Marinha da Holanda

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #135 em: Fevereiro 03, 2020, 07:24:23 pm »
MLUs de verdade, e não encher mastros com ar  ::)
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #136 em: Fevereiro 14, 2020, 01:03:21 pm »



"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #137 em: Fevereiro 20, 2020, 09:31:02 am »
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #138 em: Fevereiro 20, 2020, 10:14:23 am »
Damen awarded contract for new RNLN support ship

Richard Scott, London - Jane's Navy International
19 February 2020


An artist’s impression of the new combat support ship, Den Helder, to be built by Damen for the RNLN Source: Damen
The Netherlands' Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) has contracted Damen Shipyards Group for the construction of a new combat support ship (CSS) for the Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN).

To be named HNLMS Den Helder , the new vessel will restore the dedicated afloat support capability lost when the replenishment vessel HNLMS Amsterdam was decommissioned as a savings measure in December 2014.

The contract was signed by the DMO and Damen on 19 February, and calls for delivery in the second quarter of 2024. Following trials and work up, Den Helder is expected to achieve operational status with the RNLN in the second quarter of 2025.

The design of Den Helder is derived from that of the RNLN's joint support ship HNLMS Karel Doorman . Approaching 200 m in length and displacing 22,000 tonnes at full load, the new ship will have a crew of 75, plus accommodation for an additional 75 people on board. Two replenishment-at-sea stations will be fitted for the transfer of fuel, dry stores and ammunition, and there will be space to carry approximately 20 containers as deck cargo.

A flight deck and hangar facility provide for the operation and support of rotary-wing aircraft. Two rigid-hull inflatable boats will be carried for boarding and rescue operations and passengers. There will also be provision to carry two 9.5 m FRISC (Fast Raiding, Interception and Special forces Craft) interceptors.

A diesel-electric propulsion system is specified, with twin shafts each driving fixed pitch propellers. Maximum speed will be over 18 kt.

The design process has paid close attention to reducing fuel consumption and exhaust emissions (to meet IMO Tier III regulations on nitrogen oxide emissions). According to the Ministry of Defence (MoD), the combination of propulsion system, hull shape and propeller design reduces fuel consumption by around 6% compared to Karel Doorman .

https://www.janes.com/article/94412/damen-awarded-contract-for-new-rnln-support-ship
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #139 em: Abril 10, 2020, 02:45:27 pm »
38SWZ MARITIME • MARCH 2020

With the Den Helder, the maritime supply capacity of the Royal Netherlands Navy will be restored.

This ship will replace the HNLMS Amsterdam that de-commissioned due to budget cuts in 2014. The other supply vessel, the HNLMS Karel Doorman, entered the fleet in 2015 replacing the HNLMS Zuiderkruis. The Den Helder will be delivered in June 2024 and is to be fully operational a year later.

The ship will have a length over all of 178.3 metres, beam of 26.4 metres and the design draft is 8.3 metres. The displacement is 22,595 tonnes. It is somewhat smaller than the Karel Doorman (204.7 x 30.4 x 8.0 metres) with a displacement of 27.800 tonnes. This Joint Support Ship (JSS) has larger loading capacities and more facilities.

The permanent crew of the Combat Support Ship (CSS) consists of 75 pax. In addition, facilities are available for another 85 pax for performing extra mission related assignments.

On the 19th of February, the Director of the Defence Materiel Organization Vice Admiral Arie Jan de Waard and the new CEO of Damen Shipyards Group Arnout Damen signed the contract for the new Combat Support Ship HNLMS Den Helder. The contract includes engineering and production. The event took place on the bridge of the HNLMS Karel Doorman, the so-called Joint Support Ship, the other supply vessel that served as the basis for the new design.

IMPROVED EFFICIENCY FOR NEW COMBAT SUPPORT SHIP
Seven per cent efficiency gain

The ship will be equipped with Wärtsilä diesel generator sets (Tier) to deliver 15.8 megawatts installed power. Electric propulsion motors and two fixed pitch propellers allow for a maximum speed of 19 knots.

Extensive model tests at Marin resulted in a seven per cent gain in propulsion efficiency with regards to the JSS. Marin took the opportunity to celebrate the fact that the measurements were carried out with the 10,000th model since the institute was founded with a beautiful light show for a lot of guests.

Equipment

The ship is equipped with two Replenishment at Sea (RAS) stations on both sides, constructed according to a NATO standard (STANAG) to provide NATO ships with fuel at sea, while both ships continue to sail and manoeuvre. The ship can supply 7600 m3 of diesel fuel (F 76) and 1000 m3 of aviation fuel (F44) and besides that 226 m3 of fresh water and 290 m3 of urea for application in a selective catalytic re-duction (SCR) catalysator.

The ship is also able to supply solids at sea: ammunition (storage capacity 434 tonnes) and other goods such as provisions and spares. The ship can also carry 24 containers on deck and one below deck. The ship will be equipped with two 40-tonne cranes.

Two Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (LCVP, 24 tonnes) will be placed in niches; one on starboard and one port side. The same applies to the two Fast Raiding Interception and Special Forces Craft (FRISC, 10 tonnes). The ship will have two lifeboats.

The ship also offers facilities for helicopter operations. The hangar is designed for operations with two NH 90 helicopters or a Merlin or NH90 in com-bination with two Unmanned Air Vehicles.

The ship is equipped with a hospital (Role-2 basic afloat), which is less in size than onboard the JSS.

Survivability

During the design of the CSS, specific attention was paid to enhance the ship’s survivability. That is, the ability of the ship and its systems to remain functional during a mission in a hostile environment. It is composed of a combination of the ship's susceptibility, vulnerability and recoverability.

For the platform, this means that the signatures, underwater noise, radar cross section and in-frared (IR) radiation are reduced as much as possible. With regard to vulnerability: shock requirements will be applied, which will result in harness bulkheads and other protection and – quite important – a well-designed general arrangement of the ship.

The enhancement of recoverability is achieved for instance by damage control and firefighting and where effective, further automation.
Internal communication is important and therefore a wireless system will be installed, whereby everyone is equipped with a mobile device, which also serves alarm handling. The ship will receive a most up-to-date cyber security system.

Focus on maintenance

Preparation of the ship’s maintenance is very important for proper transfer to the fleet and, therefore, more attention is paid to producing extensive technical documentation, purchasing the correct spare parts and education and training.

The CSS Den Helder will be built entirely at Damen’s shipyard in Galati, Romania, including setting to work and the execution of sea trials. Construction will be in accordance with DNV-GL class rules and the Naval Ship Code, the naval equivalent to SOLAS
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 
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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #140 em: Abril 22, 2020, 10:24:45 am »
Leonardo To Supply New 127mm Main Guns For Netherlands Navy’s LCF Frigates

The Dutch Defence Material Organisation (DMO) announced that it has selected Italian company Leonardo to supply new 127mm naval gun systems for the Royal Netherlands Navy's four De Zeven Provinciën-class LCF frigates.

https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2020/04/leonardo-to-supply-new-127mm-main-guns-for-netherlands-navys-lcf-frigates/
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #141 em: Abril 23, 2020, 09:09:46 am »
Building ‘Den Helder’

(Source: Dutch Defence Matériel Organisation; issued April 6, 2020)

(Unofficial translation by Defense-Aerospace.com)


An artist’s impression of the Dutch Navy’s future Combat Support Ship, Den Helder, together with the logos of the estimated 100 companies that will contribute to its construction. (Damen image)

With the new contract for the construction of the new supply ship Zr.Ms. Den Helder, more than 100 (mainly) Dutch companies will obtain work.

The Director of Defense Materiel Organization (DMO), Vice Admiral Arie Jan de Waard, and Arnout Damen, the new CEO of Damen Shipyards Group, signed the agreement before the restrictions caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

The DMO and Damen, as main contractor, will supervise the project together.

The future Den Helder will operate alongside the Joint Support Ship Zr.Ms. Karel Doorman, which will also provide the basic design of the Combat Support Ship (CSS).

The supply vessel, which is almost 200 meters long, will have a 75-person crew and will also be able to accommodate 75 additional passengers on board. There is room for a number of helicopters and about 20 containers.

The design has explicitly looked at fuel consumption and exhaust gas emissions. The combination of diesel engines, hull shape and screw design provide a fuel consumption reduction of approximately 6 percent compared to Zr.Ms. Karel Doorman.

Completion is scheduled for the 2nd quarter of 2024. The CSS must be operational for operation one year later. The size of the total project budget is € 375 million.

(ends)

Main Contractor Damen And More Than A Hundred Companies Contribute to Combat Support Ship

(Source: Damen Schelde; issued February 19, 2020)

With the contract signing for construction for the new supply ship HNLMS Den Helder, more than a hundred, mainly Dutch companies receive work. The contract was signed today in Den Helder by the Director of Defence Material Organization (DMO), Vice Admiral Arie Jan de Waard and Arnout Damen, the new CEO of the family business Damen Shipyards Group.

Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding (DSNS) will supervise the project, together with DMO, as the main contractor. Damen will not do this alone; more than a hundred companies from the Dutch naval construction sector are involved in this ship. This means that a large part of the sector will be deployed to participate in this innovative new ship.

With HNLMS Den Helder, the maritime supply capacity of the Royal Netherlands Navy will be restored. The ship will operate alongside the Joint Support Ship HNLMS Karel Doorman. This vessel also forms the basis for the design of this Combat Support Ship. The new ship can be used worldwide and can operate under high threat, protected by frigates. In addition, she can be used in the fight against drug trafficking, controlling refugee flows and providing emergency aid.

The supply ship, which is almost 200 metres long, will receive a 75-person crew and can also take 75 extra people on board. There is room for several helicopters and around 20 containers. The design explicitly looked at fuel consumption and exhaust emissions. The combination of diesel engines, hull shape and propeller design reduces fuel consumption by around 6 % compared to HNLMS Karel Doorman.

The building contract is not contracted out elsewhere in Europe. DMO wishes to keep the knowledge and skills of designing and building naval ships in the Netherlands. The armed forces thus invoked Article 346 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. It states that Member States may protect essential security interests. This also relates to the production of defence equipment.

Completion is scheduled for the second quarter of 2024. A year later, in the second quarter of 2025, the Combat Support Ship must be operable. The size of the total project budget is 375 million euros.

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=121&page=4

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« Última modificação: Abril 23, 2020, 09:10:56 am por tenente »
 

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #142 em: Maio 26, 2020, 12:05:07 pm »
Citar
Considering the advantages of such a capability, but also the expectations that in the future it is more likely that smaller, for instance company-sized, units will be deployedfor SOF/SOC operations, all large surface units would preferably have such an inherent amphibious capability. Combining the earlier mentioned BMD-platform with an amphibious ship design, a so-called crossover, provides an interesting angle to approach the challenge of the future replacement programs of present amphibious capability and all high-end warfare frigates.

Especially considering the RNLMC is able to field six special operations capable raiding squadrons, which can operate independently, support SOF-operations, andoperate together as battalions. Independent crossover frigates can have a significantflexibility to execute the tasks within the three naval roles and the adaptability to operate in low-intensity and high-intensity environments. Subsequently, a number of crossovers operating together are able to create a potent flexible navy/marine expeditionary task group on a European level.

https://www.academia.edu/30676050/Royal_Netherlands_Navys_Future_Fleet_Capabilities_A_Continuation_of_Rational_Thinking?email_work_card=view-paper
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 
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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #143 em: Maio 26, 2020, 02:38:52 pm »
Dutch Navy’s support ship Pelikaan to undergo mid-life electrical refit

EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY
May 25, 2020, by navaltoday


Alewijnse Marine is undertaking the assessment for the upcoming electrical refit that will be an important part of the mid-life refit of the Royal Netherlands Navy’s logistic support vessel HNLMS Pelikaan (A804).

Alewijnse was awarded the contract by Damen Shipyards Den Helder in August last year and commenced work in January. The work is being carried out in Den Helder and at Damen Shiprepair Harlingen.

The 65.4-meter-long Zr.Ms. Pelikaan operates exclusively in the Caribbean region where she provides support to maritime security operations and, in times of disaster, humanitarian relief. The support ship is permanently based at Curaçao.

Alewijnse’s scope of work during the refit project is said to be extensive. The company is responsible for total service provision for the electrical work, covering engineering, supply and installation of equipment, project coordination and commissioning of all on board electrical systems. This includes the installation of brand new telephone, radar, CCTV and alarm and monitoring systems (AMS).

Alewijnse undertook the original electrical installation when the vessel was built at Damen Shipyards Galati in Romania in 2005. The company is expected to complete the new project on time, enabling the vessel to be back in the Caribbean in time for the Hurricane season.

COVID-19 pandemic
The project has faced additional challenges as a result of the coronavirus crisis. Alewijnse’s contract manager Perry Eikelenboom explained:
“The safety of our personnel and of all those working on location is our top priority during this project. Maintaining safe distances while working and minimising the number of people on location at any one time place pressure on the schedule, but are essential.”
“Thankfully, we enjoy a close cooperation with the yard and, working together and following their robust safety measures, we manage to be both efficient and safe.”

https://www.navaltoday.com/2020/05/25/dutch-navys-support-ship-pelikaan-to-undergo-mid-life-electrical-refit/

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« Última modificação: Maio 26, 2020, 02:40:17 pm por tenente »
 

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #144 em: Julho 04, 2020, 07:54:29 pm »
New milestone crossed for Belgian-Dutch mine hunter program



Amid the coronavirus crisis, a new contractual milestone was crossed by the Belgium Naval & Robotics teams representing the Naval Group-ECA Group consortium.

Exactly one year after the notification of the contract in 2019, the program which provides for the supply of twelve mine hunters equipped with drone systems (Toolbox) to the Belgian and Dutch navies reached the “System Functional Review” milestone on May 23, 2020.

The review validates the functional and architectural studies of all the systems of mine action ships developed by Naval Group such as computer networks, electrical installations, propulsion or combat systems, as well as those of all drones developed by ECA Group, key elements of the ships.

This review also focused on the systems of systems that provide mission management, communications and cybersecurity, as well as on the integration of drone systems on the ship.

“This milestone represents an important step because it demonstrates that the systems’ architecture of the armed ship meets the functional requirements of our Belgian and Dutch customers,” Eric Perrot, program director for Naval Group, commented.

The twelve ships will be equipped with a total of a hundred drones managed in a pool called Toolbox, shared by the two navies and supplied by ECA Group.

The configuration of the Toolbox, used on board each ship or deployed from the shore, will vary depending on the typology of the missions. It will consist of surface drones USV INSPECTOR125, underwater drones AUV A18M and towed sonars T18 for mine detection and the MIDS system (Mine Identification and Disposal System) for mine identification and neutralization.

“The requirement and the rigor of the client when passing these milestones are essential; we can thus approach the following phases of the program under sound conditions. Furthermore, the mobilization of our teams during the confinement period made it possible to ensure an efficient telework organization and thus meet the deadlines,” Jean-Louis Sambarino, program director of ECA Group, said.

In charge of the preliminary design of the ships, Naval Group works in close collaboration with Kership who will carry out the detailed design of the ships and their construction. Kership’s activities will start after crossing the Preliminary Design Review milestone, which is scheduled for December 2020.

The contract for twelve mine hunters for the Belgian and Dutch navies will span over ten years. After a design period of three years, Belgium Naval & Robotics will move on to the production phase of these ships and drone systems, with an initial delivery scheduled for 2024.

https://www.navaltoday.com/2020/07/03/new-milestone-crossed-for-belgian-dutch-mine-hunter-program/

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #145 em: Setembro 09, 2020, 11:05:24 am »
GE to Provide Electric Propulsion Systems to Royal Netherlands Navy New Combat Support Ship

(Source: GE Power Conversion; issued Sep 07, 2020)

GE’s Power Conversion business have signed a contract with Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding (DSNS) to deliver an energy management and electric propulsion package intended for the new Combat Support Ship (CSS) in use at Royal Netherlands Navy.

GE’s robust, proven electric propulsion technology was selected for its low noise signature, high level of reliability and commonality with the Joint Support Ship (HNLMS Karel Doorman). One of the customer’s key concerns is underwater radiated noise, meaning strict noise and vibration levels are imposed on the propulsion systems. Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) voltage source inverters feed robust, high-torque density induction motors, allowing high-performance through the modern and optimized propulsion system.

GE’s scope of supply includes the main switchboards for the ship distribution system, with two shore connection cubicles, the main electric propulsion system with two shaft lines of 7.9 MW each, as well as the associated power management and remote-control systems. The ship’s Energy Management System, which controls power generation and distribution systems, also supplied by GE, will ensure availability of electrical power in the ship network.

By utilizing an existing vessel design, that one of the Joint Support Ship (JSS) already in operation with the Royal Netherlands Navy, GE and DSNS will be able to deliver the ship in June 2024. The CSS will be built by Damen in Romania, after which the ship’s combat management system – amongst others – will be installed in Den Helder, Netherlands. The engineering of the vessel will largely take place in the Netherlands, with a large number of systems and components being delivered by Dutch suppliers.

Once built, the CSS vessel will supplement the existing JSS, HNLMS Karel Doorman. The CSS, by its 180-meters almost in length, will accommodate 75-persons basic crew with capacity for an additional 85 persons on-board. The CSS vessel has capacity for two helicopters and up to twenty-five containers, it will be able to support longer maritime operations, both nationally and internationally. This increases the effectiveness of both national and combined operations performed by the Royal Netherlands Navy.

“We are proud to be working with DSNS to deliver this vessel to the Royal Netherlands Navy. GE’s proven technology will enable the smooth, quiet running of this dedicated naval vessel.” said Eric Muller, Regional Marine Leader for GE’s Power Conversion business.

GE’s Power Conversion business applies the science and systems of power conversion to help drive the electric transformation of the world’s energy infrastructure. Designing and delivering advanced motor, drive and control technologies that evolve today’s industrial processes for a cleaner, more productive future, it serves specialized sectors such as energy, marine, industry and all related services.

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=121&page=4

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« Última modificação: Setembro 09, 2020, 11:08:01 am por tenente »
 

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #146 em: Setembro 24, 2020, 12:59:23 pm »
Belgian and Dutch Naval Replacement Programmes

Belgium and the Netherlands will replace almost their entire fleets in the next 15 years. This will mean six new ships for the Belgian Navy, and 23 for the Royal Netherlands Navy.

Some of these new ships are being developed jointly by Belgium and the Netherlands, while for some others the Netherlands is seeking cooperation with Germany.

Many vessels in the Belgian and Dutch fleets date back to the eighties and nineties and the Netherlands in particular has long postponed the replacement of many ships. Although Belgium replaced their WIELINGEN class frigates 15 years ago, they did so with Dutch M-frigates from the nineties. Both countries also operate TRIPARTITE minehunters which are over thirty years old.


This is what the future Belgian-Dutch MCM Motherships will look like. (Photo: Belgium Naval and Robotics)

Because Belgium bought two Dutch M-frigates, both navies are equipped with the same frigates and also the same minehunters. Both navies have been working together since 1948 and have almost merged in recent years. The Belgian frigates are maintained in the Netherlands and the Dutch minehunters in Belgium. The navies share a headquarters in Den Helder (the Netherlands), their operational and logistics schools are binational, and from 2021 both fleets will receive the same uniforms. It is therefore logical that the two countries jointly replace their frigates and minehunters.

Mine Countermeasure Vessels

Already in 2013, Belgium and the Netherlands had plans to jointly replace their TRIPARTITE minehunters. Three years later, the Ministers of Defence of Belgium and the Netherlands signed a Letter of Intent for the joint replacement. It was agreed that the Netherlands would lead in the replacement of the M-frigates, while Belgium would take on the new minehunters. A European tender followed.

The project is now in full swing and the consortium Belgium & Naval Robotics, consisting of the French companies Naval Group and ECA Group, is working hard to deliver the first new mine countermeasures vessel (MCMV) in April 2024 to the Belgian Navy; the Royal Netherlands Navy will follow later. Both navies will receive six ships each.

An important part of the project is the new concept of stand-off mine warfare; the motherships remain outside the mine danger area and MCM tools operate from the mothership to detect, classify and destroy mines from a great distance, often over the horizon.
The future MCMVs are in fact built around the Launch & Recovery System (LARS) mainly intended for unmanned service vehicles (USVs). (Photo: Belgium Naval and Robotics)

While the old TRIPARTITES are made of composite, the future MCMVs will be made of steel.

They are in fact built around the Launch & Recovery System (LARS) that was specially developed for these ships. With a length of 81.4 m and a width of 17 m, the ships have an uncommon length to breadth ratio for warships.

The LARS is mainly intended for unmanned service vehicles (USVs). The 12 m-long INSPECTOR-125 USV can operate with up to six drones in the mine danger area. These drones were developed and built by the ECA Group in Belgium. The drones in question are the T-18M UMISAS towed sonar that is dragged behind the INSPECTOR and thanks to the interferometric synthetic aperture sonar, can transmit high-resolution images to the mothership in real time. The autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) A-18M can independently search the seabed and when a contact is made, the crew in the operations room in the mothership can inspect the mine-like object with the camera of its remotely operated vehicle (ROV), the SEASCAN. Finally, the K-STER C will destroy the object.

To operate drones over the horizon, Saab SKELDAR V-200 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) provide communications between the USV and the mothership. The UAV can of course also be used for other tasks.

The latter also applies to the motherships that can accommodate 63 additional crew, in addition to the 29 permanent ship’s complement. The ships are equipped with various sensors and weapon systems and will also receive a 40 mm gun, which is somewhat unusual for modern-day MCMVs. At the time of writing, it is still not known which gun will be chosen, nor has a final choice been made for radars and electro-optical sensors.
Construction of the first ship will start on 23 February 2021 and the ships will be built in France by Kership and Piriou.

In anticipation of the arrival of these new ships and especially the new toolbox, the Dutch Navy has leased a civilian vessel, the GEOSEA. Dutch and Belgian naval personnel have been working with this ship and with drones from ECA since spring 2020 to become familiar with the new systems and to provide the manufacturer with feedback that can be used for the development of future tools. The project team is also planning to test the LARS with the GEOSEA. Whereas the ships are designed to last at least thirty years, the toolbox will be regularly updated or replaced.


The 12 m-long INSPECTOR-125 USV can operate with up to six drones in the mine danger area. (Photo: Belgium Naval and Robotics)

M-Frigates

The replacement of the M-frigates started in the Netherlands in 2010 with the first studies carried out. It soon became clear that the Netherlands wanted to replace the frigates in cooperation with other countries. Considering Belgium also operated M-frigates, it was the logical partner, but the Netherlands also looked at the German MKS 180 frigates. However, cooperation in this area came to an end when the German ship became too big and expensive.

Belgium and the Netherlands proceeded with a Dutch design. The replacement project was officially started in the Netherlands in June 2016 and soon thereafter, it became known that Belgium had reserved €1Bn for two new frigates.

Unlike the MCMVs, no European tender was launched for these frigates, but Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding (DSNS) was contracted directly. That did not mean that DSNS designed the ships, because that is still largely done by the Afdeling Maritieme Systemen (Department of Maritime Systems) of the Defensie Materieel Organisatie (DMO).

Since 2013, several designs have been published, sometimes accidentally. Over the years, the size of the ship increased, but the design has eventually decreased. In 2019, design 22D was presented, and according to DMO, it represented the “ideal ship” that met the requirements, but it did not fit the budget. Research was then conducted into an off-the-shelf design of DSNS, but that ship failed to meet the requirements. DMO then removed systems from the design and some requirements were adjusted.

This resulted in DMO design 22D being modified to a 132-m long frigate, displacing 5,500 tonnes. The MK 41 VLS, with 16 cells, is primarily intended for the Evolved SeaSparrow Missile Block 2 (ESSM Bl. 2), but Belgium has previously indicated that it was considering the Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) as well. With such a weapon, Belgium wants to contribute to ballistic missile defence (BMD).

Although missiles like the SM-3 can be fitted in the MK 41 VLS, the frigate is not designed for BMD. The new frigates are in fact designed with anti-submarine warfare in mind. Since they are required to operate far from the task force in search of submarines, they must also be able to defend themselves against missile attack.

They will therefore have the new APAR Block 2 X-band radar, an S-band radar that has been further developed from SMILE and NS100 and a new fire control concept called Above Water Warfare Suite (AWWS), which has been developed by Thales in the Netherlands for several years. MKS 180 will also receive these sensors.

However, the most important sensor for the new frigates is located in the stern area of the ship, namely the low frequency active passive sonar (LFAPS). This is a DMO development in collaboration with the Dutch research institute TNO and the Canadian company, Ultra Electronics Maritime Systems. The frigate can lower the LFAPS into the sea and detect submarines far better than previously the case using a passive towed array or medium-frequency sonar. The current Dutch M-frigates recently sailed with this new sensor.

The Multi Use Accoustic Support Suite (MUASS) will also be introduced on the ships at the end of this year. This software was developed by DMO and the Dutch Navy together with TNO and is based on an existing TNO sonar model. Data and algorithms have been added to this, such as data from the ship, sensors, environmental information and oceanographic models. It resulted in a package that, as sea tests now show, brings major improvements to anti-submarine warfare by ship and submarine.

Although these important elements are already deployed at sea with the current frigates, it will take a while before the new ships can start looking for submarines. The contract for the ships is expected to be signed at the end of 2021 with the four ships for the Netherlands and Belgium are scheduled to be delivered in the period 2027-2030. DMO is investigating whether there is a sufficient budget to build the frigates at the Damen yard in the Netherlands and not, as has been usual practice since 2005, at Damen’s shipyard in Romania.

Combat Support Ship

The first new ship the Dutch Navy will receive is not an MCMV or a frigate, but a tanker. The combat support ship (CSS), the future HNLMS DEN HELDER, will be delivered in 2024.


The future HNLMS DEN HELDER (Photo: Damen)


In contrast to the other projects, the CSS project started only recently. After the decommissioning of HNLMS ZUIDERKRUIS in 2012 and the sale of HNLMS AMSTERDAM in 2014, the Dutch Navy lacked a tanker until the arrival of HNLMS KAREL DOORMAN.

However, because it was decided not to replace the AMSTERDAM, the KAREL DOORMAN became the only tanker in Dutch service, even though it is a joint support ship (JSS) and replenishing at sea is only one of the tasks of this multifunctional ship.

It was no surprise that when HNLMS KAREL DOORMAN was commissioned, the Chief of the Royal Netherlands Navy said that he needed another replenishment ship. When in late 2016, budget funds became available for ‘combat support’ for all defence services, the Navy managed to squeeze a ‘combat support ship’ into the plans. At the time, it was still intended to be a fairly simple tanker that would be based on a proposal that DSNS had already designed for a tender for a new Norwegian tanker. In addition, elements from the JSS would be used for commonality.

DMO and DSNS worked jointly the design and specifications. However, the requirements changed gradually, especially when it came to the environment, but the requirements for shock, blast and signature reduction were also higher than in the beginning. The design boasted a gun, the advanced Thales NS100 radar and a GOALKEEPER CIWS (which is being replaced). But a budget deficit arose because the estimates of the investment budget were not indexed and the Navy feared that the operating budget of the tanker would be too tight. At that time, DMO realised that the design did not fit the budget.

Ultimately, it was decided to increase the budget and simply adjust the design. The weapon systems and sensors were removed from the design, however, provisions for these systems have been spared.

On 19 February 2020, Damen and DMO signed the contract for the ship. In February 2021, construction of the vessel will begin at Damen Shipyards Galati, in Romania. The CSS will arrive in Den Helder in June 2024, after which the combat management system, sensors and weapon systems will be installed. The CSS is scheduled to be commissioned in 2025.

The new Dutch tanker will measure 178.3 m in length and will have a displacement of 22,585 tonnes. There is room for 160 people in total, including a complement of 75 crewmembers. Weapon systems will initially be limited to machine guns. The propulsion of the CSS is diesel-electric and the DEN HELDER will be the first naval vessel to sail with the new WÄRTSILÄ 31 diesel generator sets. Combined with the shape of the hull and the design of the propeller, the design yields a saving of 6% compared to a comparable ship with engines of a different brand and type.
« Última modificação: Setembro 24, 2020, 03:18:36 pm por LM »
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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #147 em: Setembro 24, 2020, 01:02:55 pm »
(...)

Submarines

The replacement of the WALRUS class submarines (1990) is by far the most complex project of all the current Dutch naval projects. As with the frigates and MCMVs, the plans were already clear in 2013, but it is by no means certain whether the first new submarine can be delivered in 2027.

The complexity of the project relates to its international nature and major political interests. The other naval projects have, however, continued to progress without too much political interference. In the submarine project, however, there have always been conflicts of interest between the Ministry of Defence (the best boat), the Ministry of Finance (the cheapest boat or nothing at all), Economic Affairs (a Dutch submarine) and Foreign Affairs (a decision that does not result in an argument with Paris or Berlin). The Submarine Service, in the end, has relatively little to no influence.


HNLMS KAREL DOORMAN commissioned in 2015 (Photo: Royal Netherlands Navy)

The roots for this can be found back in the eighties and nineties. The WALRUS class were more expensive in the 1980s and were delayed. Despite the fact that the boats were cheaper and have a higher rate of availability than contemporaries of the VICTORIA class (Canada) and COLLINS class (Australia), this is still called the WALRUS affair and politicians still shudder at the thought of the “scandal”. Another reason is that, partly due to political disinterest, the Dutch submarine shipyard RDM ran out of work from the 1990s and went bankrupt a few years later. Without a submarine builder, the Netherlands had to cooperate with foreign shipyards. Furthermore, the Netherlands wants diesel-electric submarines that can operate far from home. Dutch coastal waters are too shallow for safe submarine operations, so these submarines have been active in the Indian Ocean, and from the Norwegian Sea to the Caribbean. The result is a sensitive international process with a large number of committees, councils and resonance groups, and a lot of delay.

Initially, four shipyards participated in the tender. These were Navantia (Spain), Naval Group (France), TKMS (Germany) and Saab (Sweden). Naval Group has recently started Royal IHC as a partner in the Netherlands, and Saab has been working with Damen on the replacement project since 2015.

In December 2019, under political pressure, the MoD decided to continue the next round with three shipyards and start the competitive dialogue with Naval Group, Saab and TKMS.

This led to excessive criticism from experts and from parliament. Nevertheless, the Ministry of Defence wants to continue with this and a final decision will only take place in September.

If the Ministry’s plans go ahead, discussions will be held with the shipyards about the requirements and the design. This normally happens between DMO and DSNS, but DMO now want to talk to the three yards at the same time. None of the shipyards though has a design matching exactly the Dutch requirements. The existing submarines are either too small (Saab Kockums A26 and TKMS Type 212CD) or too large (Naval Group BARRACUDA SSN). Although the yards have already submitted proposals in the various RFIs, DMO has not yet told the yards what the requirements are.

Knock-out criteria will determine which yards will drop out prematurely. The contract must be signed in 2022 with the four new submarines expected to be completed between 2027 and 2031.

Auxiliary Vessels

DMO wants to replace ten smaller ships all at once. In May 2020, DMO sent a letter to the Dutch Parliament regarding the replacement of submarine tender HNLMS MERCUUR (1987), diver training vessel SOEMBA (1989), four diver support vessels CERBERUS class (1992), training vessel VAN KINSBERGEN (1999), two hydrographic survey vessels SNELLIUS class (2003) and the Caribbean support vessel HNLMS PELIKAAN (2006).

Although the ships are all different and the replacements will not be identical, according to DMO the ships have many similarities and the DMO therefore wants to tender the ships simultaneously. It is still being decided whether this is to be done by a contract directly awarded or by a (European) tender. What the final path looks like will be announced at the end of 2021/ beginning of 2022. The first ship will have to be replaced around 2024.

Air Warfare and Command Frigates

The Air Warfare and Command frigates (LCFs) entered service in the period 2001-2005. The ships are currently being modernised with AESA radars for, inter alia, ballistic missile defence (BMD), the Thales SMART-L MM / N. In the near future, the frigates will also receive Leonardo’s VULCANO 127/64 LW naval gun. These new guns will replace the antiquated 127 mm OtoBreda guns, which were bought second hand from the Royal Canadian Navy.

The LCF replacement project was expected to start in 2021, but in 2019 a decision was taken to postpone the timeline by five years because funds were needed to improve buildings instead and because the rising costs for the F-35 had to be covered.

The German plans to replace the F124 frigates might also have been a factor. Because Damen will collaborate with the German shipyards Blohm + Voss, Lürssen and German Naval Yards for the construction of the German MKS 180 frigates, there are talks between the Dutch and German MoDs to replace the LCFs and F124s together. Both ships, incidentally, arose from the failed NATO Frigate for the Nineties (NFR90) and both countries collaborated in the field of sensors and weapons systems. However, the Dutch director of DMO, Arie Jan de Waard said that the Netherlands currently had no plans to build identical ships with Germany. He is currently focused mostly on the subsystems.

Landing Platform Dock

The Royal Netherlands Navy operates two landing platform docks (LPD): HNLMS
ROTTERDAM (1998) and HNLMS JOHAN DE WITT (2007). The ROTTERDAM has been on the list of ships to be replaced for some time, but in 2013, it was announced that the replacement vessel had been postponed.


HNLMS ROTTERDAM has been on the list of ships to be replaced for some time, but in 2013 it was announced that the replacement programme had been postponed. (Photo: Damen Shipyards)

Incidentally, the ROTTERDAM was modernised in 2019 and equipped with, among other things, the new Thales NS100 radar, a combined operations room and an amphibious warfare centre. The JOHAN DE WITT will also receive a midlife upgrade shortly.

In June 2020, the Dutch MoD announced that it planned to collaborate with Germany on new amphibious vessels. While the German Navy does not possess these vessels, its own Seebataillon (an integral part of the Dutch Marine Corps since 2016) does engage in the amphibious domain.
Replacement, no Enlargement

Not all plans are set in stone – some are no more than sketches and the future has now become more uncertain due to the Coronavirus pandemic. The high costs that Belgium and the Netherlands, like many other countries, will have as a result of this crisis, mean it is highly likely that projects will experience difficulties in the coming years, although there are no plans for budget cuts so far.

In both countries, there is also much political uncertainty. Belgium still has no government and there will be elections in the Netherlands in March 2021. For decades there have been budget cuts imposed on both navies and especially in the Netherlands, this has led to a large backlog with many relatively old ships still serving in the fleet. The backlog is now being addressed, but the Navy remains very vulnerable. Also, both the Belgian and Dutch Navies, with two and six frigates respectively, are small. However, all efforts are now focused on replacement, as enlargement seems to have been ruled out this decade.
« Última modificação: Setembro 24, 2020, 03:17:31 pm por LM »
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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #148 em: Setembro 29, 2020, 04:10:51 pm »
124 New Tracked Vehicles for the Dutch Marines


The Bandvagn 206 articulated tracked armored vehicles in service with the Dutch military will be replaced from 2024 by a new vehicle being jointly developed for Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Sweden. (Dutch MoD photo)

The Netherlands Marine Corps (Korps Mariniers) will have 124 new tracked vehicles available from 2024. They will replace some of the obsolete Bandvagn 206 and Viking vehicles, State Secretary Barbara Visser reported this to the Lower House yesterday (Sept. 24).

The vehicles to be replaced are now in use by the Marine Corps. The future vehicles are to be lightly armored and must be deployable in extreme conditions, such as in the snow and difficult terrain. They must have at least as much terrain mobility as the current vehicles.

The Netherlands is cooperating with Germany, the United Kingdom and Sweden on their acquisition, as agreed in the Memorandum of Understanding on Multinational Cooperation on All Terrain Vehicles concluded last year. These countries also want to replace the BV-206 in roughly the same period as the Netherlands. Sweden is coordinating this project.

First delivery in 2024

The intention is that the first vehicles will arrive in 2024 and the last in 2027. Once deliveries are completed, Defense will have more tracked vehicles in total than now. This larger number is based on the deployability objectives according to the Defense Note and the desired capabilities of NATO. The arrival of tracked vehicles is therefore a new step towards further modernization.

124 units are being purchased, involving an amount of 100 to 250 million euros. This falls within the investment budget of Defense. In addition, an option is included in the contract for additional vehicles. In that case, the costs will exceed 250 million euros. If that option is selected, the House will be informed additionally.

Separate project

In addition, there are plans to replace the remaining BV-206 and Viking vehicles. This should be done with smaller All Terrain patrol vehicles. A separate project will be set up for this, about which the House will be informed next year.

The Bandvagn 206 entered service with the Ministry of Defense in the 1980s. Initially it concerned 156 vehicles, of which 127 have been modernized over the years so that they can be used at least until this year. The Viking Bandvagn S10 was previously purchased as a replacement for the unarmored BV-206 D6.

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=10&page=26

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« Última modificação: Setembro 29, 2020, 04:13:06 pm por tenente »
 

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #149 em: Outubro 02, 2020, 10:39:39 pm »


Victor Barreira / Defence 360° (@Defence360) tweetou: On September 17, 🇳🇱 @damen delivered the Zr. Ms. Pelikaan logistics support ship to the 🇳🇱 @kon_marine following a mid-life upgrade lasting eight months. Following the work, the vessel, which @damen delivered to the @kon_marine in 2006, is ready for a further 15 years’ service.

https://t.co/eoQuAXsLFn

https://twitter.com/Defence360/status/1311979239890182144?s=20

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