his withdrawal is geared only to [Israeli] settlers and not soldiers ... or the Palestinians are able to put together a credible security force."

4 STABILIZE LEBANON

BY LEAVING SOLDIERS IN THE WEST BANK after any withdrawal, Israel might hope to guarantee security on its eastern border. But the same tactic wouldn't work to the north; nobody is going to countenance Israel's occupying a swath of southern Lebanon again (as it did from 1982 to 2000) to deny Hizballah room from which to fire its rockets--least of all Israelis themselves, who are horrified by the idea of a re-occupation. That is why the fourth key to peace is to stabilize Lebanon. In part, that means propping up the fragile government of technocrats led by Fouad Siniora and pumping donors to help Lebanon rebuild itself (again)--which will be the focus of a high-level international meeting in Rome this week. But it also means ensuring that Hizballah can no longer use its strongholds in the south to threaten regional peace. That explains why Rice has been at pains to insist that her mission is not to restore the status quo ante but to change the game in Lebanon so that Hizballah is out of the picture. Rice and other top U.S. officials do not expect that Hizballah will be completely disarmed by Israel anytime soon; but they would not be sorry to see its power sufficiently undermined so that other nations can contribute to what Rice calls the "robust" force that will be needed to police the border when hostilities cease.

Getting those forces in place may be easier said than done. When Israeli officials are pressed on who, precisely, might man the border and face down the remnants of Hizballah, they throw out names--Turkey, Egypt, "the Europeans"--in a way that suggests the plan has not yet been thought through. Israeli officials take refuge in the hope that other nations will recognize that Iran, Hizballah's sponsor, is sufficiently dangerous to regional peace that defanging its proxy becomes something that every sensible party would want to do. "Iran," says Peres, "is trying to make a mockery of world institutions." That thought leads to the fifth key to peace--and perhaps the hardest of all to pin down.

5 HANDLE IRAN

THE ONE FACTOR THAT TRULY DISTINGUISHES this summer's crisis from earlier ones is the realization that Iran is a central player. Among Israelis, it is generally assumed that Hizballah had Iran's encouragement when it kidnapped the soldiers. And that view isn't held just in Jerusalem. "There isn't the slightest degree of ambiguity or doubt as to Iran's role in this," says a French foreign-affairs official. "How much coincidence could there be in Hizballah kidnapping the Israeli soldiers on the same date that ministers met in Paris to decide what measures to take on the Iranian nuclear issue? None, in our opinion." Avi Dichter, Israel's Internal Security Minister, calls on other countries to help Israel show that "Iran's strategy has failed in Lebanon" and claims that if Iran is not faced down, it will try to destabilize oil states in the Gulf.

Assuming Iran was indeed behind Hizballah's raid, what happens next? The U.S. and other powers are discussing how to rein in Iran's nuclear program, and it may be easier to jointly impose sanctions now that Iran is viewed as responsible for mayhem in Lebanon. But what then? Take a look at a map. Iran is an oil-rich nation that borders Pakistan, Afghanistan, Turkey and Iraq, among others. It has a strategic position in Eurasia that cannot be wished away. European officials talk of a "constructive dialogue" with Tehran that involves recognizing it as an important regional power while maintaining the right to sanction it if it breaks the nuclear rules. But Israel--along with many supporters in the U.S.--thinks dialogue with a nation whose leader has said that Israel "must be wiped off the map" is a waste of breath. The U.S., meanwhile, has had few substantive talks with Iranian officials for the past 26 years--and it is anything but clear what levers Washington and its allies think they can pull if Iran really does seek a position of hegemony in the region. Yet even if Iran was to be contained or if it changed its tune, it is hardly certain that Hizballah would follow suit. There is even less reason to think Hamas would. Israel's Dichter claims that Iran made its first overtures to Hamas in 2001 and that Khaled Mashaal, the Syrian-based leader of Hamas, is a "frequent flyer between Damascus and Tehran." But Hamas is a Sunni organization rooted in Palestinian resistance. It doesn't need Iran's encouragement to fight Israel.

6 PRAY FOR IRAQ

THERE IS, FINALLY, THE MATTER OF IRAQ. The original U.S. hopes for Iraq were not implausible: a successful democracy there would indeed help bring stability to the whole region. But the failure of the U.S. to impose order in Iraq after the invasion of 2003 has emboldened all those who believe that further spasms of violence will force Washington and its allies to give up their push for fundamental change. And there are worse possible outcomes. Iraq could become the launching pad for a full-on war between Sunni and Shi'ite, with Iran entering the fray on the Shi'ite side and the Arab states defending Iraq's Sunnis. In the bitter Iran-Iraq war of 1980-88, more than a million people were killed or wounded--and any repeat of that carnage would take place in the context of a region where at least one power, Iran, is determined to develop nuclear weapons.

Seen in that light, there's little wonder that Rice is off on her travels. Her predecessors may have found their shuttles around the Middle East both vexing in their detail and disappointing in their outcome. But they knew that for the U.S. and the world, staying at home was more dangerous still. Rice and her boss, it seems, have got that message.
With reporting by With reporting by Mike Allen, Elaine Shannon, Mark Thompson / Washington, Lisa Beyer, Tim McGirk / Jerusalem, Bruce Crumley / Paris, Scott MacLeod / Cairo


http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1218058,00.html?internalid=AOT_h_07-23-2006_6_keys_to_peace

Citar
Hizballah Nation


How the Lebanese militants morphed from guerrilla group to political party and then set off the confrontation that has the world on edge
By CHRISTOPHER ALLBRITTON/BEIRUT, NICHOLAS BLANFORD/TYRE

Nervously eyeing the skies for Israeli warplanes, Hussein Naboulsi, a spokesman for Hizballah, took quick strides as he accompanied foreign journalists through the bombed-out neighborhoods of Beirut's southern suburbs. "Listen to me!" he shouted. "We have to move very fast!" He paused amid the devastation to point out the pulverized office blocks in the Harat Hreik district where Hizballah's headquarters had stood only a week earlier. "Now I have no place to work," said Naboulsi, the son of a prominent Shi'ite Muslim cleric.

But the primary work Hizballah does these days is not in office buildings but on the battlefield, and despite an Israeli onslaught that has targeted the group's top brass and top guns, the organization has proved more resilient than many expected. Across southern Lebanon, Hizballah fighters have manned batteries firing as many as 350 rockets a day at Israeli cities and towns, from an arsenal estimated at 13,000 projectiles. At least 100 of the more than 900 missiles fired at Israel have hit Haifa, the nation's third-largest city, while one radar-guided antiship missile (the C-802), a gift to Hizballah from its Iranian sponsors, struck an Israeli gunboat off the coast of Lebanon. Other Hizballah militants, operating in bands of as many as 50 fighters, have battled Israeli troops at close range, knocking out tanks and even crossing into the Israeli town of Metulla.

After several days of fighting, the familiar assumption that Israel could militarily crush any enemy in the region seemed less certain. Could Hizballah survive the onslaught and remain a potent force in the region? Operating from caves or fortified bunkers are some 600 active-duty Hizballah members joined by many more of the several thousand reserves from around the country ready to fight. A military source in Lebanon told TIME that the fighters are apparently communicating via encrypted short-burst-transmission sets to overcome Israeli jamming and eavesdropping capabilities, enabling Hizballah to maintain an effective chain of command. In the Dahiya, the Shi'ite suburbs of Beirut, Hizballah gunmen wearing vests jammed with ammunition patrol the streets. When not engaged in conflict, they assist some of the 500,000 refugees in Lebanon displaced by the fighting and Israel's bombs.

Having triggered the conflict by capturing two soldiers inside Israel, Hizballah is functioning not just as a state within a state but almost as the state itself. Hizballah leader Hassan Nasrallah initially held a press conference to outline his terms for a prisoner swap: the soldiers would be returned for Lebanese and Palestinian prisoners in Israel. But Israel answered by bombing the runways at Beirut's international airport. Hizballah then began raining rockets on northern Israel. Although Nasrallah went into hiding along with other Hizballah leaders, he continues to issue statements, telling al-Jazeera TV, for example, that he was not harmed by what Israeli officials described as a 23-ton bomb attack on a suspected Hizballah leadership meeting. Such is the bravado of the Islamic fundamentalist leader, who is hailed throughout the Arab world for fighting Israel while other Arab leaders sit on their hands. He gets credit not only for standing up to Israel right now but also for leading a guerrilla war that was widely seen as driving Israeli forces out of Lebanon in 2000 after a 22-year occupation. Becoming resistance heroes helped Hizballah overcome a dodgy past: it is believed to have launched violent attacks during the 1980s ranging from the kidnapping of Americans in Beirut to the bombing of a U.S. Marine barracks in Lebanon.

Despite its record of violence, Hizballah enjoys broad appeal among Lebanese. It has morphed into a political party--winning 14 seats in Lebanon's 128-member Parliament in May 2005--and operates an effective social-welfare organization. Hizballah runs hospitals and schools throughout downtrodden Shi'ite districts. In the kidnapping gambit, however, Hizballah's normally cautious leaders may have overreached. Some Lebanese political insiders speculate that either the group misjudged the probable Israeli response or Iran or Syria ordered Hizballah to deliberately provoke Israel. "They are a tool in the hands of the Syrian regime and for Iran's regional ambitions," says Walid Jumblatt, veteran leader of Lebanon's Druze community. Iran created Hizballah in 1982 in response to Israel's invasion of Lebanon that year. A Lebanese official told TIME that Iran recently doubled its cash infusions to Hizballah, to about $300 million a year.

Lebanon's various factions have united against Israel's onslaught, and Hizballah can still count on broad support. But many citizens are angry at Hizballah for taking it upon itself to initiate a new conflict with Israel. Some politicians say privately that when the dust settles from the fighting, Hizballah should be held to account and disarmed. That's assuming Hizballah continues to survive Israel's blitz in some recognizable form. As Naboulsi, the spokesman, made his way through the rubble of Harat Hreik, a security man with a walkie-talkie suddenly shouted, "Evacuate! Evacuate!" Naboulsi started running down the street: the Israelis, he said, were coming back.


http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1218049,00.html


Ha tambem uma foto reportagem "Inside Hizballah" que recomendo :arrow: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/artic ... 62,00.html
 

*

ricardonunes

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3564
  • Recebeu: 32 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 1 vez(es)
  • +10/-5
(sem assunto)
« Responder #198 em: Julho 25, 2006, 04:24:33 pm »
Citar

Ha tambem uma foto reportagem "Inside Hizballah" que recomendo Arrow http://www.time.com/time/magazine/artic ... 62,00.html


A foto reportagem mostra algumas crianças activistas num "partido" mais ou menos o que era a Mocidade Portuguesa.
http://www.mouzinhoalbuquerque.com/imag ... ustria.jpg

Pelo que sei, e o que me contam os jovens portugueses não eram propriamente "voluntários" na mocidade portuguesa.
Quantos deles foram obrigados, e já agora por terem participado na dita instituição faz deles facistas?
Pois neste momento são esses facistas que gerem, educam, governam, etc... este país.
Agora por estes jovens participarem em actividades, que pelas imagens eram simples acampamentos tipo escuteiros, uma delas apareciam a fazer um tipo qualquer de juramento á imagem do que se fazia cá (Portugal), patrocionadas por um "partido politico", não faz delas futuros terroristas.
Potius mori quam foedari
 

*

Azraael

  • Perito
  • **
  • 413
  • +0/-0
    • http://www.bgoncalves.com
(sem assunto)
« Responder #199 em: Julho 25, 2006, 04:28:09 pm »
Citação de: "ricardonunes"
Agora por estes jovens participarem em actividades, que pelas imagens eram simples acampamentos tipo escuteiros, uma delas apareciam a fazer um tipo qualquer de juramento á imagem do que se fazia cá (Portugal), patrocionadas por um "partido politico", não faz delas futuros terroristas.
Pois nao... mas coloca-os numa boa posicao para serem recrutados  para tal... funciona como um sitio em que o Hizbollah pode estar atento a quem por la passa e ir seleccionando os que forem mais facilmente manipulaveis. O problema nao e' (parece-me) os putos participarem em "campos de escuteiros", mas sim a doutrina que lhes e' incutida nesses mesmos campos.
 

*

ricardonunes

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3564
  • Recebeu: 32 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 1 vez(es)
  • +10/-5
(sem assunto)
« Responder #200 em: Julho 25, 2006, 04:39:25 pm »
Os putos participam em "campos de escuteiros", ensinham-lhes as doutrinas, chegam a casa têm de fugir da bomba, vinda de Israel, que entretanto mata os pais e os irmãos, os putos revoltam-se ( e julgam que o que lhes foi incutido afinal era verdade) e vão mandar umas bombas para Israel.
Os putos de Israel perdem um familiar, passam dias em abrigos, revoltam-se  e alistam-se no Exercito para irem mandar umas bombas para acabar com os terroristas (pois a teoria do terrorismo também é incutida nos israelitas desde pequenos).
E isto é um ciclo que nunca vai ter fim, pois existe alguém que está de fora de calculadora na mão a contabilizar o lucro por cada bomba disparada.
Potius mori quam foedari
 

*

JoseMFernandes

  • Perito
  • **
  • 394
  • Recebeu: 1 vez(es)
  • +0/-0
(sem assunto)
« Responder #201 em: Julho 25, 2006, 04:51:23 pm »
O Hezzbollah (partido de Deus) apareceu depois da invasao israelita do Libano em 1982, como milicia chiita.Em 1989, no fim da "guerra" os acordos de Taef previam o desarmamento de todas as milicias, mas o Hezbollah pretendendo lutar contra a presença dos israelitas no sul do Libano, conseguiu escapar a essa determinaçao.Quando o Tsahal (FA israelitas) retirou dessa zona em Maio de 2000, o Hezzbollah reivindicou essa retirada como vitoria militar sua, e obteve imenso prestigio nao so a nivel libanes como regional.

"Face as crescentes capacidades militares da organizaçao, que ultrapassam as do exercito regular do Libano os apelos ao seu desarmamento tornaram-se mais prementes e culminaram na resoluçao 1559 da ONU em Set/2004.
Mas o Hezbollah pretende que cerca de vinte quilometros quadrados (as famosas quintas de Chebaa) continuam ocupadas por Israel.De resto este partido que considera o conjunto da Palestina como terra muçulmana ocupada por Israel ( que entende como estado  sem direito a existencia),  beneficia do acordo e assistencia da Siria e do Irao.
Alem do seu ramo militar o Hezbollah mantem importantes serviços sociais destinados especialmente a populaçao chiita,(um terço da populaçao libanesa e a mais pobre do Libano).Graças a esses serviços sociais e de saude, bem como a sua estaçao de televisao (Al-Manar), mantem um grande prestigio nas zonas chiitas do sul libanes, nalguns arredores de Beirute, e no planalto de Bekaa (junto a fronteira siria).
 Depois de o movimento ter conseguido duas pastas ministeriais no governo libanes (proveniente do que se chamou a "primavera de Beirute") em Março de 2005, muitos observadores pensaram que o Hezbollah se transformaria num partido politico classico, mas isso nao viria a acontecer.

trad.livre de CourrierInternational 20/7/2006

Citar
(...)Nao foram apenas dois soldados israelitas que ficaram refens, foi todo o Libano.O problema nao e simplesmente a resposta militar israelita, por muito aterrorizante que seja na sua amplitude.E algo mais profundo, pois toca na existencia mesmo de um estado libanes constantemente posto a  desafio, tanto do exterior como do interior, nas suas prerrogativas fundamentais e soberania.Mesmo que o Estado hebreu decidisse nao ripostar e negociar para recuperar os seus soldados, esse aspecto do problema permaneceria integralmente para o Libano.(...)
A historia contemporanea demonstra que as frustraçoes e  coleras
contidas acabam sempre por explodir.Se nada se faz para travar a engrenagem o Hezbollah ira conduzir inelutavelmente este pais para uma nova catastrofe.Hassan Nasrallah (secretario-geral do Partido de Deus) e os seus partidarios deveriam saber que os seus actos suscitam a colera e frustraçao de inumeros libaneses.Por quanto tempo ainda o primeiro "governo de independencia" do Libano, depois de trinta anos de tutela siria podera sobreviver a sua esquizofrenia?
Como se podera a partir de agora apoiar a ideia de um grupo que tem em tao pouca conta a opiniao dos seus parceiros possa continuar no gabinete governamental?Como tolerar esta chantagem para o suicidio?Como fazer coexistir uma cultura de vida e paz com o culto do sangue e da morte?
Sem duvida que seria desejavel  preservar um minimo de unidade nacional.Mas que unidade seria essa?Aquela que procura encontrar denominadores comuns a opinioes divergentes ou outra que consiste em que uma maioria de libaneses continue a calar-se face a iniciativas de um partido que se comporta como um Estado no Estado?
E necessario que este problema seja definitivamente resolvido, mas para tal sera necessario que a maioria no poder se disponha a agir como tal.

trad. de um artigo de Elie Fayad no jornal libanes  "l'Orient-Le Jour"
 

*

papatango

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 5512
  • Recebeu: 9 vez(es)
  • +18/-0
    • http://www.areamilitar.net
(sem assunto)
« Responder #202 em: Julho 25, 2006, 05:27:32 pm »
Citação de: "Komet"
Ó papatango, mas será isso desculpa para atacar alvos civis deliberadamente do outro lado? Muito menos com cluster bombs? Que como todos nós sabemos, são autênticos potenciais campos minados lançados do ar? Imagina que o hezbollah por acaso era sediado em Portugal, e atacava a vizinha Espanha, parece-lhe correcto que os F-18 Castelhanos lançassem esse tipo de munição sobre a nossa população civil que não quer nada com a guerra, e muito menos com aquele movimento?


Em primeiro lugar, terá que ser provado que as bombas foram efectivamente lançadas.

Em segundo lugar:

Se um Estado, é reconhecido internacionalmente e tem representação nas Nações Unidas, então não pode deixar que aconteça o que acontece no Líbano sem assumir responsabilidades.

A realidade é que o Líbano não tem capacidade para garantir a autoridade do estado Libanês dentro das suas fronteiras.

Se nas zonas controladas pelo Hezbollah houver problemas, é o Hezbollah que os resolve ou tenta resolver, trata-se de um Estado dentro do Estado.
Uma situação anacrónica, e Israel não tem que ser responsável pelo facto de um país vizinho não conseguir manter a ordem e deixar um movimento terrorista armar-se até aos dentes e refugiar-se entre os civis para assim garantir a sua sobrevivência sempre que efectua ataques.

Os civis que agora fogem, deveriam ter fugido há muito tempo, quando se tornou evidente que o governo do Líbano tinha deixado de ter autoridade.

Para muitos dos Xiitas no sul do Líbano, o Hezbollah é um governo legitimo e muitos protegem o movimento e para verificar isso basta ver os resultados eleitorais.

São os mesmos que votaram no Hezbollah e protegem os terroristas que agora ficam aflitos quando com grande espanto lhes caem as bombas em cima.

O que é que eles esperavam?

Que se mantivesse o Status Quo de um movimento que ataca quando quer e depois se esconde entre os civis para evitar as bombas?

Quaisquer mortes são uma desgraça para a Humanidade!

Mas não podemos ser cegos ao ponto de não ver que é o "Modus Operandi" do Hezbollah que provoca a situação.

Os árabes não têm os mesmos valores de respeito pela vida humana que têm os ocidentais. A televisão do Hezbollah, coloca no ar publicidade em que afirma e pergunta ao mesmo tempo:
"Há 300 milhões de Árabes no mundo e há 5 milhões de Judeus na palestina ocupada, de que é que você está à espera para agir?"

Para eles, o respeito pela vida humana não passa de fraqueza e cobardia dos ocidentais. A obrigação moral de não atingir civis, é um principio seguido pelos exércitos ocidentais há relativamente pouco tempo. Os radicais islâmicos apenas se limitam a utilizar essa arma, porque sabem que é um ponto "fraco".
Eles, o Hezbollah, são os principais responsáveis pela morte dos civis.

Volto a perguntar:
:arrow: Onde estão as centenas ou milhares de veículos que eles utilizam?
:arrow: Porque é que até na Al-Jazeera vimos claramente que eles utilizam edificios no centro da cidade de Beirute para disparar misseis anti-aéreos?
:arrow: O que estava nas zonas hoje destruidas, para que fosse proíbido visita-las?

Acho que as respostas são óbvias

O comportamento deste radicais islâmicos, faz lembrar aqueles putos reguilas que fazem tudo o que querem porque os páis deixam, e de repente levam uma estalada no focinho e começam num berreiro de meia-noite porque não entendem porque é que lhe deram a estalada e já tinham esquecido (ou nunca lhes tinham ensinado) o que é autoridade.

Cumprimentos
 

*

ricardonunes

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3564
  • Recebeu: 32 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 1 vez(es)
  • +10/-5
(sem assunto)
« Responder #203 em: Julho 25, 2006, 05:39:16 pm »
Citar
Volto a perguntar:
Arrow Onde estão os milhares de foguetes e as centenas de mísseis do Hezbollah?
Arrow Onde estão as centenas ou milhares de veículos que eles utilizam?
Arrow Onde estão as bases do Hezbollah, se não estão nas caves dos edificios civis?
Arrow Porque é que até na Al-Jazeera vimos claramente que eles utilizam edificios no centro da cidade de Beirute para disparar misseis anti-aéreos?
Arrow Porque é que nos lugares onde hoje os activistas do Hezbollah levam os jornalistas para ver a destruição, até há duas semanas atrás era proíbido aos jornalistas por alí os pés, sob pena de morte?
Arrow O que estava nas zonas hoje destruidas, para que fosse proíbido visita-las?

Acho que as respostas são óbvias


Porque é que os jornalistas só mostram vitimas civis, á excepção do relato de dois elementos do Hezbollah capturados?
Seram os jornalistas ocidentais todos anti-sionistas?
Potius mori quam foedari
 

*

Bravo Two Zero

  • Especialista
  • ****
  • 1009
  • Recebeu: 13 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 16 vez(es)
  • +0/-0
(sem assunto)
« Responder #204 em: Julho 25, 2006, 05:47:16 pm »
Citação de: "ricardonunes"
Seram os jornalistas ocidentais todos anti-sionistas?

Muito pelo contrário, ricardonunes

Enquanto, no DD:

Citar
Israel vai manter «zona de segurança» no sul do Líbano

Israel vai manter uma «zona de segurança» no sul do Líbano até à chegada à região de uma força multinacional, disse hoje o ministro da Defesa israelita, Amir Peretz.
«Não temos outra hipótese», disse. Temos de construir uma nova faixa de segurança que proteja as nossas forças», acrescentou.

Peretz, que falava enquanto a secretária de Estado norte-americana se encontrava com diversos líderes, no âmbito da sua digressão diplomática na região, acrescentou que a zona de segurança será mantida sob controlo das forças israelitas enquanto não for para ali enviada uma força multinacional.

No entanto, o ministro da Defesa mostrou-se optimista quanto à obtenção de um acordo favorável a Israel para pôr termo ao conflito.

«Haverá um acordo que implicará o afastamento do Hezbollah do sul do Líbano, o controlo das passagens fronteiriças entre a Síria e o Líbano e a prevenção da passagem de novas armas», disse.

«E, claro, (um acordo que) implicará o destacamento de uma força multinacional (para a região) com capacidade de intervenção, uma força capaz de manter o acordo que será assinado», afirmou Peretz.

As hostilidades entre Israel e o Hezbollah prosseguem hoje pelo 14º dia, tendo as forças hebraicas retomado os bombardeamentos contra o sul de Beirute, bastião das milícias xiitas, os quais tinham sido suspensos há mais de 24 horas devido à visita de Rice à capital libanesa.

Ao mesmo tempo, o Hezbollah continua com ataques de mísseis contra a cidade de Haifa, no norte de Israel.

Cerca de 380 libaneses e cerca de 40 israelitas morreram até agora no conflito, desencadeado depois de o Hezbollah ter capturado dois soldados israelitas na fronteira israelo-libanesa, a 12 de Julho.



Mais uma "zona-tampão" nas mãos de Israel.........
"Há vários tipos de Estado,  o Estado comunista, o Estado Capitalista! E há o Estado a que chegámos!" - Salgueiro Maia
 

*

papatango

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 5512
  • Recebeu: 9 vez(es)
  • +18/-0
    • http://www.areamilitar.net
(sem assunto)
« Responder #205 em: Julho 25, 2006, 06:47:55 pm »
Citação de: "ricardonunes"
Porque é que os jornalistas só mostram vitimas civis, á excepção do relato de dois elementos do Hezbollah capturados?
Seram os jornalistas ocidentais todos anti-sionistas?

Uma coisa são as operações para a propaganda e os desfiles, em que os activistas estão fardados, mas outra muito diferente são as operações efectuadas pelo Hezbollah contra Israel.

Eles não estão fardados, mas sim vestidos com roupas civis. Por isso, não vai haver vitimas fardadas do Hezbollah, da mesma forma que não havia Talibãs fardados e que não havia muitos combatentes iraquianos fardados.

Aliás, quando se houve uma rajada ou explosão, a primeira coisa que eles fazem é despir a roupa, se por acaso ela puder identificar a origem.

Os jornalistas não são provavelmente nem pro nem contra, só que é fácil um grupo como o Hezbollah enganar os jornalistas.

Cumprimentos
 

*

ricardonunes

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3564
  • Recebeu: 32 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 1 vez(es)
  • +10/-5
(sem assunto)
« Responder #206 em: Julho 25, 2006, 06:51:24 pm »
Citação de: "Bravo Two Zero"
Citação de: "ricardonunes"
Seram os jornalistas ocidentais todos anti-sionistas?

Muito pelo contrário, ricardonunes

Enquanto, no DD:

Citar
Israel vai manter «zona de segurança» no sul do Líbano

Israel vai manter uma «zona de segurança» no sul do Líbano até à chegada à região de uma força multinacional, disse hoje o ministro da Defesa israelita, Amir Peretz.
«Não temos outra hipótese», disse. Temos de construir uma nova faixa de segurança que proteja as nossas forças», acrescentou.

Peretz, que falava enquanto a secretária de Estado norte-americana se encontrava com diversos líderes, no âmbito da sua digressão diplomática na região, acrescentou que a zona de segurança será mantida sob controlo das forças israelitas enquanto não for para ali enviada uma força multinacional.

No entanto, o ministro da Defesa mostrou-se optimista quanto à obtenção de um acordo favorável a Israel para pôr termo ao conflito.

«Haverá um acordo que implicará o afastamento do Hezbollah do sul do Líbano, o controlo das passagens fronteiriças entre a Síria e o Líbano e a prevenção da passagem de novas armas», disse.

«E, claro, (um acordo que) implicará o destacamento de uma força multinacional (para a região) com capacidade de intervenção, uma força capaz de manter o acordo que será assinado», afirmou Peretz.

As hostilidades entre Israel e o Hezbollah prosseguem hoje pelo 14º dia, tendo as forças hebraicas retomado os bombardeamentos contra o sul de Beirute, bastião das milícias xiitas, os quais tinham sido suspensos há mais de 24 horas devido à visita de Rice à capital libanesa.

Ao mesmo tempo, o Hezbollah continua com ataques de mísseis contra a cidade de Haifa, no norte de Israel.

Cerca de 380 libaneses e cerca de 40 israelitas morreram até agora no conflito, desencadeado depois de o Hezbollah ter capturado dois soldados israelitas na fronteira israelo-libanesa, a 12 de Julho.


Mais uma "zona-tampão" nas mãos de Israel.........


"cerca de 380 libaneses e cerca de 40 israelitas morreram....depois do Hezbollah ter capturado dois soldados israelitas..."

Onde estão as Forças Especiais Israelitas?
Seria assim tão dificil uma incursão em territorio libio por parte dessas forças para reaver os dois soldados?
Não será este conflito uma provocação do Irão e ao mesmo tempo uma forma para os Estados Unidos (situação esta instigada por estes)airosamente sairem do Iraque e invadirem o dito, com a desculpa de ir proteger os amigos Israelitas?
Potius mori quam foedari
 

*

Jorge Pereira

  • Administrador
  • *****
  • 2198
  • Recebeu: 58 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 116 vez(es)
  • +16/-0
    • http://forumdefesa.com
(sem assunto)
« Responder #207 em: Julho 25, 2006, 06:54:01 pm »
Citação de: "papatango"
Os civis que agora fogem, deveriam ter fugido há muito tempo, quando se tornou evidente que o governo do Líbano tinha deixado de ter autoridade.

Para muitos dos Xiitas no sul do Líbano, o Hezbollah é um governo legitimo e muitos protegem o movimento e para verificar isso basta ver os resultados eleitorais.

São os mesmos que votaram no Hezbollah e protegem os terroristas que agora ficam aflitos quando com grande espanto lhes caem as bombas em cima.

O que é que eles esperavam?

Que se mantivesse o Status Quo de um movimento que ataca quando quer e depois se esconde entre os civis para evitar as bombas?

Quaisquer mortes são uma desgraça para a Humanidade!

Mas não podemos ser cegos ao ponto de não ver que é o "Modus Operandi" do Hezbollah que provoca a situação.

Os árabes não têm os mesmos valores de respeito pela vida humana que têm os ocidentais. A televisão do Hezbollah, coloca no ar publicidade em que afirma e pergunta ao mesmo tempo:
"Há 300 milhões de Árabes no mundo e há 5 milhões de Judeus na palestina ocupada, de que é que você está à espera para agir?"

Para eles, o respeito pela vida humana não passa de fraqueza e cobardia dos ocidentais. A obrigação moral de não atingir civis, é um principio seguido pelos exércitos ocidentais há relativamente pouco tempo. Os radicais islâmicos apenas se limitam a utilizar essa arma, porque sabem que é um ponto "fraco".
Eles, o Hezbollah, são os principais responsáveis pela morte dos civis.

Volto a perguntar:
:arrow: Onde estão as centenas ou milhares de veículos que eles utilizam?
:arrow: Porque é que até na Al-Jazeera vimos claramente que eles utilizam edificios no centro da cidade de Beirute para disparar misseis anti-aéreos?
:arrow: O que estava nas zonas hoje destruidas, para que fosse proíbido visita-las?

Acho que as respostas são óbvias

O comportamento deste radicais islâmicos, faz lembrar aqueles putos reguilas que fazem tudo o que querem porque os páis deixam, e de repente levam uma estalada no focinho e começam num berreiro de meia-noite porque não entendem porque é que lhe deram a estalada e já tinham esquecido (ou nunca lhes tinham ensinado) o que é autoridade.

Cumprimentos


Nem mais. Assino por baixo!
Um dos primeiros erros do mundo moderno é presumir, profunda e tacitamente, que as coisas passadas se tornaram impossíveis.

Gilbert Chesterton, in 'O Que Há de Errado com o Mundo'






Cumprimentos
 

*

pedro

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 1439
  • +0/-0
(sem assunto)
« Responder #208 em: Julho 25, 2006, 07:54:03 pm »
Ja somos dois.
Cumprimentos
 

*

Azraael

  • Perito
  • **
  • 413
  • +0/-0
    • http://www.bgoncalves.com
(sem assunto)
« Responder #209 em: Julho 25, 2006, 08:12:02 pm »
Citação de: "ricardonunes"
"cerca de 380 libaneses e cerca de 40 israelitas morreram....depois do Hezbollah ter capturado dois soldados israelitas..."

Onde estão as Forças Especiais Israelitas?
Seria assim tão dificil uma incursão em territorio libio por parte dessas forças para reaver os dois soldados?
Não será este conflito uma provocação do Irão e ao mesmo tempo uma forma para os Estados Unidos (situação esta instigada por estes)airosamente sairem do Iraque e invadirem o dito, com a desculpa de ir proteger os amigos Israelitas?

A meu ver, ha ja muito tempo que isto deixou de ser acerca dos soldados israelitas... A mensagem que tentam transmitir parece-me ser que nenhum ataque contra Israel sera tolerado e que a resposta sera a destruicao dos responsaveis e todos os que os apoiarem. Resumindo: Ataque contra Israel = Suicidio.
 

 

Israel aceita com condições a independência para a Palestina

Iniciado por Pimenta

Respostas: 1
Visualizações: 2365
Última mensagem Novembro 30, 2012, 09:01:02 am
por P44
Resolução do Conselho de Segurança condena Israel

Iniciado por JNSA

Respostas: 17
Visualizações: 4334
Última mensagem Junho 07, 2004, 12:51:26 pm
por Rui Elias
Israel e Palestina anunciam cessar-fogo

Iniciado por Ricardo Nunes

Respostas: 3
Visualizações: 1962
Última mensagem Março 22, 2005, 07:31:56 pm
por Normando
Estará Israel a ganhar a Intifada ?

Iniciado por fgomes

Respostas: 0
Visualizações: 1155
Última mensagem Dezembro 10, 2004, 06:13:49 pm
por fgomes
Israel compra misseis Patriot PAC-3

Iniciado por antoninho

Respostas: 8
Visualizações: 5669
Última mensagem Setembro 16, 2008, 03:10:32 pm
por nelson38899