Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)

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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #60 em: Abril 21, 2021, 09:05:48 am »
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The FDI (Frégate de Défense et d'Intervention) in "Hellenic Navy" configuration. It features 32 VLS for ASTER surface to air missiles and a RAM launcher as CIWS. Combined with its SeaFire radar, the FDI HN is a heavily armed surface combatant. Naval Group image.

In Details: Naval Group’s Frigate Proposal To Greece

French shipbuilder Naval Group is proposing its new FDI for the Hellenic Navy frigate requirement. Four frigates in a special "Hellenic Navy" configuration are part of a wider package offer by the shipbuilder, who partnered with MBDA and Thales...
Xavier Vavasseur 21 Apr 2021

To fully answer the Hellenic Navy needs, the "FDI HN" comes with 32 VLS for ASTER surface to air missiles and a RAM launcher.

It recently surfaced that the Hellenic Navy need was not limited to new-built frigates. Their need is so urgent that they require a “stop-gap” solution (consisting in the procurement of second-hand vessels or a lease of existing vessels) as well as an upgrade to the in-service Hydra-class frigates.

We previously reported on the proposals from several competitors (details and links at the end of this article). This time around, we contacted Naval Group to learn more about the French proposal to Greece. Laurent Mourre, Vice President of Sales for Europe at Naval Group answered our questions.

Naval News – Can you please detail Naval Group’s offer in terms of new ships ?

Laurent Moure – The French offer is a comprehensive and robust package designed to ensure Greece has the best capabilities in the shortest timeframe with optimised costs.

For the new ships, we offer the FDI HN (Hellenic Navy) which is the most modern new generation frigate.

The 4 units will be delivered in a very tight timeframe. The first frigate will be built in Lorient and in service by 2025, and the 3 others built in Greece will follow in 2027, 2028and 2029.

Naval Group has a long track record of successful transfers of technology across the world. The frigates will be co-produced in Greece, with significant involvement of the French team. Construction of the 1st frigate in France will ensure delivery to the Hellenic Navy in the shortest timeframe and secure the transfer of technology to allow construction of the other 3 frigates in Greece. The transfer of technology will ensure long-term autonomy for HN and significant economic benefits for the Hellenic naval and defence industries and for the supply chain in Greece.

Naval News – What is Naval Group proposing for the interim (gap filler) solution ? Which former French Navy ships are being proposed ?

Laurent Moure – The French Navy is proposing a strong gap filler solution with 2 frigates available in less than a year and at no cost.

AAW frigate Jean-Bart and ASW frigate Latouche-Tréville are currently in service in the French Navy and have prestigious operational records. They will be available for the Hellenic Navy in early 2022 after extensive maintenance and regeneration works.

The main mission of AAW frigate Jean-Bart is to carry out area anti-aircraft warfare, for the benefit of a naval air force with warships, including an aircraft carrier and possibly commercial ships.

The main missions of ASW Frigate Latouche-Tréville are Anti-submarine warfare on high seas and protection of high value units.

They have been engaged in national operations, but also for joint operations and exercise with NATO and EU forces demonstrating the capabilities and interoperability. They will be in service within the Hellenic Navy in 2022, ensuring a smooth transition with the FDI HN.

Naval News – What about the Hydra-class upgrade ?

Laurent Moure – The systems on-board the MEKO 200HN frigates will be fully interoperable will all NATO and EU fleets, including the FDI HN who like all Naval Group frigates are capable of assuming all multimission roles within any kind of allied NATO fleet and obviously within the HN fleet.

Naval News – Can you shed light on the Hellenic Navy configuration of the FDI ?

Laurent Moure – The FDI is a multi-mission frigate designed to serve as the backbone of a first rank and operational navy. She is the most modern frigate of her category and responds to all HN operational needs. Ordered by the French Navy, FDI will have the same missions than the FREMM frigate inside Aircraft Carrier Group.

She has been designed to deal with the latest threats, and her physical and digital infrastructures guarantee an evolutionary potential that will ensure that the Hellenic Navy will be able to deal with emerging and future threats over the life of the ship (UAVs, Cyber, anti-ship ballistic missiles, hypersonic missiles, stealth threats underwater or above water, etc.).

The FDI HN will be a power and sovereignty asset for Greece. The final configuration will be the decision of the Greek authorities, but she will offer unrivalled capabilities for the permanent control of air and sea space and autonomy of action, in support of the political and military objectives set. Like all Naval Group frigates, the FDI HN will be fully interoperable with NATO and EU fleets. She will be capable of assuming all mission roles within any kind of allied fleet and within the HN fleet.

The FDI HN is a compendium of the best technologies from the European defence industries Thales, MBDA and Naval Group. The 32 Aster missiles onboard can be engaged very quickly in all directions and ensure an unmatched hit-to-kill capability, making it possible to defeat saturating attacks. RAM, as CIWS capability, will be integrated into the FDI HN Combat System to provide 360 degrees short range protection against incoming missiles in addition to the 76 mm gun, completing the long-range protection provided by ASTER missiles

This makes the FDI HN the only frigate offered to the Hellenic Navy capable of protecting efficiently shore facilities, cities and Greek islands.

Naval News – Have you visited shipyards in Greece? Have you identified local partners already?

Laurent Moure – It is in Naval Group’s culture to select credible and reliable local partners when entering a country. The group has a long history of conducting transfers of technology and know-how in major complex industrial programs all over the world.

Greek shipyards and the Greek naval industry have demonstrated their capacities in the past.  The French team has designed a very ambitious industrial cooperation plan that will contribute to the revitalization of a profitable naval industry while significantly increasing Greece’s autonomy and sovereignty. It will reinforce the international recognition of the excellence of the Greek naval industry while providing the best high-end “Made in Greece” warships to defend the country’s citizens and interests.

We have visited the shipyards and met with many industry partners. More than Ten Greek companies have already been pre-qualified and lots of others are in the process of being pre-qualified. We have also signed partnerships with three universities.

To further our survey of potential Greek partners, a Naval Group Task Force will be based in Athens for the next 2 months.

Naval News – Is the French government supporting your bid ? Do you have French or European partners for this bid ?

Laurent Moure – Yes, this bid is a Team France effort between Naval Group, Thales and MBDA and is fully supported by French authorities.

Laurent Mourre wanted to add the following:

Beyond reinforcing the strong ties between France and Greece, the French offer addresses all the current and future needs of the Hellenic Navy. It ensures the Hellenic Navy will operate the best frigates in the shortest timeframe with a Gap filler solution available in less than a year and the first new frigate as soon as 2025. It also ensures the success of the “Made in Greece” frigates as Naval Group is the only bidder with such a track-record of successful transfer of technologies. The French offer also goes beyond the frigate program with an extensive cooperation plan to revitalise the Hellenic naval industry, ensuring several hundreds of highly qualified jobs and generating long-term economic spin-offs in Greece for decades to come.

For the record, France and Greece were involved in exclusive negotiations for a while, for two FDI type frigates. However, despite the signing of an LOI in October 2019, Greece decided to keep its options open and is now considering several designs. The designs being considered today, in addition to Naval Group’s FDI, are:

Lockheed Martin with the MMSC
Navantia with the F110
Damen Sigma 11515
Babcock with the Type 31/Arrowhead
TKMS with the MEKO A200NG (or MEKO A300)
Fincantieri (allegedly with the FREMM)
The procurement process doesn’t seem to be a “classic open tender” but rather government to government (G to G) discussions with each party.

https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2021/04/in-details-naval-groups-frigate-proposal-to-greece/
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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #61 em: Maio 04, 2021, 06:23:40 pm »
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What are the differences between the Hydra class from previous MEKO 200 class surface combatants?
What are the differences between the MEKO 200HN class of the Hellenic Navy and the MEKO 200 ANZ class of the Royal Australian and Royal New Zealand Navy?
What are the capabilities of the main weapon systems and radars of these frigates?
What major events have made the ANZAC class a symbol?
https://www.youtube.com/user/HSMW/videos

"Tudo pela Nação, nada contra a Nação."
 

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redkukulkane

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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #62 em: Maio 04, 2021, 08:22:05 pm »
As principais caracteristicas em infograficos dos concorrentes, a proximas fragatas gregas. 8)


https://www.navalanalyses.com/2021/04/infographics-48-characteristics-of.html
 
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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #63 em: Junho 02, 2021, 03:41:29 pm »
Oferta del astillero español Navantia para la Armada Helénica

Por Juan Carlos Benavidez -31 mayo, 2021



Según un comunicado de prensa publicado por Navantia el 31 de mayo de 2021, la compañía se ha comprometido a la entrega de 4 nuevas fragatas para la flota de la Armada Helénica y a la modernización de la Clase Hydra dentro del exigente calendario de la Armada Helénica.

Las nuevas fragatas incluyen su último diseño de fragata inteligente, la F-110, que se convertirá en la columna vertebral de la Armada española.

La clase F110, también conocida como clase Bonifaz, es una clase polivalente y antisubmarina de fragatas pesadas equipadas con el sistema de combate Aegis que se está desarrollando para la Armada española. El proyecto está siendo desarrollado conjuntamente por el Ministerio de Defensa español y la empresa estatal Navantia. La construcción de las fragatas comenzará en 2020 y su entrega está prevista entre 2023 y 2027.


Los buques tienen una capacidad de 6.100 toneladas y contarán con una tripulación de 150 personas. Las fragatas estarán equipadas con un sistema de combate español, SCOMBA, desarrollado por Navantia. Este sistema actúa como el cerebro del buque e integra todos los sensores y armas de la fragata, como los sensores de superficie, EW e IFF suministrados por Indra, el radar Band S y el lanzador vertical de Lockheed Martin, el AAW – SM-2 de Raytheon, los sistemas de guerra antisubmarina y los sonares SAES, pero también los sistemas de navegación y comunicaciones de Navantia Sistemas.

La clase Hydra es un grupo de cuatro fragatas en servicio en la Armada Helénica. Fueron diseñadas en Alemania y forman parte del grupo de buques de guerra modulares MEKO, en este caso, el diseño MEKO 200.

Para reforzar sus lazos con la industria griega, Navantia lanza el 9 de junio un portal web del Día de la Industria para relacionarse con el ecosistema industrial y de construcción naval griego, incorporando a empresas locales de todo tipo y tamaño.


https://www.zona-militar.com/2021/05/31/oferta-del-astillero-espanol-navantia-para-la-armada-helenica/
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #64 em: Junho 04, 2021, 08:43:15 am »
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #65 em: Junho 04, 2021, 01:38:31 pm »
Mais uma proposta interessante, é reencaminhar para o tópico das VdG também.  :mrgreen:
 

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"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #67 em: Junho 08, 2021, 11:00:29 pm »
No que toca a este tópico, sigo com interesse a disputa, no entanto, soube hoje que os Espanhóis foram eliminados, por questões políticas (apoio a Turquia).
Vai estar entre os Franceses e Holandeses.
Cps,

 
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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #68 em: Junho 09, 2021, 08:33:12 am »
No que toca a este tópico, sigo com interesse a disputa, no entanto, soube hoje que os Espanhóis foram eliminados, por questões políticas (apoio a Turquia).
Vai estar entre os Franceses e Holandeses.
Cps,

Confirma-se...

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Greece Short-Lists At Least 6 Offers For Hellenic Navy Frigate Program

On June 5, a meeting chaired by Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis on the procedures for evaluating proposals for the acquisition of new frigates revealed that the Spanish shipbuilder Navantia and its offer had not been selected.

Martin Manaranche 09 Jun 2021

Spain's F110 Frigate is not among them...

According to the Greek Ministry of Defense, during the meeting, a proposal to further examine the evaluation capabilities for the acquisition of frigates from the following countries was accepted: France, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Through this declaration, it is possible to notice that Spain is absent from the selected offers. No announcements were made to explain the refusal of Navantia’s bid.

As Naval News reported previously, the Hellenic Navy requested a procurement of four new frigates, but the need was not limited to new-built frigates. Their need is so urgent that they require a “stop-gap” solution (consisting in the procurement of second-hand vessels or a lease of existing vessels) as well as an upgrade to the in-service Hydra-class frigates.

The Navantia proposal consisted of:

Four new F110 frigates,
An interim solution consisting of delivering two new Alfa 3000 light frigates in only 35 months,
the modernization of the Greek Navy’s Hydra class frigates.
Unlike some of its competitors, Navantia’s stop gap solution did not consist of second-hand ships but of new ships. The Spanish shipbuilder’s proposal was to provide two brand new 3,000-tonne light frigates with anti-aircraft, anti-ship and anti-submarine capabilities.

It is understood that the designs still being considered today, are:

Lockheed Martin with the MMSC
Naval Group with the FDI/Belharra
Damen Sigma 11515
Babcock with the Type 31/Arrowhead
TKMS with the MEKO A200NG (or MEKO A300)
Fincantieri (allegedly with the FREMM)
There may be an additional American offer under consideration: A “mini Burke” design being pitched by local naval architect Gibbs & Cox.

https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2021/06/greece-short-lists-at-least-6-offers-for-hellenic-navy-frigate-program/
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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #69 em: Julho 11, 2021, 07:34:59 pm »
A Close Look At 3 Frigates On The New Shortlist For The Hellenic Navy

A shortlist was recently leaked for the future frigate of the Hellenic Navy. Naval News reviews in detail the three frigates at the top of this list.

In a previous article we reported about the alleged shortlist for the Hellenic Navy’s frigate competition. With the DEFEA defense exhibition in sight, we are now taking a close look at the ships in the so called “1st category” of this shortlist.



One of the proposed designs for the Sigma 11515 HN, seen here with the more advanced integrated mast and APAR radars

It is not surprising to see Damen and their proposal at the top of this list. Indeed, it is a very cost effective choice with its powerful equipment at a relatively low price, complemented by additional options to further increase the ships’ capabilities if required, their Sigma 11515 HN frigate proposal is more than fitting for the Hellenic Navy.

The standard version proposed offers a 4,440 tons ship, equipped with CODLOG (Combined Diesel-Electric Or Gas) propulsion, allowing it to reach up to 30 knots and still be able to conduct ASW operations with the quieter electric motors.

The Sigma 11515 HN is equipped to face a wide range of threats, and as such is fitted with an array of advanced sensors and armament to effectively detect and destroy potential targets, all while ensuring the protection of the ship.

As such, this frigate is capable of protecting itself and other assets with its comprehensive surface-to-air defensive equipment. Proposed with 16 Mk 41 VLS cells, it will be able to fit up to 32 ESSMs SAMs or a mix of ESSMs and SM-2s for longer range defense. With a Mk 49 CIWS for an additional 21 RAM surface-to-air missiles, this ship can defend both from long range threats and saturation attacks.

Morevover, the Sigma 11515 HN is well equipped for ASW missions. Indeed, it is fitted with advanced sensors, Kingklip Mk.2 hull mounted sonar and CAPTAS variable depth sonar (VDS), both from Thales, as well as effectors with a pair of triple torpedo tubes.

For surface targets, the Sigma 11515 HN is fitted with the classic configuration of eight SSMs, here AGM-84 Harpoons. Naval artillery is not lacking either, with a 76mn/62cal Super Rapido main gun from Leonardo and three 20mn Narwhal remote weapon stations (RWS) from Nexter.

The protection of the ship is assured both from the numerous decoys launchers, for a total of 36, to defend from any threats, as well as its extensive electronic warfare equipment. It is composed of electronic support measures, communication support system, jammers, communication interception capabilities and laser warning receivers.

While this standard configuration is offered at the very competitive price of approximately 550 millions euros per unit, Damen offers different options to further the ship’s capabilities.

For instance, the main gun can receive the STRALES upgrade which brings improved capabilities in anti air warfare (including against incoming missiles). The RWS can be replaced by 30mn ones, the number of the VLS cells can be doubled to 32 and the NS110 radar can be switched for the more powerful NS200 or Sea Master 400 also from Thales.
The latest configuration of the Sigma 11515 which came out in early June.

The most notable option is the version aimed at increasing AAW missions is offered for 600 millions euros with the standard equipment plus STRALES and the NS200 radar.

Like any other proposed ship here, this is not a perfect ship. However, while it can be critiqued on some aspects, most of the attacks against Damen’s frigate have been pushing the idea of a paper design, not mature enough to be selected by the Hellenic Navy.

These critiques are unfounded. First of all, the same could be argued about the other proposals, and would still be incorrect. The FDI-HN for instance, while originating from a design selected by the French Navy is technically also a paper design with the first ship delivered to the Marine Nationale only in 2023.

More importantly, major elements of the Sigma 11515 HN already are built, tested and operational. The complex diesel-electric engines for the CODLOG propulsion of the ship are already in place on the Holland class offshore patrol vessels of the Royal Netherlands Navy, built by Damen. Similarly, the SM400 radar proposed in some of the more advanced options for the ship is also fitted on the Holland class. This shipbuilder has vast experiences with this type of hulls, the 11515 HN being a variant of the Sigma family with the 9113 and the 10514. The armament itself is also fairly generic and proven, composed of Mk.41 VLS cells and a 76mn main gun from Leonardo, a common combination. As such, claims of immature or paper design do little sense.

As seen above, Damen proposed with this Sigma 11515 HN a cost efficient package, able to successfully meet the requirements of the Hellenic Navy and potentially exceed them with the different upgrades proposed in parallel with the standard version.


Artist impression of the proposed FDI-HN from Naval Group (seen here with a STRALES main gun). Naval Group image.

This new announcement of the FDI-HN being selected in the first category is particularly good news for Naval Group considering the difficulties they encountered with this Greek contract and the efforts they made to improve their proposal each time.

Indeed, Naval Group was aiming for a Greek purchase of the FDI since 2018 with the initial negotiations between them and Lockheed Martins. Eventually these exclusive talks were stopped in favor of a contract opened to a wider range of competitors.

Still, Naval Group carried on and adapted to the new situation. The requirement of the Hellenic Navy required an improved proposal to add the necessary equipment while still fitting within the tight budget. These changes led to the current proposal with the FDI-HN frigate.

The selected design is a frigate of around 4,500 tons of displacement, 122 meters in lengths with a 17 meters beam. The propulsion would remain in the CODAD (Combined Diesel And Diesel) configuration found on the French version of the frigate, with a maximum speed of 27 knots.

The main improvement from the original French design concerns saturation attacks. Since it is equipped with the excellent Sea Fire radar from Thales and the Aster-30 surface to air missile, the FDI is more than capable to serve as an area-denial frigate. However, with only 16 missiles in the initial proposal, one per Sylver A50 VLS cell, its resistance against saturation attacks appeared to be limited.

To remedy this issue, the newest design incorporates 32 Sylver A50 VLS cells for a mix of Aster-15/30 and VL-Mica NG (which, unlike ESSM, can not be quad-packed). This puts the total missile output of the cells to 32, double that of the original proposal. Moreover, this new frigate is also equipped with the Mk 49 CIWS with its 21 RAM missiles for close defense. This new package ensures the ship’s protection even against the most potent attacks.

As usual with French frigates, the ship proposed by Naval Group is well equipped for ASW missions. With a Kingklip Mk.2 hull mounted sonar and a CAPTAS 4C variable depth sonar, both from Thales, this frigate is equipped with some of the most advanced sensors available today for submarine hunting missions. MU90 lightweight torpedoes in twin tubes on each side of the hull are set to ensure the destruction of the detected threats.

Armed with eight SSMs in the form of MM40 Exocet Block IIIc (the latest variant of the missiles, with the new coherent seeker), a Leonardo Super Rapido 76mn/62cal main gun (or STRALES as an option) and two 20mm Narwhal RWS, the compact hull packs a rather powerful punch.

There still are issues with the French proposal, most of them originating from the initial French Navy requirements for their version of the FDI, shaping research and development.

Indeed, with all its qualities the ship still lacks any form of ECM, a significant flaw for a 21st century front line warship, set to operate in contested waters. In addition, while the ship is equipped for the naval version of the SCALP cruise missile, and is proposed with it, there are still concerns on whether or not the its integration price will be included in the final proposal.

Thus, we still have to wait to see what the final result will be but it is certain that Naval Group have now a solid proposal for the Hellenic Navy and have shown their determination and adaptation skills in this competition.


The Carlo Bergamini from the Italian Navy, a FREMM in General Purpose (GP) variant

Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri is the third company that made on this shortlist for the future frigate of the Hellenic Navy. This comes as quite a surprise since Fincantieri remained quite secretive on their offer as far as to what ship they would actually offer to Greece.

Rumours went all over the place, with some contradictory elements being mentioned from reputable sources. The main question was whether the FREMM-IT would be proposed or if it would be another ship such as a design derived from the Doha class air defence corvette.

However, with the recent successes of the FREMM design, the basic design of which was adopted for the US Navy’s Constellation class frigate, the two ships sold to Egypt in 2020 or the recent contract for the Indonesian Navy, it is quite likely that Fincantieri will try to capitalize on these achievements to promote the design to the Hellenic Navy, and as such it will be the ship we will study here.

The FREMM is a ship originating from a Franco-Italian agreement to build a common class of frigates. In the end two different designs emerged with two subclasses within the Italian FREMM, the general purpose (GP) and anti submarine warfare (ASW) versions. Initial rumors concerned the GP, general purpose, version for the Hellenic Navy.

This is a quite heavy frigate, displacing 6,700 tons for 144 meters and a nearly 20 meters beam. The Italian selected a CODLAG, Combined Diesel-Electric And Gas, propulsion configuration to allow for speeds in excess of 30 knots. With its size, this frigate can accommodate two helicopters in its two dedicated hangars, as opposed to only one on the French version.

The FREMM is fitted with an impressive set of sensors allowing it to adequately detect potential threats early on to ensure the protection of the ship and neighboring critical assets. Notable elements here include the excellent Kronos 3D radar from Leonardo, capable of more than 300km range, as well as the long list of complementary radar equipment such as the RAN-30X 2D medium range radar, the IRST SASS, silent acquisition and surveillance system, the 2D LPI, low probability of interception, surveillance radar and even the UMS 4110 CL hull sonar from Thales. This list is not exhaustive, many others equally as vital sensors being installed, but it is not desired to list all of them here, the excellent blog of Dimitri Mitch, Naval Analyses, should help those interested.

For its protection the frigate can count on a capable complement of decoys with the SLCAR-H decoys launchers, as well as the advanced electronic warfare systems present on the vessel. These are the NETTUNO 4100 ECM from Elettronica, found on all versions of the FREMMs and the ALTESSE C-ESM and COMMIT system from Thales.

The FREMM-It is armed with 16 Sylver A50 VLS cells for Aster 15/30 with another 16 behind available for 16 A70 if need be to equip cruise missiles. It is also fitted with eight SSMs, in the form of Teseo Mk.2 from MBDA, which can be changed for the MILAS ASW version if required. To complement this ASW capability, triple torpedo tubes are present on each side for the MU90 lightweight torpedo.

As it is often the case with Italian designs, the naval artillery is more than adequate. Indeed, it is armed with a 127mn/64cal main gun from Leonardo with the VULCANO upgrade, allowing it to reach targets at 100km with precision. A 76mn/62cal cannon is also equiped at the rear with the STRALES upgrade to enhance its capabilities and serve as a CIWS. Finally, two remotely controlled 25mn autocannons on each side complete this impressive display of firepower.

As seen here, the FREMM-IT from Fincantieri is a more than capable design. However, this also reflects in its price with it being the most expensive option on this list, at around 700 millions euros per unit. It must still be said that in the end, with crew training, maintenance and all other often overlooked factors, the original price difference might actually not differ significantly from each proposal, depending on how they are compared.

If this is the ship that ends up being proposed by Fincantieri, the Hellenic Navy will potentially have a very powerful new navy in its hands, if they can afford it. While initial rumors mentioned a FREMM in GP configuration, new ones tend to point towards an export variant of the “American FREMM” (i.e. Constellation class frigate) or a FREMM GP with US-made weapons and sensors. Naval News will make sure to shed light on this next week directly with the Italian shipbuilder, during DEFEA.

Conclusion

As seen here all of the shortlisted proposals for the Hellenic Navy would deliver a perfectly capable frigate, some more armed, some more expensive. And don’t forget the proposals in the so called “2nd” and “3rd” categories too, which may still win the tender. In the end we have to keep in mind that this is a non-exhaustive overview of an incredibly complex selection process, and that these ships are not in a vacuum, they are a part of a larger proposal and that other geopolitical factors will inevitably play in the final decision. Moreover, and as we have seen throughout this competition, things can change, these proposals are not set in stone and could evolve to better adapt to the situation. We only have to wait and see what the final result will be, and probably the best place to follow these events directly from Greece would be the excellent Naval Defense website.

https://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/forum/sea-warfare/224-nato-naval/page2

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Quando um Povo não Respeita as Suas FFAA, Não Respeita a Sua História nem se Respeita a Si Próprio  !!
 

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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #70 em: Julho 14, 2021, 08:59:00 am »
DEFEA 2021 Video: Hellenic Navy’s Future Frigate

Day 1 for Naval News at DEFEA 2021, the International Defense Exhibition held in Athens, Greece. We focused on the future frigate requirement of the Hellenic Navy and interviewed five of the six contenders.

Xavier Vavasseur  14 Jul 2021

The Hellenic Navy is seeking next generation frigates as well as a so-called “stop-gap” (interim) solution (consisting in the procurement of second-hand vessels or a lease of existing vessels). They also want to upgrade to the in-service Hydra-class frigates.

Here is the shipbuilders and designs we covered:

Fincantieri FREMM
Damen Sigma 11515
Naval Group FDI
Lockheed Martin HF2
Babcock Arrowhead 140


https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2021/07/defea-2021-video-hellenic-navys-future-frigate/
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #71 em: Julho 23, 2021, 02:01:04 pm »
DEFEA 2021: Israel Shipyards Introduce The Themistocles-Class Corvette
Israel shipyards introduced the Themistocles-class corvette at DEFEA – Defence Exhibition in Athens – last week. The company believes it is the right design to answer an upcoming Hellenic Navy corvette requirement.

https://www.navalnews.com/event-news/defea-2021/2021/07/defea-2021-israel-shipyards-introduce-the-themistocles-class-corvette/
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #72 em: Julho 23, 2021, 02:58:15 pm »
Se for a seguir as tendências actuais a Fincantieri leva o caneco com a FREMM, ao mesmo tempo deixam os "amigos" franceses não tão tristes e levam a menina bonita da região do mediterrâneo para casa.
An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile — hoping it will eat him last.
Sir Winston Churchill
Democracies aren’t overthrown; they’re given away
George Lucas, 2005
 

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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #73 em: Setembro 06, 2021, 08:19:52 am »





Citar
The MEKO 200 is a frigate (FFG) design by the German shipyard Blohm+Voss as part of the MEKO family of warships. A total 25 MEKO 200 frigates of seven (7) different configurations were built for Australia (8 ships), New Zealand (2 ships), Turkey (8 ships), Portugal (3 ships) and Greece (4 ships). The Australian and New Zealand frigates have received (or are about to complete) a MLU while Turkey is about to start the MLU of its four newest frigates. Portuguese frigates will receive a limited modernization that will necessitate repurposing the frigates for low-intensity missions only while Greece is currently planning to upgrade its four 3,400-ton Hydra-class (MEKO 200HN) frigates commissioned during the 1990s (1992 first ship, 1998 final ship), as part of an ambitious program that amounts to 5 billion euros.

https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2021/04/hellenic-navys-hydra-class-frigates-mlu-limited-budget-but-many-possibilities/
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 
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Re: Marinha Grega (Hellenic Navy)
« Responder #74 em: Setembro 24, 2021, 11:56:40 am »
Lockheed refines bid to modernize the Greek frigate fleet. Here’s what it’s offering.
By Megan Eckstein
 Thursday, Sep 16



An artist's rendering of Lockheed Martin's Hellenic Future Frigate design for Greece. (Lockheed Martin)

WASHINGTON — American defense company Lockheed Martin is continuing to update its bid to build the Hellenic Navy’s new frigates and modernize its current ones, with Greece set to choose a path forward for its surface fleet by the end of the year.

Greece has asked for a three-part solution to modernize its surface fleet amid increases in Russian submarine presence in the Mediterranean Sea, migration from Africa across the sea and tension with neighboring Turkey. The Hellenic Navy wants to buy four new frigates, modernize the combat capability of its four current Hydra-class MEKO 200 frigates and receive some kind of interim capability to operate while the MEKOs undergo their upgrade process.

Lockheed Martin — alongside the U.S. Navy, with which the firm is paired for the official United States bid in the competition — thinks it has a winning solution due to the way its Aegis Combat System would link these frigates with the rest of the Hellenic fleet across a network, and due to the company’s promise to send the bulk of construction work to Greek companies.

Additionally, “one of the big benefits of the U.S. offer, as compared to all the other offers, is that this is being done through the U.S. government Foreign Military Sales process. Greece has transacted somewhere near 2,000 Foreign Military Sales cases with the U.S. It’s a very well-established process, it’s a very transparent process,” Jon Rambeau, Lockheed’s vice president and general manager for the Integrated Warfare Systems and Sensors business line, told Defense News in a Sept. 10 phone interview.

Five other bids from European shipbuilders appear to be still in contention, but he said Lockheed’s proposal is the only one that is part of an official Foreign Military Sales program, and that therefore comes with all the cost and schedule guarantees the U.S. Navy would expect if it were spending its own money.

In June, Naval News reported that Greece named the six bids on its short list: the Netherland’s Damen (SIGMA 11515 HN); France’s Naval Group (FDI-HN); Italy’s Fincantieri (FREMM); the United Kingdom’s Babcock (Arrowhead 140); Germany’s Blohm+Voss (MEKO A-200); and the United States’ Lockheed Martin.

Rambeau said those bids were given an initial ranking by Greek officials, but that order was not shared with industry.

Rambeau also said that if the American pitch wins, the U.S. Navy would act as “the custodian of Greece’s money” and “will contract with Lockheed Martin, and they will negotiate with us just as hard as if they were procuring this for the U.S. government. And at the end of the day, if there’s money left over in that case, by law the United States will have to return that money back to Greece.”

He’s hoping Greece’s familiarity with the FMS process and with Lockheed Martin, with which the Greek military has worked for more than 50 years, will give the bid an extra boost this fall. Bids are due in November, with a decision expected by the end of the year.

What is Lockheed offering?
Joe DePietro, Lockheed Martin’s vice president and general manager for naval combat and missile defense systems, told Defense News in a June interview that Greece’s requirements are based on a need for improved anti-submarine warfare and expanded-area air defense capabilities.

The new construction portion of the U.S. pitch is based on Lockheed’s Freedom-variant littoral combat ship for the U.S. Navy. The LCS was also used as the starting point for the Saudi multimission small combatant currently under construction.

This new frigate, dubbed Hellenic Future Frigate, would be centered around the COMBATSS-21 version of the Aegis Combat System and would be armed with eight Naval Strike Missiles, a 76mm Strales gun, 11 Mk 41 Vertical Launching System tubes and 21 RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missiles. The ship would include Link 16, Link 22 and Tactical Common Data Link connectivity, enabling it to connect across a network to the rest of the Hellenic military, DePietro told Defense News.

The ship would also come ready to accept the Common Anti-air Modular Missile Extended Range, which features two-way communication between the ship and the missile for better targeting and in-flight updates.

The ship would also be optimized for anti-submarine warfare with many of the systems that are included in the LCS anti-sub warfare mission package, DePietro explained. The SQQ-89 combat suite would help the frigate make sense of the whole operating area by combining information from the frigate’s variable-depth sonar — from dipping sonars employed by MH-60R helicopters and from hull-mounted sonars on other ships in the fleet. That information would inform the firing of anti-submarine rockets either from the frigate or its helicopters.

When it comes to modernizing the MEKO frigates, Lockheed is offering to install an Aegis-based combat system that would integrate these 1990s-era ships with the new frigates, the fleet of MH-60R helicopters, the Hellenic Air Force’s F-16s and more.

DePietro said the MEKO hulls are in decent shape but would need upgrades to their generators and turbines. But the top modernization priorities are to add a common combat system as well as Link 16 and Link 22 compatibility.

Rambeau said the ability to create a link across a network with the rest of Greece’s existing and future aircraft and weapons systems “has been a consistent theme as we think about the upgrades.”

The U.S. Navy would be the one offering the interim solution — likely a few decommissioned ships from the service that could temporarily be given to Greece — until the MEKO upgrades are complete.

A source familiar with the bid but not authorized to talk about the ongoing negotiations between the two countries told Defense News that if the U.S. Navy retires some of its Aegis cruisers or Freedom-class LCSs in fiscal 2022, as it asked Congress to do, then those ships could be the ones sent to Greece for the interim capability.

The Ticonderoga-class cruisers sport the Aegis Combat System that Lockheed is pitching in the new-build and MEKO-upgrade portions of the bid, and the Freedom-variant LCSs would be very similar in design to the new frigates; both are 118 meters in length, with largely the same hull, mechanical and electrical systems and with some of the same combat systems. However, much of the power for anti-submarine warfare capabilities on the LCS comes in an optional mission package, rather than built into the hull.

Industrial base considerations
Lockheed’s Hellenic Future Frigate design is nearly complete, and the company is in varying stages of talks with companies in Greece and throughout Europe to discuss their involvement in construction and in supplying weapons and sensors that Greece requested in its technical specifications.

Last month, Lockheed announced a list of key industry partners on the frigate modernization side of the bid. Companies who have signed formal agreements with Lockheed include Oceanking Technical and Trading, Intracom Defense Electronics, Endeavor Integrated Solutions, Akmon, Metka, Aeroservices, and ALS Naval Ship Designs.


An MH-60S Seahawk helicopter transfers suspected contraband from the Freedom-class LCS Billings to the LCS Sioux City on July 23, 2021. (MC2 Marianne Guemo/U.S. Navy)

Lockheed has been talking to the Skaramangas, Greece, shipyard about working together to build some of the four new frigates there; about what investments would be made to facilities there for this frigate program; and more potential work it could take on.

DePietro said Lockheed previously partnered with shipyards in Spain, Canada, Japan and South Korea, as well as in the U.S. when it paired with Fincantieri’s Marinette Marine Shipyard in Wisconsin for the LCS program. Lockheed helped modernize the foreign yards to build ships to American standards, he added.

The ongoing dialogue with the Skaramangas shipyard “very much reminds me of Marinette circa 2006, and a big part of this program is being able to revitalize and recapitalize Greek shipbuilding and its defense industry, which has kind of fallen off from where they were some 20 years ago in capabilities,” he said.

Rambeau said that an analysis of Lockheed’s proposal shows about a third of the money would be spent in the U.S., a third in Greece and a third elsewhere in Europe. About 70 percent of the labor, though, would take place in Greece to “put money back into the local economy.”

According to a Lockheed document, the frigate program would create 7.7 million hours of labor across a five-year construction timeline for the Greek workforce, with 2,500 skilled jobs at the shipyard alone.

DePietro said a range of options are under discussion with the Greek shipyard regarding which ships the yard would participate in building versus fully constructing. For any ships that are not fully built in Greece, he added, the Fincantieri Marinette Marine yard would be able to take on the work without disrupting the tail end of the LCS production there, the beginning of the U.S. Navy’s Constellation-class frigate construction, or the four-ship Saudi multimission combatant program.

He added that the Hellenic frigate project would benefit the supply chain, where many but not all the companies involved will transition to the Constellation class that Fincantieri will build in Marinette. Fairbanks Morse, for example, provides the LCS engines but is not on the Constellation program. Lake Shore Systems also provides several items for the LCS hull that will not be in the Constellation design.

For companies like them, keeping their production lines hot through their work on the Greek frigate program would benefit the U.S. Navy by allowing it a longer period of time to make decisions on how many spares it wants in the inventory.

Between now and the formal bid submission in November, the U.S. government is seeking congressional approval for the FMS case, and Lockheed is shoring up industry agreements.

https://www.defensenews.com/digital-show-dailies/dsei/2021/09/16/lockheed-refines-bid-to-modernize-the-greek-frigate-fleet-heres-what-its-offering/
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas