Sistema Galileo

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Sistema Galileo
« em: Julho 15, 2004, 03:20:35 pm »
EU and Israel Seal Their Agreement on GALILEO  
 
 
(Source: European Commission; issued July 14, 2004)
 
 
 On 13 July, negotiations between the European Union and the State of Israel reached final approval and agreement on the European satellite radio navigation program was signed by both parties. Welcoming the outcome of the negotiations, Vice-President Ms de Palacio said: “This is a very important step for the development of Galileo as an international program and its future use worldwide”.  
 
Since the Council invited the Commission to start formal negotiations with Israel on Galileo on 16 January 2004, intensive exchanges have been held between the parties. An agreed text was approved in record time at the round of talks held in Tel Aviv on 17 March and yesterday the final agreement was signed in Brussels by Vice-President Loyola de Palacio, representing the European Commission, Mr. Ehud Olmert, Vice-Prime Minister, representing Israel, and Mr. Bernard Bot, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands representing the Presidency of the European Union.  
 
This agreement provides for co-operative activities on satellite navigation and timing in a wide range of sectors, notably science and technology, industrial manufacturing, service and market development, as well as standardization, frequencies and certification. Israel is also invited to take part in the program financially through a stake holding in the Galileo Joint Undertaking, the body managing the program. The Galileo Joint Undertaking will immediately start discussions with Israel to that effect so that the activities can start as soon as possible.  
 
Israel is one of the eight countries within the world space community demonstrating significant technological assets on space programs and achievements on GNSS applications, equipment, user segment and technology.  
 
After the recent signatures of the agreements between the EU, the People’s Republic of China and the United States, the signature of the agreement with Israel represents a big boost for the GNSS market which is indeed potentially considerable: 3 billion receivers and revenues of some 250 billion euros per year by 2010 worldwide, and the creation of more than 150.000 high qualified jobs in Europe alone.  
 
This agreement confirms the ambition of the EU to further stimulate international cooperation around itself. By the end of this year, the Commission is expected to sign further agreements with the Russian Federation on the compatibility between the Galileo and GLONASS systems, and with other third countries such as India, Ukraine, Brazil, South Korea, Mexico and Australia.  
 
BACKGROUND  
 
Galileo is Europe’s satellite radio navigation program. It was launched on the initiative of the European Commission and developed jointly with the European Space Agency (ESA). It will make for the development of a new generation of universal services in areas such as transport, telecommunication, agriculture or fisheries, and promises to be highly profitable. The Galileo program will be administered and controlled by civilians and offers a guarantee of quality and continuity which is essential for many sensitive applications. Its complementarity with current systems will increase the reliability and availability of navigation and positioning services worldwide.  
 
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« Responder #1 em: Setembro 02, 2004, 02:05:28 pm »
Galileo: Europe's Own Constellation
 
 
(Source: Deutsche Welle German radio; issued Sept. 1, 2004)
 
 
 For years, the Galileo satellite navigation system was seen as a barrier to transatlantic relations. But the European Union's most ambitious space project is now seen as a competitor and complement to GPS.  
 
After its completion around 2009, Europe's Galileo navigation system will guide trucks carrying goods across European highways, it will help land planes at Europe's crowded airports, it will assist ships docking in its busy ports, and it will aid the blind in finding their way through city streets.  
 
But to many Europeans, the most important thing about Galileo is that it will wean the EU of its technological dependence on the American global positioning system (GPS). Europeans have long complained that GPS is unreliable for critical use because, as a military system, it can and has been scrambled during times of crisis.  
 
"It's always better to be the master of your future," Jean Claude Gayssot, the former Transport Minister of France said when the EU approved the project in 2002. "If you are not the owner of your own system, how can you be sure that every decision is going to be taken in your interest?"  
 
Dominique Detain of the European Space Agency, which has been responsible for the initial development and testing of Galileo, says Europe needs its own navigation system because GPS isn't reliable enough. "You're never sure of the data or the signal you get from GPS," he told DW-WORLD. "You can't be certain of the continuity of the signal and that you will be made aware of a disruption to the signal. And that's not because it's not possible, but because the military does not want to provide such information."  
 
That lack of reliability has made GPS unfeasible for applications where a slight inaccuracy could result in deaths, like air traffic control. "With Galileo, we will provide all of the information and we will assure that it is valid," he said. European critics of GPS often point out that the Pentagon scrambled its signal at times during the war in Kosovo, disrupting service to civilian users.  
 
A global service industry  
 
Europe's biggest infrastructure project ever, Galileo is currently being planned by the European Space Agency and the firm Galileo Industries, a Germany-based consortium that includes European space industry giants like EADS, Alcatel and Alenia Spazio. By the time operations of the 30-satellite constellation begins, the EU will have invested approximately 3.4 billion euros on the ambitious project.  
 
But the payoff could be even greater. European Commissioner for Transportation Loyola de Palacio has estimated Galileo will create a global services industry with more than 150,000 new jobs and 10 billion euros in annual revenues gained from premium versions of the Galileo signal. The EU will also derive revenues from a licensing fee paid by manufacturers of Galileo receivers. Galileo will provide Europe's first competition to the global positioning system of satellites launched by the US in 1973 and operated by the Pentagon.  
 
Cutting a deal with Washington  
 
For a number of years, Galileo served as a serious thorn in the side of transatlantic relations. Officials in Washington feared the spectrum used by Galileo could interfere with the GPS signal used by the military, making it difficult for the Americans to scramble the signal in times of crisis. Others in the US argued that satellite navigation systems should be available for free, like GPS, and there was no need for a commercial version. But Washington and Brussels reached a deal in June that will make the two systems compatible and interoperable while at the same time maintaining autonomy over each system, effectively eliminating any remaining conflict over the project.  
 
"With this agreement, we are going to set the rules of the game for the GPS and Galileo for the coming decades, both systems being fully interoperable, and they will set the world standards in the market through the use of the same open signal," European Commissioner for Transportation Loyola de Palacio of Spain said in June. "This will allow all users to use in a complementary way both systems with the same receiver." She said the cooperation would also benefit the European and American space industries, which are already highly interwoven.  
 
The Bush administration also extended its support for the deal. "The agreement manages to balance the competition that is inherent in the commercial dimension of satellite navigational technology with the cooperation necessary for the security dimension," Secretary of State Colin Powell said. The diplomat said the existence of redundant systems would also "ensure the safety and availability of satellite navigation technology for transportation and recreational users worldwide."  
 
Critics still lurking  
 
Still, some in Washington are adamantly opposed to Galileo, which they see as a threat to US space dominance. Speaking at a recent space conference, Republican Congressman Dave Weldon encouraged the US to expedite its own plans for a next-generation GPS in order to beat the Europeans at Galileo. "I am concerned that while we fail to deploy GPS-3, the European/Chinese efforts for Galileo will be encouraged and they will field a competing system," he said. "GPS is the world standard and provides us a measure of space control and dominance unmatched. To cede this could be tragic."  
 
In other words: the fears in the US weren't just that there would be technical overlap with the GPS signal -- old fashion competition also plays a role. "There was concern Europe was going to build a system that effectively turned GPS into Betamax," Joan Johnson-Freese, a space expert at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, explained in an interview with DW-WORLD. She added that the participation of the Chinese, who are investing in Galileo, also sparked discomfort in Washington.  
 
"The US and China view space as zero-sum," she explained, "Any gain by one is a loss for the other. The fact that Europe is working with China on Galileo makes the perception of it even more threatening to the United States."  
 
Coming to a receiver near you  
 
The first Galileo test satellites are expected to be launched in Autumn 2005, with remaining satellites being launched by 2009. European space industry giants are currently bidding for the right to the concession to operate Galileo after it has been launched.  
 
ESA's Detain says Galileo should be seen not only as a service for Europe, but also one for the rest of the world. "The Galileo satellites won't stop working once they've passed the European borders. It will be a global system," he said. "GPS is a great system, but some information isn't provided -- the data gets upgraded and downgraded and you're never sure of it. Europe couldn't develop activities on a system where it is unsure of the source, so it's very important strategically to have an independent system. Now that Galileo and GPS are going to be interoperable, this will benefit everyone, even America."  
 
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« Responder #2 em: Setembro 08, 2004, 08:31:09 pm »
GALILEO: The Commission Proposes to Open Negotiations with Ukraine on Satellite Navigation
 
 
(Source: European Commission; issued Sept. 7, 2004)
 
 
 On 2 September 2004, the Commission sought Council approval for its recommendation to start negotiations on a cooperation agreement with Ukraine on the development of a Civil Global Navigation Satellite system (GNSS). “This proposal for a new international cooperation agreement clearly underlines the success of GALILEO and demonstrates again the widespread interest in the project”, stated Loyola de Palacio, Vice-President of the European Commission.  
 
The Commission intends to start the negotiations immediately after approval of the Council at the end of September 2004.  
 
Following the Ukraine-EU joint statement on cooperation on satellite navigation adopted in October 2003, and after several meetings with Ukrainian officials, Ukraine formally expressed its wish to pursue negotiations leading to an agreement on GALILEO. The scenario of cooperation identified in preliminary talks includes multilateral and industrial cooperation, research and scientific activities especially on standardisation issues, regional integrity monitoring and financial investment in GALILEO.  
 
Ukraine is one of the eight countries within the world space community demonstrating significant technological background on space programmes and important achievements on GNSS applications, equipment, user segment and regional technology. The Ukrainian space industry is among the world’s leader in the design and production of launchers and GNSS components. Ukrainian companies are active on applications and service development sector. GNSS technology is used in a variety of civilian applications such as transportation, environment, agriculture, engineering, personal outdoor recreation and safety of life systems.  
 
International cooperation on GALILEO is developing rapidly. Agreements have already been signed with China and Israel and discussions are under way with India, Russia, Brazil, South Korea, Mexico and Australia. Moreover, the signature of the EU/US agreement on 26 June confirmed the full interoperability and compatibility between GALILEO and GPS, thus giving a strong boost for the GNSS market which is potentially considerable: 3 billion receivers and revenues of some EUR 250 billion per year by 2010 worldwide, and the creation of more than 150,000 highly qualified jobs in Europe alone.  
 
 
BACKGROUND NOTES:  
 
GALILEO is Europe's satellite radio navigation programme. It was launched on the initiative of the European Commission and developed jointly with the European Space Agency (ESA). It will prepare for the development of a new generation of universal services in areas such as transport, telecommunications, agriculture and fisheries.  
 
To date this technology, which promises to be highly profitable, is only available through the United States’ GPS system and Russia's GLONASS system, both of which are financed and controlled by military authorities.  
 
The GALILEO programme will be administered and controlled by civilian authorities and offers a guarantee of quality and continuity which is essential for many applications. It is complementary with current systems and will increase the reliability and availability of navigation and positioning services worldwide.  
 
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« Responder #3 em: Dezembro 08, 2004, 06:43:03 pm »
Galileo: the Commission Proposes Opening Negotiations with Morocco
 
 
(Source: European Commission; issued Dec. 7, 2004)
 
 
 BRUSSELS --- The European Commission today proposed negotiating directives to the Council on the conclusion of a cooperation agreement with Morocco on the development of Galileo, a civil satellite navigation system.  
 
The Commission will start discussions with Morocco as soon as the Council has approved the negotiating directives. “The prospect of a new Galileo cooperation agreement, this time with Morocco, highlights the success of this European programme. Such an agreement will enable Galileo to become established in the western Mediterranean and West Africa", said Jacques Barrot, Vice-President with responsibility for Transport.  
 
On 13 October, following several preparatory meetings with the Commission, Morocco formally announced its interest in opening negotiations and the prospect of an agreement on its participation in Galileo. This will involve industrial and scientific cooperation, particularly regarding standardisation issues, monitoring regional integrity and developing specific applications for Morocco and its geographic environment (the western Mediterranean and West Africa).  
 
International cooperation in the Galileo Programme is expanding rapidly. Agreements have already been signed with China and Israel and discussions are underway with India, Russia, Ukraine, Brazil, South Korea, Mexico and Australia. Furthermore, the agreement between the European Union and the United States which was signed on 26 June confirmed the total interoperability between Galileo and GPS. This will considerably boost the world market for satellite radio-navigation, which involves some 3 billion receivers and is likely to be worth about EUR 250 billion from 2010. The Commission expects over 150 000 highly qualified jobs to be created in Europe.  
 
 
BACKGROUND  
 
Galileo is Europe’s satellite radio-navigation programme. It was launched at the initiative of the Commission and the European Space Agency and is a technical revolution similar to that of mobile phones. It is also behind the development of a new generation of universal services in areas such as transport, telecommunications, agriculture and fisheries. At the moment, this technology, which has proved highly profitable, is only available through the United States’ GPS or Russia’s Glonass system, which were primarily developed and funded for military purposes.  
 
The Galileo programme will be administered and controlled by civilian authorities and will offer a guarantee of quality and service continuity. It will be complementary with current systems and will increase the reliability and availability of navigation and positioning services worldwide.  
 
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« Responder #4 em: Dezembro 13, 2004, 10:26:46 pm »
GALILEO on the Home Straight
 
 
(Source: European Commission; issued Dec. 10, 2004)
 
 
 GALILEO will definitely become operational in 2008: a decisive stage has just been completed which will allow the GALILEO programme to be fully completed, despite the obstacles along the way.  
 
On a proposal from the Commission, the Council has today confirmed the technical characteristics of the system, in particular with regard to the services being offered. It has decided in favour of moving on to the launching (2006-2008) and operational phases of the project and confirmed that the European Union will contribute to the funding of those two phases.  
 
“GALILEO is without a doubt the most wonderful European technological project. We are now on the home straight: next year will see the launch of the first satellites", said Jacques Barrot, Vice-President of the Commission. “GALILEO will be as much of a technological revolution as mobile telephony. This venture shows how capable Europe is of making a united effort in pursuit of a common goal"  
 
GALILEO is the European satellite radio navigation programme launched at the initiative of the European Commission. It promises the development of a new generation of universal services in areas such as transport, the environment, agriculture and fisheries. GALILEO will become the global standard for civil navigation by satellite and there will be total interoperability between the European and US systems  
 
The programme will be developed in 4 phases: definition of the project; development between 2002 and 2005 (total costs: EUR 1.1 billion); deployment from 2006 to 2008, (EUR 2.1 billion - 1/3 public sector, 2/3 private sector) ; and then operation and exploitation. Exploitation costs are estimated at EUR 220 million a year with an exceptional contribution of the public sector for the first few years of EUR 500 million. Thereafter, these costs will be entirely covered by the private sector.  
 
The “deployment” phase, which today got the green light and during which satellites and ground receiving stations are to be built and launched, is the phase which is crucial to making GALILEO operational.  
 
The private sector has confirmed its significant commitment to the funding of the GALILEO system on the basis of business plans which demonstrate the commercial viability of the programme as a result of the significant income it will generate. The next stages of the programme will be dedicated to the selection, before the end of February 2005, of one of the two applicants still competing to operate the system by the GALILEO Joint Undertaking and, subsequently, to negotiation of the concession contract in 2005.  
 
The Commission is committed to promoting the use of satellite radionavigation and to developing the related markets.  
 
Three European legislative instruments advocate or already require the use of satellite navigation for the satellite monitoring of ships, the interoperability of electronic road toll systems in the EU and the protection of animals during transportation. That is only the start. At the same time, the Commission is continuing to negotiate cooperation agreements with third countries.  
 
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« Responder #5 em: Dezembro 22, 2004, 01:30:35 pm »
In-Orbit Validation Contract: a Further Step Forward for Galileo
 
 
(Source: European Space Agency; issued Dec. 22, 2004)
 
 
 The Galileo project is now well and truly taking shape, with today's signing of a second contract concerning the In-Orbit Validation (IOV) phase, following that signed in July 2003 for two test satellites.  
 
The European Space Agency and Galileo Industries have signed a EUR 150 million contract, as a first stage towards signing an approximately EUR 950 million contract covering the overall IOV phase.  
 
"This marks a further step forward for Galileo", says Giuseppe Viriglio, Director of EU and Industrial Programmes at the Agency. "In line with the recent EU Transport Council green light for final deployment of the constellation, ESA is securing the foundations for this unique satellite locating and positioning system."  
 
For Günter Stamerjohanns, chief executive officer of Galileo Industries: "This contract marks a key step towards completing this major European technology project. Galileo Industries is proud to be playing a leading part in meeting this enormous challenge."  
 
The contract provides the basis and the technical activities necessary for in-orbit validation of the Galileo system. It gives preliminary authorisation to proceed with the whole of this work, over a six-month period. This work notably concerns the management of the programme and the choice of engineering systems and technical support required to maintain the overall credibility of the scheduling and ensure system coherence.  
 
In-orbit validation involves the delivery of the first four satellites in the Galileo constellation of 30, along with a number of ground stations. Subsequently, the programme will enter its deployment phase, which will cover the entire network of ground infrastructure and the launch of the remaining 26 satellites which will complete the constellation.  
 
At present, the test phase has started, with the launch of a first test satellite onboard a Soyuz launcher expected by end-2005. To ensure that this phase is a success, two satellites are being built in parallel by European industry.  
 
Galileo is a joint initiative of the European Space Agency and the European Union. It will be the first-ever global satellite-navigation system designed for civilian needs that delivers guaranteed continuity of services, unlike the American GPS. The two systems will nevertheless be compatible and interoperable. (ends)  
 
 
 
 EADS Astrium Awarded Contract to Commence the Build of the First Four Galileo Satellites
 
 
(Source: EADS; issued Dec. 21, 2004)
 
 
 MUNICH, Germany --- The European satellite navigation project Galileo is beginning to take shape. On Tuesday, the European Space Agency (ESA) and Galileo Industries signed a preliminary contract in Paris for the In-Orbit-Verfication-Phase (IOV).  
 
With a 38 percent stake, EADS Astrium is the largest shareholder in Galileo Industries and will take on important work packages as the major subcontractor in this initial phase.  
 
"After extensive discussions, this authorisation to proceed enables us, at last, to get started on building the Galileo satellites," says Evert Dudok, Director of Earth Observation, Navigation and Science at EADS Astrium. “By the end of the decade, a global independent satellite navigation system, under civil control, will be available to all.” Dudok estimates the value of the subcontracts that will be awarded to EADS Astrium, as part of this first agreement between ESA and Galileo Industries, to be of the order of 75 million euros. The preliminary contract covers the first work packages for the IOV-Phase, which comprises the construction and launch of the first four Galileo satellites and the in-orbit testing of this initial part of the overall system.  
 
Contracts between ESA and the space industry on the entire IOV phase should be finalised by the middle of next year. The total contract value for this phase, amounting to about 950 million euros, will cover the first four Galileo satellites, due for launch in 2008, and the development and operation of the associated ground infrastructure. A further 26 satellites will follow to make up the 30 required in the Galileo constellation. It is expected that Galileo will be fully operational by the end of the decade.  
 
As the largest shareholder in Galileo Industries, EADS Astrium, based in Germany, the United Kingdom, France and Spain, will play a significant role in the construction phase of these Galileo satellites. The contract to build the satellites will be managed by EADS Astrium in Ottobrunn near Munich and, in addition, EADS Astrium Germany will be responsible for systems engineering and parts of the ground segment. Responsibility for the navigation payload as well as the management and system engineering of the ground control segment which monitors and controls the satellites, will be in Portsmouth, UK. The Toulouse site in France will contribute to the ground mission segment, which will monitor the signal quality of the satellites. EADS Astrium Spain is also participating in the Galileo programme and technical experts from all countries are already being assigned to Galileo Industries by EADS Astrium.  
 
Galileo will stimulate a step change in the role of satellite technology in the daily lives of both the public and business, from satellite positioning chips in mobile phones, to a vast array of public services including transport management and personal mobility applications. In complimenting GPS, it will give increased accuracy and integrity, particularly in built-up areas and it will guarantee a role for European industry in the rapidly expanding satellite navigation market.  
 
EADS Astrium is Europe’s leading satellite system specialist. Its activities cover complete civil and military telecommunications and Earth observation systems, science and navigation programmes, and all spacecraft avionics and equipment. EADS Astrium, wholly owned subsidiary of EADS SPACE, which is dedicated to providing civil and defence space systems. In 2003 EADS SPACE had a turnover of EUR 2.4 billion and 12,000 employees in France, Germany, the United Kingdom and Spain.  
 
EADS is a global leader in aerospace, defence and related services. In 2003, EADS generated revenues of EUR 30.1 billion and employed a workforce of more than 100,000.  
 
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« Responder #6 em: Fevereiro 25, 2005, 01:51:23 am »
Korea to Join European Satellite Radio Navigation Program
 
 
(Source: Korean Information Service; issued Feb. 24, 2005)
 
 
 South Korea is looking to participate in the Galileo project, the satellite radio navigation program by the EU, as backup for the U.S.-led global positional system (GPS) it currently uses.  
 
During the fourth science-related ministers’ meeting on Thursday (Feb. 24), the government decided to join the European project, which will enable people to pinpoint positions of objects within 1 meter.  
 
Toward that end, the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) plans to present its intent to the EU as early as next month with the aim of sealing the agreement this year.  
 
Korea will be required to contribute at least 5 million euro (6.7 billion won) to be a part of the multi-billion euro Galileo program, which will be up and running in 2008.  
 
“Currently, we depend on the GPS system for satellite-based positioning services. Although the U.S. promises to supply the service seamlessly, we need to retain an alternative just in case,” said a MOST official, who wanted to be identified by only his surname, Park.  
 
However, Park added Korea would continue to use GPS as a primary platform while maintaining Galileo as a backup.  
 
Galileo is the world’s largest commercial space program aimed at providing a precision time and location system based on a group of 30 satellites and ground stations.  
 
The 3.4 billion euro program was spearheaded by the EU and the European Space Agency and later included aspiring space powers such as China and Israel.  
 
Up until now, the U.S. has dominated global positioning technology under its military developed GPS system.  
 
Park said that the EU approached Korea to join Galileo in 2001 but the country hesitated to accept it. However, Korea’s decision will not likely pose a risk to any diplomatic ties between the allies.  
 
“As far as I know, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade got an understanding from its U.S. counterpart,” Park said.  
 
In addition to ensuring an alternative satellite navigation system to GPS, Korea’s move is aimed at boosting sales of global positioning service-enabled cell phones.  
 
“After the Galileo scheme enters operation in 2008, our handsets makers will need to embrace both the European platform and the GPS system of the U.S. to remain competitive. The situation pushes us to be engaged in both systems,” Park noted.  
 
The dual-band-dual-mode phones will be a major issue for Korean cell phone makers, which combine to account for about 30 percent of the world market, to continue their strong footage.  
 
The MOST expects the global market volume of satellite navigation system-embedded phones will range between $1.4 billion and $3.1 billion in 2010.  
 
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« Responder #7 em: Março 23, 2005, 09:59:26 pm »
Korea to Join EU Navigation Satellite System
 
 
(Source: Korea Information Service; issued March 23, 2005)
 
 
 The government plans to join the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) project that the European Union (EU) aims to put into service by 2008, the Ministry of Science and Technology said Monday.  
 
The GNSS, or Galileo project, is the world’s largest commercial space program aimed at providing precise time and location service based on a group of 30 satellites and ground stations, countering the ground positioning system (GPS), which is being operated by the United States.  
 
The Office of Science and Technology Renovation at the ministry said that it will submit a letter of intent to the EU and begin negotiations to conclude an agreement in consultation with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. The office plans to seek funds needed for the project from the budget.  
 
To prepare for the project, the office will form a policy consultation council composed of deputy ministers of 10 ministries under the chairmanship of the vice minister for science and technology renovation, which will deliberate major policies involved in the satellite navigation system and coordinate business segments among ministries. The office will also set up a working-level panel composed of lower officials from the ministries for efficient handling.  
 
The ministry expects the global market of satellite navigation system service will range between $1.4 billion and $3.1 billion in 2010.  
 
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« Responder #8 em: Abril 06, 2005, 12:31:05 am »
Galileo: European Commission Proposes to Open Negotiations with Argentina on Satellite Navigation
 
 
(Source: European Commission; issued April 4, 2005)
 
 
 BRUSSELS --- Today the Commission sought Council approval for its recommendation to start negotiations on a cooperation agreement with Argentina on the development of a Civil Global Navigation Satellite system (GNSS). “This proposal for a new international cooperation agreement clearly underlines the success of Galileo and demonstrates again the widespread interest in the project”, stated Jacques Barrot, Vice-President of the European Commission in charge of transport. The Commission intends to start the negotiations immediately after approval of the Council.  
 
Latin American countries confirmed their interest to collaborate in the field of satellite navigation at the last joint EU-LA summit of May 2004 in Guadalajara. Since then, the Commission, together with the European Space Agency and the Galileo Joint Undertaking, held information events in Brazil, Mexico, Chile and Argentina.  
 
Following the successful Information Day and bilateral meetings in Buenos Aires mid-December 2004, Argentina formally expressed its wish to pursue negotiations leading to an agreement on Galileo. Preliminary talks identified possible co-operation in the areas of market development, industrial applications, ground segments, and possibly also satellite elements, training, regional and local augmentation systems.  
 
The Galileo Joint Undertaking has also launched a call for specific projects in Latin America to set up a Galileo information centre and to conduct awareness raising, training and demonstration activities in the region.  
 
International cooperation on Galileo is developing rapidly. Agreements have already been signed with China and Israel and discussions are under way with India, Russia, Ukraine, South Korea, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Malaysia and Australia. Moreover, the signature of the EU/US agreement on 26 June 2004 confirmed the full interoperability and compatibility between Galileo and GPS, thus giving a strong boost for the GNSS market which is potentially considerable: 3 billion receivers and revenues of some EUR 275 billion per year by 2020 worldwide, and the creation of more than 150,000 highly qualified jobs in Europe alone.  
 
BACKGROUND NOTES:  
 
Galileo is Europe's satellite radio navigation programme. It was launched on the initiative of the European Commission and developed jointly with the European Space Agency (ESA). It will prepare for the development of a new generation of universal services in areas such as transport, energy, telecommunications, agriculture and fisheries. To date this technology, which promises to be highly profitable, is only available through the United States’ GPS system and Russia's GLONASS system, both of which are financed and controlled by military authorities.  
 
The Galileo programme will be administered and controlled by civilian authorities and offers a guarantee of quality and continuity which is essential for many applications. It is complementary with current systems and will increase the reliability and availability of navigation and positioning services worldwide.  
 
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« Responder #9 em: Maio 03, 2005, 12:51:42 am »
Citação de: "Diário Digital"
Português escolhido para liderar projecto Galileo

O português Pedro Pedreira foi eleito esta segunda-feira, em Bruxelas, director executivo da empresa que vai montar e gerir o projecto europeu Galileo que irá concorrer com o GPS norte-americano na área do posicionamento por satélite.

O engenheiro de 48 anos com grande experiência em telecomunicações, actualmente a exercer funções na PT Comunicações, foi eleito numa votação do conselho de administração da Autoridade Europeia que vai supervisionar a instalação do projecto Galileo.
Nesta última fase de selecção, a lista reduzida de candidatos ao lugar de director executivo incluía também dois franceses e um austríaco.

O projecto Galileo, que vai criar uma alternativa europeia ao Global Positioning System (GPS) norte- americano, está actualmente em fase de desenvolvimento, prevendo-se que entre em funcionamento dentro de três anos.

O sistema vai assentar numa constelação de 30 satélites colocados em órbita a 24.000 quilómetros de altitude, cobrindo a totalidade do globo terrestre, com uma rede de estações de controlo em terra.

Cada satélite permitirá localizar a posição de qualquer tipo de objecto, fixo ou móvel, com uma margem de erro inferior a um metro.

A entrada em pleno funcionamento dos satélites encontra-se prevista para 2008.


Começa a ser condição necessária ser português para se liderar uma grande instituição ou um grande projecto. :nice:
Um dos primeiros erros do mundo moderno é presumir, profunda e tacitamente, que as coisas passadas se tornaram impossíveis.

Gilbert Chesterton, in 'O Que Há de Errado com o Mundo'






Cumprimentos
 

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alfsapt

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« Responder #10 em: Maio 03, 2005, 10:46:12 am »
Citação de: "Jorge Pereira"
Começa a ser condição necessária ser português para se liderar uma grande instituição ou um grande projecto. :nice:


Para além do mérito pessoal dos escolhidos para tais cargos, não é irrelevante a capacidade de relacionamento com outros povos dos Portugueses ao longo dos tempos... antigos e mais recentes.

Relevante é tambem o facto de se constatar cada vez mais que afinal a má gestão neste País não se deve à falta de bons gestores ...
"Se serviste a patria e ela te foi ingrata, tu fizestes o que devias, ela o que costuma."
Padre Antonio Vieira
 

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JLRC

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« Responder #11 em: Junho 06, 2005, 01:22:23 pm »
EU and Ukraine Seal Galileo and Aviation Agreement
 
 
(Source: European Commission; issued June 3, 2005)
 
 
 Brussels --- Negotiations on Ukraine’s participation in Europe’s satellite radio navigation programme finally reached approval. The agreement was initialled today in Kiev by François Lamoureux, Director-General for Energy and Transport at the European Commission, and by Oleh Shamshul, deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine. A first agreement between the EU and Ukraine in the field of civil aviation was also initialled today.  
 
The agreement will give any European airline access to the Ukrainian market from any Member State of the EU and is a first step towards the creation of a Common Aviation Area with Ukraine.  
 
The Galileo agreement initialled today with Ukraine provides for co-operative activities on satellite navigation in a wide range of sectors, particularly in science and technology, industrial manufacturing, service and market development, as well as standardisation, frequency and certification. It also represents the first step towards the extension of EGNOS (European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service) to Ukraine and the participation of the country in the programme through a stake in the GALILEO Joint Undertaking.  
 
Ukraine is one of the eight countries within the world space community with significant technological knowledge on space programmes and important achievements on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) applications, equipment, user segment and regional technology. The Ukrainian space industry is among the world’s leader in the design and production of launchers and GNSS components.  
 
The Galileo agreement with Ukraine confirms the European Union’s ambition to further stimulate international cooperation. Ukraine is the third country formally joining the GALILEO programme after China and Israel. Discussions are under way with India, Morocco, Brazil, Mexico, Chile, South Korea, Canada, Argentina and Australia. The ever growing interest of third countries to participate in the GALILEO programme represents a big boost for the GNSS market, which is potentially considerable: 3 billion receivers and revenues of some 275 billion euros per year by 2020 worldwide, and the creation of more than 150.000 highly qualified jobs in Europe alone.  
 
The aviation agreement is the first agreement in the field of civil aviation between the European Union and Ukraine. The agreement brings existing bilateral air services agreements between the Member States and Ukraine in line with EU legislation. It ends the national provisions that do not authorise European carriers to fly to Ukraine unless they leave from their countries of origin. All 25 bilateral agreements between EU Member States and Ukraine will remain in force with the exception of those provisions changed by today’s agreement.  
 
The Commission has initialled similar agreements with 15 countries worldwide including Australia, New Zealand, Bulgaria, Romania, Morocco as well as Georgia and Azerbaijan.  
 
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JLRC

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« Responder #12 em: Junho 10, 2005, 07:38:42 pm »
Galileo Test Satellites Six Months From Launch
 
 
(Source: European Space Agency; issued June 9, 2005)
 
 
 Two experimental satellites are being developed for the Galileo System Test Bed – Version 2, which will make up the first phase of in the 'in-orbit validation' of the Galileo system. Both spacecraft are now approximately six months away from launch.  
 
The main mission of these first Galileo satellites is intended to secure the Galileo frequency filings, validate new technologies for operational use, characterise the radiation environment of medium earth orbit that the operational satellites will occupy and enable experimentation with live Galileo signals. To ensure the success of this phase, two satellites have been ordered from industry, currently known as GSTB-V2/A and GSTB-V2/B, and they are being built in parallel. They are the first step towards the 'in-orbit validation' phase, which will require a constellation of four satellites.  
 
 
Satellite assembly and test  
 
GSTB-V2/A is being developed by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (UK). Galileo Industries (GaIn) is developing the GSTB-V2/B satellite. GaIn is a European consortium including Alcatel Space Industries (F), Alenia Spazio (I), Astrium GmbH (D), Astrium Ltd (UK) and Galileo Sistemas y Servicios (E).  
 
Much of the testing of the units and subsystems that will make up the two spacecraft has been completed. Both satellites are now being assembled and prepared for their environmental tests, which ensure that the satellite is able to withstand the stress of launch and that it will operate correctly in space. GSTB-V2/A will be transported to the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) to undergo testing early in the summer. GSTB-V2/B, currently being assembled at Astrium in the UK, will begin its test campaign at Alenia in Rome before moving to ESTEC for final testing in the autumn.  
 
 
ESA payload procurement  
 
In GSTB-V2, the European Space Agency (ESA) has direct responsibility for the procurement of all of the GTSBV2/B payload units and some of the GSTB-V2/A payload units. The other part of the GSTB-V2/A payload is a parallel signal generation chain developed by SSTL, the satellite prime contractor.  
 
The units procured by ESA include:  
 
--rubidium frequency standards (both satellites)  
--a passive hydrogen maser (GSTB-V2/B)  
--clock monitoring and control units (both satellites)  
--navigation signal generation units (both satellites)  
--frequency generation and upconversion units (both satellites)  
--solid state power amplifiers (GSTB-V2/B)  
--output filters and diplexer (GSTB-V2/B)  
--navigation antennas (both satellites)  
 
The flight versions of all units have been successfully delivered to the satellite prime contractors and production of the spare units is in progress.  
 
 
Ground facilities  
 
In parallel with the construction of the two spacecraft, the ground facilities required for controlling the satellites and performing the validation experiments are being developed and tested.  
 
The primary ground systems for GSTB-V2/A are located at the Chilbolton Observatory and Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The control centre for GSTB-V2/B is at Fucino in Italy.  
 
 
Launch  
 
Preparations for the launch of both satellites have been initiated. Soyuz vehicles will launch both spacecraft from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. An inspection of the launch facilities was completed in April. The launch of the first Galileo test satellite is currently scheduled for December this year.  
 
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« Responder #13 em: Agosto 02, 2005, 01:06:04 pm »
Galileo Satellite Arrives at ESA-ESTEC for Testing
 
 
(Source: European Space Agency; issued August 2, 2005)
 
 
 One of the two Galileo satellites currently under development, GSTB-V2/A, has arrived at ESA’s European Space Research and Technology Centre to undergo testing.  
 
Two satellites are being developed for the Galileo System Test Bed – Version 2, which will make up the first phase of in the 'in-orbit validation' of the Galileo system.  
 
The primary mission of the first Galileo satellites is to secure the Galileo frequency filings, validate new technologies for operational use, characterise the radiation environment of the medium earth orbits that the operational satellites will occupy and enable experimentation with live Galileo signals.  
 
Galileo is a global navigation satellite infrastructure under civil control. It is a joint initiative of the European Commission and ESA.  
 
 
The satellite  
 
The GSTB-V2/A spacecraft is being developed by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL), based in The United Kingdom. It is a 3-axis stabilized satellite with a body measuring 1.3 m × 1.8 m × 1.65 m and it has a lift-off mass of about 600 kg. Seven hundred Watts of electrical power will be provided by two sun-tracking solar arrays each 1.74 m long when deployed.  
 
The satellite will carry a payload that will transmit a Galileo experimental signal. Main elements of the payload are:  
 
--An antenna, comprising a phased array of individual L-band elements, illuminating all the visible Earth below the satellite  
 
--Two signal generation units, one able to generate a simple Galileo signal, and the other able to generate more representative Galileo signals  
 
--Two Rubidium atomic clocks  
 
The expected satellite lifetime is two years.  
 
 
Test campaign  
 
ESA maintains a large centre for the testing of space vehicles and their subsystems at its European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC), located at Noordwijk in The Netherlands. The ESTEC Test Centre has the capability of simulating the conditions that spacecraft will experience during launch and once they are in space. ESA will conduct the GSTB-V2/A testing on behalf of the spacecraft manufacturer.  
 
The tests that GSTB-V2/A will undergo include:  
 
--Space environment simulation – the satellite will be placed in ESTEC’s Large Space Simulator (LSS), where its performance in the cold and vacuum of space can be assessed.  
 
--Solar array deployment – the solar arrays will be unfolded to confirm correct functioning of the deployment mechanisms and the systems that keep them stowed during launch.  
 
--Shock and vibration – the spacecraft will be subjected to vibration and mechanical shocks during launch and separation from the launcher. An electrodynamic shaker will simulate this environment to ensure that the satellite can withstand it.  
 
--Acoustic – at lift-off and during the early part of its journey into space, the satellite is exposed to intense noise. The Large European Acoustic Facility will simulate this environment to check that the spacecraft will not be damaged by the noise.  
 
--Electromagnetic compatibility – to ensure that the various spacecraft systems do not affect one another’s correct functioning through radio signals emitted intentionally or by electrical interference  
 
GSTB-V2/A has had the instrument sensors needed for the first sequence of tests installed and it has been placed in the LSS ready for the start of thermal vacuum and thermal balance testing.  
 
 
The future  
 
The other of the two Galileo satellites, GSTB-V2/B, made by the European consortium Galileo industries, is currently being assembled and tested at the premises of Alenia Spazio in Rome, prior to moving to ESTEC for final testing in the autumn.  
 
The first Galileo launch is scheduled for December this year. The satellite will be carried into space from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan by a Soyuz launcher.  
 
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« Responder #14 em: Agosto 09, 2005, 11:35:37 pm »
Indra Develops Emergency Services for Galileo System
 
 
(Source: Indra; issued Aug. 2, 2005)
 
 
 Indra has been awarded the contract to develop stations for receiving and processing emergency signals for search and rescue services by Galileo Joint Undertaking, the company created to develop the Galileo satellite system. The Spanish company defeated the competition in an international tender against two other bids for a project in excess of 4 million euros.  
 
Satellite search and rescue services enable an emergency signal to be located quickly, reliably and precisely to ensure efficient rescue operations. The future Galileo navigation system will dedicate part of its satellite capacity to this type of international services.  
 
The Galileo satellites will receive the alarm signal transmitted by an emergency beacon and transfer it to the reception/processing stations. These stations will process the signals and will generate precise and reliable information for the different national rescue centres and for the international control centre. Furthermore, in addition to the capacity dedicated in the satellites, the terrestrial systems will have to be developed to guarantee the highest levels of service.  
 
Indra is counting on an international consortium of four French companies, one British, one Czech and one Portuguese to develop this project. It will also collaborate with CNES (French Space Agency) and INTA (Spanish Institute for Aerospace Technology).  
 
The terrestrial stations will be compatible with the current GPS (American) and GLONASS (Russian) systems and can be used by rescue teams throughout the world thanks to the global coverage offered by these navigation systems.  
 
Indra’s work will mean a significant improvement in the service level offered by search and rescue services today, in particular the precision and response time needed to locate emergency beacons which in turn will expand the capacity of these services.  
 
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