Marinha da Holanda

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Major Alvega

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #120 em: Novembro 10, 2018, 05:24:13 pm »

Pelas imagens dá para ver que o CSS Zr.Ms. Den Helder vai estar equipado um canhão de 30mm Marlin WS na proa, 2 RWS Hitrole de 12,7mm a bombordo e a estibordo e um CIWS Goalkeeper. Ao nivel dos sensores vai ter um radar AESA Thales NS 50 ou 100 de última geração.
« Última modificação: Novembro 10, 2018, 05:27:11 pm por Major Alvega »
 

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #121 em: Novembro 12, 2018, 10:41:44 am »
Dutch Navy’s new combat support ship to be named HNLMS Den Hélder


Photo: Royal Netherlands Navy

The Royal Netherlands Navy’s new combat support ship that will be delivered in 2023 will be named HNLMS Den Helder, the navy announced on November 9.
As the name of the new ship was announced, the defense ministry also shared a 3D animation of the ship arriving at the Den Helder naval base.

Barbara Visser, state secretary for defense, said this is the first time a Dutch Navy ship will bear the name of Den Helder in recognition of the city’s long-standing cooperation with the navy. Den Helder serves as the logistics base for Dutch and some Belgian warships.
A final contract for the construction of the combat support ship (CSS) will be signed with Dutch shipbuilder Damen in 2019.

The CSS will supply other naval vessels at sea with fuel, ammunition and goods. It will be equipped with two replenishment at sea stations and feature a helicopter deck and hangar for flight operations. There is space for sea containers on the upper deck. For boarding and rescue operations and passenger transport, there are two RHIB motorboats on board.

The future HNLMS Den Helder is the first in a series of new acquisitions for the Royal Netherlands Navy under the country’s 2018 defense white paper. In addition to the CSS, the Dutch Navy will receive new minehunters and frigates that will be procured in collaboration with Belgium.

https://navaltoday.com/2018/11/12/dutch-navys-new-combat-support-ship-to-be-named-hnlms-den-helder/

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #122 em: Novembro 12, 2018, 01:25:53 pm »
Façam lá as OMEGA para a gente comprar as M
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #123 em: Novembro 13, 2018, 06:13:12 pm »
Netherlands: new DMV Anaconda tactical military vehicles for Korps Mariniers

In 2019, the Mariniers Korps (Marine Corps of The Netherlands) will receive 46 DMV Anaconda 4x4 tactical vehicles. The DMV Anaconda is a completely indigenous and new vehicle designed by DEBA Trucks, a Dutch company (DMV stands for Dutch Military Vehicles).


Deba's Anaconda tactical vehicle developed for the Korps Marinies of The Netherlands on an Iveco chassis (Picture source: Derba)

The Anaconda project started this year and will be available in several variants. The first 36 DMV Anaconda tactical vehicles developed by the Deba Bedrijfswagens B.V. (Bedrijfswagens means professional vehicles) will be formally transferred to the Mariniers Korps on 31 January 2019. Two months later, another 10 will follow.

The DMV Anaconda is a light 4x4 vehicle in the 7-tonne class. Vehicle is based on an Italian Iveco chassis. The power pack consists of a 3-liter Iveco diesel engine generating 180 HP (430 Nm), coupled to an automatic transmission with one reverse and five forward gears. This enables the vehicle to reach a maximum speed of 110 km/h and a maximum range of 1,000 km.

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=42&page=11

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #124 em: Fevereiro 28, 2019, 04:17:04 pm »
Thales to develop air warfare mission suite for new Dutch, Belgian frigates


Photo: Thales

The Netherlands Defence Materiel Organisation (DMO) has contracted Thales to develop a new anti-air warfare system, dubbed the Above Water Warfare System (AWWS), which will be used on the new generation of frigates to be built for the Netherlands and Belgium.

The current multi-purpose (M) frigates in service with the two navies will be replaced as they are reaching the end of their lifecycle. A new generation of M-frigates is scheduled to start entering service in 2024.

Although their primary role will be anti-submarine warfare, the new frigates must be able to independently defend themselves as well as nearby units against air and surface threats.

For this purpose, they will be equipped with AWWS, a new system that will continuously generate the best solution to counter incoming threats. It will consist of a new generation of sensors, coupled with intelligent software that continuously calculates which actions are best suited to tackle each threat detected by radar and other sensors in the right manner. This maximizes the chance of survival, while the crew stays in control.

AWWS will use the fully digital dual-band X/S radar suite: an integral combination of active phased array radar (APAR) and Sea Master 400 radar technologies.

Prior to the AWWS contract, the Dutch defense ministry initiated advanced research into this technology with DMO, TNO and Thales more than ten years ago. This resulted in an agreement for a “technology demonstrator”.

The technology demonstrator will eventually be installed at a shore-based test site for tests and trials.
“For many decades, the naval building cluster, knowledge institutes and defense have been supplying modern and technologically advanced products in what we call the Triple Helix. These products are essential for our national security,” Arie-Jan de Waard, director, DMO. “It is great we are taking an important step for this priority with the development of the AWWS project with Thales.”

https://navaltoday.com/2019/02/28/thales-to-develop-air-warfare-mission-suite-for-new-dutch-belgian-frigates/

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #125 em: Fevereiro 28, 2019, 04:24:29 pm »
Dutch sub program in bed with the Swedes: Would it make any sense?


The Dutch submarine HNLMS Walrus sits moored to the pier at Submarine Base New London. (John Narewski/U.S. Navy)

The Netherlands’ new batch of submarines may come from the alliance between Dutch and Sweden shipyards. The decision is an attempt to save a dying industry, in a show of solidarity between European Union countries. But investing in Europe while NATO is the main defense provider on the continent is mixing apples and oranges — especially since Sweden isn’t a NATO member.

After many years of loyal service, the small fleet of Walrus-class submarines will soon be retired out of the Dutch Navy. They have served well, despite their old age, and can no longer be extended or upgraded. The new subs will have to be non-nuclear, but top of the line, as the Netherlands expects to keep up the good work it has been providing within NATO operations until now.

In recent years, with the resurrection of Russian military power, an increasing number of incursions into the Baltic Sea, North Sea and Bothnian Sea have been spotted, with the Russians gathering intelligence and re-establishing their blanket of power. The U.K. is no longer able to contain the mountain threat and needs partners inshore (such as the Netherlands), as explained by British Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson: “In 2010, a Royal Navy ship was called on just once to respond to Russian Navy ships approaching U.K. territorial waters. Last year we had to respond 33 times.” Dutch submarine crews have done a good job hounding them so far, much to the satisfaction of NATO, and intend to do even better with the new ships.

So far it is rumored that the ships will be built by a consortium including national shipyard Damen, Swedish shipyard Kockums (a division of Saab) and maybe even German partner ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems — if TKMS survives that long. But this arrangement brings about many questions, and leaves observers puzzled.

The first worry to come to mind is technical and industrial. If Damen and Kockums do get the deal, it will indeed represent a breath of fresh air. Kockums hasn’t received an international order since the 1990s, which means that all its experienced engineers are now retired. The future Dutch subs not being nuclear doesn’t make them simple. Indeed, diesel-electrics are not a thing of the past: In fact, their technology is still roaring and developing fast. A long streak with no contracts, or the outright discovery of such technologies, will come with many trials and errors.

This challenge will be further complicated by Kockums’ recent past. After a heinous divorce from German partner TKMS (who would like to get back in the game), Kockums was reacquired by Saab in 2014, under government pressure. New partnership, new technology, new headquarters, low-production capacity: a lot of “ifs” for one of the most complex armament programs to exist.

Of course, the argument of European solidarity does stand. Europe has had the fantasy to tighten its military cooperation for many years, with regular mentions of a European army, even. Given the unlikelihood of such a development in the near future, starting with armament cooperation does make sense. Or does it?

So far, European defense has been an urban legend more than anything else. There has been some level of cooperation, a few experimental tries and even low-intensity military operations. But the fact remains that Europe is indeed well-defended, but not by Europe. NATO has been the cornerstone of European defense for decades and will likely remain so for many more.

Given that Sweden is an EU member, but not a NATO member, doesn’t building a submarine program with the Swedes amount to feeding the wrong horse? The Netherlands should know, as they are themselves very active NATO members, and fully appreciate, as continental defenders, the concept of military sovereignty.

Sovereignty: the keyword in the matter. In the old days, submarines were little more than underwater ships. Practical, indeed, but just another piece on the chessboard. Nowadays, with the evolution of submarine roles and capacities, they are sovereignty vector.

Submersibles now represent a military capacity to strike anywhere in the world, at a small or large scale, and to be everywhere and nowhere: the very definition of power. But sub programs are immensely complex and sensitive. To be successful, their design must be top notch, secret and properly implemented, and the builder must stay alongside the program throughout its life for maintenance, upgrades and troubleshooting.

The Damen-Kockums partnership, on the other hand, amounts to entrusting a foreign, non-NATO, private company, with limited technological command, with the Netherlands’ most valuable sovereignty vector. Kockums’ last order was the Australian Collins class, which was poorly designed and required levels of maintenance which Kockums struggled to provide. And things would probably get even worse in the case of a joint venture with former partner TKMS, who sold three submarines to bankrupt Greece but didn’t bother delivering them, and whose latest warships were thrown out by the German Navy over defects.

The EU is not a military force, nor will it be anytime soon. There is much to be said about intra-European cooperation, but do the Dutch actually want the country’s (and NATO’s) most valuable military asset to be within the hands of a foreign private company that still has everything to prove in its capacity to successfully carry out submarine programs? NATO has been asking European members to ramp up their defense efforts. For one of Europe’s main defenders to keep on defending Europe, it needs submarines that work.

Günther Hoffmann is a former officer of the Royal Netherlands Navy. Since retiring from the service, he has worked as a part-time civil servant for the Dutch Ministry of Defence, acting as an adviser on technological and industrial issues for the Navy.


http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=368&page=3

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #126 em: Março 07, 2019, 08:38:12 pm »
 

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #127 em: Março 27, 2019, 10:11:41 am »
SMART-L MM/N BMD radar installed on first LCF frigate

Richard Scott, London - Jane's Navy International
26 March 2019
   
The Royal Netherlands Navy (RNLN) air defence and command frigate (LCF) HNLMS De Zeven Provinciën has become the first ship of its class to receive the new SMART-L MM/N L-band long-range radar.


HNLMS
        %3CI%3EDe Zeven Provinciën%3C/I%3E
         has become the first LCF frigate to receive the new SMART-L MM/N L-band long-range radar. (Thales)
HNLMS %3CI%3EDe Zeven Provinciën%3C/I%3E has become the first LCF frigate to receive the new SMART-L MM/N L-band long-range radar. (Thales)

Developed and manufactured by Thales Nederland, the SMART-L MM/N radar (previously known as SMART-L Early Warning Capability [EWC]) is being procured as part of a combat systems upgrade that will confer the RNLN's four LCF ships with a maritime ballistic missile defence (MBMD) early warning capability. This will form part of the Netherlands' national contribution to NATO's Ballistic Missile Defence (BMD) capability.

SMART-L MM/N is a new active electronically scanned array radar, using Gallium Nitride transmit/receive modules, designed to detect air, surface, and high-speed exo-atmospheric targets out to an instrumented range of 2,000 km.

https://www.janes.com/article/87470/smart-l-mm-n-bmd-radar-installed-on-first-lcf-frigate
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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Re: Marinha da Holanda
« Responder #128 em: Maio 22, 2019, 07:40:13 pm »
Belgian, Dutch minehunter contract officially awarded


Photo: Naval Group

The Belgium Naval & Robotics consortium, composed of Naval Group and ECA Group, officially received a contract for the construction of twelve mine-hunting vessels for the navies of the Netherlands and Belgium.

As revealed, the 12 ships will be equipped with some 100 drones, clustered in ten mission toolboxes.
The contract is worth 2 billion euros over a span of 10 years. Production is scheduled to start after a three-year design phase.
The first ship is expected to be delivered in 2024.

Belgium Naval & Robotics said it would carry out a significant part of the contract in Belgium, in particular the production of certain equipment for the ship and all naval drones. Ship maintenance will be carried out in Zeebrugge in partnership with Flanders Ship Repair (FSR).

The 2800-ton vessels will incorporate an implementation and recovery system for ECA Group’s Inspector 125 unmanned surface vehicles (USV). They are integrated into the C2 MCM Umisoft system connected to the Naval Group’s I4drones system to form the mine-warfare mission system integrated into the ship’s combat system.

The solution includes A18-M autonomous underwater vehicles, T18-M towed sonars and mine identification & destruction systems composed of SEASCAN and KSTER-C remotely operated vehicles. All these drones can be operated autonomously from the USV Inspector 125. The drone system also includes unmanned aerial vehicles and dredgers.

https://navaltoday.com/2019/05/22/belgian-dutch-minehunter-contract-officially-awarded/

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