F-35 JSF

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Fábio G.

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« Responder #30 em: Julho 14, 2004, 10:21:07 pm »
Uma noticia da FAM del Mundo de Maio:

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Singapura ingressa no programa JSF

Singapura assinou uma carta de aceitação para unir-se ao programa do F-35 JSF. Por agora, Singapura é o único país asiático em participar no programa. Levará a cabo estudos de integração de requesitos para poder ter exemplares em 2012.




Já reparei que o FórumDefesa já alcançou a barreira das 10000 mensagens.  :D :G-Ok:  :festa:
 

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emarques

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« Responder #31 em: Julho 14, 2004, 11:00:11 pm »
E o Fábio G é responsável por mais de 10% do conteúdo. ;)
Ai que eco que há aqui!
Que eco é?
É o eco que há cá.
Há cá eco, é?!
Há cá eco, há.
 

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« Responder #32 em: Julho 15, 2004, 02:03:10 pm »
É caso para dizer que a responsabilidade é de

Fábio "Janes" Gee!  :wink:
Ai de ti Lusitânia, que dominarás em todas as nações...
 

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« Responder #33 em: Setembro 15, 2004, 07:19:30 pm »
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USAF to buy 'hundreds' of STOVL JSFs

By Marc Selinger
09/14/2004 11:19:25 AM



The U.S. Air Force plans to buy "hundreds" of F-35 Joint Strike Fighters in the short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) configuration, a key general said Sept. 13, adding further clarity to the service's plans for the JSF variant.

The specific figure remains under review, said Gen. John Jumper, Air Force chief of staff.

"I can't give you an exact number, but it's going to be more than a handful," Jumper said at a press briefing at the Air Force Association's Air & Space Conference in Washington.

Current budget plans call for the Air Force to buy all 1,763 of its JSFs in the conventional takeoff and landing (CTOL) configuration, but Jumper and Air Force Secretary James Roche announced in February that the service would like to buy the STOVL variant as well to provide close air support, particularly for Army ground troops (DAILY, Feb. 13, Feb. 17). The Air Force has said since then that the number of STOVL JSFs it buys could result in a corresponding reduction in the number of CTOL F-35s it acquires.

Roche said in May that the Air Force's revised acquisition strategy for the Lockheed Martin JSF could be finalized by the end of the year (DAILY, May 17).

Also during the press briefing, Jumper and Roche said they are becoming increasingly convinced of the need to acquire an interim long-range strike system to serve as a bridge between the current bomber force and a next-generation platform, which may not enter service for more than two decades.

The Air Force asked industry for ideas on interim capabilities earlier this year and is evaluating the responses to that request for information (RFI). A bomber version of the Lockheed Martin F/A-22 Raptor has been mentioned as one option the Air Force might pursue (DAILY, May 20, May 24).
Ricardo Nunes
www.forum9gs.net
 

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« Responder #34 em: Fevereiro 07, 2005, 10:47:44 pm »
The F136 Fighter Engine Team Ready to 'Lift' Off in 2005
 
 
(Source: GE Aircraft Engines; issued Feb. 4, 2005)
 
 
 General Electric Company has successfully completed assembly and installation in the test rig of its first F136 Short Takeoff Vertical Landing (STOVL) test engine for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program. The engine is slated to begin ground testing this month at GE's outdoor test facility in Peebles, Ohio, USA.  
 
Bob Griswold, president of the GE Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team, LLC said: "Approximately 300 hours of testing are planned, and this will include primary control integration, durability screening testing, time at temperature, and thrust measurements. Testing is targeted to conclude in May 2005."  
 
Tom Hartmann, senior vice president of the Fighter Engine Team, stated: "The F136 will be fully interchangeable and affordable to meet the requirements of all aircraft variants. The F136 STOVL engine has been specifically designed to power the F-35B JSF, which has been selected by the United States Marine Corps and the United Kingdom Royal Navy and Air Force."  
 
The first STOVL engine test follows in the footsteps of the first F136 CTOL engine, which effectively completed testing in December 2004 at the GE's facility in Evendale, Ohio. Testing on this engine included engine performance assessment, fan risk reduction, fan stalls, and initial closed loop control demonstration. It successfully demonstrated smooth starts, throttle transients, stall free operation, low vibration levels and included a run to 105% max design speed. Additional testing resumed in January 2005.  
 
 
BACKGROUND NOTES:  
 
The Direct Lift + Lift Fan STOVL engine system uses the common turbomachinery of the F136 Conventional Take Off Landing (CTOL) engine and adds a drive shaft, clutch, 2-stage counter rotating Lift Fan (for forward "cool" vertical thrust), roll-posts in the wings, (for "cool" roll control thrust), and a 3-Bearing Swivel Duct (for aft "hot" vertical thrust). This commonality lends itself well to the F-35 due to the need for affordability, interchangeability, and readiness and is designed to meet all of the customer's Key Performance Parameters (KPPs).  
 
GE Transportation - Aircraft Engines, with responsibility for 60 percent of the F136 program, is developing the core compressor and coupled high pressure/low pressure turbine system components, controls and accessories, and the augmentor. Rolls-Royce, with 40 percent of the F136 program, is responsible for the front fan, combustor, stages 2 and 3 of the low-pressure turbine, and gearboxes. International partner countries are also contributing to the F136 through involvement in engine development and component manufacturing.  
 
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« Responder #35 em: Fevereiro 18, 2005, 07:49:18 pm »
First F136 Short Take-Off Vertical Landing Development Engine Begins Testing
 
 
(Source: General Electric Aircraft Engines; issued Feb. 16, 2005)
 
 
 PEEBLES, Ohio --- The first GE Rolls-Royce F136 Short Take-off Vertical Landing (STOVL) development engine has successfully begun testing at GE's outdoor facility in Peebles, Ohio.  
 
The engine was connected to the Rolls-Royce LiftSystem and was fired up for the first time to perform idle leak checks, dry and wet motoring, and to begin its initial mechanical and controls evaluation.  
 
"Another tremendous effort by the team brought our STOVL variant engine to test six days early," said Bob Griswold, GE's general manager of the F136 program and president of the GE Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team (FET). "We are developing world-class propulsion systems for our customers and we believe we are well suited to match the needs of the F-35."  
 
Tom Hartmann of Rolls-Royce North America and vice president of the FET, said, "We are very excited about this latest milestone in the program. We have two engines testing and are positioned well as we move into our System Design and Development (SDD) phase in August."  
 
The STOVL engine is expected to run through May of 2005 and total of 300 hours of testing are planned.  
 
This successful STOVL test is significant as the last major milestone to be achieved in the F136 Phase III, pre-SDD program and is the first major milestone achieved since the FET was awarded its Transition Award Contract in November of 2004. The Transition Award Contract is designed to fund the F136 program until August of 2005 when the FET anticipates the awarding of a new multi-year SDD contract.  
 
Based on the current schedule, SDD development testing commences in 2006, which signals the start of thousands of hours of ground and flight-testing. This culminates with delivery of the first F136 powered F-35's in 2012.  
 
Designed in support of the F-35 program, the F136 will be fully interchangeable and affordable to meet the requirements of all the aircraft variants. Engines will be tested for all JSF variants during Phase III: STOVL for the U.S. Marine Corps and U.K. Royal Navy, CTOL for the U.S. Air Force, and the Carrier Variant (CV) for the U.S. Navy.  
 
 
BACKGROUND NOTES:  
 
The STOVL engine system uses the common turbomachinery of the F136 Conventional Take Off Landing (CTOL) engine and adds a drive shaft, clutch, 2-stage counter rotating Rolls-Royce LiftFan (for forward "cool" vertical thrust), roll-posts in the wings, (for "cool" roll control thrust), and a 3-Bearing Swivel Module (for aft "hot" vertical thrust). This commonality lends itself well to the F-35 due to the need for affordability, interchangeability, and readiness and is designed to meet all of the customer's Key Performance Parameters (KPPs).  
 
GE Transportation, Aircraft Engines, with responsibility for 60 percent of the F136 program, is developing the core compressor and coupled high pressure/low pressure turbine system components, controls and accessories, and the augmentor.  
 
Rolls-Royce, with 40 percent of the F136 program, is responsible for the front fan, combustor, stages 2 and 3 of the low-pressure turbine, and gearboxes. International partner countries are also contributing to the F136 through involvement in engine development and component manufacturing.  
 
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« Responder #36 em: Abril 27, 2005, 11:34:49 pm »
Northrop Grumman Completes First Major Aircraft Component of F-35 Joint Strike Fighter
 
 
(Source: Northrop Grumman; issued April 26, 2005)
 
 
 PALMDALE, Calif. --- Northrop Grumman Corporation has completed the first major component of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, demonstrating manufacturing concepts that will become critical once initial production begins in 2007.  
 
The center fuselage was delivered on-time to F-35 prime contractor Lockheed Martin during a ceremony on April 23 and will be shipped to Fort Worth, Texas, on May 2 for the beginning of the aircraft's final assembly.  
 
"With the completion of the center fuselage, the first major aircraft component to be assembled, the F-35 team has ushered in a new era for aircraft production that incorporates advanced technologies and cutting-edge manufacturing techniques into what will be a unique continuous moving-line process," said Scott Seymour, corporate vice president and president Northrop Grumman Integrated Systems. "Northrop Grumman's F-35 work leverages decades of experience in advanced tactical fighters, long-range strike aircraft and the integration of systems such as the F/A-18, B-2 and Global Hawk."  
 
The company's assembly line in Palmdale, Calif., integrates advanced 3-D modeling techniques, state-of-the-art fabrication and tooling equipment and a factory layout similar to that of the automotive industry to support the F-35’s rigorous production schedule.  
 
The 12-month assembly process began in May 2004 on the upper subassembly with the drilling, counter-sinking and assembly of the inlet ducts. New technologies developed by Northrop Grumman allowed each duct, made entirely from composite materials, to be assembled as a single structure instead of from numerous pieces. The ducts were then mated to the upper portion of the center fuselage, the first fuel tanks were sealed, the system components were installed and pressure and leak tests were successfully accomplished.  
 
In parallel, the lower subassembly, built of aluminum and titanium frames and keel components, was manufactured. In early January 2005, the two structures were mated and the center fuselage was structurally complete.  
 
Final systems installation and testing of hydraulics, actuated doors, the power thermal management system and wire harnesses completed the assembly.  
 
"Innovative design and outstanding craftsmanship, brought together by the thousands of aerospace experts from Northrop Grumman and its suppliers from around the world, were instrumental in the development of this shipset," said Janis Pamiljans, vice president and F-35 program manager, Northrop Grumman Integrated Systems. "The future of military aircraft design, manufacturing and supportability has been dramatically altered and everyone -- the F-35 team and our customers -- will benefit from these new processes."  
 
The F-35 is a stealthy, supersonic multi-role fighter designed to replace a wide-range of aging fighter and strike aircraft. Three variants derived from a common design will ensure the F-35 meets the performance needs of the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Navy and allied defense forces worldwide, while staying within strict affordability targets.  
 
Currently, U.S. and United Kingdom sales alone account for nearly 2,600 aircraft and the Pentagon expects additional foreign purchases to be in the thousands.  
 
As a principal member of the Lockheed Martin team, Northrop Grumman plays a critical role in the development and demonstration of the F-35. The company's contributions total more than 25 percent of the aircraft and span five of its seven sectors. They range from integrating a major section of the aircraft's structure to producing key avionics and communications subsystems to developing mission-planning software and training systems. Working as an integrated team with its customers, teammates and suppliers, Northrop Grumman delivers products that help make the F-35 the world's most advanced multi-role, stealthy combat aircraft.  
 
In addition to Integrated Systems, four other Northrop Grumman sectors support the F-35 program: the Electronic Systems sector provides the fire control radar and, in joint efforts with Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, is developing the electro-optical distributed aperture system and the electro-optical targeting system; the Mission Systems sector provides system and software engineering support for the mission planning system; the Space Technology sector provides the integrated communications, navigation and identification avionics suite; and the Information Technology sector, in joint efforts with Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training and Support, provides training management software.  
 
Northrop Grumman Corporation is a global defense company headquartered in Los Angeles, Calif. Northrop Grumman provides technologically advanced, innovative products, services and solutions in systems integration, defense electronics, information technology, advanced aircraft, shipbuilding and space technology. With more than 125,000 employees, and operations in all 50 states and 25 countries, Northrop Grumman serves U.S. and international military, government and commercial customers.  
 
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« Responder #37 em: Maio 17, 2005, 08:47:44 pm »
Final Assembly of First F-35 Under Way at Lockheed Martin
 
 
(Source: Lockheed Martin; issued May 16, 2005)
 
 
 FORT WORTH, Texas---Workers at Lockheed Martin joined the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter's 35-foot-wide carbon- fiber composite skinned and metal structure wing to the aircraft's fuselage on Monday, uniting three of the F-35's four major sections -- the forward fuselage, the center fuselage and the wing. The assembly milestone was completed on schedule, and marks the beginning of F-35 final-assembly activities.  
 
"We knew that the F-35's completely digital design and manufacturing process would yield impressive results, but the precision and accuracy in the way the pieces of this first airplane fit together is almost beyond imagining," said Bob Elrod, executive vice president and F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program general manager. "It's just about perfect, and it is helping us stay on schedule for first flight next year."  
 
With affordability as its cornerstone, the F-35 is designed for fast, streamlined production with extremely high standards for assembly precision and quality. At peak production, the Lockheed Martin factory in Fort Worth will produce one F-35 each working day.  
 
"The F-35 team is committed to delivering an aircraft that brings major advances in performance, but at a cost comparable to that of existing multi- role fighters. It's becoming clear that we are on the path to achieving the efficiencies that will enable us to do just that," said Ralph D. Heath, executive vice president of Lockheed Martin's Aeronautics business area.  
 
The F-35 is a next-generation, supersonic, multi-role stealth aircraft designed to replace the AV-8B Harrier, A-10, F-16, F/A-18 Hornet and the United Kingdom's Harrier GR.7 and Sea Harrier. The first F-35, a conventional-takeoff-and-landing (CTOL) variant, is scheduled for completion at year's end.  
 
The F-35's aft-fuselage, built by BAE Systems in Samlesbury, England, will be delivered to Lockheed Martin officials on May 17 and shipped to the Fort Worth plant, where it will become the final major subassembly joined to the rest of the aircraft. The horizontal and vertical tails, also made by BAE Systems, will be completed and delivered a short time later. The center fuselage, produced by Northrop Grumman in Palmdale, Calif., arrived in Fort Worth on May 3, and was immediately mated to the Lockheed Martin-built forward fuselage.  
 
Three versions of the F-35 are planned: a CTOL, a short-takeoff/vertical landing (STOVL) and a carrier variant (CV). Each is derived from a common design, and will ensure that the F-35 meets the performance needs of the U.S. Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy, the U.K. Royal Air Force and Royal Navy, and allied defense forces worldwide, while staying within strict affordability targets.  
 
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« Responder #38 em: Maio 24, 2005, 05:35:45 pm »
Northrop Grumman Radar for F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Achieves Program Milestone
 
 
(Source: Northrop Grumman; issued May 23, 2005)
 
 
 BALTIMORE --- Northrop Grumman Corporation's fire control radar for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter has passed a key milestone in system integration testing by detecting airborne targets at the company's integration laboratory.  
 
Designated the AN/APG-81, the radar incorporates an active electronically scanned array (AESA). Its unmatched multi-mode capability will support air-to-air, air-to-surface and electronic warfare missions. The radar will also provide the pilot with precision all-weather targeting and advanced air-to-ground target cueing.  
 
"This achievement represents another critical advance in the radar's development," said John C. Johnson, vice president of Combat Avionics Systems at Northrop Grumman's Electronic Systems sector. "I'm proud of our engineering team and their tireless efforts, which will enable us to start flight-testing the radar on our testbed aircraft this summer, slightly ahead of the program schedule."  
 
Mr. Johnson added that nearly a year of integration work has been completed on the building-block radar mode known as All-Aspect Search, the basic tool pilots will use to search for airborne targets.  
 
The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is a supersonic, multi-role stealth fighter designed to replace a wide range of aging fighter and strike aircraft, including the AV-8B Harrier, A-10, F-16, and the United Kingdom's Harrier GR.7 and Sea Harrier. It will also replace the F/A-18C/D Hornet and complement the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. Three variants derived from a common design will ensure that the F-35 meets the performance needs of the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, and U.S. Marine Corps as well as allied defense forces worldwide, while also meeting strict affordability requirements.  
 
As a principal member of the Lockheed Martin team, Northrop Grumman plays a critical role in the development and demonstration of the F-35. The company's contributions total more than 25 percent of the aircraft and span five of its seven sectors.  
 
In addition to the radar, Electronic Systems is developing the electro-optical distributed aperture system and the electro-optical targeting system, both in joint efforts with Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control. The Integrated Systems sector is responsible for design and integration of the center fuselage, weapons bay, and related subsystems; the Mission Systems sector provides system and software engineering support for the mission planning system; the Space Technology sector is developing the integrated communications, navigation and identification avionics suite; and the Information Technology sector, in joint efforts with Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training and Support, provides training management software.  
 
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« Responder #39 em: Agosto 01, 2006, 04:01:25 pm »
Primeiro F-35 "de fábrica" toma forma..
http://www.spacewar.com/reports/First_S ... e_999.html

As 3 gerações de Lightnings comparadas
http://www.flightglobal.com/Articles/20 ... pared.html

F-35 VS Competição Europeia (já tinha referido esta notícia na discusão do avião de combate do futuro)
http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htairf ... 60714.aspx
 

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« Responder #40 em: Agosto 03, 2006, 10:54:05 am »
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F-35 Lightning II - Strong Global Partnership, Ready to Begin Production and Sustainment

(Source: Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company; issued July 18, 2006)

FARNBOROUGH, England --- With a new name, its first flight on the near horizon, six aircraft in various stages of subassembly and plans being laid for operation and support, the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II, the only 5th generation fighter available on the international market, is moving quickly into production with an eye toward long-term sustainment.  
 
Joining many of his F-35 team members in the Media Hall at the Farnborough International Air Show, F-35 Program Executive Officer Rear Adm. Steven Enewold and Deputy Program Executive Officer Brig. Gen. Charles Davis remarked on the program's progress.  
 
"After 56 months of development, we are encouraged by the tangible progress in the flight qualification of our designs," said Enewold. "Most notable is the first flyable test aircraft, but we are also demonstrating performance on the major avionics systems in laboratories and flying test beds. There are still many challenges, but I am encouraged by the team's achievements."  
 
According to Davis, soon-to-be Enewold's successor as leader of the program, "I've worked in flight test and acquisition for 16 plus years and have never seen a program this advanced in its development at this stage ... B-2, F-22, etc. None were this far at this point in time. Sure we've got challenges -- and we'll have challenges we've not thought of yet -- but we're seeing them much earlier and fixing them faster than any legacy program I've known," said Davis.  
 
Dan Crowley, Lockheed Martin executive vice president and F-35 program general manager, agreed and said the aircraft possesses significant technical maturity compared to past fighter programs at this stage of their development. "We believe the F-35 is ready for low rate-production because the program systems are maturing well beyond those of legacy programs. The program's devotion to affordability, risk-reduction and its ability to exploit new advances in digital design tools and manufacturing technology are combining to promote design stability, more reliable cost forecasts and adherence to schedules," said Crowley.  
 
Tom Burbage, Lockheed Martin executive vice president and general manager of F-35 Program Integration, added that the U.S. and F-35 partner nations are already planning for the F-35's long-range sustainment, one of the program's biggest components. "This is an affordability-based program, both in terms of aircraft price and the cost of maintaining it," Burbage said.  
 
"We are sharply focused on sustainment as a means to an end -- and that end in this case is an F-35 that is affordable to operate and support. All of our partner countries will be deeply involved in that endeavor down to the local level," he added.  
 
In a ceremony on July 7 at Lockheed Martin in Fort Worth, Texas, the F-35 made its public debut and received its name -- Lightning II -- which echoes two great fighter aircraft of the past: the World War II-era Lockheed P-38 Lightning and the supersonic, Mach 2, Lightning fighter developed by English Electric in the middle 1950s.  
 
The F-35 Lightning II is a 5th Generation, supersonic stealth fighter designed to replace a wide range of existing aircraft, including AV-8B Harriers, A-10s, F-16s, F/A-18 Hornets and United Kingdom Harrier GR.7s and Sea Harriers. The F-35 will be the most powerful single-engine fighter ever made.  
 
Lockheed Martin is developing the F-35 with its principal industrial partners, Northrop Grumman and BAE Systems. Two separate, interchangeable F-35 engines are under development: the Pratt & Whitney F135 and the GE Rolls-Royce Fighter Engine Team F136.  
 
The inaugural flight of the first F-35, a preproduction conventional takeoff and landing variant, is planned for later this year. Fifteen F-35s will undergo flight test, seven will be used for static testing and another will validate the aircraft's radar signature.  
 
 
Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin employs about 135,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation reported 2005 sales of $37.2 billion.
defense-aerospace.com
 

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« Responder #41 em: Agosto 04, 2006, 05:32:32 pm »
 

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« Responder #42 em: Agosto 16, 2006, 09:42:14 pm »
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Lockheed Says F-35 Could Fly Pilotless

Lockheed Martin Corp. has proposed an unmanned version of its Joint Strike Fighter, the F-35, which would make it the first full-scale fighter to operate without a pilot and signal the Bethesda weapons maker's push into the growing market for drone aircraft.

The idea has been in the works for two years, Lockheed Vice President Frank Mauro said at a briefing yesterday. He provided few details but said the plane could be built as an interchangeable hybrid -- manned by a pilot for some missions and operated remotely for others.

The Joint Strike Fighter, funded with help from several other countries, is meant to replace the F-16 as the workhorse fighter of the United States and its close allies. Less powerful than the F-22 Raptor that Lockheed developed to give the United States an advantage in air combat, the Joint Strike Fighter is still designed to travel at supersonic speed and carry up to 15,000 pounds of bombs and missiles.

Test flights of the F-35 are expected to begin later this year. The idea of a remote-control version of the plane has not been pitched to the Air Force, though it has been through the company's conceptual design phase, Lockheed officials said.

Air Force officials could not be reached for comment yesterday.

Yesterday's briefing marked a strategic turn for Lockheed, which for years has stayed publicly on the sidelines as the Pentagon increased its spending on unmanned systems.

Such competitors as Northrop Grumman Corp. and Boeing Co. are entrenched in the market, with products such as Northrop Grumman's Global Hawk surveillance drone, which is deployed overseas.

Lockheed ceded the market in the late 1990s while it focused on winning the contract to build what many predict will be the Air Force's last manned fighter jet, the F-35. Lockheed then feared that the unmanned market could diminish demand for its more expensive fighter jets, analysts said.

"When you think about unmanned combat systems, I think about Boeing," said John E. Pike, executive director of GlobalSecurity.org.

But in the past three to four years, Lockheed's aeronautics division has spent 30 to 40 percent of its internal research-and-development budget on unmanned systems, company officials said. That includes $21 million the company has spent on the Polecat, a prototype drone that Lockheed plans to test at 60,000 feet or above this year. At a briefing yesterday, the firm trumpeted a stable of unmanned systems that can run on the ground, hauling equipment and supplies for troops, and underwater, searching for submarines and mines. Some of the systems are still being developed and some are deployed in Iraq.

Much of the work is being done at Lockheed's research-and-development lab in California, known as the Skunk Works, where the U-2 spy plane was developed in secret in the 1950s.

Some of the company's investment "is playing catch-up for all those big dollars that the government has invested" in unmanned technology, and some is "leapfrogging" existing systems, Mauro said.

The Pentagon, looking to save money, has accelerated spending on unmanned systems since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. This year, it allocated $2 billion for unmanned aircraft and millions more in the supplemental budget, compared with $363 million in 2001. The figure is projected to reach more than $3 billion by the end of the decade.

What has resulted is a hodgepodge of unmanned vehicles, such as small, bomb-seeking robots that can be carried in a backpack, and airplanes that provide surveillance for days at a time. The systems have become bigger and more expensive in recent years, such as the Predator, built by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc., and the Global Hawk, which has a 134-foot wingspan, comparable to the Boeing 737.

"Lockheed is playing catch-up and acknowledging that unmanned vehicles is a trend that is not going to go away," said Loren B. Thompson Jr., a defense industry analyst and Lockheed consultant. "It's going to be hard to penetrate a market where competitors are already established."

"We're looking at picking it up when we get enough customer interest, and that's the way they want to go," Mauro said. "Right now we're focused on getting the manned version of the F-35 flying."

While some analysts called the idea improbable, it could be an acknowledgment that the Pentagon's initial plan to buy about 2,000 F-35s is now considered likely to change -- in part because of improved drone technology. The decision to propose an unmanned F-35 may anticipate the day when all military aircraft are pilotless, analysts said.

The F-35 program has run into problems, including a rising price that is expected to reach $276 billion, up from the original estimate of $201 billion.

"I think they would be crazy not be looking at this," Pike said. "It's a foregone conclusion that at some point in the F-35 production program that [the Air Force is] going to decide we're going to replace the rest with unmanned systems." It would be smart "if Lockheed can come in and say, 'We have a solution for this.' "




http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/15/AR2006081501288.html


A isto e' que eu chamo um UAV...
 

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« Responder #43 em: Agosto 17, 2006, 12:55:14 pm »
Primeras fotos oficiales de la cabina del F-35............!!ciencia-ficcion!!




Como veis no lleva HUD............por que este va integrado en el casco:

 

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« Responder #44 em: Agosto 17, 2006, 04:56:35 pm »
Não há dúvida que as imagens são fantásticas, mas se formos analisá-las friamente, vemos que são o evoluir das técnologias que já estão neste momento no mercado.
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.