Marinha da Índia

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Re: Marinha da Índia
« Responder #90 em: Dezembro 15, 2020, 02:27:58 pm »


Primeira imagem da demonstração de descolagem de um F/A-18E Super Hornet através de rampa
Foto: Eric Hildebrandt/US Navy

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India’s only carrier, the INS Vikramaditya, is equipped with a ski-jump ramp to launch aircraft, as is a second carrier - the INS Vikrant - that has yet to enter service.

In US Navy service the Super Hornet is launched by catapults, a capability that could feature on a proposed third Indian aircraft carrier.

“The [ski-jump] testing is going to take place sometime in the first quarter at [NAS] Patuxent River,” says Shockey.

New Delhi has a requirement for 57 carrier-borne fighters - a contest which will pit the Super Hornet against the Dassault Rafale.

In addition, the Indian Navy has elected to proceed with an ambitious all-new twin-engined carrier-based fighter, abandoning its proposed Hindustan Aeronautics LCA Navy MkII.
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

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Re: Marinha da Índia
« Responder #91 em: Maio 12, 2021, 11:45:57 am »
Indian Navy’s aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya had a minor fire incident on 8 May, with all personnel safe and no damage done.


Courtesy of Indian Navy
The fire was immediately put down by the Navy personnel, according to the local sources. No damage was done to both the Navy personnel and the vessel.

INS Vikramaditya is a modified Navy Kiev-class aircraft carrier that India bought from Russia in 2013. Previously named Admiral Gorshkov, it was renamed in honor of Vikramaditya, the legendary emperor of ancient India.

The warship was originally built as Baku and commissioned in 1987, and served the Soviet Navy before the Russian Navy. It decommissioned in 1996.

After being purchased by the Indian Navy, it was extensively refurbished with new propulsion systems, hull sections, sensors, and flight deck. It was operationally deployed with a full complement of MiG-29 aircraft in May 2014.

The ship was berthed in Karwar Harbour in the southwestern state of Karnataka.

An investigation is launched to identify the cause of the fire.

https://www.navaltoday.com/2021/05/10/ins-vikramaditya-caught-minor-fire/
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Re: Marinha da Índia
« Responder #92 em: Maio 24, 2021, 06:42:29 am »
A España servir hasta morir
 
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Re: Marinha da Índia
« Responder #93 em: Junho 09, 2021, 08:21:41 am »
Indian navy to float $6 billion tender for six submarines
By: Vivek Raghuvanshi    1 day ago


The Indian Navy's third Scorpene-class submarine "Karanj" is pictured at its launch ceremony at the Mazagon Dock Shipyard in Mumbai in 2018. International shipbuilders are now vying for another submarine contract cleared by the Indian government under the name Project 75-I. (Punit Paranjpe/AFP via Getty Images)


NEW DELHI – India’s government has approved the launch of a $6.14 billion program for the construction of six conventional submarines under Project 75-I.

The approval was granted by the defense ministry’s procurement body, the Defence Acquisition Council, on June 4. It permits the Indian navy to publish a tender for six submarines, with a target audience of domestic shipbuilders.

Officials cleared the issue of a Request for Proposals (RfP), which “envisages indigenous construction of six conventional submarines equipped with the state-of-the-art Air Independent Propulsion (AIP) system,” the ministry of defense said in a press statement.

“This is a landmark approval, being the first case processed under the strategic partnership model,” the statement reads. India’s strategic partner’s policy, introduced by the MoD in June 2017, allows the selection of private-sector companies to produce major weapons and platforms, including submarines, in partnership with overseas original equipment manufacturers (OEMs).

A senior Indian navy official said the MoD has already shortlisted two domestic companies – state-owned Mazagon Dockyard Limited (MDL) and private firm Larsen & Toubro Ltd, and five foreign vendors: Rubin Design Bureau of Russia, Naval Group of France, Navantia of Spain, ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems (TKMS) of Germany, and Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering of South Korea.

The official said a formal tender will be issued to two domestic shipyards within the next two months, with the expectation that those companies will then team up with one of the five foreign vendors.

https://www.defensenews.com/global/asia-pacific/2021/06/07/indian-navy-to-float-6-billion-tender-for-six-submarines/
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Re: Marinha da Índia
« Responder #94 em: Julho 21, 2021, 10:05:19 am »

Once fully implemented, the Project-75(I) submarine program would complement the Indian Navy existing fleets of submarines (Credit: Indian Navy)

Indian MoD Issues A Request For Proposal For The Construction Of Six P-75(I) Submarines

As a major initiative towards ‘Make in India’, Ministry of Defence (MoD) has issued Request of Proposal (RFP) for the first acquisition programme under the Strategic Partnership Model for construction of six AIP fitted Conventional Submarines named Project 75 (India) [P-75(I)] for the Indian Navy, on July 20, 2021.
Martin Manaranche  20 Jul 2021

Indian Ministry of Defence press release

The RFP was issued to shortlisted Strategic Partners (SPs) or Indian Applicant Companies for the project viz, M/s Mazagaon Dock Shipbuilders Limited (MDL) and M/s Larsen & Tubro (L&T). The project cost is over Rs 40,000 crore.

Project-75(I) envisages indigenous construction of six modern conventional submarines (including associated shore support, Engineering Support Package, training and spares package) with contemporary equipment, weapons & sensors including Fuel-Cell based AIP (Air Independent Propulsion Plant), advanced torpedoes, modern missiles and state of the art countermeasure systems. This would provide a major boost to the indigenous design and construction capability of submarines in India, in addition to bringing in the latest submarine design and technologies as part of the project.

Post receipt of responses to the Expression of Interest (EoI), shortlisting of potential Strategic Partners (SPs) and Foreign OEMs was undertaken. The shortlisted SPs to whom the RFP has been issued would be collaborating with any of the shortlisted Foreign OEMs viz, M/s Naval Group-France, M/s TKMS-Germany, M/s JSC ROE-Russia, M/s Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering Co Ltd-South Korea and M/s Navantia-Spain. These five foreign firms are the world leaders in the field of conventional submarine design, construction and all other related technologies. The foreign OEMs will be the technology partner in the SP Model. Foreign OEMs will enable SP for construction of submarines, achieving high levels of indigenization, and ToT for various technologies. These OEMs would enable setting up of dedicated manufacturing lines for these submarines in India by providing ToT for submarine design and other technologies and make India the global hub for submarine design and production.

The project would not only aid in boosting the core submarine/ship building industry but would also greatly enhance manufacturing/industrial sector, especially the MSME by development of an industrial eco-system for manufacture of associated spares/systems/equipment related to submarines. In order to achieve these objectives, the RFP has key features like mandatory level of indigenous manufacture of platforms, ToT for design/ manufacture/ maintenance of submarines and a few critical equipment and systems, setting up of an eco-system in India for such indigenisation and incentivisation for other key technologies, etc.

The overall aim would be to progressively build indigenous capabilities in the public/private sector to design, develop and manufacture complex weapon systems for the future needs of the Armed Forces. This will be an important step towards meeting broader national objectives, encouraging self reliance and aligning the defence sector with the ‘Make in India’ initiative of the Government.

-End-


https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2021/07/indian-mod-issues-a-request-for-proposal-for-the-construction-of-six-p-75i-submarines/
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Re: Marinha da Índia
« Responder #95 em: Agosto 04, 2021, 11:58:56 am »
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
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Re: Marinha da Índia
« Responder #96 em: Setembro 13, 2021, 08:11:07 am »
The Indian Navy’s future power: Kolkata-Class and Visakhapatnam-Class Destroyers




The Kolkata-class and Visakhapatnam-class destroyers are the Indian Navy’s most proficient surface combatants today. Therefore, they will retain these designations until the Project 18-class destroyers are launched in 2028.

History and Background
In 1980, India began an indigenous destroyer design and construction program. The first vessel in this series, INS Delhi, was put down in 1987 and launched in 1991. However, due to the Soviet Union’s disintegration, the armament systems for the Delhi-class, also known as the Project 15-class, we’re unable to be delivered on time. As a result, the program was delayed by three years. Finally, the Indian Navy could commission INS Delhi in 1997.

In 1986, India launched the Kolkata-class destroyer program as a replacement for the Delhi-class destroyers. Initially, the program’s objective was to design and build a surface combatant capable of superior air defense, ground attack, anti-submarine warfare, and anti-ship warfare to its predecessor. However, the Indian Navy later requested a new destroyer based on the Delhi class with advanced technology subsystems and a stealth design. Thus, in 2000, India authorized the construction of a new kind of warship dubbed the Kolkata-class.



The Kolkata-Class
The Kolkata class, also known as the Project 15A-class, has similar dimensions to the Delhi class. But, there are nearly 2,500 modifications to its design than its predecessor’s. Similar to previous naval shipbuilding programs, India also experienced unfortunate problems and delays in the Kolkata class. Russia could not deliver naval-grade steel on time. While the design works continued, the Indian Navy decided to change the ship’s surface-to-air missile system and gun. Also, it demanded the inclusion of a sonar dome and modification of the helicopter hangar. Naturally, these changes caused delays.

In 2003, Mazagon Dock Limited lay down INS Kolkata, the first ship of this type. However, the difficulties were not resolved. The Ukrainian supplier was unable to supply the ship’s propellers and shafts. As a result, India had to place a new order with Russia for propellers and shafts in 2006. In the same year, INS Kolkata was launched. However, some issues arose during the sea trials. For instance, working the engine, gearbox, and shaft concurrently resulted in increased noise. Additionally, a malfunctioning carbon dioxide valve resulted in a tragic accident in 2014. Each issue is addressed individually, and the Indian Navy commissioned the INS Kolkata in 2014.

Three ships of this class are among the region’s most capable surface combatants, and they represent a watershed moment in India’s shipbuilding technology.

The Visakhapatnam-Class
Visakhapatnam-class aircraft, also known as Project 15B-class aircraft, is a more capable variant of the Kolkata class. In 2011, India authorized the construction of the Visakhapatnam-class. Its hull is identical to that of the Kolkata class. However, significant alterations have occurred in the superstructure. For instance, the Visakhapatnam-class is more stealthy than its forerunner. The bridge and tower have been rebuilt to lower the radar cross-section. Additionally, it features a flush deck and enhanced acoustic and infrared signature reduction technologies. The Visakhapatnam-class helicopter is secured through a rail-less helicopter traversing system.



It is network-centric in design and includes a ship data network, an autonomous power management system, and a combat management system. This feature enables the complement to be reduced while enhancing fighting efficiency. In 2013, India lay down the first of four ships in its class, the INS Visakhapatnam. Two years later, she was launched. This year, the Indian Navy intends to commission the destroyer.

General Features of Kolkata-Class
The Kolkata class has a total enrollment of 390 crew. It has a 7,400-ton displacement. The destroyer measures 163.2 meters in length, 17.4 meters in beam, and 6.5 meters in draught. Four Zorya-Mashproekt DT-59 reversible gas turbines with a combined output of 20,705 horsepower offer a top speed of 30 knots. The ship’s range is 15,000 kilometres at an economical speed of 18 knots. The frigate is armed with two eight-cell vertical launchers for BrahMos anti-ship missiles, four eight-cell vertical launchers for Barak 8 air defence missiles, a 76mm Super Rapido gun, four AK-630 close-in weapon systems, four 533mm torpedo tubes, and two RBU-6000 anti-submarine warfare rocket launchers.

The Kolkata class is equipped with a spacious hangar and flight deck to accommodate two Sea King or Dhruv helicopters. Visakhapatnam-class aircraft is slightly lighter than its predecessors. These ships are capable of network-centric warfare. Due to its cooperative engagement capability, a destroyer of these classes may execute an operation using sensor data from other boats and armament systems. The Indian Navy is the second Navy in the world, after the US Navy, to have achieved the capacity and the first in Asia.



These classes’ S-band EL/M-2248 MF-STAR radars are capable of surveillance and fire control operations. It can detect, identify, and track fighter jets at a range of 250 kilometres and missiles at a range of 25 kilometres. The radar is capable of monitoring more than 100 targets concurrently. The D-band LW 08 radar can detect a target with a radar cross-section of 2 square meters at a range of 260 kilometres. It is capable of tracking 64 targets concurrently.

General Features of The Visakhapatnam-class
The Visakhapatnam-class ships are armed with the 127mm Mk 45 Mod 5 gun, which ranges 37,000 meters. The EL/M-2248 MF-STAR radar controls the destroyers’ AK-630 close-in weapon systems. Five thousand rounds per minute are the rate of firing of the AK-630. It has an effective range of around 5,000 meters. The anti-submarine warfare rocket launcher RBU-6000 has an effective range of 5,230 meters and a depth capability of 1,000 meters. Typically, salvos of 1, 2, 4, 8, or 12 rockets are launched. Automatic reloading occurs. These ships are armed with 53-65 KE active homing torpedoes with a range of 18,000 meters or SET-65 active-passive homing torpedoes with 20,000 meters. These destroyers are equipped with aviation facilities to accommodate two Sea King or Dhruv helicopters.

Conclusion
China’s ambition today is to control the whole Indian Ocean, beginning with the Malacca Strait. It works to forge alliances with many countries in the region, most notably Pakistan, to accomplish this purpose. As a result, the already tricky Sino-Indian relations have deteriorated further in recent years. A powerful navy is critical for India now more than ever. That increases the value of destroyers of the Kolkata and Visakhapatnam classes. The Kolkata-class destroyers are assigned to the Indian Navy’s Western Naval Command and India’s shipbuilding industry’s pride and joy.

https://navalpost.com/kolkata-and-visakhapatnam-class-ddg/
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas