U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos

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typhonman

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Red Baron

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Re: U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos
« Responder #556 em: Abril 14, 2021, 09:00:40 pm »


Bonito, o substituto do F22.  :mrgreen:
 

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dc

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Re: U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos
« Responder #557 em: Abril 15, 2021, 11:16:08 am »
https://www.flightglobal.com/fixed-wing/us-air-force-claims-longest-air-to-air-missile-shot-with-aim-120-amraam/143293.article

Como seria de esperar, a distância a que foi feito o abate do alvo é classificada, tal como a versão do míssil.
 

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Cabeça de Martelo

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Re: U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos
« Responder #558 em: Abril 21, 2021, 02:46:00 pm »
First enlisted woman qualifies for formal combat controller training
Rachel S. Cohen


Special tactics airmen from the 24th Special Operations Wing jump out of an MC-130H Combat Talon II at Hurlburt Field, Fla., in January 2015. The 24th SOW’s mission is to provide special tactics forces for rapid global employment to enable airpower success. (Senior Airman Christopher Callaway/Air Force)

A female airman will soon begin formal training to become an Air Force combat controller, the closest any enlisted woman has gotten to breaking that glass ceiling so far.

The unnamed woman recently finished the four-week assessment and selection course needed to progress to specialized instruction in combat control, Air Education and Training Command spokeswoman Marilyn Holliday said Monday.

She is one of four female officers and enlisted members vying to break into special warfare professions that remain dominated by men. The Air Force withholds their personal information to protect their privacy.

“Acting as a one-man attachment to other special forces teams, these highly specialized airmen are trained in a wide range of skills, including scuba, parachuting and snowmobiling, as well as being FAA-certified air traffic controllers in order to establish air control and provide combat support on missions all over the globe,” the Air Force says of combat controllers.

The woman will undergo another four-week class to prepare for combat dive school in Florida, which lasts five weeks, followed by parachuting training, free-fall and battlefield survival training, air traffic control classes, and two other combat control and special tactics courses that include advanced weapons and demolition skills.

A second female airman will start the assessment and selection course at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, in May, Holliday said.

The A&S course is the third step in the process to qualify as a combat controller, after 16 weeks of basic military training and the special warfare preparatory course at Lackland. The Air Force saw its first prospective female combat controller in 2019. At that time about a dozen women had attempted special warfare training. None succeeded.

Another enlisted woman who started down the path toward becoming a tactical air control party specialist has dropped out. She began an apprentice course last summer but left the program and switched to another Air Force career, Holliday said.

On the officer side, one woman is currently in training to become a special tactics officer. While the Air Force wouldn’t say where in the process she stands, the woman has made it farther than any other female officer pursuing that job. She will soon be joined by a second woman on track to enter the STO pipeline after graduation from the U.S. Air Force Academy, said 1st Lt. Alejandra Fontalvo, a spokeswoman for the 24th Special Operations Wing.

“Any airman or recruit aspiring to enter special warfare career fields, regardless of gender, will be accessed and qualified using the current validated standards,” Holliday added.

Air Force special warfare includes some of the service’s most elite and toughest career fields, including combat control, TACP, pararescue, special reconnaissance, special tactics officer, combat rescue officer, and air liaison officer. Those airmen must undergo intense training that prepares them to deploy to battlefields for ground operations alone or with a unit.

They work apart from the traditional air base support, logistics and aircraft sorties handled by the rest of the Air Force. In the case of combat controllers, they set up remote airfields while conducting air traffic control, calling in airstrikes, and more. Special tactics officers handle tasks like directing international coalition forces in assault zones, combat search and rescue, and battlefield trauma care.

The Defense Department opened all combat career fields to women in 2015, but the Air Force’s pipeline of female special warfare trainees remains a trickle. Some opt to leave the training program on their own terms, while others encounter other hurdles like injury or simply the physical requirements of the work. The professions can also be overly daunting or unfamiliar to women considering military careers, winnowing the pool of prospective trainees.

While women have been part of other facets of special operations for decades, the community is preparing to greet more female airmen as they earn the remaining “firsts.”

“I’ve been able to meet a couple of the women. … I am so excited and proud of what these women are going to come do,” Col. Allison Black, vice commander of the 24th Special Operations Wing — the Air Force’s only special tactics wing — said in a recent interview.

She looks forward to the day when women are no longer an outlier in special warfare.

https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2021/04/15/first-enlisted-woman-qualifies-for-formal-combat-controller-training/
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

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dc

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Re: U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos
« Responder #559 em: Abril 27, 2021, 08:26:54 pm »
https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a36232876/b-21-raider-bomber-updates/

Dentro do orçamento? Ora aqui está algo raríssimo de se ver neste sector!  :mrgreen:
 

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dc

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Re: U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos
« Responder #560 em: Maio 14, 2021, 11:56:54 pm »
 

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redkukulkane

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Re: U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos
« Responder #561 em: Maio 15, 2021, 05:50:30 pm »
A USA air force querem cortar 421 aviões de combate antigos,e comprar 304 novos. 8)

https://www.airforcemag.com/air-force-wants-to-cut-421-old-fighters-buy-304-new-ones/
 

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dc

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NVF

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Re: U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos
« Responder #563 em: Maio 16, 2021, 05:18:46 am »
Air Force Wants to Cut 421 Old Fighters, Buy 304 New Ones

https://www.airforcemag.com/air-force-wants-to-cut-421-old-fighters-buy-304-new-ones/

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May 14, 2021 | By John A. Tirpak

The Air Force will ask Congress to retire 421 legacy aircraft through 2026, replacing them with just 304 new fighters, according to fiscal 2022 budget talking points obtained by Air Force Magazine. The savings derived from operating a smaller fleet will be put toward acquiring new systems such as the Next-Generation Air Dominance fighter later this decade, and a new Multi-Role fighter, called MR-X, in the 2030s.

“The information outlined in the talking points regarding future Air Force fighter force structure is pre-decisional,” said Brig Gen Patrick Ryder, an Air Force spokesperson. The document was not labeled as such, however. He declined further comment about potential future budget or resourcing decisions.

The 421 aircraft described in the talking points include a total phase-out of the aged F-15C/D fleet, numbering about 234 aircraft, by the end of fiscal 2026. The F-16 fleet would be reduced by 124 aircraft, mostly from what are called the “pre-block,” or oldest models, leaving a force of 812, also by the end of 2026. The A-10 attack plane would be reduced from 281 total aircraft to 218, for a reduction of 63 tails, but on a more aggressive timeline ending in fiscal 2023.

Over the future years defense plan ending in fiscal ’26, the Air Force would also bring on 84 new F-15EX and 220 F-35A fighters, resulting in a net reduction of 117 jets over the five-year period. The downsizing would be the largest since the “CAF Redux,” or Combat Air Forces Reduction of the early 2010s, in which USAF trimmed its fleet by about 250 airplanes. 

Air Force leaders have been pushing for several years to be allowed to retire legacy systems in order to pay for new ones that will be more relevant to the future fight, particularly in the Indo-Pacific theater. Service officials in recent days have said they plan to start phasing out the fifth-generation F-22 in 2030, to be replaced by the classified NGAD family of systems, known to be at least one manned fighter and potentially several unmanned variants. Like the NGAD, the new MR-X would also be designed using new digital methodology to drastically reduce design, development and fielding timelines, while sharply reducing sustainment costs by baking in a short service life, with the expectation that successor aircraft will follow swiftly.

“To just keep pace with the threat would require an additional $6- to $7 Billion per year to modernize our current force projected into the future,” the USAF talking points say. “Even if affordable, this force falls well short of the capability required to counter a future peer threat.”  The document goes on to argue that no technology can transform “our fourth-generation fighters into fifth-generation fighters, or fifth-generation fighters into NGAD.”

The paper also points out that legacy systems are becoming “significantly more expensive to sustain,” and that USAF fields one of the oldest fleets serving worldwide. The Air Force’s fleet averages 28.6 years, the document points out; by comparison, the Navy’s fleet averages 14.4 years; the Army’s aviation arm averages 15.3 years; the Royal Australian Air Force, 8.9 years, and the U.K. Royal Air Force 16.5 years.

Lt. Gen. David S. Nahom, deputy chief of staff for plans and programs, said this week that USAF’s operating and sustainment costs are “skyrocketing,” and increasing at double the rate of inflation, due to the age of the aircraft. He said 44 percent of USAF’s fleet is operating beyond its planned service life. The F-16 was initially expected to serve only until about 2005. 

The F-22 fleet of about 180 aircraft would remain intact through the FYDP, receiving continuing funds for sensor upgrades and to remain fully viable until it begins transitioning out of the force in 2030. According to the talking points, though, the F-22 “cannot be made competitive against the threat two decades from today.”

The NGAD “family of systems” represents “our ability to fight and win in the highly contested environment in the future,” the document says. The new methodology of developing the NGAD “at a pace future threats cannot match” will allow the Air Force to maintain its advantage.

Even so, however, the Air Force seems to have accepted that broad control of the air in a high-end conflict is no longer achievable. It is aiming, rather, for “temporary windows of superiority” in “highly-contested threat environments,” with “complementary capabilities” for the Joint force and U.S. allies. To achieve this, USAF needs “full-spectrum survivability, high speed, advanced weapons, and extended ranges.”

To perform the “global strike” mission, USAF adds to those characteristics “sufficient payload” and resilience achieved through “the use of human-machine teaming and a mix of manned and unmanned systems.”

The F-16 and A-10 fleets would also continue to receive funding for structural modifications and capability enhancements to keep them relevant until they fully retire.

The plan reflects the results of “extensive gaming and analysis using the most difficult problem (China) and the most difficult scenario (Taiwan) at the most difficult time (2035),” according to the document. “It is clear that the Air Force must change the future fighter force structure mix by changing investment priorities to provide the capability, capacity, and affordability required to meet a peer threat,” they said.

Chief of Staff Gen. Charles Q. Brown Jr. said on May 12 the service must neck down from seven fighter types to “four plus-one,” the “one” being the A-10, in order to reduce the costs of maintaining so many logistics trains.

The A-10 is “very effective in current conflicts, but it is not viable in the long term,” according to the talking points. “Its lack of survivability in the evolving global threat environment and its singular capability set renders it ineffective in the needed role of affordable capacity.” The A-10 cannot perform the defensive counter air, suppression of enemy air defense, or homeland defense missions, the documents said. The service has tried to retire the A-10, unsuccessfully, several times, thwarted by enthusiasts who say it is an unmatched close air support machine.

However, the Air Force plans to prosecute the CAS mission in a different way, Lt. Gen. Clinton S. Hinote, deputy chief of staff for strategy, integration, and requirements, told Air Force Magazine May 13. Hinote did not describe the new CAS concept, but suggested it would involve unmanned aircraft.

Beyond the FYDP, and potentially into the 2030s, the Air Force expects about 600 “post block” F-16s—C/D models from Block 40 on—to remain in the force with with some upgrades, useful in both permissive and some competitive environments. The transition to the MR-X is expected “in the mid-30s.” This new airplane will be a “clean sheet” design, created by digital methods, and the “decision point” to launch the program is now expected to be “six to eight years away,” according to the document. The MR-X “must be able to affordably perform missions short of high-end warfare.” The F-35 could potentially fill this role, but only if its operating costs could be “brought significantly lower.”

The F-15E/X is described in the papers as “an outsized weapons truck,” useful for carrying standoff weapons in a contested theater or performing air superiority in less-contested airspace. Interestingly, while the Air Force has mentioned that the F-15EX could launch the hypersonic, air-to-surface AGM-183A Air-launched Rapid Response Weapon, or ARRW, the talking points say it can also carry an “outsize … air-to-air” weapon, as well. Presumably, this is a long-range weapon meant to counter China’s long-range PL-15 air-to-air missile, but the documents don’t say whether the weapon referenced is the AIM-260, a classified developmental air-to-air missile revealed two years ago.

The Air Force plans to buy 11 F-15EX in 2022, followed by 14 in 2023 and 19 annually thereafter through the FYDP. If that ramp rate extends through the decade, USAF would buy its 144th F-15EX in 2030. Contractual documents released last year show that USAF has options to buy up to 200 F-15EXs.

Brown told a defense symposium this week that his tactical aircraft study, announced in February, is not meant to be a product delivered to Congress, but is an internal assessment of the right future fighter force mix, which will inform the fiscal 2022 budget request but would be implemented in the fiscal ’23 budget and Program Objective Memoranda.

The White House is expected to release its full budget on May 27. The Biden administration released a “skinny” budget last month, which calls for $753 billion for national security programs, including $715 billion for the Department of Defense.
Talent de ne rien faire
 

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Lusitano89

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dc

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Re: U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos
« Responder #565 em: Maio 22, 2021, 01:49:57 am »
https://www.flightglobal.com/fixed-wing/raytheon-looks-at-integrating-amraam-er-in-f-35a-internal-carriage/143866.article

Bem, como já tinha dito, este míssil teria grande potencial para ser usado como míssil ar-ar. Pelos vistos há mesmo algum interesse em concretizar esta ideia.
 

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tenente

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Quando um Povo/Governo não Respeita as Suas FFAA, Não Respeita a Sua História nem se Respeita a Si Próprio  !!
 

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HSMW

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Re: U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos
« Responder #567 em: Maio 30, 2021, 11:07:06 pm »






Citar
The 85th Test and Evaluation Squadron completed a munitions proof-of-concept called Project Strike Rodeo, May 11, 2021, that validated loading five AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles (JASSM) on an F-15E Strike Eagle.
This lays the foundation for follow-on flight testing that would more than double the F-15E’s current JASSM-carrying capacity.
« Última modificação: Maio 30, 2021, 11:07:47 pm por HSMW »
https://www.youtube.com/user/HSMW/videos

"Tudo pela Nação, nada contra a Nação."
 

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dc

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Re: U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos
« Responder #568 em: Junho 30, 2021, 04:11:51 pm »
https://www.airforce-technology.com/news/usaf-receives-10000th-aim-9x-sidewinder-missile/

Está explicado porque é que não há AIM-9X na FAP, os gajos ficam com eles todos.  :toto:
 
Os seguintes utilizadores agradeceram esta mensagem: NVF

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mafets

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Re: U.S.A.F. - Força Aérea dos Estados Unidos
« Responder #569 em: Julho 26, 2021, 04:47:24 pm »
F35 não?  :mrgreen:

https://www.cavok.com.br/usaf-voltara-a-treinar-operacoes-de-pousos-e-decolagens-de-a-10s-em-rodovias?fbclid=IwAR3234zWZjuszE0iolwUDmd2OKsiOJfGNSOCDgSbxgq369NP2jw1C4XMcKk

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Uma parte de uma rodovia do norte de Michigan, nos EUA, será fechada quando a Força Aérea dos EUA começará o treinamento do pessoal para pousar em estradas civis como parte da preparação para o exercício anual de guerra Northern Strike no próximo mês.


Os aviadores tentarão pousar dois C-146 e quatro aeronaves A-10 na M-32, perto do Alpena Combat Readiness Training Center em Alpena County, na quinta-feira, 5 de agosto, de acordo com uma reportagem da WPBN/WGTU. A rodovia ficará fechada das 8h às 13h de leste de Herron Road a oeste de King Settlement Road para o exercício.





Cumprimentos
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/