ARMADA AUSTRALIANA

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Menacho

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #90 em: Março 12, 2017, 12:39:52 pm »
Espectacular imagen a gran resolución:

 
Os seguintes utilizadores agradeceram esta mensagem: Cabeça de Martelo

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #91 em: Abril 13, 2017, 04:12:52 pm »
Australia could benefit from shorter warship service life, study suggests



Photo: ASC Shipyard

Reducing the service life of major Royal Australian Navy ships from 30 to 20 years could prove beneficial both for the navy and the Australian shipbuilding industry, a study carried out by the Australian Strategic Policy Institute (ASPI) suggests.

The study was done in light of current Australian Navy shipbuilding plans with the acquisition of Future Frigates and submarines ahead.

Authors of the study suggested that shortening the service life from 30 to 20 years could be more in line with the Australian government’s goals of establishing a continuous shipbuilding enterprise.

According to the study, the costs of operating warships during both a 20-year and a 30-year time span were similar for the navy’s current destroyers, frigates and submarines. So rather than focusing on cost savings, the study suggests that a 20-year service life could provide more options when it comes to the upkeep of ships’ capabilities and having a shipbuilding industry ready to accelerate warship construction should need arise.

The study noted that the current Australian start-stop approach to ship acquisition with a 30-year service made the planing of upgrades more complicated than it would have likely been under a continuous design and construction program.

The study used the U.S. Navy destroyer program to illustrate the options a continuous shipbuilding program could provide noting how the U.S. destroyers have demonstrated they could retain operational capabilities for what will likely be a 60-year time frame if the Flight III destroyers are built.

“The conclusion that can be drawn is that a continuous design and construction approach enables flexible replacement and upgrade options that might otherwise be unavailable. Either an upgrade or a replacement approach —or both—can be chosen, depending on the considerations of the day, whether they be strategic, fiscal or otherwise,” the study said.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/04/13/australia-could-benefit-from-shorter-warship-service-life-study-suggests/

Com um pouco de sorte aqui estão as futuras fragatas que vão substituir as nossas VdG !!!!

Abraços
« Última modificação: Abril 13, 2017, 04:21:54 pm por tenente »
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #92 em: Abril 15, 2017, 10:12:16 am »
« Última modificação: Abril 15, 2017, 10:16:10 am por tenente »
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #93 em: Abril 26, 2017, 08:23:21 am »
Australia kicks off replacement Pacific Patrol Boat construction


Austal Pacific Patrol Boat replacement design. Photo: Austal

Australia started the construction phase of the replacement Pacific Patrol Boat program with a steel cutting ceremony in Western Australia on April 26.

Up to 21 steel-hulled vessels are set to replace the existing fleet of Pacific Patrol Boats as part of Australia’s new Pacific Maritime Security Program.

Austal is in charge of designing and constructing the first 19 vessels in Henderson, Western Australia.

Minister for Defence Industry, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, attended the steel cutting ceremony at HD Plasma and Laser Cutting Services in Bibra Lake.

“HD Plasma and Laser Cutting Services has been contracted by Austal for the supply, transport, storage and cutting of Australian manufactured steel plate,” Minister Pyne said.

“This is a fantastic example of what we are trying to achieve and highlights the benefits of building ships in Australia because the supply chain wins work and jobs are created.”

Once constructed and tested the vessels will be handed to the Australian Government and subsequently given to 12 Pacific Island countries as part of Australia’s new Pacific Maritime Security Program.

The first vessel is scheduled for delivery in late 2018.

Two vessels have also been offered to a new member of the program, Timor-Leste, with an option for these additional vessels to be constructed by Austal at an agreed fixed price should Timor-Leste accept the offer.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/04/26/australia-kicks-off-replacement-pacific-patrol-boat-construction/

Ora bem se me permitem

1º Navio entregue em finais de 2018 quando o 1º corte do aço foi efectuado hoje 26 de Abril, ano e meio para um Navio estar operacional, exactamente como por cá, o tal país que nem consegue atempadamente construir patrulhas Costeiros e nem dinheiro tem para os Armar/Equipar devidamente !!!!!!!
Haja dinheiro para os amigos que estão nos nossos Bancos, pois o pilim que lá está sai dos nossos bolsos e do nosso trabalho, e  para as festas que os nossos Políticozecos vão fazendo para comemorar a DEMOCRACIA DELES !!
São estes pequenos pormenores que fazem as grandes diferenças, mas nós é que somos os RICOS...........sem mais comentários.

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« Última modificação: Abril 26, 2017, 08:36:16 am por tenente »
 

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mafets

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #94 em: Maio 23, 2017, 09:24:51 am »
Continuam os problemas... :o
Citar
The Royal Australian Navy has conceded there might be design faults with its two largest ships which have been docked in Sydney since March undergoing urgent repair work.

Engineers are still trying to identify what is causing problems with the "azimuth" propulsion system on board the $1.5 billion Landing Helicopter Docks (LHDs) HMAS Canberra and HMAS Adelaide.

"It may well be a design issue," conceded Rear Admiral Adam Grunsell, the head of maritime systems in Defence's Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group.This week, HMAS Adelaide was placed into dry dock at the Garden Island naval base so the ship's propulsion pods could be removed for a thorough examination.

The diesel-electric powered propellers which sit at the stern of the LHDs are known as "azi-pods" and are mounted on steerable pods that have a 360-degree rotation.

Preliminary samples taken from the propulsion pods on board HMAS Adelaide have identified metal fragments in lubricants, while faulty engine seals on HMAS Canberra are believed to be responsible for the "migration", or leaking, of various oil types into different engine areas.

Asked whether the problems could be due to a design fault or because the ships have been operating at sea for too many days, Chief of Navy Vice Admiral Tim Barrett said it was too early to say.

"I would not speculate on any of those outcomes, but clearly in a root cause analysis you have to consider all of those options," he said.



http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-19/navy-cant-rule-out-design-faults-as-cause-of-ships-problems/8542382


Cumprimentos
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

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HSMW

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #95 em: Maio 24, 2017, 08:10:44 pm »
http://www.youtube.com/profile_videos?user=HSMW

"Tudo pela Nação, nada contra a Nação."
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #96 em: Novembro 20, 2017, 08:45:23 am »
Australia’s second air warfare destroyer ‘Brisbane’ starts sea trials


AWD Alliance photo of future HMAS Brisbane

Royal Australian Navy’s future air warfare destroyer (AWD) Brisbane has started her first phase of sea trials, the alliance in charge of delivering the destroyers announced on Monday.

The second of three destroyers to be built will spend the coming weeks on sea trials, marking further progress towards her delivery to the Royal Australian Navy next year.

This first phase of sea trials will test the ship’s propulsion, manoeuvring, control and navigation systems and will be followed by a more advanced phase of sea trials next year to test Brisbane’s combat and communications systems.

“Our workforce of more than 1,700 in Adelaide has improved and evolved the production and set to work of these ships, with our whole team working hard to achieve this milestone ahead of post-reform schedule targets,” said Paul Evans, AWD Alliance General Manager.

The AWD enterprise partners include the Australian defense department, Raytheon Australia as the combat systems integrator, ASC as the shipbuilder and Navantia as the shipbuilder manager.

Raytheon Australia managing director Michael Ward commended the team on today’s achievement. “As the combat systems integrator for the AWD program, Raytheon Australia has applied its highly skilled Australian workforce of 350 architects, systems engineers and project managers to the AWD program over the last decade,” he said.

Mid-next year, Brisbane will be delivered to the Royal Australian Navy to join her sister ship, HMAS Hobart, and will be followed in quick succession by the delivery of the third and final Air Warfare Destroyer, Sydney, in 2019.

australias-second-air-warfare-destroyer-brisbane-starts-sea-trials


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« Última modificação: Novembro 20, 2017, 08:50:21 am por tenente »
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #97 em: Novembro 24, 2017, 10:41:10 am »
Australia picks Lürssen for AU$4b offshore patrol vessel project


Lürssen photo of the OPV80 design

The fleet of 12 new Royal Australian Navy offshore patrol vessels will be built by German ship designer Lürssen as prime contractor, the Australian government announced on November 24.

The government further stressed that OPV project, which is worth up to AU$4 billion, will be delivered by “Australian workers, in Australian shipyards using Australian steel”.

The design for the 12 new vessels will be based on Lürssen’s OPV80 design adapted to Australian requirements.

Somewhat bigger than the four OPVs Lürssen built for the Royal Brunei Navy, Australian OPVs will be 80 meters in length with a displacement of 1700 tonnes and a draught of 4 meters.
The vessels will be fitted with a 40mm gun for self-protection, three 8.4m sea boats, and command and communication systems. This will allow the OPVs to operate alongside Australian Border Force vessels and other Australian Defence Force units.
The vessels will accommodate up to 60 personnel, including a crew of around 40 Navy personnel and have the ability to accept modular mission packs such as unmanned aerial systems.

First two ships will be built by ASC Shipbuilding in Adelaide and the project will then transfer to the Henderson Maritime Precinct in WA where Lürssen will use the capabilities of Austal and Civmec to build ten OPVs, subject to the conclusion of commercial negotiations.

The first of the 12 OPVs will start production in the fourth quarter of 2018 and is expected to enter service in 2021 starting the replacement of the current Armidale-class patrol boats.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/11/24/australia-picks-lurssen-for-au4b-offshore-patrol-vessel-project/

PS : Ou seja 12 NPO's por 2.457 milhões de Euros, 204 milhões p/ Navio !!!  :conf:
teria sido EXCELENTE se tivesse sido possível aos West Sea, concorrer com uma versão da classe Viana do castelo, digamos por 50 milhões a unidade ???
:G-deal:



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darussalam-class_offshore_patrol_vessel





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« Última modificação: Novembro 24, 2017, 11:13:30 am por tenente »
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #98 em: Dezembro 01, 2017, 09:14:17 am »
Australian Navy retires S-70B-2, AS350BA helicopters from active service


Royal Australian Navy photo of AS350BA Squirrel helicopters performing their signature Pairs Aerobatic Display in 2015

The Royal Australian Navy has formally retired its S-70B-2 Bravo Seahawk and AS350BA Squirrel helicopters in a ceremony at naval air station HMAS Albatross on December 1.
The Seahawk has been in the Fleet Air Arm inventory for 29 years and was operationally deployed in the Middle East throughout its entire service history.
The Squirrel has served for 33 years amassing an enviable record in both operations and training.
Commander Fleet Air Arm, Commodore Chris Smallhorn said both aircraft had a proud record of service to the nation.



“Today we farewelled two magnificent aircraft with pride in our heart and tears in our eyes,” he said. “During the 1990-91 Gulf War the Squirrel carried out shipping surveillance, mine searches and top cover for helicopter boarding operations.

“It was also deployed in East Timor and on numerous disaster relief operations, including the 2001 ‘Black Christmas Bushfire’ crisis and the 2011 South East Queensland and Victoria floods.
“Over the last three decades the majority of naval aviators have trained in the Squirrel and many, including myself, have wonderfully fond memories of their time flying the ‘Cyril’ as many affectionately referred to the AS350.
“A machine that has served its country in peace and war and across three services, it’s a truly impressive chapter in Navy’s story,” Commodore Smallhorn said.

The S-70B-2 Bravo Seahawk was designed specifically for navy’s needs when it was introduced in 1989. Labelled a Role Adaptable Weapons System due to the flexibility it brought to the fleet, the S-70B-2 performed anti-submarine and surface operations in addition to secondary utility type missions.
The Bravo Seahawk has also fought fires, flood and extreme weather events along with conducting many challenging rescue operations at sea, one of the most famous and difficult being during the ill-fated the 1998 Sydney to Hobart yacht race.
The retirement of the two aircraft was done as part of Ceremonial Divisions at HMAS Albatross and Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, took the opportunity to congratulate Albatross on the fine turn out.

“The work done here at Albatross is not always easy and it is very important for the nation,” he said.
“Whether you are a logistician, a maintainer or an operator; whether you are part of a project, a training organisation, or an enabling service your role is important in ensuring that the squadrons, commands, services and groups can achieve the operational outputs required of us by government and ultimately the Australian people. Thank you.”

https://navaltoday.com/2017/12/01/australian-navy-retires-s-70b-2-as350ba-helicopters-from-active-service/

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« Última modificação: Dezembro 01, 2017, 09:22:07 am por tenente »
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #99 em: Dezembro 05, 2017, 10:17:38 am »
Australian base HMAS Cairns set for AU$300m upgrade in preparation for new OPVs


HMAS Cairns Naval Base. Photo: Royal Australian Navy

Royal Australian Navy base HMAS Cairns will be undergoing a $300 million upgrade to accommodate new offshore patrol vessels to be built under German shipbuilder Lurssen as prime contractor.

HMAS Cairns will be home to four of the new vessels.

The upgrades were announced by member of the House of Representatives, Warren Entsch MP, Member for Leichardt, who noted that the government approval for investment represented an additional $200 million for works on the upgrade.

“This comes on top of the $22 million which has already been planned for a mid-term refresh in 2019-20, and another $313 million for the redevelopment of HMAS Cairns post 2025-26,” Entsch said.

“That takes the overall committed spend for HMAS CAIRNS to $635 million over the next 12 years, which is $215 million more than the $420 million which was first committed in the in the white paper.”

The 12 new offshore patrol vessel, to be delivered by Lurssen under a project worth up to AU$4 billion, will start construction in the fourth quarter of 2018 and are expected to start entering service in 2021.

Based on Lurssen’s OPV80 design adapted to Australian requirements, the vessels will be 80 meters in length with a displacement of 1700 tonnes and a draught of 4 meters.

The vessels will be fitted with a 40mm gun for self-protection, three 8.4m sea boats, and command and communication systems. This will allow the OPVs to operate alongside Australian Border Force vessels and other Australian Defence Force units.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/12/05/australian-base-hmas-cairns-set-for-au300m-upgrade-in-preparation-for-new-opvs/

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« Última modificação: Dezembro 05, 2017, 10:24:35 am por tenente »
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #100 em: Dezembro 11, 2017, 08:26:27 am »
Australian Navy frigate HMAS Darwin retires after 33 years of service


HMAS Darwin's ceremonial guard, march from the ship during the decommissioning ceremony at Fleet Base East in Sydney. Photo: Royal Australian Navy

Royal Australian Navy frigate HMAS Darwin concluded her 33 years of service and was decommissioned in a ceremony at her homeport of Garden Island, Sydney.
In a ceremony on December 9, Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Tim Barrett, paid tribute to the service of the ship’s company past and present.

“Darwin has laid down a proud history over her 33 years,” Vice Admiral Barrett said.
“The ship and her successive companies have served Australia with distinction, being awarded battle honours three times for successful maritime security operations.
“It is through the hard work and dedication of the crews who have called Darwin home that made this frigate so effective over such a long career.”

Since commissioning in 1984, the Adelaide-class frigate has steamed over a million nautical miles, visited more than 50 countries, and undertaken operations in the Middle East, East Timor, and the Solomon Islands.
HMAS Darwin and her sister ships Melbourne and Newcastle are being replaced by the Hobart-class guided missile destroyers, first of which entered service in September this year.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/12/11/australian-navy-frigate-hmas-darwin-retires-after-33-years-of-service/

Abraços

PS : as nossas VdG já vão com 26 anos !


« Última modificação: Dezembro 11, 2017, 08:30:33 am por tenente »
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #101 em: Dezembro 11, 2017, 01:09:14 pm »
Australia bolsters naval shipbuilding workforce retention strategy


Australian defense industry minister Christopher Pyne visited the Osborne shipyard in Adelaide to announce new positions. Photo: Twitter

In a bid to keep as many skilled naval shipbuilders within the industry, the Australian defense industry minister announced that shipbuilders currently working on the air warfare destroyer project would transition to support Collins-class submarine sustainment work as the destroyer project winds down.

To enable this, up to 200 new positions will be created within ASC Submarines in Adelaide.

In addition to Collins-class sustainment work, workers will undertake training and upskilling to support naval construction programs.

Defense industry minister Christopher Pyne said as many as 100 scholarships would be offered to workers to support opportunities to upskill in roles in operations management, computer-aided design, and engineering and supply chain fields.

“Over the next 10 years, the size and skill level of the naval shipbuilding workforce will need to increase significantly to meet the demands of the various shipbuilding programs,” minister Pyne said.

“To meet these challenges we need to keep as many of the workers currently building the air warfare destroyers in the naval shipbuilding industry as possible.”

“This initiative is on top of the offshore patrol vessel decision made recently, creating up to 400 direct jobs and 600 indirect jobs, and the announcement that Australian naval infrastructure will create 600 additional jobs to redevelop the Osborne South shipyard.

“We are stabilising the shipbuilding workforce. With the future frigates decision to be made early next year and further workforce decisions made as required, things are truly on the up at Osborne,” Pyne added.

Australian federal minister for finance Mathias Cormann said the workforce package would ensure the retention of critical workforce skills in anticipation of future shipbuilding programs.

“With ASC’s performance on the air warfare destroyers continually improving, we now have a highly skilled naval shipbuilding workforce in South Australia.”

https://navaltoday.com/2017/12/11/australia-bolsters-naval-shipbuilding-workforce-retention-strategy/

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« Última modificação: Dezembro 11, 2017, 01:11:44 pm por tenente »
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #102 em: Dezembro 13, 2017, 06:37:22 am »
Drastic turnaround in Future Frigates Program


HMAS Perth, one of the Anzac class frigates to be replaced under the SEA 5000 program. Image via Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Defence.
Maritime and Undersea Warfare | 12 December 2017 | Amelia McMahon

On the back of the surprising SEA1180 Offshore Patrol Vessel decision, Defence may backflip on its decision to not mandate the use of ASC Shipbuilding or existing shipbuilding workforces on the Future Frigates Program.
ASC Shipbuilding CEO Mark Lamarre spoke with Defence Connect about the $35 billion SEA5000 project and said the organisation’s initial fears of missing out on a role in the project have dissipated.
Lamarre said the government’s decision to have ASC build the first two of 12 OPVs in South Australia, with the remaining 10 to be built by Austal and Civmec in Western Australia, has seen a change in dialogue with the three companies bidding for the SEA5000 project – BAE Systems, Fincantieri and Navantia.

“We were concerned when the [SEA5000] request for tender became public, with some of what we read there and since that time there's been a bit of change with the dialogue that we've had with the Future Frigate designers,” explained Lamarre.
“But since the award of the OPV project the announcement that ASC shipbuilding would be building those ships, all three designers are back to the table, everybody is very enthusiastic, and we're actively working through models to collaborate for the future.”
“My optimism is very high now in that we will have a prominent role.”

ASC’s contribution to the Future Frigates Program has been far from assured, with Labor senator Kim Carr and Nick Xenophon's team of senators furiously lobbying the government for several months to go against the request for tender, which had no requirement for the use of an Australian shipbuilder.

"In particular, the Commonwealth is not mandating that the successful tenderer uses the workforce of ASC Shipbuilding Pty Ltd currently working on the AWD Program," the request for tender (RFT) reads.

At a Senate hearing into the future of Australia’s shipbuilding industry earlier this year, Lamarre and Austal chief executive David Singleton said the release of the SEA5000 RFT resulted in an abrupt change in both of the company's engagement with all three international contenders.

"Prior to the release of the RFT we, Austal, were heavily involved with all three of the foreign design companies to provide an Australian shipbuilding solution to their offer to the government," Singleton told the hearing.
"When the RFT came out that was really the end of that engagement between us and those companies."

Lamarre echoed these sentiments, adding, "I would say there was a change [in dialogue] after the issue of the RFT, absolutely."

Defence Industry Minister Christopher Pyne also floated the possibility of ASC building the Future Frigates while at the shipyard to unveil a new jobs and scholarships package.

"They [the frigates] will be built by either Fincantieri, BAE or Navantia, they will be the prime in the project and they will use whatever subcontractors that they wish to use, whether it's Austal, or Civmec or ASC and the workforces involved in those businesses, or indeed any new players.

"The idea that there will be anybody other than ASC, Austal or Civmec being used is quite frankly mad."

Officials from the Department of Defence, including Minister Pyne, Deputy Secretary Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group Kim Gillis and Associate Secretary to the Department of Defence Brendan Sargeant, have previously said any changes to the SEA5000 Future Frigate project at this stage of the tender evaluation process would cause delays to the project by up to two years.

Senator Rex Patrick of the Nick Xenophon Team shot down these suggestions, saying the decision to include ASC, Austal and Civmec in the SEA1180 project "puts a lie to the federal government's claims".

"The final shipbuilding configuration announced... which is different, proves the government can change tack even very late in the piece to give Australian shipbuilders a prime role," said Patrick.
"There is now no excuse for the government to maintain its stubborn course to not allow Austal and ASC to play leading roles with the Future Frigate build.
"If the government doesn't stand up for Australian shipbuilding and create a sovereign capability, it will undermine national security and compromise export markets and, in the process, cost thousands of local jobs and billions of dollars in economic activity."

The nine vessels, to be designed by either BAE Systems, Fincantieri or Navantia, are scheduled to begin construction in Adelaide in 2020. A decision on the successful tenderer is expected by April next year.

The nine new anti-submarine warfare frigates will replace Australia's Anzac frigate fleet.

https://www.defenceconnect.com.au/maritime-antisub/1655-drastic-turnaround-in-future-frigates-program

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« Última modificação: Dezembro 13, 2017, 07:04:12 am por tenente »
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #103 em: Janeiro 31, 2018, 04:45:04 pm »
Australia signs offshore patrol vessel construction contract with Lürssen


Lürssen photo of its OPV80 design

The Australian government on January 31 announced it signed the patrol vessel construction contract with German shipbuilder Lürssen.

Australian defense industry minster Christopher Pyne said the contract with Lürssen to lead the design and build is worth at least $3 billion for 12 OPVs.

“The vessels will be delivered by Australian workers, in Australian shipyards using Australian steel,” Pyne said. “The project will create around 1000 jobs – 400 direct and a further 600 in the supply chain.”
The OPV project will also help preserve and enhance shipbuilding skills required for the Future Frigates.
The first two OPVs will be built at the Osborne Naval Shipyard in South Australia starting this year and 10 will be constructed at the Henderson Maritime Precinct in Western Australia from 2020.
Lürssen will sub contract ASC to build the first two ships in SA and are in negotiations with Austal and Civmec to build the 10 ships in WA.
Civmec will provide the steel from Australian suppliers for all 12 OPVs.
The new Australian OPVs will be 80 meters in length with a displacement of 1700 tonnes and a draught of 4 meters.
The vessels will be fitted with a 40mm gun for self-protection, three 8.4m sea boats, and command and communication systems. This will allow the OPVs to operate alongside Australian Border Force vessels and other Australian Defence Force units
.
The vessels will accommodate up to 60 personnel, including a crew of around 40 navy personnel and have the ability to accept modular mission packs such as unmanned aerial systems.


https://navaltoday.com/2018/01/31/australia-signs-offshore-patrol-vessel-construction-contract-with-lurssen/

O que eles não poupavam, se tivesse sido possivel oferecer a concurso e sido escolhido, o modelo NPO2000, Tuga !!!!!

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« Última modificação: Janeiro 31, 2018, 04:46:51 pm por tenente »
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #104 em: Fevereiro 20, 2018, 02:40:03 pm »
Royal Australian Navy - HMAS Hobart (DDG 39) Guided Missile Destroyer Sea Trials


« Última modificação: Fevereiro 20, 2018, 06:01:12 pm por Lusitano89 »
 

 

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Armada Russa - Typhoon Upgraded sea trials

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Respostas: 1
Visualizações: 1929
Última mensagem Junho 24, 2004, 04:56:56 pm
por JLRC