Oficial: 12 Pods LITENING AT adquiridos

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Sintra

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Oficial: 12 Pods LITENING AT adquiridos
« em: Agosto 01, 2008, 03:33:43 pm »
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Northrop Grumman to Upgrade Portuguese Air Force F-16s With LITENING Advanced Targeting System
 
 
(Source: Northrop Grumman Corp.; issued July 31, 2008)
 
   
 
 ROLLING MEADOWS, Ill. --- The Portuguese Air Force today announced the selection of Northrop Grumman Corporation's third-generation LITENING Advanced Targeting (AT) system for their F-16 Advanced Targeting Pod upgrade program.

Under the terms of the contract, Northrop Grumman will deliver 12 targeting pods and spares to the Portuguese Air Force beginning this year, with final deliveries in 2009.
“This win is especially gratifying for the Northrop Grumman team as it further strengthens our presence in the international targeting pod marketplace,'' said Mike Lennon, vice president of Targeting and Surveillance programs for Northrop Grumman's Defensive Systems Division. “Portugal's Air Force is the fifth European air force and the latest addition to a growing number of NATO and allied nations to procure LITENING targeting pods. The selection of LITENING by the Portuguese Air Force further demonstrates a growing interest in LITENING's advanced technology, unique features and high reliability all at a very competitive price and delivery schedule.''

To date, over 550 LITENING targeting pods have been ordered by the United States Air Force and allied nations. More than 470 of the systems have been fielded, the largest number of any advanced targeting and sensor system. LITENING is combat proven on the AV-8B, A-10, B-52, F-15E, F-16 and F/A-18 aircraft. Together, all variants of the LITENING AT pod have amassed over 865,000 flight hours, with more than 410,000 of these hours posted in combat arenas. Moreover, LITENING is the pod of choice for the F-16 platform and has been integrated on F-16 Blocks 15, 25, 30/32, 40/42, and 50/52, amassing more than 420,000 cumulative flight hours.

With this contract award, the Portuguese Air Force joins the United States Air Force, United States Marine Corp, Royal Netherlands Air Force, Finnish Air Force, Royal Australian Air Force, Spanish Navy and Italian Navy expanding LITENING AT operational use by coalition forces.

Northrop Grumman's LITENING AT system is a self-contained, multi-sensor weapon aiming system that enables fighter pilots to detect, acquire, auto-track and identify targets for highly accurate delivery of both conventional and precision-guided weapons. LITENING AT features advanced image processing for target identification; coordinate generation for GPS weapons; a 640 x 512 pixel forward-looking infrared sensor for effective day and night operations; a new 1,024 x 1,024 pixel charge-coupled device (1k CCD) television sensor; a new dual waveband infrared laser designator and range finder; a laser spot tracker; an infrared laser marker; and an optional air-to-ground data link and digital video recorder.


Northrop Grumman Corporation is a global defense and technology company whose 120,000 employees provide innovative systems, products and solutions in information and services, electronics, aerospace and shipbuilding to government and commercial customers worldwide.

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http://www.defense-aerospace.com/cgi-bi ... le=release
 

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Jorge Pereira

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« Responder #1 em: Agosto 01, 2008, 03:52:12 pm »
Obrigado pela boa nova, caro Sintra. :wink:
Um dos primeiros erros do mundo moderno é presumir, profunda e tacitamente, que as coisas passadas se tornaram impossíveis.

Gilbert Chesterton, in 'O Que Há de Errado com o Mundo'






Cumprimentos
 

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nelson38899

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« Responder #2 em: Agosto 01, 2008, 03:59:58 pm »


"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
Agostinho da Silva
 

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AMRAAM

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« Responder #3 em: Agosto 01, 2008, 04:05:53 pm »
Muy buena noticia!! :D Sin lugar a dudas una muy buena compra.. :G-Ok:
"Con la sangre de un guerrero y el primer rayo de sol, hizo Dios una bandera, y se la dio al pueblo español"
 

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typhonman

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« Responder #4 em: Agosto 01, 2008, 05:15:52 pm »
Excelente escolha sem duvida  c34x
Artigo 308º

Traição à Pátria

Quem, por meio de violência, ameaça de violência, usurpação ou abuso de funções de soberania:

a) Tentar separar da Mãe-Pátria, ou entregar a país estrangeiro ou submeter à soberania estrangeira, todo o território português ou parte dele
 

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nelson38899

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Re: Oficial 12 Pod´s LITENING AT adquiridos
« Responder #5 em: Novembro 04, 2009, 06:32:46 pm »
ALQ-131(V)

ALQ-131(V) Block I.  This was the original version.  A major update overcame reliability and maintainability problems and adapted the pod to a changing threat requirement.
ALQ-131(V) Block II.  The Block II effort was de-veloped as a quick reaction program to integrate the lessons learned from the ALQ-131(V)’s growth process, several System Project Office studies, and the Airborne Self-Protection Jammer (ASPJ) program.  It consists primarily of a new receiver/processor.
Block II can generate many advanced jamming tech-niques and is fully power managed for efficiency.  It has a look-through feature, is more fully integrated with host aircraft systems, and provides three operational modes controlled from the cockpit.  Block II pods were used during Operation Desert Storm.
New receiver/processor units have been in production since 1985, with over 500 delivered for US and Foreign Military Sales customers.
ALQ-131(P).  The ALQ-131(V) components can be repackaged by Per Udsen Co of Denmark into an F-16 weapons pylon to make full capability possible with no reduction in weapons-carrying capability.
ALQ-131(V) Plus.  This is a standard ALQ-131(V) Block II pod with a MIL-STD-1553 Augmentation Board and a three-sensor AAR-54(V) installed for full lower hemisphere missile warning.  An off-the-shelf countermeasures dispenser and DIRCM can be added.  In addition, an ALE-50(V) fiber-optic towed decoy can be added to the rear of the pod, and can be upgraded to an infrared (IR) towed decoy.  It has been demonstrated on the F-16.
A standard pod can be field-modified for the ALE 50(V), and the towed decoy dispenser inter-changed between pods.  The configuration has under-gone live-fire tests and a flight demonstration.
ALQ-131(V) Receiver/Processor.  This is a self-con-tained module within the jamming pod that facilitates completely automatic computer-controlled jamming and enhances the pod’s performance in single- and multiple-radar threat environments.  It has been included in roughly 700 US and allied pods.
 
Program Review
 
Background.  Development of the ALQ-131(V) began in 1972 and it entered full-scale engineering develop-ment in 1976.  Flight testing and evaluation were completed quickly and an initial production contract was awarded in 1977.
Full USAF reliability demonstration tests of the Block II upgrade were completed in August 1986.  Fifteen Block II pods were delivered to the Air Force in July and three were delivered to the Royal Netherlands Air Force.  Delivery of the eighth production lot began in July, for a total of 129 Block II pods.
In August 1988, the Air Force advocated a “two-pod” strategy.  Under this acquisition plan, both the ALQ 184(V) and the ALQ-131(V) would be procured, with quantities based on an annual competition.  The Air Force argued that each system had advantages over the other, and sources believed that the competition would run over a five-year period and involve up to 1,000 pods.
In September 1989, the Air Force selected only the ALQ-184(V) to meet its annual requirement.  Exclusive ALQ-184(V) annual procurement continued through January 1993.
The Air Force deployed 260 Block II and 130 Block I ALQ-131(V)s to the Persian Gulf for Operation Desert Storm.  They were carried on 8,000+ sorties by a variety of tactical aircraft facing the Iraqi ground defenses in the Kuwait Theater of Operations.  Block I pods were carried by RF-4C and F-16 aircraft.  Block II pods were carried by F-15, RF-4C, F-4G, F-16, F-111, and A-10 aircraft.  The low attrition rate of Coalition air forces was directly attributed to the destruction of Iraq’s air defense infrastructure and the effective electronic warfare performance throughout the theater of operations.
A major reprogramming effort during the Desert Shield buildup enabled the pods to effectively counter the variety of threat systems used by Iraq.  Because of these intensive reprogramming efforts, the Block II receiver/processor achieved Initial Operating Capability (IOC) in October 1990 instead of January 1991, as planned.  Sources indicate that reliability and main-tainability during combat operations were good.
ALQ-131(V) pods remained operational in the theater of operations and were carried by USAF and RNLAF aircraft involved in Operation Southern Watch, Provide Comfort, and Deny Flight.
In 1993, the Air Force upgraded 60 fielded Block II pods with low-band modules removed from retired Block I systems.  Many of the new pods were ear-marked for possible use in Bosnia.  Responding to changing threat analysis, the Air Force extended the low-frequency capabilities of Block II pods.  Reports indicate that fewer than 100 Block II pods were acquired with modules to cover all three frequency bands (450 Block I pods carried all three canisters).
By 1994, a conversion kit was developed that could upgrade an existing Block I pod into Block II con-figuration, producing a pod identical to a production Block II.  The conversion retained common Block I/II components, replacing the others.  
In 1994, the Royal Netherlands Air Force awarded a US$17 million, three-year contract to update all of its Block I pods to Block II standard as part of the F-16 Mid-Life Upgrade program.  The first conversion system was delivered in December 1994.  Production deliveries began in 1995.
Also in 1994, a US$22 million contract to build and integrate 54 Receiver/Processor units for RNLAF Block II ALQ-131(V) pods was awarded.  Deliveries were completed by June 1996.
In mid-1994, the Special Operations Command evaluated both ALQ-131(V) and ALQ-184(V) pods for use on its AC-130 gunships.  The ALQ-131(V) Block II pod, with the new receiver/processor, was selected after test flights.  The pods were to be used by the gunships until ALQ-172(V) internal jammers could be installed.
RNLAF C-130s were modified to carry ALQ-131(V) Block II pods for use during humanitarian relief and troop transport missions.  The experiences of air forces engaged in the Bosnian air lift generated further interest in C-130 protection.  For example, the Belgian Air Force expressed interest in procuring ALQ-131(V)s for use on its F-16 and C-130 aircraft.  Pods would come from USAF Block I stock and be updated to Block II standard later.  In early 1995, the Belgian Air Force was trying to acquire 25 ALQ-131(V) pods from US Air Force stock to operate in conjunction with the Carapace radar warning and jamming system on Belgium’s F-16s.  Belgian F-16s had flown without ECM for 14 years.  The pods and Carapace would work in conjunction with the ALE-40(V) countermeasures dispensers already carried by the aircraft.  Demonstra¬tions proved that the ALQ-131(V)s would not interfere with Carapace.
A January 1996 notice in the Commerce Business Daily disclosed that the Air Force was soliciting engineering services and engineering materials needed to integrate and test the GEC-Marconi Fiber-Optic Decoy sub-system with the ALQ-131(V) Block II ECM pod.
In February 1998, the Belgian pod upgrade effort was completed and all 25 pods achieved IOC.  In April 1998, the US Department of Defense published a notice that the government of Norway was interested in contracting to upgrade 16 ALQ-131 Block I pods to Block II configuration with receiver/processor and low-band capability, along with modification kits, spare and repair parts, support and test equipment, and the required training.  Estimated cost would be US$47 million.  
In September 1998, the Pentagon issued an announce-ment of the possible sale of Block II upgrades for the 40 pods being used by the Israeli government.  The estimated US$76 million effort would include up¬grades, spares, support, technical data, and training.  Also in September 1998, the DoD announced that the government of Egypt planned to upgrade 40 ALQ 131(V) pods from Block I to Block II configura-tion.  That project was valued at US$76 million.
In April 1999, Mitsubishi Electric Corp awarded Northrop Grumman a US$19.6 million contract to supply ALQ-131(V) components for assembly and license production.  This was a follow-up to annual procurements of ALQ-131(V) components since licensing in 1991.  Deliveries began in April 2000.
A June 1999 announcement noted that the Royal Norwegian Air Force had awarded a contract worth US$15.8 million for 16 ALQ-131(V) Block II upgrades.  Norwegian pods would be upgraded at the Northrop Grumman Regional Support Center in Robins, Georgia.
Also in June 1999, New Zealand agreed to buy the 28 F-16A/B Block 15 aircraft originally bought by Pakistan but never delivered owing to concerns about the Pakistani nuclear weapons program.  The Air Force said that reports that the package would include 12 ALQ-131(V) pods were false.
In January 2000, Egypt awarded Northrop Grumman a US$39 million contract for 39 Block II conversion kits for the Egyptian Air Force.  The pods are to be used on the EAF’s F-4, F-16, and C-130 aircraft.
In April 2001, the Bahrain Amiri Air Force announced that it would upgrade Block I pods to the Block II standard by procuring Receiver/Processors as part of a US Navy contract for 12 R/P units.  The other six would be used to upgrade Block I pods in the US inventory for sale to Bahrain.  The pods would be used on its F-16s as part of a larger upgrade and modernization of its air force.

Bahrain.  Procured 6 pods for F-16s.  Upgrading to Block II and procuring six more Block II pods
Egypt.  Procured 82 Block II pods for its F-16s.  Upgrading Block Is to Block IIs
Israel.  Procured 20 pods for F-15 and F-16 use
Japan.  Procured 60 pods for its F-4J and F-4E aircraft
Netherlands.  Procured 105 pods for its F-16 fleet
Norway.  Procured pods for its F-16 aircraft.  Upgrading 16 Block Is to Block IIs
Pakistan.  Procured 40 pods for tactical aircraft
Portugal.  Procured 8 pods for A-7 aircraft
Singapore.  Procured pods for tactical aircraft
Taiwan.  Procured pods for F-16 aircraft
United States.  Carries 1,018 pods on a variety of tactical aircraft
"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
Agostinho da Silva
 

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jonhfx

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Re: Oficial: 12 Pods LITENING AT adquiridos
« Responder #6 em: Novembro 06, 2009, 09:47:39 am »
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Portugal. Procured 8 pods for A-7 aircraf

Este Pod Não tem nada a ver com o "AN/AAQ-28(V) LITENING targeting pod " comprados para os F-16
 

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nelson38899

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Re: Oficial: 12 Pods LITENING AT adquiridos
« Responder #7 em: Novembro 06, 2009, 09:50:14 am »
Eu sei que não! apenas é um dos pod que a fap usa.
"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
Agostinho da Silva
 

 

Targeting Pods para os F-16

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