ARMADA AUSTRALIANA

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #150 em: Julho 07, 2020, 02:46:51 am »
Mais uns que se vão desfazer dos NH90 mas, pelo menos, vão ficar em casa. Parece que, por estes lados, transferir equipamento entre Ramos é um problema de fácil resolução.

Navy to get new utility helicopter

https://adbr.com.au/navy-to-get-new-utility-helicopter/

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The Royal Australian Navy’s 808SQN based at HMAS Albatross near Nowra will soon replace its Airbus MRH 90 helicopters with a new utility helicopter.

As forecast in the Government’s 2020 Force Structure Plan and accompanying Defence Strategic Update released on July 1, the new utility helicopter will be acquired in the 2025 timeframe, although this may need to be brought forward in order to maximise commonality with existing capabilities.

The Force Structure Plan offers little detail, saying only that the RAN will, ‘Expand and rationalise the support and logistics helicopter fleet consistent with the expectations for larger naval operations.’ An accompanying timeline chart shows a project for a ‘Logistics Helicopter’ running from 2025 to 2031, and is valued at $1bn to $1.5bn.

ADBR understands the new capability will replace the small fleet of six MRH 90s taken on by Navy to replace its Westland Sea King Mk50/A in 2011 under Project AIR 9000 Phase 6. Industry sources claim the small fleet of MRH 90 helicopters – despite being identical to the 41 machines operated by the Australian Army – is difficult to sustain, especially when embarked at sea, and that these machines will be absorbed by Army.

After suffering multiple delays with its own AIR 9000 Phases 2/4 project milestones since the MRH 90 was introduced in 2006, Army has had improved sustainment success with and availability of its MRH 90s in recent years due to having a greater mass of machines and a joint industry and uniformed maintenance team in Townsville, north Queensland.

But none of the 47 MRH 90s in Army and Navy service are marinised, so sustained operations as sea from the RAN’s Canberra class LHDs and other vessels require an inordinate amount of preventative maintenance and washing after each flight to mitigate corrosion.

Instead, sources tell ADBR that the RAN is instead considering a new helicopter type with greater commonality to its Sikorsky MH-60R ‘Romeo’ Seahawk combat helicopter, of which it has 24 in service. This really leaves just two possibilities – the MH-60S ‘Sierra’ Nighthawk, or additional MH-60Rs.

On paper, the MH-60S makes more sense from a utility point of view, as it has a larger cab based on the Black Hawk airframe with double doors on both sides of the cab, seating for up to 12 passengers, and more internal space for cargo. The MH-60S also shares its cockpit, engines, and dynamic components with the MH-60R, and crews can be dual-qualified.

The MH-60S can also perform combat search & rescue, mine-countermeasures, can employ Hellfire and APKWS air-to-surface missiles, and can conduct special forces combat support missions.

But with the US Navy having fulfilled its requirement for 275 aircraft and another eight aircraft for Thailand by 2016, the MH-60S is no longer in production, and it is unclear if production could be restarted on the existing line.

The missionised MH-60R has a much smaller cab than the Sierra, with space for just a couple of seats. The dipping sonar, sonar buoy tubes, and sensor operator station can be removed to increase cargo and seating area, but this is a time-consuming and difficult task to perform at sea. Despite carrying all of the above equipment, RAN Romeos currently conduct logistics operations when embarked using an external cargo hook.

And while the US Navy has fulfilled its requirement for 291 MH-60Rs and has completed orders for South Korea and Denmark, the aircraft remains in low-rate production for orders from India and Saudi Arabia.

With the RAN’s surface combatant fleet scheduled to grow over the next two decades as the Arafura class OPVs are introduced and the Hunter class frigates begin to enter service, it is likely more than 24 combat helicopters will be required to fulfill the RAN’s combat helicopter and associated training requirement.

For its fleet of 24 Romeos, the RAN bases its current rate of effort on eight 816SQN aircraft being embarked at sea at any one time, eight being used for training with 725SQN, and eight in maintenance or being prepared for deployment.

The Romeo and Sierra are built by Lockheed Martin subsidiary Sikorsky at Hartford in Connecticut, and are then flown to Owego in neighbouring New York state for the integration of their mission and combat systems.


Two 808SQN MRH 90s at HMAS Albatross, Nowra. (ADF)


While outwardly similar, this side-by-side comparison of a US Navy MH-60S (above) and RAN MH-60R (below) clearly shows the longer cab and double doors of the Sierra. (USN & ADF)
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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #151 em: Julho 24, 2020, 06:50:27 am »
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #152 em: Agosto 08, 2020, 10:10:35 am »
Classe Hobart

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Reportedly Defence could not get these ships put under one of the Class Societies due to issues with longitudinal strength. This has also meant there is no TH118 which certifies structure and seaworthyness. Can they not be fitted with additional keel and sheerstrake doublers to address these, similar to the progressive increases in displacement of the FFGs? Light scantlings are reportedly also in the LHDs which require additional consideration for drydocking. Is this a Navantia-wide issue, and what about the new replenishment ships?
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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #153 em: Agosto 13, 2020, 04:38:57 pm »
Provas de mar do novo AOR construído pela Navantia para a marinha Australiana.


Cumprimentos,
:snip: :snip: :Tanque:
 
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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #154 em: Setembro 04, 2020, 10:26:19 am »
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #155 em: Setembro 12, 2020, 05:22:16 pm »
Keel laid for Australian Navy’s third Arafura-class OPV

The Australian government’s National Shipbuilding Program has reached another milestone with the keel laying for the first offshore patrol vessel (OPV) under construction in Western Australia or the third new Arafura-class OPV.


Arafura-class OPV design. Photo by Luerssen
“This milestone marks the start of the consolidation phase for the third Arafura class ship to be built in Australia, named Pilbara by the Chief of Navy,” Minister for Defence, Linda Reynolds, said.

“It demonstrates the success of this Government’s Naval Shipbuilding plan, with eight vessels already built and another 10 vessels currently under construction at Henderson and Osborne”

“Since construction commenced ahead of schedule in March, the Luerssen and Civmec teams in WA have continued to make significant progress on building the blocks that, when complete, will form a 1,600 tonne 80 metre long OPV.”

“I am very pleased that Luerssen and Civmec have been able to reach this milestone in such a timely manner, and I have no doubt that is due in part to the practices they put in place to deal with COVID-19,” Minister for Defence Industry Melissa Price, said.

The OPVs are based on the Lürssen PV80 design.

The first two vessels are under construction at the Osborne Naval Shipyard in South Australia and will be followed by ten ships to be built at the Henderson shipyard.

https://www.navaltoday.com/2020/09/11/keel-laid-for-australian-navys-third-arafura-class-opv/

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #156 em: Outubro 13, 2020, 11:03:24 am »
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 
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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #157 em: Outubro 21, 2020, 10:17:37 am »
21 OCTOBER 2020

Australia, UK sign frigate agreement


by Jon Grevatt

Australia and the United Kingdom have signed an agreement to collaborate on BAE Systems’ AUD35 billion (USD25 billion) programme to build nine Hunter-class frigates for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN).

The frigates, the first of which is scheduled to enter service in the late 2020s, are based on the Type 26-class frigate that BAE Systems is building for the UK Royal Navy.

The Australian Department of Defence (DoD) said that the new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), which was announced on 20 October, is positioned to support both countries and both projects. The MOU reinforces Australia and the UK’s “commitment to working together on delivering these important high-profile national programmes and maximising mutual opportunities”, it said.


BAE Systems is scheduled to start the prototyping phase of Australia’s Hunter-class frigate (an artist’s impression of which is pictured above) in late 2020. (Royal Australian Navy)

The DoD added that the agreement is focused on supporting exchanges of information and efforts to engage industry in both countries, including providing opportunities to access each other’s supply chains.

“A key aspect of the MOU is a pledge for information exchange to ensure shipbuilding best practice is shared and both frigate programmes deliver world-beating maritime capabilities to the Royal Navy and Royal Australian Navy,” said the DoD,

The DoD added that the agreement also sets out a framework to “enable both nations to utilise the Type 26 and Hunter programmes to create jobs and contribute to the growth of the UK and Australian economies”. A focus of the accord was supporting small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in both countries, it said.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/news-detail/australia-uk-sign-frigate-agreement
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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Re: ARMADA AUSTRALIANA
« Responder #158 em: Janeiro 09, 2021, 02:51:36 pm »
08 JANUARY 2021

Royal Australian Navy formally accepts new AOR vessel from shipbuilder Navantia
by Gabriel Dominguez

The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) has formally accepted the first of two Supply-class auxiliary oiler replenishment (AOR) ships on order for the service from Spanish shipbuilder Navantia.

The Department of Defence (DoD) in Canberra announced on 8 January that the 19,500-tonne vessel, which will be known as HMAS Supply (II) (with pennant number A195) once commissioned, is expected to sail into its homeport of Sydney in the coming days.


The future HMAS Supply during sea acceptance trials in 2020. The Australian DoD announced on 8 January that the RAN has formally accepted the AOR vessel from Spanish shipbuilder Navantia. (Navantia Australia via Twitter)

The vessel, which completed sea acceptance trials off the Spanish coast in August 2020 before arriving in Australia in October 2020 for final fit-out and testing activities, is one of two ships of the class ordered as part of an AUD642 million (USD500 million) contract signed in May 2016 under Australia’s Project Sea 1654 Phase 3 Maritime Operational Support Capability programme.

Second-of-class Stalwart (III) (with pennant number A304) was launched on 30 August 2019 and is expected to join the RAN later this year.

The 173.9 m-long vessels, which are based on the Spanish Navy’s Cantabria-class AORs, are to replace the AOR ship HMAS Success (II), which was decommissioned on 29 June 2019 after 33 years of service, and the supply ship HMAS Sirius .

“With Australia’s current replenishment capability reaching its end of life in 2021, NUSHIP Supply will be the first AOR to replace the retired HMAS Success and bridge [the] navy’s current capability gap,” Australian Defence Minister Linda Reynolds was quoted as saying.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/news-detail/royal-australian-navy-formally-accepts-new-aor-vessel-from-shipbuilder-navantia
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas