UAV / UCAV

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migbar2

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« Responder #30 em: Junho 18, 2008, 12:18:59 am »
Citação de: "nelson38899"
Citação de: "migbar2"
Citação de: "nelson38899"
Citação de: "Instrutor"
É tudo muito bonito, projectos no âmbito das nossas forças armadas não faltam ... o pior é quando não tem pernas para andar, ou se cai no descrédito e no esquecimento... vamos dar aqui alguns exemplos:
- Projecto do Missil portugues? Como está? Axo que ja era.
- Projecto do Mini-submarino portugues? Como está? Axo que ja era.
- Projecto de veículos aéreos não tripulados com o apoio da Loockeed, em contrapartida da modernização dos P3P- Cup. Como está???
- Agora aparece este projecto da força aérea com a Universidade do Minho para um UAV... Como está?? vamos ver....
- Projecto do Airbus A400M. Como está? Devagar... devagarinho... quase parado.

Enfim um sem número de projectos, aos quais ideias não faltam, falta é vontade política para os levar avante... Um Portugal no seu melhor, prefere desenvolver a industria estrangeira do que a nacional... parabens senhores governantes... Portugal no seu melhor sem dúvidas.

Quanto o Projecto de veículos aéreos não tripulados com o apoio da Loockeed, em contrapartida da modernização dos P3P- Cup, pelas ultimas informações que tenho, ja existem concurrentes ao concurso e o que parece, vai haver fumo.

Cump.


Vai haver fumo como ????? :shock:  è mais um projecto que vai arder ??  :twisted:  :twisted:

quando eu disse que vai haver fumo, quer dizer que as coisas estão encaminhadas, para o desenvolvimento do UAV. Agora se no fim do projecto, é para ir para o lixo, aí é uma decisão politica





Eu entendi...isto foi só bricadeira !!!! É para disfarçar a tristeza de termos a política de defesa que temos  :wink: .
 

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nelson38899

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« Responder #31 em: Julho 11, 2008, 03:25:50 pm »
Dassault AVE-D drone completes its first fully autonomous demonstration flight

The Dassault Aviation AVE-D drone completed its first fully autonomous demonstration flight on June 30, 2008 near Toul, France. The flight, watched by representatives of France’s Délégation Générale pour l’Armement (DGA) armaments procurement agency, comprised a completely automated sequence: roll from parking spot, runway alignment, takeoff, in-flight maneuvers, landing, braking and rolling back to the parking apron.

This AVE-D flight marks a significant first for Dassault Aviation, confirming the company’s expertise in Uninhabited Air Vehicles, or drones. The demonstration flight is a key development milestone for a technology essential to the successful pursuit of the European nEUROn Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle Demonstrator program.

The AVE (Aéronefs de Validation Expérimentale) series is a family of scale model experimental unmanned aircraft developed by Dassault Aviation. These aircraft enable Dassault Aviation to carry out flight validation tests of technological advances in the field of Uninhabited Air Vehicles, or UAVs, including stealth and autonomous flight.

Achieving maximum stealth is a decisive factor for the success of observation or attack missions in a hostile combat environment. The first AVE aircraft—called AVE-D, for “discretion”—made its maiden flight in July 2000, becoming the first stealth drone to fly in Europe.

The next stage in the validation program consisted in eliminating the aircraft tail to enhance stealth. This aerodynamic configuration makes aircraft unstable, thus rendering control more difficult. This led to the AVE-C (C for “control”), that completed its first flight in June 2003.

Within the framework of a contract with DGA, the AVE family have made several flights since 2004.

http://frontierindia.net/dassault-ave-d ... ion-flight

"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
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nelson38899

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« Responder #32 em: Setembro 05, 2008, 03:50:45 pm »
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SAN DIEGO, Sept. 2, 2008 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) is on track for the first flight of its revolutionary Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator for the U.S. Navy's Unmanned Combat Air System Carrier Demonstration (UCAS-D) program.

The first of two X-47B carrier demonstration system air vehicles is well over 50 percent complete and ahead of its build schedule, enabling this first flight in November 2009, just over 24 months from initial contract award. This is a historical step toward operating an unmanned combat aircraft aboard a Navy aircraft carrier.

The X-47B UCAS-D will be the first ever unmanned tailless jet to land aboard a carrier. The flight test program will include catapult launch and arrested landings from the carrier, autonomous carrier control area operations, and precise movement of X-47B aircraft on the carrier flight deck. The first carrier landing and subsequent sea trials are planned to begin in November 2011.

"The UCAS-D program will establish the feasibility of operating stealthy autonomous unmanned aircraft from aircraft carriers, enabling the Navy to project a highly survivable and persistent surveillance and attack presence from anywhere to anywhere on the globe," said Scott Winship, Northrop Grumman vice president and UCAS-D program manager. "The Navy's leadership in propelling this revolutionary technology forward and the industry team's commitment to rapidly deliver the capability to the fleet underscore the tremendous momentum on the program. We clearly recognize the historical importance of the Navy UCAS program and the role it will play in transforming carrier aviation."

The X-47 UCAS-D industry team includes Lockheed Martin, GKN and Pratt & Whitney. The Navy awarded the UCAS-D contract to Northrop Grumman in August 2007.



http://www.irconnect.com/noc/press/page ... l?d=149562
"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
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nelson38899

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« Responder #33 em: Novembro 25, 2008, 10:02:08 am »
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Russia seeks to buy Israeli UAVs

Israel is to seek the approval of the US government for a potential sale of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to Russia, say sources, in what could mark the first Russian acquisition of advanced defence systems from Israel.

The requirement for reconnaissance UAVs stems from lessons learned by the Russian Army after the five-day war with Georgia in August over South Ossetia, in which Georgian forces operated Israeli Elbit Systems Hermes 450 medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) UAVs.

"The Russians realised during the fighting in Georgia that they are years behind in the area of UAVs," an Israeli defence source told Jane's on 20 November.
http://www.janes.com/news/defence/jdw/j ... _2_n.shtml
"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
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nelson38899

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« Responder #34 em: Março 12, 2009, 10:20:25 am »
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USMC Developing UAV To Re-Supply Combat Forces

By this summer, combat troops in Afghanistan could be getting re-supplied by giant unmanned aerial vehicles, a U.S. Marine Corps general told Congress on March 11.

The Marines are working with industry to build a cargo-carrying UAV capable of hauling up to 1,200 pounds of battlefield essentials - such as ammunition, water and batteries - to ground troops in remote places, Assistant Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. John Amos told the House Appropriations Committee's subcommittee on defense.

The move is part of a short-term plan to find new ways to reduce the weight Marines carry into combat. Details are sketchy, but Amos said "I'm looking for something now. We want to get a solution into Afghanistan by this summer."


Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Peter Chiarelli, who also testified at the hearing, told Army Times in an interview that he was unsure if the Army will use cargo UAVs in the future. He said that the Army has been able to deliver up to 26,000 pounds of supplies a day using precision air drop.
http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i= ... =AME&s=AIR


quem dizia os humanos não iam ser substituídos no transporte, esta noticia mostra que já estivemos mais longe. Na minha opinião já não deve faltar muito para aviões como o c130, comecem a voar sozinhos.
"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
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nelson38899

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« Responder #35 em: Abril 28, 2009, 11:06:38 am »
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Paris Air Show: Lockheed Martin Skunk Works details Morphing UAV progress

14-Jun-2005
Janes.com

"The Lockheed Martin Skunk Works Advanced Development Programs (ADP) 'Morphing' unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) is three weeks away from achieving its first flight, according to Frank Cappuccio, vice-president and general manager of Skunk Works ADP. Morphing technology promises to revolutionise the way UAVs and their combat equivalents, unmanned combat aerial ..."


From what I've seen on tv about morphing aircraft, it usually means having the wings sweep forward from their swept back position. But it could be changing the shape of the wing to make it more bird-like.





http://www.aer.bris.ac.uk/research/morp ... intro.html
"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
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nelson38899

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« Responder #36 em: Maio 19, 2009, 04:16:02 pm »
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Pentagon officials are still sorting out the new IOT&E schedule for the Block 20/30 Global Hawk. And, Northrop Grumman is probably still reeling from a sharp rebuke from outgoing Pentagon acquisition chief Sue Payton.

But, when times are tough, a good contractor never loses a chance to market. This was the case at the Navy Leagus's Sea, Air Space exposition this month when Northrop Grumman provided some new videos of the U-2 replacement.

The company is now on contract for Global Hawk variants for the USAF, U.S. Navy and Germany.

Check out this video for some pretty pics of the high-flying UAS ... and some concept art.


http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/blogs/de ... 2fd29514ee
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9OWLikE ... r_embedded
"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
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Carlos Barbosa

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« Responder #37 em: Junho 28, 2009, 02:50:09 pm »

PALMDALE, Calif., June 25, 2009 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) and the U.S. Air Force unveiled the next-generation of high-flying unmanned aircraft - the RQ-4 Block 40 Global Hawk - in a ceremony today at Northrop Grumman's Palmdale, Calif., manufacturing facility.

"This unveiling of the first of 15 Block 40 aircraft is a significant step to fielding Global Hawk to Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota, in 2010 and reaffirms our excellent track record of delivering Global Hawks since low rate production began," said Duke Dufresne, sector vice president for Northrop Grumman Aerospace System's Strike and Surveillance Systems Division. "Carrying an advanced, all-weather multi-platform radar technology insertion program (MP-RTIP) sensor, the Block 40 aircraft will provide game-changing situational awareness for our warfighters with its unprecedented capability to detect, track and identify stationary and moving targets."

Use of the MP-RTIP sensor on the Block 40 Global Hawks marks the first time the active electronic scanned array (AESA) technology has been used on a high-altitude unmanned aircraft. AESA technology provides all-weather, day-night synthetic aperture radar mapping and ground moving target indicator capability.

"The Global Hawk system is in high demand by joint warfighters overseas, having successfully flown more than 31,000 hours since 2001," said Steve Amburgey, Global Hawk program director for the 303rd Aeronautical Systems Group at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. "Congratulations to the entire Global Hawk team for continuing to provide our service men and women with a reliable intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) system."

Designated AF-18, this Block 40 aircraft was the 27th Global Hawk built since the program's inception in 1995 and is scheduled to begin flight testing next month.

"This magnificent aircraft represents the future of Grand Forks Air Force Base. This and the rest of the Block 40 fleet will make significant contributions to the safety and security of our nation for years to come," said Sen. Kent Conrad of North Dakota. "I look forward to seeing this airframe on the Grand Forks ramp next year."

Global Hawk's range, endurance and large payload capabilities are well suited to support a variety of customers and missions, including environmental and Earth science research, homeland security, border and coastal patrol, hurricane and fire monitoring, and other disaster relief support activities. Global Hawk effectively provided imagery of the California wildfires in 2007 and 2008, and of Hurricane Ike in 2008.

Flying at altitudes of more than 60,000 feet for more than 32 hours per sortie at speeds approaching 340 knots, the MP-RTIP-equipped Block 40 Global Hawk can persistently see through most type of weather, day or night. As the world's first fully autonomous high-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aircraft system, Global Hawk is the platform of choice for a wide variety of sensors, foreign and domestic, meeting the global need for persistent ISR.

Northrop Grumman
 

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teXou

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« Responder #38 em: Junho 29, 2009, 11:22:23 pm »
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As Northrop Grumman rolls out its first Global Hawk Block 40 aircraft, the high-flying unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) program is facing some hurdles.

The Office of the Secretary of Defense and U.S. Air Force are ironing out particulars of a delay to the initial operational test and evaluation (IOT&E) period for the Block 20/30 Global Hawk. Industry and government sources suggest it is likely to be nine months; the original plan was to start IOT&E in August and wrap up in November.

Meanwhile, House appropriators are considering a substantial cut to the program in fiscal 2010, according to a program source. The Air Force requested $667.8 million in FY ’10 to continue producing air vehicles and $317.3 million for continued research and development. The House move could trim three air vehicles from the planned buy of five aircraft next fiscal year.

Though the program is facing delays, demand for Global Hawk services is not diminishing. The Pentagon has approved the addition of a Battlefield Airborne Communication Node (BACN) onto two Global Hawk Block 20 air vehicles; this communications relay plan came in response to a request from commanders in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Ashton Carter, Pentagon acquisition czar, this month approved Northrop Grumman’s production of Lot 8 vehicles, including two Block 30s (which will carry the Airborne Signals Intelligence Payload) and three Block 40s, which will provide ground surveillance using the Northrop Grumman/Raytheon Multi-Platform Radar Technology Insertion Program (MP-RTIP) active electronically scanned array radar.

Northrop Grumman rolled out the first Block 40 in Palmdale, Calif., on June 25. The Block 40 program, however, continues to suffer setbacks.

Carter, in his June 12 acquisition decision memorandum, says he is “concerned” about the 32-month delay in the Block 40 IOT&E plan. The delay is largely due to snags in MP-RTIP development. Though two radar modes completed testing on a surrogate aircraft, two new modes still must complete this milestone. Testing of these concurrent modes, which maximize the efficiency of the radar to collect various data simultaneously, should be complete on the Proteus surrogate aircraft by the second quarter of FY ’10, Air Force officials say.

Carter also directs the Air Force to shore up its management plan for the program, and requests options for how to field Block 40 sooner. Commanders in Iraq and Afghanistan are now suffering a shortfall of ground-surveillance capability.

A cut to the FY ’10 budget would further delay the ability to field these systems to support war efforts, the program source says.

Carter also expresses concern about an increase to the average procurement unit cost (APUC) of the air vehicles. The APUC in 2007 of $90.8 million has gone up to $102.4 million, according to Air Force officials. This figure includes all program costs (nonrecurring production, testing, hardware and software, technical data, contractor services and support and training equipment, for example). The largest contributor to the increase is the cost of depot stand ups for Global Hawk sensors and readiness spares, the service officials say. A new cost estimate is now under review.

http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_channel.jsp?channel=defense&id=news/GHAWK062609.xml&headline=Block%2040%20Global%20Hawk%20Faces%20Hurdles
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Falcão

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« Responder #39 em: Julho 02, 2009, 10:32:22 pm »
Citação de: "Carlos Barbosa"

PALMDALE, Calif., June 25, 2009 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) and the U.S. Air Force unveiled the next-generation of high-flying unmanned aircraft - the RQ-4 Block 40 Global Hawk - in a ceremony today at Northrop Grumman's Palmdale, Calif., manufacturing facility.

"This unveiling of the first of 15 Block 40 aircraft is a significant step to fielding Global Hawk to Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota, in 2010 and reaffirms our excellent track record of delivering Global Hawks since low rate production began," said Duke Dufresne, sector vice president for Northrop Grumman Aerospace System's Strike and Surveillance Systems Division. "Carrying an advanced, all-weather multi-platform radar technology insertion program (MP-RTIP) sensor, the Block 40 aircraft will provide game-changing situational awareness for our warfighters with its unprecedented capability to detect, track and identify stationary and moving targets."

Use of the MP-RTIP sensor on the Block 40 Global Hawks marks the first time the active electronic scanned array (AESA) technology has been used on a high-altitude unmanned aircraft. AESA technology provides all-weather, day-night synthetic aperture radar mapping and ground moving target indicator capability.

"The Global Hawk system is in high demand by joint warfighters overseas, having successfully flown more than 31,000 hours since 2001," said Steve Amburgey, Global Hawk program director for the 303rd Aeronautical Systems Group at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. "Congratulations to the entire Global Hawk team for continuing to provide our service men and women with a reliable intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) system."

Designated AF-18, this Block 40 aircraft was the 27th Global Hawk built since the program's inception in 1995 and is scheduled to begin flight testing next month.

"This magnificent aircraft represents the future of Grand Forks Air Force Base. This and the rest of the Block 40 fleet will make significant contributions to the safety and security of our nation for years to come," said Sen. Kent Conrad of North Dakota. "I look forward to seeing this airframe on the Grand Forks ramp next year."

Global Hawk's range, endurance and large payload capabilities are well suited to support a variety of customers and missions, including environmental and Earth science research, homeland security, border and coastal patrol, hurricane and fire monitoring, and other disaster relief support activities. Global Hawk effectively provided imagery of the California wildfires in 2007 and 2008, and of Hurricane Ike in 2008.

Flying at altitudes of more than 60,000 feet for more than 32 hours per sortie at speeds approaching 340 knots, the MP-RTIP-equipped Block 40 Global Hawk can persistently see through most type of weather, day or night. As the world's first fully autonomous high-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aircraft system, Global Hawk is the platform of choice for a wide variety of sensors, foreign and domestic, meeting the global need for persistent ISR.

Northrop Grumman



Deixo aqui umas questões:

Não seria este aparelho ou  um seu equivalente de grande utilidade para a FAP?

-Controlo de navios suspeitos (tráfico de droga, poluição, pesca ilegal, imigração ilegal, etc.), isto é, vigilância da nossa enorme ZEE.

-Missões SAR.

-Eventualmente detecção de incêndios e um muito grande etc.

Tanto quanto sei, uma versão anterior a esta foi oferecida à Espanha por 40 milhões de dólares a unidade.

Não seriam um muito bom complemento à nossa frota de vigilância?
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nelson38899

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« Responder #40 em: Julho 02, 2009, 10:46:23 pm »
Para que queres comprar um UAV desses quando em Portugal, já se anda a desenvolver através do projecto PAIC um UAV para essas funções.
"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
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Falcão

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« Responder #41 em: Julho 02, 2009, 10:57:50 pm »
Citação de: "nelson38899"
Para que queres comprar um UAV desses quando em Portugal, já se anda a desenvolver através do projecto PAIC um UAV para essas funções.


Nenhum com as capacidades de um Global Hawk. Muito longe disso.
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nelson38899

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« Responder #42 em: Julho 02, 2009, 11:00:17 pm »
Citação de: "Falcão"
Citação de: "nelson38899"
Para que queres comprar um UAV desses quando em Portugal, já se anda a desenvolver através do projecto PAIC um UAV para essas funções.

Nenhum com as capacidades de um Global Hawk. Muito longe disso.


É verdade mas enquanto o global hawk custa-te 20 milhões de euros o que está a ser construído pelo PAIC custa-te 30 mil euros.
"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
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Falcão

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« Responder #43 em: Julho 02, 2009, 11:04:18 pm »
Citação de: "nelson38899"
Citação de: "Falcão"
Citação de: "nelson38899"
Para que queres comprar um UAV desses quando em Portugal, já se anda a desenvolver através do projecto PAIC um UAV para essas funções.

Nenhum com as capacidades de um Global Hawk. Muito longe disso.

É verdade mas enquanto o global hawk custa-te 20 milhões de euros o que está a ser construído pelo PAIC custa-te 30 mil euros.


E? Se não serve para os requisitos acima mencionados...
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nelson38899

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« Responder #44 em: Julho 02, 2009, 11:08:03 pm »
Citação de: "Falcão"
Citação de: "nelson38899"
Citação de: "Falcão"
Citação de: "nelson38899"
Para que queres comprar um UAV desses quando em Portugal, já se anda a desenvolver através do projecto PAIC um UAV para essas funções.

Nenhum com as capacidades de um Global Hawk. Muito longe disso.

É verdade mas enquanto o global hawk custa-te 20 milhões de euros o que está a ser construído pelo PAIC custa-te 30 mil euros.

E? Se não serve para os requisitos acima mencionados...


E quem te disse que não irá cumprir as funcionalidades que o governo português deseje para um UAV de patrulhamento marítimo. Será que voar durante 10horas sem vir à base não é um bom requisito???
"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
Agostinho da Silva