Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?

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Cabeça de Martelo

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #255 em: Dezembro 21, 2018, 11:05:41 am »
Isto são péssimas noticias, já que o Mattis era um (dos poucos) elementos estabilizadores no governo Norte-Americano e alguém em quem as Forças Armadas tinham em grande conta.
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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #256 em: Dezembro 21, 2018, 02:26:00 pm »
Mattis is out, and Blackwater is back: ‘We are coming’
By: Tara Copp



Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis is out.

Mattis' resignation comes amid news that President Donald Trump has directed the drawdown of 2,000 U.S. forces in Syria, and 7,000 U.S. forces from Afghanistan, a U.S. official confirmed to Military Times, a story first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

This month, in the January/February print issue of the gun and hunting magazine “Recoil," the former contractor security firm Blackwater USA published a full-page ad, in all black with a simple message: “We are coming.”

Is the war in Afghanistan — and possibly elsewhere ― about to be privatized?

If Blackwater returns, it would be the return of a private security contractor that was banned from Iraq, but re-branded and never really went away. By 2016 Blackwater had been re-branded several times and was known at the time as Constellis Group, when it was purchased by the Apollo Holdings Group. Reuters reported earlier this year that Apollo had put Constellis up for sale, but in June the sale was put on hold.

Blackwater’s founder and former CEO Erik Prince has courted President Donald Trump’s administration since he took office with the idea that the now 17-year Afghan War will never be won by a traditional military campaign. Prince has also argued that the logistical footprint required to support that now multi-trillion dollar endeavor has become too burdensome. Over the summer and into this fall Prince has engaged heavily with the media to promote the privatization; particularly as the Trump administration’s new South Asia Strategy, which was crafted with Mattis, passed the one-year mark.

Prince has no connection to the current Constellis group; if Blackwater does return to operations, it is not clear what, if any tie, Prince would have to the endeavor.

Constellis, which had maintained a footprint at Camp Integrity by the Kabul Airport through its previous iteration as “Academi” has leased land at the facility to hold another 800 personnel, Military Times learned.

The news of a leaning on a smaller number of privatized forces, instead of a larger U.S. military footprint — and contracted support for U.S. forces that knew few bounds and at times included coffee shops, base exchanges, restaurants, a hockey rink and local vendor shops — may be welcomed by current U.S. military leadership on the ground. That includes former Joint Special Operations Command chief Army Lt. Gen. Scott Miller, a source familiar with Miller’s approach told Military Times. Miller replaced Gen. John Nicholson as the head of all U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan in September.

In an previous exclusive interview with Military Times, Prince said he would scrap the NATO mission there and replace the estimated 23,000 forces in country with a force of 6,000 contracted personnel and 2,000 active-duty special forces.

The potential privatization of the Afghan War was previously dismissed by the White House, and roundly criticized by Mattis, who saw it as a risk to emplace the nation’s national security goals in the hands of contractors.

“When Americans put their nation’s credibility on the line, privatizing it is probably not a wise idea,” Mattis told reporters in August.

But Mattis is out now, one in a series of moves that has surprised most of the Pentagon.

Drastic change would “be more likely” now, one DOD official said.

https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2018/12/21/mattis-is-out-and-blackwater-is-back-we-are-coming/
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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #257 em: Dezembro 21, 2018, 03:03:53 pm »
Lawmakers dismayed over Mattis’ sudden departure
By: Leo Shane III


Defense Secretary Jim Mattis walks through the Capitol before a House Appropriations hearing on April 25, 2018. <strong>Lawmakers from both parties expressed concerns about Mattis' sudden resignation announcement this week.</strong> (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)

WASHINGTON — Congressional leaders reacted with shock and dismay at the sudden resignation announcement of Defense Secretary Jim Mattis on Thursday, with many blasting President Donald Trump’s reckless policies for forcing the popular former general out of office.

In a resignation letter released Thursday, Mattis said he will step aside in February so Trump can select a new military leader “whose views are better aligned with yours.” The letter appeared to contradict recent White House decisions to withdraw troops from Syria and Afghanistan, and Trump’s overall views on traditional U.S. alliances.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders downplayed the disagreements in a meeting with reporters Thursday night.

“Secretary Mattis has served the country admirably for over four decades,” she said. “He and the president have a good relationship, but sometimes they disagree. The president always listens to the members of his national team, but at the end of the day it’s the president’s decision to make."

But both Republicans and Democrats on Capitol Hill called Mattis’ departure a severe blow for the administration and the country. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., called it “regrettable” that Mattis won’t be in the middle of the White House’s key national security discussions anymore.

“It’s essential that the United States maintain and strengthen the post-World War II alliances that have been carefully built by leaders in both parties,” he said in an unusual rebuke of Trump. “We must also maintain a clear-eyed understanding of our friends and foes, and recognize that nations like Russia are among the latter.”

House minority leader and presumed next House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she was “shaken” by the announcement.

"There is something very wrong with this picture," she told reporters, noting Mattis’ resignation letter raises serious concerns about instability in the administration. “Our troops look to Secretary Mattis as a leader, and now he is going to be leaving them. This is very serious for our country.”

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Old Marines never die, but they do resign after the President ignores their advice, betrays our allies, rewards our enemies, and puts the nation’s security at risk. Turn out the lights when Mattis leaves; we will not see his like again while Trump remains in office.
  https://t.co/fKUTe5nPIR— Adam Schiff (@RepAdamSchiff) December 20, 2018

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called Mattis “one of the few symbols of strength and stability in this administration.” Senate Armed Services Committee ranking member Jack Reed, D-R.I., called the resignation a sign of Trump’s misguided defense policies run amok.

“(Mattis) didn’t resign because he grew weary from the fight,” Reed said in a statement. “I think he saw this as his last best chance to focus the nation’s attention on the serious missteps President Trump is making and get him to change course.”

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As @realDonaldTrump drives away the grownups in the room, there is cause for genuine concern.

I thank & honor Secretary Mattis for a lifetime of service.
— Sheldon Whitehouse (@SenWhitehouse) December 21, 2018

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., a prominent supporter of the president who spent much of this week sparring with him over the decision to withdraw 2,000 U.S. troops from Syria in coming months, called Mattis “one of the great military leaders in American history” and urged Trump to “listen to your national security team, who are immensely talented.”

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Just read Gen. Mattis resignation letter. It makes it abundantly clear that we are headed towards a series of grave policy errors which will endanger our nation,damage our alliances & empower our adversaries
. 1/2 pic.twitter.com/ztc0Yihccn— Marco Rubio (@marcorubio) December 20, 2018

Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., said Mattis “was giving advice that (Trump) needs to hear” and that the president’s policies of isolationism are “weak strategy that will harm Americans.”

Focus on Capitol Hill now turns to who Trump’s pick to replace Mattis may be, and what kind of confirmation fight that nominee will face.

Mattis was so highly regarded among lawmakers that they overwhelmingly approved a waiver allowing him to serve in the civilian defense leadership post even though by law his did not have enough time since his military service to be eligible. The Senate confirmed him by a 99-1 vote just hours after Trump was inaugurated.

A Military Times poll conducted in late September found that nearly 84 percent of troops had a favorable view of Mattis' work leading the armed forces. Among officers, the figure was almost 90 percent.

https://www.militarytimes.com/news/pentagon-congress/2018/12/21/lawmakers-dismayed-over-mattis-sudden-departure/

« Última modificação: Dezembro 21, 2018, 03:06:47 pm por Cabeça de Martelo »
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Lusitano89

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #258 em: Dezembro 22, 2018, 07:30:35 pm »
Enviado dos EUA para coligação contra o Estado Islâmico demite-se


 

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #259 em: Dezembro 22, 2018, 09:55:41 pm »
 

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #260 em: Dezembro 23, 2018, 09:45:39 pm »
Trump "apressa" nomeação da pasta da defesa


 

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #261 em: Dezembro 25, 2018, 12:12:31 pm »
Trump "à espera" dos democratas


 

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #262 em: Dezembro 26, 2018, 11:46:32 am »
Rapaz guatemalteco morre em detenção nos EUA


 

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #263 em: Dezembro 27, 2018, 12:18:09 pm »
Os efeitos da paralisação parcial do governo dos EUA



 

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #264 em: Janeiro 04, 2019, 03:14:48 pm »
Sem muro, democratas tentam por termo a "shutdown" nos EUA


 

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #265 em: Janeiro 04, 2019, 10:32:26 pm »
Braço-de-ferro entre Republicanos e Democratas está para durar


 

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #266 em: Janeiro 05, 2019, 02:50:16 pm »
The clash between Trump and his generals


President Donald Trump selected retired Marine Gen. Jim Mattis as his secretary of defense. With Republicans in charge of Congress, a priority of the new team is to boost the military budget by tens of billions of dollars. The administration has also loosened the rules of engagement and increased the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan. (Susan Walsh/AP)

A prominent retired four-star admiral says that several former generals have left President Donald Trump’s administration because their advice and many years of military experience did not make a difference in swaying the White House on key national security issues.

Former NATO Supreme Allied Commander Adm. James Stavridis noted in Time Magazine Thursday that former Marine Corps Gen. Jim Mattis, Trump’s former defense secretary, is only the latest high-profile departure. That list now includes his former chief of staff, retired Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly, and his former national security adviser, retired Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster.

“The President famously does not actually read the voluminous policy papers with which he is presented. From the perspective of a senior military mind, this would be akin to a car refusing to be gassed up,” Stavridis wrote.

“In the end, each of them had to ask himself, At what point does my serving in this White House become less a guardrail and more an enabler? And what will it ultimately mean that the hard-won credibility of my life and career supported the work of this administration,” Stavridis wrote.

Trump made no secret of his skepticism of military leadership even before he took office, telling voters in 2015 “I know more about ISIS than the generals do. Believe me.”

In the time that’s followed, Trump has lashed out at some of the most revered military generals of the most recent generation.

In November he called retired Navy Adm. Bill McRaven, a career SEAL who led the raid against Osama bin Laden a “Hillary Clinton fan” and chided McRaven for not getting bin Laden “sooner.”

In January, Trump questioned even the value of retired Army Gen. Stanley McCrystal’s four-star rank, putting “general” in quotation marks in a debasing tweet.

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“General” McChrystal got fired like a dog by Obama. Last assignment a total bust. Known for big, dumb mouth. Hillary lover! https://t.co/RzOkeHl3KV— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 1, 2019

Last, on Wednesday, after much backlash on the departure of Mattis, Trump said during a cabinet meeting that his former defense secretary didn’t actually resign, but was fired, despite Mattis releasing a much-publicized letter announcing his policy splits with the White House.

Trump also questioned Mattis' accomplishments.

“What’s he done for me?” Trump said Wednesday to reporters during a White House cabinet meeting. “How has he done in Afghanistan? Not too good. Not too good. I’m not happy with what he’s done in Afghanistan. And I shouldn’t be happy.”

“I mean, I wish him well. I hope he does well,” Trump said. “But as you know, President Obama fired him, and essentially so did I. I want results.”

“I think I would’ve been a good general, but who knows,” Trump said.

https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2019/01/04/the-clash-between-trump-and-his-generals/
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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #267 em: Janeiro 07, 2019, 01:45:22 pm »
Donald Trump pede muro de aço em vez de cimento



 

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #268 em: Janeiro 09, 2019, 11:23:58 am »
Trump exige financiamento para muro na fronteira com o México


 

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Re: Estarão os EUA a ficar para trás?
« Responder #269 em: Janeiro 10, 2019, 11:46:03 am »
Trump visita fronteira sem solução para o "shutdown"