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Forças Armadas e Sistemas de Armas => Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas => Tópico iniciado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 04, 2010, 05:30:41 pm

Título: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 04, 2010, 05:30:41 pm
Este é uma possível tradução de um artigo muito interessante do New York Times.

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FORT JACKSON, S.C. — Dawn breaks at this, the Army’s largest training post, with the reliable sound of fresh recruits marching to their morning exercise. But these days, something looks different.

That familiar standby, the situp, is gone, or almost gone. Exercises that look like pilates or yoga routines are in. And the traditional bane of the new private, the long run, has been downgraded.

This is the Army’s new physical-training program, which has been rolled out this year at its five basic training posts that handle 145,000 recruits a year. Nearly a decade in the making, its official goal is to reduce injuries and better prepare soldiers for the rigors of combat in rough terrain like Afghanistan.

But as much as anything, the program was created to help address one of the most pressing issues facing the military today: overweight and unfit recruits.

“What we were finding was that the soldiers we’re getting in today’s Army are not in as good shape as they used to be,” said Lt. Gen. Mark Hertling, who oversees basic training for the Army. “This is not just an Army issue. This is a national issue.”

Excess weight is the leading reason the Army rejects potential recruits. And while that has been true for years, the problem has worsened as the waistlines of America’s youth have expanded. This year, a group of retired generals and admirals released a report titled “Too Fat to Fight.”

“Between 1995 and 2008, the proportion of potential recruits who failed their physicals each year because they were overweight rose nearly 70 percent,” the report concluded.

Though the Army screens out the seriously obese and completely unfit, it is still finding that many of the recruits who reach basic training have less strength and endurance than privates past. It is the legacy of junk food and video games, compounded by a reduction in gym classes in many high schools, Army officials assert.

As a result, it is harder for recruits to reach Army fitness standards, and more are getting injured along the way. General Hertling said that the percentage of male recruits who failed the most basic fitness test at one training center rose to more than one in five in 2006, up from just 4 percent in 2000. The percentages were higher for women.

Another study found that at one training center in 2002, 3 recruits suffered stress fractures of the pubic bone, but last year the number rose to 39. The reason, General Hertling said: not enough weight-bearing exercise and a diet heavy on sugared sodas and energy drinks but light in calcium and iron.

The new fitness regime tries to deal with all these problems by incorporating more stretching, more exercises for the abdomen and lower back, instead of the traditional situps, and more agility and balance training. It increases in difficulty more gradually. And it sets up a multiweek course of linked exercises, rather than offering discrete drills.

There are fewer situps, different kinds of push-ups and fewer long runs, which Army officials say are good for building strength and endurance but often lead to injuries. They also do not necessarily prepare soldiers for carrying heavy packs or sprinting short distances.

“We haven’t eliminated running,” General Hertling said. “But it’s trying to get away from that being the only thing we do.” (The new system does include plenty of sprinting.)

Some of the new routines would look familiar to a devotee of pilates, yoga or even the latest home workout regimens on DVD, with a variety of side twists, back bridges and rowinglike exercises. “It’s more whole body,” said First Lt. Tameeka Hayes, a platoon leader for a class of new privates at Fort Jackson. “No one who has done this routine says we’ve made it easier.”

The program was largely the brainchild of two former gym teachers who now run the Army Physical Fitness School based here. They are a military version of Click and Clack, finishing each other’s sentences and wisecracking with the alternating beat of gas-fired pistons.

One, Stephen Van Camp, is a former professional kick-boxer who unwittingly ran a marathon with a fractured ankle. “That’s not tough. That’s stupid,” he now says. The other, Frank Palkoska, is a former Army officer and West Point fitness instructor who adorns his office here with black-and-white photographs of 19th-century exercise classes and an assortment of retrograde equipment like medicine balls and wooden dumbbells.

“It’s back to the future,” Mr. Palkoska says before starting into a lament about the Xbox generation. “Technology is great, but it’s killing us.”

As he and Mr. Van Camp started developing what became a 434-page manual, they began by considering what combat soldiers do and came up with a checklist of things like throwing grenades and dodging gunfire.

The old style of physical training, he said, was less relevant to soldiers’ tasks, which entail lots of jumping, crouching and climbing. “What we did in the morning had nothing to do with what we did the rest of the day,” Mr. Palkoska said.

Under General Hertling, the new regimen will also include a makeover of the mess halls at its training bases. At Fort Jackson, there are more green leafy vegetables, less fried food, and milk instead of soda. The food line includes color-coded messages to encourage privates to eat low-fat entrees (marked in green). And there are other changes: no more assaulting tires with bayonets, but more time spent on rifle marksmanship and fighting with padded pugil sticks.

The trick now will be to push the program into the rest of the Army, where evidence suggests many soldiers are becoming overweight, particularly during or soon after deployments. The Army Training and Doctrine Command recently distributed the new fitness policy to the entire Army, officially replacing a physical fitness field manual that was first published in 1992.

While the training posts will have to follow the new program, since they are under General Hertling’s command, it is not mandatory for officers in the field. Every unit’s exercise routine is determined by its commander, and the current generation of officers has been indoctrinated under the old system.

The key, Mr. Palkoska says, will be to revamp the Army’s fitness test, which is taken twice a year. It measures a soldier’s ability to do situps, push-ups and a two-mile run. Since soldiers often train to the test, those are the exercises most of them do.

Mr. Palkoska and Mr. Van Camp hope the Army will revise that test by including new kinds of exercises and perhaps eliminating the situp.

“We know kids today are less fit,” Mr. Palkoska said. “We have to adjust.”

Soldier Held in Slaying

FORT McPHERSON, Ga. (AP) — Sgt. Rashad Valmont of the Army Reserve was fasting to meet strict military weight guidelines and nearly catatonic when he shot and killed a supervisor, the soldier’s lawyer said.

Details of the shooting were revealed for the first time Monday at a military hearing to determine if there was enough evidence to go to trial.

The lawyer, William Cassara, said that Sergeant Valmont, who faces a premeditated murder charge, was dehydrated, exhausted and delirious when he burst into Master Sgt. Pedro Mercado’s office in Fort Gillem in June. Mr. Cassara said Sergeant Valmont had spent weeks trying body wraps and sauna treatments and starving himself.

 :arrow: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/31/us/31 ... ss&emc=rss (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/31/us/31soldier.html?pagewanted=1&_r=2&partner=rss&emc=rss)

O que é que acham? Eu só tenhoa experiência da minha tropa e na ETAT era completas de manhã até à noite (especialmente pulos de galo). Será que é preferivel mudar o treino fisico? Se acham que o problema da obesidade e falta de forma fisica só afecta os EUA, é porque não sabem da realidade que graça na geração que está a ingressar neste momento nas Forças Armadas...
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Get_It em Setembro 04, 2010, 09:32:58 pm
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
O que é que acham? Eu só tenhoa experiência da minha tropa e na ETAT era completas de manhã até à noite (especialmente pulos de galo). Será que é preferivel mudar o treino fisico? Se acham que o problema da obesidade e falta de forma fisica só afecta os EUA, é porque não sabem da realidade que graça na geração que está a ingressar neste momento nas Forças Armadas...
Os canadianos, alemães, dinamarqueses e franceses também já se queixam há um bom tempo do pessoal novo que entra. De facto não é algo que apenas afecta os norte-americanos.

Já há uns bons anos que em Gaia (e no resto do país) começava-se a ver alguns casos nos novos recrutas. Mas nada que umas semanas e um bom exercício não resolvam.
À medida que as coisas mudam é claro que tem de se ir adaptando o treino físico, especialmente quando ainda hoje não sabemos totalmente como o corpo humano funciona. Agora, qual é preferível? Continuar com um regime que já tem uns bons trinta, cinco anos ou pegar em algo que só está a ser utilizado à uns 2 ou 5 anos? Claro que não devemos ter medo de experimentar mas se formos a ver aqui o principal problema não é o treino físico (e já estou a falar em geral e não apenas no caso português) mas sim a sociedade que tem vindo a mudar. Talvez o melhor fosse não mudar apenas o treino físico na recruta mas toda a recruta.

Cumprimentos,
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: foxtrotvictor em Setembro 04, 2010, 10:17:36 pm
Na minha antiga casa chegaram à conclusão que não era nada aconselhável andar todo o santo dia com a mochila carregada com não sei quantos quilos e, de quando em onde, ainda com o extra da “consciência”. Os joelhos agradecem.
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Camuflage em Setembro 05, 2010, 02:13:12 pm
O problema dos EUA no que toca à obesidade é grave, já que 60% dos seus cidadãos têm excesso de peso. Enquanto que em Portugal umas semanas de exercício podem ajudar, o mesmo não ocorre com quem tem um peso muito elevado e precisa de muito mais do que exercício (novo regime alimentar, aconselhamento psicológico e talvez utilização de terapêuticas).
A solução a meu entender cabe cada vez mais a fazerem-se pressões sob o Estado e à industria alimentar, para que regulem o que é vendido ao público e no caso do Estado para que eduque a população com programas sobre alimentação e desporto (em vez de financiar o futebol que é só de alguns e os restantes são todos treinadores de bancada).
O papel da Defesa neste ponto passa por fazer pressões sobre o Estado e indirectamente sobre a industria alimentar, pois é do seu interesse conseguir jovens recrutáveis. Os países ocidentais vão cada vez mais enfrentar problemas no que toca a recrutamento e se querem dar a volta, tem que ser agora ou no futuro será muito mais difícil.
Não é eliminando exercícios básicos que vão dar a volta à coisa, isso é o que se faz agora ao baixarem os requisitos de selecção, qualquer dia nem se faz provas de selecção...
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 05, 2010, 08:43:11 pm
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Obesidade Infantil: Portugal - um dos países que revelam maior excesso de peso

Crianças dos EUA, Malta e Portugal são as que revelam maior excesso de peso.
Estados Unidos, Malta e Portugal são os três países de um conjunto de 41 analisados por um estudo da Organização Mundial de Saúde (OMS) onde as crianças com onze anos revelam maior excesso de peso.

Estes dados inserem-se num relatório sobre as desigualdades na saúde dos jovens, que inquriu mais de 200 mil crianças e jovens com 11, 13 e 15 anos.

De acordo com o documento, 25% das raparigas e 33% dos rapazes norte-americanos com 11 anos têm excesso de peso ou são obesos, valores que colocam os Estados Unidos no topo da tabela, seguidos de Malta.

Os Estados Unidos ocupam também o topo da tabela nos jovens com 13 anos e o segundo lugar nos jovens com 15 anos. Portugal surge em terceiro lugar quando a análise incide nas crianças com 11 anos. O estudo revela que 22% das raparigas e 25% dos rapazes têm excesso de peso.

Já no grupo etário dos 13 anos Portugal desce para a 10ª posição com 13% de raparigas e 18% dos rapazes a revelarem excesso de peso.

No entanto, quando a análise incide nos jovens com 15 anos Portugal volta a subir para o sexto lugar: 13% das raparigas e 22% dos rapazes revelam peso a mais.

Os adolescentes inquiridos indicaram a sua altura e peso (sem sapatos), tendo depois sido calculado o índice de massa corporal.

Segundo o relatório, os rapazes de onze anos têm mais tendência a ter excesso de peso do que as raparigas em metade dos países analisados e na maioria dos países nas idades dos 13 e 15 anos. A crescente obesidade infantil levou já a Europa a lançar estratégias de combate.

Segundo dados de Bruxelas, há 22 milhões de crianças com excesso de peso ou obesidade na União Europeia, sendo que a progressão é estimada em mais 400mil de ano para ano.

Estas crianças têm maior risco de vir a sofrer de doenças como a diabetes, problemas de fígado e cardíacos, hipertensão e acidentes vasculares cerebrais.

Contudo, apesar deste dado negativo, as crianças portuguesas são as que dizem consumir mais fruta por dia, um dos alimentos considerados importantes para uma alimentação saudável.

Uma dieta sem fruta ou com baixo consumo de fruta e vegetais e elevado consumo de gorduras também aumenta o risco dos adolescentes virem a sofrer de diversas doenças.

Já no que se refere ao pequeno-almoço, Portugal Também ocupa o primeiro lugar, com 80% das raparigas e 86% dos rapazes de 13 anos a afirmar que nunca falham esta refeição.

O objectivo do relatório é revelar onde estão as desigualdades para informar e melhorar a saúde para todos os jovens

Para quem pensa que a obesidade não nos afecta...

Não sei como é nas outras tropas, mas na minha acho que não havia um grande cuidado com hidratos...
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 06, 2010, 09:42:25 pm
Algumas coisas que se deviam proibir desde já:

Pulos de Galo (só fazem lesões e pioram as que já existem);

A Pista de Obstáculos (a Pista Vermelha é que é uma pista com cabeça tronco e membros);

Formação sem o material que se vai realmente usar nas unidades operacionais (eu ainda sou do tempo das M-62 e dos penicos, isto apesar de na sub-especialidade já se usar as Alice Pack). Que se dê à rapaziada os mesmos coletes, mochilas, tendas, etc, que se usa nos BIParas, FOE, etc.
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: HSMW em Setembro 06, 2010, 10:09:50 pm
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
Algumas coisas que se deviam proibir desde já:

Pulos de Galo (só fazem lesões e pioram as que já existem);
Tal como foram banidos os "Elefantes Pensantes". Ainda há um ou outro crómo que se lembra de mandar fazer isso...

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A Pista de Obstáculos (a Pista Vermelha é que é uma pista com cabeça tronco e membros);
Então e não é boa? E com a G-3 ainda é melhor! Só não devia era existir obstáculos com alturas diferentes. Aqueles lado a lado...

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Formação sem o material que se vai realmente usar nas unidades operacionais (eu ainda sou do tempo das M-62 e dos penicos, isto apesar de na sub-especialidade já se usar as Alice Pack). Que se dê à rapaziada os mesmos coletes, mochilas, tendas, etc, que se usa nos BIParas, FOE, etc.

M-62? Só me lembro do M-64 com bornal ou lá o que era, uma bolsa pequena à frente e uma pouco maior atrás... E capacete de ferro modelo colonial.... Parecia a guerra de 14 a 18... Tristeza de tropa...
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 07, 2010, 10:04:08 am
Citação de: "HSMW"
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
Algumas coisas que se deviam proibir desde já:

Pulos de Galo (só fazem lesões e pioram as que já existem);
Tal como foram banidos os "Elefantes Pensantes". Ainda há um ou outro crómo que se lembra de mandar fazer isso...

Tu não me faças falar...elefantes pensantes no meio de Santa Guida às tantas da madrigada...

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Citar
A Pista de Obstáculos (a Pista Vermelha é que é uma pista com cabeça tronco e membros);
Então e não é boa? E com a G-3 ainda é melhor! Só não devia era existir obstáculos com alturas diferentes. Aqueles lado a lado...

Acho-a muito básica, a pista Vermelha é muito mais complexa técnicamente e bastante mais dificil fisicamente.

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Citar
Formação sem o material que se vai realmente usar nas unidades operacionais (eu ainda sou do tempo das M-62 e dos penicos, isto apesar de na sub-especialidade já se usar as Alice Pack). Que se dê à rapaziada os mesmos coletes, mochilas, tendas, etc, que se usa nos BIParas, FOE, etc.

M-62? Só me lembro do M-64 com bornal ou lá o que era, uma bolsa pequena à frente e uma pouco maior atrás... E capacete de ferro modelo colonial.... Parecia a guerra de 14 a 18... Tristeza de tropa...

Completa de 100 para mim próprio! M-62, mas de onde é que eu tirei isto da minha cabeça?! É claro que é a M-64. :oops:
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 07, 2010, 06:16:26 pm
Mais umas idéias:

Defesa pessoal/artes marciais como parte integrante da formação dada a TODOS os militares. A razão é muito simples, quem não tem a agressividade necessária para estar nas Forças Armadas (especialmente no Exército), não deve continuar. Também serve para melhorar a forma fisica.

Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: sergio21699 em Setembro 07, 2010, 08:06:15 pm
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
Mais umas idéias:

Defesa pessoal/artes marciais como parte integrante da formação dada a TODOS os militares. A razão é muito simples, quem não tem a agressividade necessária para estar nas Forças Armadas (especialmente no Exército), não deve continuar. Também serve para melhorar a forma fisica.


Isso eu concordo, até porque num conflito pode ocorrer casos de ser necessaria luta corpo-a-corpo
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Camuflage em Setembro 07, 2010, 09:01:18 pm
Seria nesta área que a Saúde Militar devia intervir, desenhando exercícios e nutrição militar adequada, em vez de simplesmente fazerem o papel que qualquer outro técnico de saúde faz na vida civil.
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: typhonman em Setembro 07, 2010, 09:23:42 pm
Citação de: "sergio21699"
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
Mais umas idéias:

Defesa pessoal/artes marciais como parte integrante da formação dada a TODOS os militares. A razão é muito simples, quem não tem a agressividade necessária para estar nas Forças Armadas (especialmente no Exército), não deve continuar. Também serve para melhorar a forma fisica.


Isso eu concordo, até porque num conflito pode ocorrer casos de ser necessaria luta corpo-a-corpo

Eu estou-me a inicar no Krav.  c34x
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 07, 2010, 09:29:10 pm
Citação de: "sergio21699"
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
Mais umas idéias:

Defesa pessoal/artes marciais como parte integrante da formação dada a TODOS os militares. A razão é muito simples, quem não tem a agressividade necessária para estar nas Forças Armadas (especialmente no Exército), não deve continuar. Também serve para melhorar a forma fisica.


Isso eu concordo, até porque num conflito pode ocorrer casos de ser necessaria luta corpo-a-corpo

Cada vez menos.
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Camuflage em Setembro 07, 2010, 10:39:04 pm
Krav maga é sem dúvida útil para as ameaças de hoje em dia na vida civil. Tenho pena é que ainda hajam poucos pontos no país para o praticar e tenham surgido os wannabe's de "mestre" do krav maga...
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: typhonman em Setembro 08, 2010, 03:28:20 am
Citação de: "Camuflage"
Krav maga é sem dúvida útil para as ameaças de hoje em dia na vida civil. Tenho pena é que ainda hajam poucos pontos no país para o praticar e tenham surgido os wannabe's de "mestre" do krav maga...

Considero fundamental o treino de defesa contra ataque com faca.
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: sergio21699 em Setembro 08, 2010, 11:41:04 am
Typhonman aquilo é mesmo a sério? É que já li em muitos lados a dizer q aquilo é muita fantochada...
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: sergio21699 em Setembro 08, 2010, 11:44:29 am
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
Citação de: "sergio21699"
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
Mais umas idéias:

Defesa pessoal/artes marciais como parte integrante da formação dada a TODOS os militares. A razão é muito simples, quem não tem a agressividade necessária para estar nas Forças Armadas (especialmente no Exército), não deve continuar. Também serve para melhorar a forma fisica.


Isso eu concordo, até porque num conflito pode ocorrer casos de ser necessaria luta corpo-a-corpo

Cada vez menos.

Sim, mas em combates urbanos, os mais frequentes actualmente, pode haver situações em que seja necessário recorrer a luta corpo-a-corpo, além disso, como o cabeça disse tambem melhora a forma fisica e é simples e barato.
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 08, 2010, 03:40:50 pm
Outras soluções possíveis, a Ginástica de Aplicação Militar (GAM) é algo que pessoalmente acredito que pode ser perfeitamente eliminado da formação militar. Passo a explicar, no meu tempo de tropa, as GAM era apenas aquecimento para o que vinha depois, ou seja, o rastejar, reptar, brincadeiras como carregar o camarada que tem 20 kg a mais, etc. Na prática suávamos mais com as praxes a seguir do que com as GAM em si. Se acho que deve ser substituído então tenho que apresentar uma alternativa. Pois bem, da instrução militar que tive, o período em que senti que eu estava realmente a ser preparado fisicamente para melhorar as minhas performances e não só meramente praxado, foi durante o Curso de Pára-quedismo. Toda a componente física do Curso é muito à frente de tudo o resto que se faz nas Forças Armadas. A pista em circuito é excelente, as calistenias a mesma coisa, a pista de cordas é tecnicamente difícil e fisicamente é de um nível muito razoável (muito superior à pista de obstáculos). O próprio aquecimento, que se fazia antes de iniciarmos a instrução propriamente dita, era também ela muito superior às GAM. A única coisa que não recomendo, são as sessões de toros. É que os militares mais baixos e altos de cada toro é que dão o litro (quem passou por isso sabe o que eu estou a falar).
Que treino físico se faz durante a formação militar? Crosses (por mim continua), GAM (substituía-se pelas calistenias), pista de obstáculos (tem que ser uma pista estimulante como são as pistas vermelhas ou a de cordas e não esta porcaria) e a pista em circuito (que é excelente. Antes de se fazer qualquer destes treinos fazia-se o mesmo aquecimento que se faz nos Cursos de Pára-quedismo.





Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: mccormick em Setembro 08, 2010, 04:30:48 pm
Relativamente à GAM, acho que existem coisas boas e más, sendo que depende de quem as dá. Como mero exercicio de treino fisico existem outros muito melhores, mas poucos desenvolvem ao mesmo tempo a capacidade muscular, a rusticidade e o espirito de sacrifico. Os jogos, como a luta de galos, o carrinho de mão, etc ajudam a incrementar a camaradagem e o espirito de corpo. A GAM não deve ser vista apenas como treino fisico porque não o é apenas.
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Crixus em Setembro 08, 2010, 06:19:09 pm
Na minha passagem pelas forcas armadas todas as gam que fiz e vi fazer a impressao de que fiquei era de consuante a vontade (e disposicao) do instructor assim era a gam, e que era nada mais do que uma boa opurtunidade para praxar o pessoal ,mas que havia coisas bem piores havia.....
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 08, 2010, 09:29:01 pm
Mccormick eu sei disso, mas se queres saber, os momentos onde nós sentiamos um espirito de camaradagem e de corpo era nas marchas(marcor e marfor), era quando iamos a marchar à Pára-quedista e a cantar a caminho das messes, não era nas GAM.

Crixus sem dúvida alguma que dependia muito do instrutor, eu tive GAM que eram quase descanso e tive outras que até passei-me, lembro-me de uma em que o frio era tanto que ao mesmo tempo que estava a transpirar (foi muito longa) não era capaz de agarrar na G-3, é que as mãos estavam congeladas. :shock:

Outra coisa, na minha tropa as marchas são práticamente todas à noite. As marchas eram sempre depois da 3ª refeição, por vezes passava da meia noite. Para vocês é uma boa ou má decisão?
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Março 03, 2011, 11:43:35 am
Stars and Stripes reporter gets physical with combat fitness test

By Jeff Schogol
Stars and Stripes
Published: March 1, 2011
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Stars and Stripes reporter Jeff Schogol undergoes the new Army Physical Readiness Test Tuesday at Fort Jackson, S.C.
Joe Gromelski/Stars and Stripes
Buy a printFORT JACKSON, S.C. — Staff Sgt. David L. Rispress has seen all kinds of out-of-shape recruits during his two years as a drill sergeant.

Then he met me.

On Tuesday, the Army unveiled two new proposed tests to measure soldiers’ physical fitness and combat readiness. If approved by the Army chief of staff, they would replace the current Army physical fitness test.

My job was to see how tough these exercises are, not an easy feat considering that when I did physical therapy for my legs growing up, I felt most comfortable working out with stroke victims because we ran about the same pace.

Throwing caution to the wind, I showed up at Fort Jackson in my cargo pants and wicker shirt that leaves far too little to the imagination.

First, drill sergeants demonstrated the physical fitness test, going from the shuttle run to the long jump, and knocking out push-ups seemingly effortlessly. Then two soldiers ran through the combat test, which includes an obstacle course.

It all looked so easy, until — when my media colleagues were distracted — I tried it myself.

Rispress was patient and kind as he walked me through the exercises.

AdvertisementTo my great relief, I did not throw up when I did the shuttle run, colorfully known in the sports world as a “suicide.” I managed to run a total of 60 yards in 20 seconds, and I had figured it would take me a week.

And I successfully avoided ripping an Achilles tendon on the long jump, even though I stumbled back so far on my first attempt that I ended up practically at the starting line.

I also managed to drag a sled with 180 pounds of weight on it, giving me the confidence that if push comes to shove, I could haul roughly half of my own weight.

Trying to balance on a board while carrying two ammunition cans proved more difficult. I looked like a drunk trying to pass a sobriety test on St. Patrick’s Day.

But there was one exercise that nearly did me in: “the rower.”

The exercise requires you to lay flat on the ground and then do a sit-up while raising your legs toward your chest. It was probably designed by the inquisitor-general to extract confessions from accused heretics.

A drill sergeant who had demonstrated the exercise managed to do 38 reps within a minute. But when it was my turn, nothing quite worked right. While I was able to contort my body into a sitting position, I didn’t manage to do a single one correctly.

When it was over, I asked Rispress how I ranked among the less stellar recruits he has seen.

“I’ve never seen them not be able to do ‘the rower,’” he said. “I’m trying to be as polite as possible. ... So, I’ll leave it at that.”

Com o video das provas:

 :arrow: http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/Army-new- ... 918d8d23c4 (http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/Army-new-fitness-tests/ss/events/us/030211armytest#photoViewer=/110301/480/urn_publicid_ap_org8d540c7b96844798be0669918d8d23c4)
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 07, 2013, 12:43:08 pm
CrossFit study

 :arrow: http://www.25idl.army.mil/47857C3A-3478 ... 0Study.pdf (http://www.25idl.army.mil/47857C3A-3478-4595-B69D-2DD6D169D7E8/FinalDownload/DownloadId-7EC0278E6074A2142FFCC878FB3CC3AC/47857C3A-3478-4595-B69D-2DD6D169D7E8/PT/U.S.%20Army%20CrossFit%20Study.pdf)

Há alguém que tenha experimentado o CrossFit?

Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: HSMW em Setembro 07, 2013, 02:48:38 pm
O crossfit é muito hardcore. Mas uma excelente evolução do treino de base e ginástica de aptidão militar.
Antes de fazer um programa desses o pessoal vai passando por outros sem aparelhos como o insanity, PX90, T25...
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 07, 2013, 04:02:15 pm
Eu tenho os videos do George St-Pierre, tenho é que arranjar tempo para começar. :oops:

Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: HSMW em Setembro 07, 2013, 04:23:11 pm
Arranja primeiro tempo para fazer uns exercícios simples, flexões, abdominais e pernas.
Só custa até entrar na rotina porque depois é só adaptar o tempo aos exercícios. Meia hora por dia é suficiente.
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Julho 13, 2015, 04:26:02 pm
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Outubro 04, 2016, 12:24:36 pm
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Novembro 24, 2016, 06:31:04 pm
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Outubro 20, 2017, 06:08:27 pm
The Finnish Model
To Improve Europe’s Militaries, Look North

By Elisabeth Braw

When Mikael Granlund was called up for service in Finland’s military seven years ago, he could have tried to get an exemption. For an elite ice hockey player such as Granlund, who now plays for the National Hockey League team Minnesota Wild, a year in the armed forces can bring serious athletic setbacks. But Granlund didn’t try to be exempted.

“For a Finn, it’s an honor to do military service,” the 25-year-old Granlund said this month. “It’s just something you do if you want your country to stay independent.” What about athletes? “Professional athletes do it, too,” Granlund added. “It’s just something you want to do.”

Granlund is not alone. Each year, several of Finland’s top athletes join the Finnish Defence Forces as conscripts. So do music stars, who could similarly try to be exempted. Though the FDF—like most armed forces—exempts would-be conscripts only for health-related reasons, in many countries young men fake illnesses in order to avoid service. And young star athletes and artists would, one might think, have a good reason to avoid the draft, as their careers could suffer irreparably from a year away from the limelight. (Next year’s cohort of conscripts will include one of the country’s biggest pop stars, Robin, who will enter the navy.)

Indeed, as Granlund’s and Robin’s enlistments show, the FDF has managed a feat that other armed forces could learn from: it has made itself an attractive destination for conscripts and professional troops alike. This helps explain why the armed forces routinely have more applicants than openings for noncommissioned officer positions. According to a May Eurobarometer poll, 95 percent of Finns trust their army, a higher rate than anywhere else in the European Union. (In Germany, 66 percent trust the army; across the EU, the average is 75 percent.)

Granlund and many other Finns may consider conscription a patriotic duty, but militaries cannot count on citizens’ love 87 percent of the country’s citizens support President Vladimir Putin’s handling of foreign affairs, only around 37 percent of its young men perform military service, which in theory is mandatory for everyone.

The appeal of Finland’s military extends beyond patriotism and depends partly on its willingness to listen to its soldiers. In 2002, the FDF introduced a system that tracks and evaluates soldiers’ and officers’ experiences. “It has changed how we treat our soldiers and how soldiers view the FDF,” said Brigadier General Jukka Sonninen, the FDF’s head of training.

Under this system, which the FDF calls “Transformational Leadership,” Finland’s military regularly polls soldiers throughout their service on matters such as sleeping arrangements, superiors’ leadership, stress management, unit cohesion, and communications from central offices. The FDF carries out the survey at every level, too: group, company, battalion, and brigade.

Sonninen’s unit tracks and evaluates the results, paying particular attention to changes in scores. “The point is not that we conduct surveys and score well and say, ‘That’s great; they love us,’” Sonninen told me. “The point is that we analyze the results and then look for the root reason: Has a certain event caused a particular score? A certain person? Certain processes such as health care? When people figure out that the process works, it dramatically changes their attitude.”

Finnish troops, in other words, know that they don’t have to call a hot line or contact a superior to talk about their problems. Sonninen’s staff will regularly come to them and follow up on the results.

This fall, soldiers gave the cohesion of their units an average score of 4.2 out of 5 and gave the officers in charge of their training the same rating. Those scores and all others have improved over the last 15 years. In a survey of conscripts also conducted this fall, 66 percent rated their military service positively; in 2002, less than half did.

FDF officers’ leadership abilities have quickly improved thanks to the scheme. Although Finnish officers never treated their soldiers brutally, they mostly relied on their authority to get things done. Now, Sonninen told me, success is based on a mutual bond of trust between commanders and subordinates. The well-being of Finnish soldiers has also grown. “The bond between the soldier and the commander can’t just be about authority,” Sonninen said. “You don’t shout to your subordinates; you talk just like you talk to a normal person. Listen to the people you lead; don’t just give commands.”

Finland has shown that the secret to making the armed forces popular is ensuring that the low-ranking soldiers and noncommissioned officers who make up most of the ranks are content.


That approach is working. In the most recent survey of graduating conscripts, conducted this fall, 80 percent supported maintaining conscription; 42 percent said that they would serve even if conscription were not mandatory; and 22 percent were neutral. Only 36 percent said they would not serve. If Finns forced to serve say they would have done so even if they did not have to, then the FDF has managed a feat from which other countries can learn. Charly Salonius-Pasternak, a security analyst at the Finnish Institute of International Affairs (who also served as a conscript), argued that there is plenty that other countries can replicate. “Don’t oversell,” he said. “You can’t have cool videos of soldiers jumping out of airplanes if you can’t deliver. But equally, don’t undersell.” Once troops are enlisted, militaries must make their service worthwhile. “Keep them learning skills that they can also use elsewhere,” Salonius-Pasternak said. “There’s a difference between getting people and motivating them. This way you get the best people instead of a large percentage who couldn’t find any other work.” (The U.S. Army has struggled with recruits who fail their training since it relaxed its admission standards.)

Armed forces elsewhere have commanders who treat their subordinates with respect, inspire them, and help them develop. Finland has excelled by systematizing those virtues.

Although polling troops may seem like a soft-glove approach not suitable for a fighting force, it is in fact a clever way of incentivizing the enlisted to give their best. As militaries in Europe and North America seek to expand their ranks, keeping morale high will be crucial to their ability to recruit and retain troops. They should note Finland’s example.

https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/finland/2017-10-09/finnish-model
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Janeiro 05, 2019, 02:33:43 pm
The Corps is considering planks as an alternative to crunches on the PFT

(https://www.armytimes.com/resizer/7KPHviXzEFGpWhdlQoOs1evS85k=/1200x0/filters:quality(100)/arc-anglerfish-arc2-prod-mco.s3.amazonaws.com/public/PCZKWZ5H3RF3NH4ZHECRTXDQ3E.jpg)
Recruits of Company A "war cry" while in the plank position aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego in 2012. (Cpl. Eric Quintanillla/Marine Corps)

Marines have complained for ages that the crunches portion on the Physical Fitness Test, or PFT, is too easy, administratively hard to judge and easy to cheat on.

Now the Corps is looking at planks as an alternative.

In a December briefing for the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Services, the Corps said its Force Fitness Division, led by former Marine athlete of the year Col. Stephen Armes, was conducting a study on the use of planks as an alternative to crunches.

“The Marine Corps Force Fitness Division is currently testing and analyzing the use of planking as a possible measure of abdominal strength for the annual Physical Fitness Testing," Marine Corps Training and Education Command said in a statement. “Their testing remains ongoing.”

A plank is performed by holding the body in a tight formation, generally in a pushup-like position, and maintaining that form for a period of time. It is considered an isometric core exercise, as unlike crunches a plank does not involve contraction of the muscles during the workout.

Because the plank does not involve movement, there’s the possibility it could lead to fewer exercise related injuries during the PFT. The crunch portion of the PFT is often very sloppy as Marines rush to bang out over 100 crunches with poor form as they try to max their overall fitness scores.

“As a coach, I have my athletes do some ab variation at the end of every workout, but never does it include a ‘Marine Corps’ style situp,” said former Marine Sgt. Timminy Moore. “Those are not only not a good indicator of abdominal fitness, but it’s not good for lumbar or cervical spine.”

Since leaving the Corps in 2012, Moore has actively competed in powerlifting and CrossFit and has coached both sports for several years.

Brian Schilling, a professor of kinesiology and nutrition sciences at the University of Las Vegas, Nevada, said the Corps was wise to look at the plank as an alternative to crunches.

“For the most part, the muscles of the torso are ‘anti-motion;’ they work to stabilize the torso. This makes the plank a good representation of the real demands placed on the torso muscles,” Schilling said.

Schilling added that a 2012 study he co-authored in Military Medicine showed that the plank is “reliable,” and that over half of Navy sailors in the study wanted the plank to be part of the Navy fitness test.

Marines in a variety of fields say they would welcome the potential change, with some describing planks as a better core workout and a test easier for Marine leaders to administer.

One Marine Raider told Marine Corps Times that the plank was just an all-around better core workout, and from an administrative standpoint it is easier to judge proper form and harder to cheat on.

”It’s easier for me to look down a line and see everyone’s stomach off the ground than it is for me to count everyone’s crunches. So administratively it’s easier,” the Marine Raider said.

Male and female Marines between the ages of 21–40 have to knock out between 105–115 crunches depending on age and gender to maximize their score.

But it’s hard for scorers to accurately judge proper crunch form and the exercise is easily susceptible to cheating.

“For decades, people have just lied to help out their friends. With only a few proctors walking around to ensure the crunches were executed properly, it left a lot of room for cheating,” a recon Marine said.

Moore echoed those sentiments. “There’s so many ways to ‘game’ the ‘Marine situp’ to cheat the movement while still remaining in standards,” she said. “Planks are a good test of overall core stability; they test not just the main ab muscles, but also lats, rear delts, rhomboids, low back, quads, glutes, obliques; everything equally.”

Not everyone is sold on the idea that the plank will remove subjectivity from the test. It could be just as difficult to judge, leading to varying unfair standards across the Corps.

“Since there are some challenges with what is considered good form for both exercises in any case, so there will likely be no perfectly objective test,” Schilling said.

The Corps recently has flooded the force with nearly 600 Force Fitness Instructors, or FFIs, who have been charged with enforcing strict standards on the fitness tests.

“There was a lot of slop out there,” Armes said. Now there’s an FFI at the unit saying, “nope, that pullup doesn’t count … that crunch is not executed correctly.”

If the Corps decides to move to planks, those FFIs will help enforce proper form and standard with the new test.

https://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/your-marine-corps/2019/01/05/the-corps-is-considering-planks-as-an-alternative-to-crunches-on-the-pft/?utm_source=clavis
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Março 27, 2019, 12:40:00 pm
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Maio 11, 2019, 02:56:38 pm
Army Combat Fitness Test
Road to the Army Combat Fitness Test

https://pt.scribd.com/document/383529609/U-S-Army-Combat-Fitness-Test-Official-Overview#from_embed

 :G-beer2:
Título: Re: Fazer soldados estarem aptos para lutar sem flexões
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Novembro 19, 2020, 12:46:54 pm
Goodbye Curl-Ups: Navy Releases New PRT Rules for Planks and Rowing

(https://images04.military.com/sites/default/files/styles/full/public/2020-11/5823858.jpg?itok=TtwYLwov)

Retail Services Specialist 2nd Class Danielle Young performs a plank during a new physical readiness test (PRT) as part of Navy Physical Readiness Test Evaluation Phase II in 2019. In 2021, the plank will be a mandatory event for all sailors. (Class Cole C. Pielop/Navy)
18 Nov 2020
Military.com | By Gina Harkins
The long-awaited rules for the new plank and rowing events on the Navy's fitness test are out, and officials say sailors should be preparing for the biggest changes in years.

Sailors cranking out as many curl-ups as possible in a 2-minute period will be a thing of the past starting in March. Instead, they'll need to hold a forearm plank for up to 3 minutes, 40 seconds, depending on age, to qualify for full marks on their Physical Readiness Test.

The tests, which were set to resume in January, have been postponed by several months due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Navy will now hold just one Physical Fitness Assessment cycle in 2021, officials announced this week. It will run from March 15 to Sept. 15.

Scoring for the new plank event, which was announced in a service-wide message issued Wednesday, will be gender-neutral.

The switch from curl-ups to the plank, first announced by former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson in May 2019, reflects an effort to focus on more functional movements, said Aviation Structural Mechanic Senior Chief Petty Officer Eric Anderson, with the Navy's Physical Readiness Program Office.

(https://images05.military.com/sites/default/files/styles/full/public/2020-10/mil-navy-inforgraphic-correct-plank-form-1200.jpg?itok=Bbb4veYV)

"The stabilization of your core when you're pulling on that line to moor the ship or carrying a box to put it in the storeroom, the stabilization of your core is where you're developing all that power from," Anderson told a small group of reporters. "So being able to do that and test that and make sure that our sailors have a strong core is going to help make us more ready and healthier."

The Navy's youngest personnel -- those between the ages of 17 and 19 -- will have the most rigorous plank requirement. They'll need to hold their bodies in a push-up-like position, with weight resting on their forearms, for 3 minutes, 40 seconds, to earn 100 points on the plank event. The minimum time that same group needs to hit to earn a satisfactory medium score is 90 seconds.

The time required to earn an outstanding score decreases by 5 seconds with each age group. Men and women between the ages of 25 and 29, for example, will be required to hold the plank for 3 minutes, 30 seconds, to earn 100 points, while sailors who are 30 to 34 will need to hit 3 minutes, 25 seconds, to earn the same score.

The plank is a safer exercise than curl-ups, Anderson said. Curl-ups, or sit-ups, which have been part of the PRT since the 1980s, can reaggravate lower-back injuries. The plank, he said, helps build muscles to prevent problems.

Also new on the test is an option to swap the 1.5-mile run for a 2-kilometer row using a rowing machine. That event, like the run, is timed, and scoring varies by age and gender.

(https://images02.military.com/sites/default/files/styles/full/public/2020-10/mil-navy-inforgraphic-correct-row-form-1200.jpg?itok=-KBP_1HY)

Anderson said the plank scoring is gender-neutral to match the previous curl-ups requirement, which was the same for both men and women. Scores for the rowing option, like the run, will differ for men and women in every age bracket.

Men ages 20 to 24 at an altitude of less than 5,000 feet, for example, will need to complete the row within 7 minutes and 5 seconds to earn full marks on the event, with a time of 9 minutes and 25 seconds or more landing them in the probationary category. Women in the same age group at the same altitude will have between 8:05 and 10:35 to earn between an outstanding and satisfactory medium score.

Sailors completing the row at altitudes above 5,000 feet will get a bit more time.

Anderson said he's excited about the changes, particularly the plank, which will be required of everyone, because it's more relevant to what sailors do every day.

"Our goal with physical readiness is fitter, healthier sailors so we can accomplish the mission easier or be more successful at it," he said. "... Sailors are excited, and they're just ready to start."

Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. John Nowell said both changes fit into the Navy's emphasis on physical, spiritual and mental well-being. Physical fitness is critical to the service's ability to meet operational challenges, he added.

"A great example of this are the Bonhomme Richard sailors and their shipmates on the San Diego waterfront who braved extreme heat and dangerous conditions over the course of several days of firefighting to save the ship," Nowell said, referring to a devastating July 12 fire aboard. "That was only possible by being fit and able to sustain long hours of firefighting."

What Counts and When

The Navy and other military services made the unprecedented move to waive or postpone several fitness requirements during the coronavirus pandemic. Barring any additional changes, though, the plank requirement and rowing option will go into effect with the 2021 PFA.

Nowell said the plank will be safer than curl-ups during the pandemic, since curl-ups required sailors to be face-to-face as they held down one another's feet during the event.

When the 2021 PRT resumes, sailors won't immediately fail if they don't pass the plank portion of the test.

"Because it's mandated, they would not be able to fail for the plank itself," Anderson said. On their next PRT, though, they must be prepared to perform the exercise to pass, he added.

The plank is the only portion of the test that sailors won't be required to pass in the 2021 PRT cycle. Since the row isn't mandated, sailors won't be offered a waiver or re-do if they fail.

Anderson suggests sailors not assume the row will be easier than the run without training for it first, because if they find they can't finish rowing in the allotted time, it's going to count against them.

The new PRT sequence will start with push-ups and move into the forearm plank event second, followed by the cardio option. That order, Anderson said, was based on feedback they got from hundreds of sailors in the fleet who tested the new events.

"We took that into account while we were doing the testing so that we could account for that fatigue," he said. "The plank standard ... is reflective of the fact that we know they did push-ups prior to doing the plank."

Similarly, he said, the scoring criteria for the cardio events consider that sailors just did the two other requirements before moving into the run or rowing portions of the test.

The Navy has released new videos and infographics that show the proper form and techniques for the new events. For the plank, sailors should place their feet no more than hip-width apart, keep their elbows aligned with their shoulders, and maintain their neck in a neutral position.

"It's actually going to help them keep the plank longer," Anderson said. "... [When] we're looking up trying to look at the clock, looking around the room, we're adding stressors to our upper body and to our back."

More than 500 sailors in Hawaii, Florida and Virginia helped set the scoring for the new events, Anderson said. The data collected during those studies, in which sailors were observed using rowing machines and doing forearm planks, was used by the Naval Health Research Center in San Diego to set the new scoring requirements.

The Navy will continue assessing data once sailors are performing the new test events, he added, to make sure the scores are reflective of an average person's performance.

The changes show the Navy listened to sailors' feedback on what they wanted to see on the PRT, Nowell said.

"I'm excited about this change," he said, "because the idea started with sailors and, overall, it's a better way to assess our fitness levels."

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2020/11/18/goodbye-curl-ups-navy-releases-new-prt-rules-planks-and-rowing.html