Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições

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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #15 em: Julho 26, 2019, 11:37:56 pm »
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Bulgaria's National Assembly on 26 July overturned President Rumen Radev's 23 July veto of legislation approving procurement of eight F-16 Block 70 fighters, the parliament has announced on its website. Members of parliament voted 128 to 73, with three abstentions, again to ratify contracts on the purchase of equipment, maintenance and services for eight F-16 Block 70 fighters.

The four agreements for the USD1.226 billion deal signed by Defence Minister Krasimir Karakachanov on 11 July were first approved by the National Assembly on 19 July.

Esta animado este processo de compra dos Búlgaros. ;D

Presidente pró-russo vs governo pró-UE...
 

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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #16 em: Julho 29, 2019, 11:34:20 am »
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Despite recent news reports to the contrary, F-16 sales to Taiwan are not a done deal for the Trump administration, according to an adviser on Chinese issues to US President Donald Trump.

Trump has not yet approved any F-16 sales to Taiwan, Michael Pillsbury, Trump adviser and senior fellow and director for Chinese Strategy at the Washington think tank Hudson Institute said on 25 July during a panel discussion at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security.

"The sale of F-16s to Taiwan, I think, has not gone through," said Pillsbury, who was part of the Trump administration's transition team.

 :-\
 

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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições/modernizações
« Responder #17 em: Outubro 18, 2019, 04:41:52 pm »
Taiwan F-16 Fighter Jet Upgrades On Schedule, Despite Delays
(Source: South China Morning Post; published Oct. 16, 2019)




After initial delays, Taiwan’s program to upgrade its F-16 fighters to the latest F-16V standard is now underway, and is now expected to be completed by 2023. (ROCAF photo)

Taiwan’s multimillion-dollar programme to retrofit its 142-strong fleet of F-16 fighter jets to bring them up to Viper standard is expected to be completed within the next four years.

Defence Minister Yen Teh-fa told parliament on Wednesday that all problems with the upgrade programme had been solved and the air force expected to take delivery of the jets by 2023. The performance of the jets will be further bolstered by the addition of medium-range precision guided weapons and automatic ground collision avoidance systems.

Yen was responding to lawmakers’ concerns that the retrofitting timetable would be affected by the US$8 billion purchase from the US of 66 of the latest Lockheed Martin F-16V Viper fighter jets, after local military critics questioned whether the deal would force the military to axe some spending on the retrofitting programme.

Lawmakers also questioned whether Taiwan’s Aerospace Industrial Development Corp (AIDC) had sufficient manpower for the project after the company failed to deliver six refitted jets in the first quarter of this year as scheduled.

Yen refuted suggestions the delay had been the result of pressure to complete Taiwan’s first indigenous advance fighter trainer jet in September, in line with President Tsai Ing-wen’s policy for the island to develop its own military aircraft.

He said the delay had nothing to do with the purchase of the 66 new F-16V variants as the funding for the purchase and refitting was separate. “Nor does it have anything to do with the advance trainer jet because members of the trainer jet’s production team and the refitting team are two different groups of people,” Yen said.

He admitted there was a manpower shortage problem within AIDC but assured lawmakers that, after coordination with Lockheed Martin and the recruitment of more engineers, the refitting team now had an additional 200 people, which would ensure completion of the project by 2023. (end of excerpt)

Click here for the full story, on the SCMP website.

https://www.scmp.com/print/news/china/diplomacy/article/3033...

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=110&page=5

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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #18 em: Outubro 18, 2019, 09:13:45 pm »
Pois Taiwan vai fazer o upgrade a 142 F-16, os pobres daqui da zona nem a 28 conseguem aparentemente....
 :(
 

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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #19 em: Novembro 15, 2019, 05:39:45 pm »
Mais uns quantos Viper, vão ser adquiridos pela Indonésia.

https://www.defensa.com/africa-asia-pacifico/f-16-ultima-generacion-para-indonesia

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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #20 em: Novembro 15, 2019, 06:02:52 pm »
"Ese mismo se anunció la modernizatíon a la versíon V de 84 F-16 griegos por 997 millones de dólares."
E aqui os infelizes não fazem o upgrade a uns miseros 28.
Façam as contas, sai a 11.4 milhões de $ por avião, ou seja aqui seriam 319.2 milhões de $ ou seja 288 milhões de €.
Enfim....
 >:(
 

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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #21 em: Novembro 15, 2019, 07:44:02 pm »
"Ese mismo se anunció la modernizatíon a la versíon V de 84 F-16 griegos por 997 millones de dólares."
E aqui os infelizes não fazem o upgrade a uns miseros 28.
Façam as contas, sai a 11.4 milhões de $ por avião, ou seja aqui seriam 319.2 milhões de $ ou seja 288 milhões de €.
Enfim....
 >:(
Os Gregos vão fazer a modernização dos block 50/52 para Viper. Aos Block 30 eles não fazem , porque será?
 

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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #22 em: Agosto 16, 2020, 08:15:52 am »


Quando um Povo não Respeita as Suas FFAA, Não Respeita a Sua História nem se Respeita a Si Próprio  !!
 

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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #23 em: Setembro 05, 2020, 07:51:42 am »
How Lockheed Martin plans to speed up sales with commoditized F-16

The US Air Force (USAF) and Lockheed Martin believe a commoditized version of the F-16 will accelerate Foreign Military Sales of the fighter.

The jet is already the most popular combat aircraft in the world, with 2,280 examples in service at the end of 2019, according to FlightGlobal’s 2020 World Air Forces report. That is about 16% of the total world fleet, or more than double the second-most numerous competitor, the Russian-built Sukhoi Su-27/30.


United Arab Emirates air force F-16s

Yet, Lockheed Martin believes it can sell even more – faster – with the help of a new base model configuration.

As part of an indefinite-delivery and indefinite-quantity (IDIQ) fixed-price-incentive contract, which has a $62 billion ceiling and was granted by the USAF in August, the company plans to offer standardized examples of its new-build F-16 Block 70/72 aircraft.

The traditional process of pricing and customising the F-16 for foreign buyers was cumbersome, says JR McDonald, vice-president of business development in Lockheed Martin’s integrated fighter group.

“The development of the pricing, and the back and forth with the country on the pricing, and then the actual pricing when we deliver it to them in the form of an offer and acceptance letter, that takes a very long time,” he says. “And, it takes a lot of money to develop those individual contracts for each individual country.”

Now, the US government’s Foreign Military Sales process will start with a base model of F-16 that comes with a standardized price and a standard set of features, including avionics, mission systems, an active electronically scanned array radar, an electronic warfare suite, an Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System and an engine, among other typical items. The standardized items in the contract are at the lowest possible price, adds McDonald.

The idea for a standardized F-16 pricing list came from the USAF’s System Program Office. Lockheed Martin believes all international sales of the fighter will now go through the IDIQ contract and the Foreign Military Sales process, with the exception of the potential F-21 variant the company is proposing for the Indian air force’s 110 fighter programme.

The USAF and Lockheed Martin believe using the same contract over and over again, instead of writing new contracts for each customer, time will be saved in the sales process of the fighter.

“It’s a way to streamline contracting, make the pricing as transparent as possible in an [Foreign Military Sales] environment,” says McDonald. “Everybody knows what the baseline is.”

The process should also save time and money on the production line as customizations typically slow work, he adds. Lockheed Martin builds the F-16 at its Greenville, South Carolina facility, which started producing the fighter in 2019 after production was moved from Fort Worth, Texas.

Should a customer want a particular item, say a different heads-up display, that request would be fulfilled via a separate contract, while the rest of the base model fighter would be configured with the standard IDIQ contract. Speciality technologies to be incorporated into the F-16 as part of an offset agreement with a foreign nation would be handled via a separate contract also.

The USAF plans three pricing periods over 10 years for the base model F-16. The initial pricing period will be relatively short. Lockheed Martin is already in negotiations with the US government for the second period, which will last two or three years. The third pricing period will span the remainder of the contract.

Lockheed Martin has already secured two contracts via the IDIQ totalling 90 aircraft: 66 examples of the F-16 for Taiwan and 24 examples for Morocco.

The aerospace manufacturer believes now is a particularly ripe time to offer a commoditized F-16. McDonald points out that many former member states of the Soviet Union, especially those still flying the ageing Mig-21 or Mig-23 fighters, are on the market for new jets. “Those are in the end of service life and countries around the world are having to find themselves in a situation where they need to replace them,” he says.

There are 348 Mig-21s still in service, including a couple of dozen between newer NATO members Romania and Croatia, according to Cirium fleets analyser. The Mig-21 was introduced into service in 1959. And, there are 214 Mig-23s still in service, many within the air forces of African nations, such as Angola and Ethiopia. The Mig-23 was introduced into service in 1970.

Some customers of the former Soviet Union that have attempted to renew their fleets with Russian-made aircraft have been frustrated by the USA’s Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, which punishes countries for buying from Moscow, said Viktor Kladov, director of international cooperation and regional policy for Rostec at the 2019 MAKS air show. Rostec is the Russian-government owned holding company which controls Sukhoi and Mikoyan’s parent company United Aircraft Corporation.

“We feel like some nations are more cautious,” said Kladov in August 2019. “For instance, yesterday I talked to the Indonesian chief of the air force and he mentioned CAATSA, the US law. From what he says, I understand they receive threats. They are dependent not just on Russian equipment, they are dependent on a large part of US-made equipment. If as a punishment measure, let’s say, American manufacturers stop supplying spares, stop supporting American-made equipment, then there will be a breach in security in national defence in Indonesia. So, they are very cautious.”

In November 2019, Jakarta said it planned to buy two squadrons of F-16 Block 72 fighters, while also buying a squadron of Sukhoi Su-35s. The country appeared to attempt avoiding financial sanctions with a cash and barter arrangement with Russia that might include local farm products such as palm oil and coffee. Then in July, the nation’s plans appeared to change again when it reportedly made an offer for 15 of Austria’s Eurofighters.

Sanctions have no role in countries deciding to switch from Russian fighters to the US-made F-16, insists McDonald. Rather, what’s driving sales is the fighter’s performance, low life-cycle cost and its ability to serve as a connection to the USA’s security apparatus, he says.

McDonald says, for some nations, the F-16 could serve as a stepping stone to the Lockheed Martin F-35 stealth fighter – sales of which are tightly controlled by the Pentagon and permitted only to the USA’s allies and most-trusted partners.

“Not every country in the world is ready today for an F-35. And, that can be either because they from a policy perspective haven’t become that level of partner with the United States yet, or maybe just the maturity of their military, it’s hard to jump from a Mig-21 directly into an F-35,” he says. “An F-16 is the perfect pathway to F-35. You gain that familiarity with the United States, you become a reliable partner with the United States and then the next step into the F-35 is not such a stretch.”

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=259&page=16

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« Última modificação: Setembro 05, 2020, 07:57:16 am por tenente »


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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #24 em: Setembro 11, 2020, 09:31:13 am »


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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #25 em: Setembro 15, 2020, 05:46:05 pm »
Export deals to keep F-16 fighting fit

In common with Boeing’s F-15, US industry’s other similar-aged fighter – the Lockheed Martin F-16 – also has enjoyed a recent orders revival, just as it had appeared to be potentially nearing a production end.

Lockheed’s firm order backlog for the single-engined type stood at a combined 38 aircraft for Bahrain, Bulgaria and Slovakia at mid-year. However, in mid-August this was bolstered via Foreign Military Sales contracts worth over $4.9 billion, covering 66 F-16Vs for Taiwan and 24 for Morocco.


Source: Lockheed Martin Bahrain will field 16 of the type in new V-model standard

Bulgaria in April 2020 signed for six C-model fighters and a pair of D-version trainers, to be delivered in the GE Aviation F110-engined Block 70 standard. Cirium fleets data shows that the assets – which will replace the NATO nation’s RAC MiG-29 interceptors – will be delivered by 2026.

Having in December 2018 signed for 14 V-model examples, also as MiG-29 successors, Slovakia is to become a new F-16 operator from 2022. Lockheed’s other on-order aircraft are for existing operators. Bahrain – which has 21 F-16C/Ds – will take 16 V-model examples in the 2021-2023 timeframe, under a deal signed in June 2018, followed by the additional jets for Taiwan and Morocco.

Significant further success could follow, with the US Department of Defense valuing other potential F-16 sales over the next 10 years as worth $57 billion. Washington earlier this year unveiled plans to promote a so-called “commoditised” version of the type, with this standard configuration to reduce acquisition costs and streamline procurements.

Prospects include a 110-aircraft Indian air force requirement, for which the type is being promoted as the F-21.


Source: Lockheed Martin India is being offered Lockheed model under the F-21 name

Final assembly of the F-16 is performed in Greenville, South Carolina, having been moved from Fort Worth in Texas as Lockheed dedicated that site to the F-35’s production ramp-up.

But unlike the F-15, there is no prospect of further US Air Force orders for the F-16. The service declared initial operating capability with the A-model in 1979, and received its final production example in 2002. Some early examples are now being converted by Boeing into QF-16 aerial targets for the service.

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=259&page=16

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« Última modificação: Setembro 15, 2020, 05:53:42 pm por tenente »


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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #26 em: Novembro 13, 2020, 10:23:00 am »
Croatia receives ‘best and final' fighter bids
by Gareth Jennings

Croatia has received the final offers from the four government teams hoping to secure the country’s requirement to replace its Yugoslav era MiG-21 ‘Fishbed’ fighters.


With the best and final bids now submitted, Croatia will begin the state-level decision making process for its MiG-21 replacement process in 2021. (Croatian Ministry of Defence)

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) announced that bids from the United States for the Lockheed Martin F-16V Block 70/72 Fighting Falcon, from Israel for surplus Block 30 aircraft, from France for surplus Dassault Rafales, and from Sweden for newbuild Saab Gripen C/D were all received. The Croatian government received offers from each competitor earlier in September, but allowed each bidder the opportunity to submit its best and final offer by 11 November.

“The decision-making process at the state level will begin in early 2021, and includes the opinion of the Defence Committee of the Croatian Parliament and the Defence Council and the decision of the Government of the Republic of Croatia on the most favourable offer for a multirole fighter aircraft,” the MoD said. “The data [is] classified both by us and by the bidders. During the process of evaluation and selection of the best offer, we cannot go public with detailed data.”

Croatia is looking for 12 fighters to replace its ageing MiG-21s on a one-for-one basis (although only between three and six are understood to still be operational despite the fleet being overhauled in Romania in 2003 to 2004 and receiving a minor upgrade in Ukraine between 2013 and 2015).

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/news-detail/croatia-receives-best-and-final-fighter-bids

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« Última modificação: Novembro 13, 2020, 10:24:09 am por tenente »


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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #27 em: Dezembro 08, 2020, 08:40:44 am »

Taiwan aiming to complete upgrade of 22 F-16A/B fighters by end of 2020

Taiwan’s plan to complete the upgrade of 22 Republic of China Air Force (RoCAF) F-16A/B multirole fighter aircraft to the latest F-16V configuration by the end of 2020 remains on schedule, Taiwanese media have reported referring to a RoCAF report submitted to the island’s Legislative Yuan.

Taiwan’s Central News Agency (CNA) reported on 6 December that 19 of the 22 F-16 upgrades planned for this year under the RoCAF’s Peace Phoenix Rising programme have already been completed, with three more aircraft set to complete the upgrade later this month. These 22 platforms will add to the 15 that have been upgraded over the past two years, according to the CNA.

Under the Peace Phoenix Rising programme, which was launched in 2016 and is being carried out by Lockheed Martin and Taiwan’s Aerospace Industrial Development Corporation (AIDC), about 140 F-16A/Bs are to be upgraded to the F-16V configuration by the end of 2023.


Taiwan’s plan to upgrade 22 RoCAF F-16A/B fighter aircraft to the latest F-16V configuration (seen here) this year remains on track, according to the RoCAF. (Lockheed Martin)

According to the media outlet, Taiwan plans to upgrade 35 more F-16A/Bs in 2021, an equal number of aircraft the following year, and the remaining 32 aircraft by 2023.

The latest developments come after the Pentagon announced on 5 November that Lockheed Martin had been awarded a USD53.2 million contract modification to provide miscellaneous support for 50 F-16 “retrofit” fighter aircraft under the programme.

The US Department of Defense said the modification “provides for contractor over and above support, and acquisition of legacy aircraft hardware and equipment”, adding that work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas; and Taiwan, and is expected to be completed by 31 December 2023.

https://www.janes.com/defence-news/news-detail/taiwan-aiming-to-complete-upgrade-of-22-f-16ab-fighters-by-end-of-2020

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Re: Lockheed Martin F-16V as futuras aquisições
« Responder #29 em: Janeiro 22, 2021, 09:03:37 pm »
Sounds Like the Air Force Wants to Buy F-16s Again
So much for swearing off non-stealthy fighters.


BY KYLE MIZOKAMI JAN 22, 2021


aviation stock imagesNURPHOTOGETTY IMAGES

The U.S. Air Force is reportedly looking into buying new F-16 fighter jets.
The Air Force received its first F-16s in 1978, and the plane has been in continuous service since.
Upgrades for the foreign market have ensured new jets with modern tech are ready to go.
The U.S. Air Force is seriously considering ordering more F-16 fighter jets, more than 42 years after the service received its first “Fighting Falcon.” The Air Force, which once vowed it would never buy a non-stealthy fighter again, appears to have had a change in heart. The extreme cost of stealthy fighters like the F-35 probably has something to do with it.


According to Aviation Week & Space Technology, the Air Force is reviewing its tactical air requirements for the 2020s and is giving real thought to purchasing more F-16s. The Air Force currently flies over 900 F-16s, including 783 single-seat F-16Cs and 151 F-16Ds. The average age of the F-16C fleet, per Air Force magazine, is 28.7 years.

This content is imported from {embed-name}. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

General Dynamics originally designed the F-16 to be an agile, lightweight, inexpensive multi-role fighter meant to balance the more capable—and more expensive—F-15 Eagle.

RELATED STORY

Why the F-15 Is Such a Badass Plane
Early F-16s carried just two Sidewinder short-range air-to-air missiles and 10,200 pounds of bombs and missiles on external hardpoints. General Dynamics and Lockheed Martin eventually built more than 4,500 Fighting Falcons, and 25 countries, including Turkey, Norway, and Iraq, ultimately adopted the plane.

Over the years, the F-16 evolved to gain a more capable active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar, longer-range AMRAAM radar-guided missiles, and fuselage-conforming fuel tanks. The Air Force hasn’t bought a new F-16 since the early 2000s, and most of the new upgrades have been driven by export orders to countries like Israel and South Korea.

The latest version, known as F-16 Block 70/72 or F-16V, incorporates the new APG-83 AESA radar, infrared search and track targeting capability, a new flight control computer, and the new Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS), which prevents the plane from crashing into the ground if the pilot becomes unconscious or disoriented.

The Air Force’s F-16 fleet was originally supposed to be replaced by the F-35A Joint Strike Fighter, and the service never intended to buy a non-stealthy fighter again. Unfortunately, the F-35A’s cost of $110 million per plane, while gradually decreasing, is still nowhere near the $50 million originally promised.

Plus, as the Air Force buys these new F-35s, it must also pay to fly them—and that isn't cheap. Each F-35 costs an eye-popping $44,000 an hour to fly. That translates into an investment of $44 million for every 1,000 hours of flight time, or just under one-third the cost of the plane itself.

The F-35 was supposed to be the F-16 of its time, but it appears the F-16 could once again repeat its role as a low-cost fighter—more than 40 years after it first entered service.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a35282264/air-force-could-buy-f16-fighter-jets-again/

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« Última modificação: Janeiro 22, 2021, 09:05:42 pm por tenente »


Quando um Povo não Respeita as Suas FFAA, Não Respeita a Sua História nem se Respeita a Si Próprio  !!