Marinha Real Canadiana

  • 53 Respostas
  • 15641 Visualizações
*

JLRC

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 2509
  • Recebeu: 1 vez(es)
  • +4/-42
Marinha Real Canadiana
« em: Novembro 23, 2004, 11:45:11 pm »
Northrop Wins Canadian Navy Contract for Inertial Navigation Systems
 
 
(Source: Northrop Grumman Corp.; issued Nov. 22, 2004)
 
 
 CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. --- Northrop Grumman Corporation has been awarded a contract to supply the Canadian Department of National Defence with advanced ring-laser gyro (RLG) inertial navigation systems to be installed on two Protecteur-Class multi-cargo supply ships.  
 
Under the firm, fixed-price contract valued at $1.5 million, the company's Sperry Marine business unit will supply two MK 39 Mod 3A ring-laser gyro systems for each of the two ships, plus a fifth system that will be used in the Canadian navy training center. The systems will be shipped by the end of 2004. Sperry Marine will also deliver a set of pre-faulted modules that will be used for training Canadian navy personnel in trouble-shooting, maintenance and field repairs.  
 
The MK39 Mod 3A ship's inertial navigation systems, which are based on Sperry Marine's third-generation ring-laser gyro technology, provide high-accuracy position data and precise attitude, velocity and heading inputs for the ship's navigation and fire control systems.  
 
Sperry Marine is a world leader in ring laser gyro technology, having supplied more than 80 percent of the RLG systems at sea today. The MK39 system has been specified by more than 28 international navies for a variety of ship platforms, and the MK49 is standardized for NATO ships, including the Canadian Halifax and Iroquois class. Sperry Marine's AN/WSN-7 RLG navigator is standard equipment throughout the U.S. Navy surface and submarine fleets.  
 
Sperry Marine, with worldwide headquarters in Charlottesville, Va., and major engineering and support offices in New Malden, U.K., and Hamburg, Germany, is part of Northrop Grumman's Electronic Systems sector. Sperry Marine provides smart navigation and ship control solutions for the international marine industry with customer service and support through offices in 16 countries, sales representatives in 47 countries, and authorized service depots in more than 250 locations worldwide.  
 
Headquartered in Baltimore, Md., Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems is a world leader in the design, development and manufacture of defense and commercial electronic systems including airborne radar, navigation systems, electronic countermeasures, precision weapons, airspace management systems, communications systems, space sensors, marine and naval systems, government systems and logistics services.  
 
-ends-
 

*

JLRC

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 2509
  • Recebeu: 1 vez(es)
  • +4/-42
(sem assunto)
« Responder #1 em: Novembro 24, 2004, 01:39:04 pm »
Government of Canada Awards Contracts to Sikorsky for New Canadian Forces Maritime Helicopter
 
 
(Source: Government of Canada; issued Nov. 23, 2004)
 
 
 OTTAWA --- The Government of Canada today announced the signing of two separate but interrelated contracts with Sikorsky International Operations Inc. for the Maritime Helicopter Project.  
 
The first contract, worth $1.8 billion, covers the acquisition of 28 fully integrated, certified and qualified helicopters with their mission systems installed.  
 
The second contract, valued at $3.2 billion, is for the 20-year in-service support for the helicopters, and includes the construction of a training facility, as well as a simulation and training suite.  
 
"The CH-148 Cyclone will provide our men and women in uniform with a helicopter that can perform the diverse and difficult roles required in today's global security environment," said Defence Minister Bill Graham. "This acquisition is one that will provide significant economic benefits to Canadian companies from coast to coast for decades to come."  
 
"The awarding of these contracts marks the end of an extremely rigorous procurement process, through which Canada has purchased the right helicopter for the Canadian Forces at the best price for Canadians," said the Honourable Scott Brison, Minister of Public Works and Government Services.  
 
"The Canadian Forces are increasingly called upon to respond to challenging and complex operations throughout the world," said General Ray Henault, Chief of the Defence Staff. "The CH-148 Cyclone provides us with a robust, multi-role helicopter that will support our maritime operations well into the future."  
 
Delivery of the first helicopter, to be called the CH-148 Cyclone, is required to be no later than November 2008, with the remaining helicopters to be delivered at a rate of one per month thereafter. The contract has a series of bonuses for early delivery but also imposes penalties for late delivery, making it very much in the company's interest to deliver the helicopters as soon as possible.
- ends -
 

*

JLRC

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 2509
  • Recebeu: 1 vez(es)
  • +4/-42
(sem assunto)
« Responder #2 em: Novembro 24, 2004, 01:41:48 pm »
Sikorsky Signs Contracts to Replace Canada's Sea King  
 
 
(Source: Sikorsky Aircraft Corp.; issued Nov. 23, 2004)
 
 
 OTTAWA, Ontario --- Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. today announced it has signed contracts worth C$5-billion with the Government of Canada to provide and maintain 28 Sikorsky H-92 maritime helicopters. The new H-92s will replace Sea King aircraft currently in service with the Canadian Forces and deliveries are scheduled to begin in late 2008.  
 
Canada's new H-92 Cyclones will be multi-mission capable and will perform surface surveillance and control, subsurface surveillance and control, and utility operations that include search and rescue, passenger and cargo transfer, medical evacuations and tactical transport in support of national, North American and international security.  
 
"Sikorsky has been a part of Canada's history for more than 50 years, and we are proud to continue this legacy," said Sikorsky President Steve Finger. "The specifications for Canada's new maritime helicopter were rightfully among the most demanding in the world. There is no better aircraft to fulfill these missions than the H-92."  
 
The robust H-92's flaw-tolerant design and other advances provide unprecedented levels of safety and reliability. It is the only rotorcraft in the world certified to the latest and most demanding North American and European safety regulations, which exceed military specifications in many areas.  
 
The H-92 builds on the heritage of five million hours of military operating experience accumulated by Sikorsky's Super Stallion, Seahawk and Black Hawk aircraft, and the Sikorsky Sea King that has served the Canadian Forces for more than four decades.  
 
Sikorsky Aircraft has reiterated its long-term commitment to Canada by joining with two leading Canadian companies to form The Maritime Helicopter Team. General Dynamics Canada, based in Ottawa, Ontario, is responsible for the H-92 systems integration and will furnish a 100 per cent Canadian-developed and -built Mission Data Management System. L-3 MAS Canada, based in Mirabel, Quebec, brings proven performance in long-term in-service support for the Canadian Forces.  
 
Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, based in Stratford, Conn., is a world leader in the design, manufacture and service of advanced helicopters for commercial, industrial and military uses. They are flown by all five branches of the United States armed forces, along with military services and commercial operators in more than 40 nations.  
 
Sikorsky is a subsidiary of United Technologies Corporation, of Hartford, Conn., which provides a broad range of high-technology products and support services to the aerospace and building systems industries. UTC directly employs some 9,000 people in Canada.  
 
-ends-
 

*

JLRC

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 2509
  • Recebeu: 1 vez(es)
  • +4/-42
(sem assunto)
« Responder #3 em: Novembro 29, 2004, 10:01:52 pm »
Extension Granted for HMCS Chicoutimi Board of Inquiry
 
 
(Source: Canadian Department of National Defence; issued Nov. 26, 2004)
 
 
 OTTAWA --- The Board of Inquiry (BOI) that is investigating the October 5 fire in HMCS Chicoutimi has been granted an extension to Wednesday, December 22, by the convening authority, Vice-Admiral Bruce MacLean, the commander of Canada's Navy.  
 
The Board of Inquiry had an original mandate to complete its investigation by November 30. The extension comes in response to a request from the BOI President, Commodore Dan Murphy, for additional time to gather technical data, interview witnesses, research and prepare the final report.  
 
"Given the complexity of the investigation I think it is important that the Board of Inquiry have additional time to complete its thorough and detailed examination of the Chicoutimi accident," said Vice-Admiral Bruce MacLean. "A great deal of effort has gone into this investigation and I am confident of the Board's thoroughness."  
 
The Board of Inquiry can request an extension as outlined in the terms of reference assigned to it by the convening authority.  
 
The Chicoutimi Board of Inquiry was originally ordered on October 8 and convened in Faslane, Scotland on October 11.  
 
-ends-
 

*

JLRC

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 2509
  • Recebeu: 1 vez(es)
  • +4/-42
(sem assunto)
« Responder #4 em: Dezembro 09, 2004, 04:15:14 pm »
Raytheon Awarded $32 Million to Upgrade Canada's Phalanx System
 
 
(Source: US Navy; issued Dec. 6, 2004)
 
 
 RESTON, Va. --- Canada's Department of National Defence has awarded Raytheon Company $32 million ($44.6 CDN) to provide repair, overhaul and upgrade services to an additional 16 Phalanx systems for the Canadian Navy.  
 
In October 2004, two options totaling $32 million were exercised on an omnibus contract initially awarded to Raytheon Canada by the Department of Public Works and Services in June 2003. These options extend Raytheon's service to 2009 and bring the total value of the contract to more than $57 million.  
 
Under the contract, Raytheon provides total life-cycle support for Canada's Phalanx Close-In Weapon Systems (CIWS), including fleet repair work, field service support, overhauls, upgrades, overhaul support material and engineering services.  
 
"Canada has made a significant commitment to enhancing its Navy's ship self-defense capabilities, and Phalanx plays a critical role in that effort," said Dennis Kuklovsky, manager of Raytheon Canada's Phalanx CIWS program. "We're pleased to assist in making the Canadian fleet one of the most modern in the world."  
Work, including upgrade to the 1B configuration, will be performed by the Services and Support Division (SSD) of Raytheon Canada, at its Naval Systems Support (NSS) facility in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The NSS facility has been in operation since 1995. Its extensive technology and expertise provides an all-inclusive service facility to provide total system life-cycle support for the Phalanx CIWS.  
 
Raytheon Canada's SSD is a subsidiary of Raytheon Technical Services Company LLC (RTSC) and is a Canadian leader in the provision of comprehensive support services for high technology systems.  
 
Raytheon Company, with 2003 sales of $18.1 billion, is an industry leader in defense and government electronics, space, information technology, technical services, and business and special mission aircraft. With headquarters in Waltham, Mass., Raytheon employs 78,000 people worldwide.  
 
 
BACKGROUND NOTES:  
 
Phalanx, developed by Raytheon's Missile Systems, Tucson, Ariz., is a rapid-fire computer-controlled radar and 20mm gun system that protects ships from anti-ship missiles, surface craft and aircraft. It automatically acquires, tracks and destroys enemy threats that have penetrated all other ship defense systems. Phalanx detects, tracks and engages small surface craft and mines, low-slow aircraft and helicopters, and high-G anti-ship missiles. Phalanx provides situational awareness to the commanding officer and fire control solutions to other weapon systems. More than 850 systems have been built and deployed in the navies of 21 nations.  
 
Block 1B is an evolutionary, rather than revolutionary, enhancement of Phalanx CIWS' capability to defeat the changing threat. One performance enhancement is that Block 1B improves anti air warfare (AAW) by increasing the number of hits achieved against high velocity maneuvering anti ship missile threats. This is the single most significant improvement in AAW capability since Block 1.  
 
Block 1B provides a surface mode to the ship's self-defense system and expands the role of Phalanx to better defend Naval vessels against shoreline threats. It enables Phalanx to: engage surface targets day or night, defend against small high speed surface craft, detect and engage low speed air targets, and maintain its primary role of defense against current anti-air warfare threats.  
 
-ends-
 

*

JLRC

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 2509
  • Recebeu: 1 vez(es)
  • +4/-42
Marinha do Canadá
« Responder #5 em: Maio 19, 2005, 01:19:56 pm »
Canadian Submarines Resume Operations
 
 
(Source: Canadian Department of National Defence; issued May 18, 2005)
 
 
 ESQUIMALT --- HMCS Victoria, under the command of Lt-Cmdr Jamie Clarke, returned to sea today. The submarine sailed with embarked Sea Training staff to complete the measured and paced process of crew work-ups that began last week with alongside training.  
 
“HMCS Victoria met all the requirements for a safe return to sea,” said Vice-Admiral Bruce MacLean, Commander of Canada's Navy. “Having implemented all the immediate recommendations from the Chicoutimi board of inquiry I am satisfied that all our crew and submarine verification work has proven Victoria ready and safe for operations.”  
 
As recommended by the board of inquiry, the Canadian Navy has carried out the necessary safety improvements for the submarines to return to sea, including modifications to the submarines and enhancements to crew procedures and training that has satisfied the Commander of the Navy and the Navy's SubSafe organization.  
 
“The return of Victoria to sea was made possible through the efforts of a huge number of people – from the SubSafe board to civilian dockyard workers to the Sea Training Staff to the crew, with its outstanding commitment and confidence in their boat,” said Commodore Roger Girouard, Acting Commander of Maritime Forces Pacific.  
 
Verification work will now focus on HMCS Windsor on the east coast and it is expected that this Halifax-based submarine will soon return to sea as well. The remaining two boats are currently getting their Canadianization upgrades and repairs.  
 
-ends-
 

*

SSK

  • Moderador Global
  • *****
  • 1523
  • Recebeu: 13 vez(es)
  • +1/-0
(sem assunto)
« Responder #6 em: Agosto 29, 2007, 06:42:34 pm »
Citar
Second Hand Sometimes Sucks
by James Dunnigan
July 27, 2007
Discussion Board on this DLS topic

Canada is having no end of trouble with the four used diesel-electric subs it bought from Britain nine years ago. Submarines are expensive
boats to build and maintain, even if they are second hand. Canada wanted to replace its 1960s era diesel-electric subs, but the cost of
new boats would have been be several hundred million dollars each.

Britain, however, had four slightly used Upholder class diesel-electric subs that it was willing to part with for $188 million each.
Britain had built these boats in the late 1980s (for about $500 million each), put them in service between 1990 and 1993, but then
mothballed them shortly thereafter when it decided to go with an all-nuclear submarine fleet. So the deal was made in 1998, with delivery
of the British boats to begin in 2000.

The Upholders are now called the Victoria class, and are much more modern and capable than the older Oberons. The Victorias are 2160 tons
(displacement on the surface), have a crew of 46, and six torpedo tubes (and 18 Mk 48 torpedoes.) The electronics on the Victorias are
state of the art and a primary reason for buying these boats second-hand. The subs will be used to patrol Canada's extensive coastline.
The passive sonars on these subs make it possible to detect surface ships over a great distance.
 

Canada decommissioned its Oberons in 2000, then discovered that the British boats needed more work (fixing flaws, installing Canadian
equipment) than anticipated. This delayed use of the new boats. But not having many subs on active duty for the past eight years has
become a major issue in Canada. The British insist that the boats left their yards in excellent shape, and the Canadians did sign off on the
refurbishment work done before the subs crossed the Atlantic.

According to the British, the delays are mainly the fault of the Canadian shipyards that have been adding equipment and making
modifications desired by the Canadians. This work has taken longer than anticipated, and then there has been a bit of bad luck
(accidents.) As a result, only one of the boats is currently in service. Another is not expected to be available until 2009, and the
other two are undergoing scheduled refits.

What particularly hacks off the Canadians is that these boats have a useful life of thirty years, and a third of that is gone, without
Canada getting much work out of them. The subs have, however, proved to be a bonanza for Canadian media, politicians and pundits, none of
whom miss a chance to denounce all the problems and delays.


Do que nós nos livramos :!:
"Ele é invisível, livre de movimentos, de construção simples e barato. poderoso elemento de defesa, perigosíssimo para o adversário e seguro para quem dele se servir"
1º Ten Fontes Pereira de Melo
 

*

Lightning

  • Moderador Global
  • *****
  • 7405
  • Recebeu: 616 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 755 vez(es)
  • +97/-30
Re: Marinha do Canadá
« Responder #7 em: Dezembro 23, 2014, 02:45:41 pm »
Citação de: "mafets"
http://www.torontosun.com/2014/11/16/hmcs-toronto-members-fight-fire-while-on-shore-leave-in-turkey
Citar
HMCS Toronto crew members are being hailed as heroes after rescuing people from a fire while on shore leave in Turkey.

“Six members of the crew provided first response to a fire and assisted in the evacuation of the building, saving lives,” the Department of National Defence said.

It all happened in Antalya, Turkey, on Friday.

The crew were in a restaurant when a fire broke out. Trained in fire fighting and first responding, they went to work.


Cumprimentos
 

*

HSMW

  • Moderador Global
  • *****
  • 8525
  • Recebeu: 780 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 1267 vez(es)
  • +81/-34
    • http://youtube.com/HSMW
Re: Marinha do Canadá
« Responder #8 em: Janeiro 27, 2015, 02:32:59 pm »
http://www.youtube.com/profile_videos?user=HSMW

"Tudo pela Nação, nada contra a Nação."
 

*

mafets

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 5466
  • Recebeu: 1098 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 602 vez(es)
  • +373/-136
Re: Marinha do Canadá
« Responder #9 em: Julho 09, 2015, 12:02:06 pm »
http://defence-blog.com/?p=6614
Citar
French newsletter Intelligence Online says shipbuilder DCNS has activated lobbyists in Canada in order to sell to Ottawa the Mistral-class ships that Russia ordered.

In 2011, France and Russia signed a $1.5 billion deal for Paris to build two Mistral-class amphibious assault ships for Russia. The ships have already been built and the first one was scheduled to be delivered last November, but France pulled out of the agreement at the last minute over Russia’s role in the Ukraine crisis.

Ever since Paris began to reconsider the agreement, there have been periodic reports that Russia might build its own helicopter carriers to replace the Mistral vessels.


Cumprimentos
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

*

mafets

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 5466
  • Recebeu: 1098 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 602 vez(es)
  • +373/-136
Re: Marinha do Canadá
« Responder #10 em: Julho 12, 2015, 11:44:44 am »
http://www.janes.com/article/52869/newly-equipped-canadian-frigate-joins-nato-maritime-group-in-europe
Citar
Key Points
Canada's HMCS Winnipeg, a modernised Halifax-class frigate, has arrived in the eastern Atlantic to support NATO maritime operations in the region
Winnipeg is the second modernised Halifax frigate to deploy overseas, and the first embarked with an enhanced naval boarding party to support interdiction operations
A modernised Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) Halifax-class frigate has arrived in the eastern Atlantic Ocean to support standing NATO maritime forces in the region, and has a maritime interdiction operations team embarked, officials told IHS Jane's on 8 July.

HMCS Winnipeg (FFH 338) - the second of the RCN's upgraded frigates to deploy overseas - has replaced sister ship HMCS Fredericton (FFH 337), which had since January 2015 been supporting Operation 'Reassurance', Canada's contribution to NATO assurance measures in Central and Eastern Europe.

On an eight-month deployment, Winnipeg is Canada's first frigate to embark an Enhanced Naval Boarding Party (ENBP) specifically trained and equipped for maritime interdiction operations in high-risk environments. RCN ships have traditionally conducted vessel boardings using crew members trained for the task alongside their shipboard duties.

Winnipeg 's ENBP is the first cadre of what will eventually become a 70-100 strong Advanced Naval Boarding Party (ANBP) team for the RCN.

"The Advanced Naval Boarding Party will be a specialised unit that will deliver a more proficient, capable, and tactically agile force generation and protection capability than is currently provided by ships' boarding parties," the RCN told IHS Jane's on 8 July. "Maritime tactical operators belonging to this unit will employ a spectrum of advanced tactics, such as hand-to-hand combat, improvised explosive device (IED) identification, close quarters tactics, as well as tactical shooting."

As well as the ENBP, Winnipeg is embarked with a CH-124 Sea King helicopter. Before sailing for its mission with standing NATO maritime forces, Winnipeg had for three weeks conducted surveillance missions in support of Operation 'Caribbe' - Canada's contribution to the multinational counter-narcotics and counter-trafficking task force in the Caribbean and eastern Pacific Ocean.

Fredericton had been on station in Europe as part of Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 (SNMG2) conducting maritime security operations and joint NATO training exercises in the Mediterranean, Black, and Baltic Seas as well as in the North Atlantic Ocean, according to the Department of National Defence. The Halifax-based frigate is expected to arrive home in mid-July.

Fredericton was the first modernised Halifax frigate to deploy on operations. Its upgrades included a new combat management system, new radar capability, a new electronic warfare system, upgraded communications and missiles, and a new integrated platform management system.

"These modernisations enhanced Canada's operational readiness and interoperability with our NATO allies and security partners to respond in a timely and effective manner to a variety of operational contingencies in Central and Eastern Europe and around the world," the RCN said in its statement.

Fredericton served as the SNMG2 flagship for 16 days and, throughout its deployment, operated with 121 different ships from 21 NATO navies, and visited 23 ports in 13 partner and NATO nations, the RCN added. While operating in the European theatre, Fredericton participated in NATO training exercises and maritime situational awareness operations; exercises included 'Joint Warrior', 'Dynamic Mongoose', and 'BALTOPS'.

Citar
The Royal Canadian Navy Halifax-class frigate HMCS Winnipeg, pictured here earlier in its service days prior to the class's modernisation programme. Source: IHS/Harry M Steele

Saudações
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3796
  • Recebeu: 1728 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 662 vez(es)
  • +484/-68
Re: Marinha do Canadá
« Responder #11 em: Setembro 09, 2015, 02:12:01 pm »
VICTORIA, B.C. — Chile and Spain will provide resupply ships to the Royal Canadian Navy on a temporary basis as the Canadian government tries to fast-track the leasing and conversion of a commercial vessel that can provide fuel and provisions to its warships.

The Royal Canadian Navy's senior leaders have been scrambling over the last six months to put in place such measures because of ongoing delays in the construction of its two new supply ships.

Those two vessels — called joint support ships — won't be ready until 2021. In the meantime, the RCN took its two aging supply ships out of service, leaving it with no way of its own to provide fuel, ammunition and other supplies to its vessels at sea.

The Chilean Navy ship, Almirante Montt, arrived at the naval base here on July 3 and will be available for 40 sea days, RCN spokesman Lt. Cmdr. Desmond James said.

Negotiations are still underway with Spain for the provision of a supply ship to be used for the RCN's Atlantic fleet.

The Royal Canadian Navy estimates it will need to rely on its allies and a leased commercial tanker for at least the next six years.

Defence Minister Jason Kenney announced June 23 that the government was entering into discussions with Chantier Davie Shipyard of Levis, Quebec, about the acquisition of what is being called an "interim" supply ship. Those talks would look at the whether the company can provide a commercial vessel that can be converted to provide refueling and other resupply functions for the Navy.

"An interim supply-ship capability will allow the RCN to operate more freely around the world while also keeping our crews' skills up to date in anticipation of the arrival of the more robust joint support ship," Kenney said.

He noted the government is trying to move as quickly as possible to put in place such a capability but he did not provide any details on when that might happen.

Industry sources estimate that once a contract is signed, it will take Chantier Davie around 15 months to complete conversion of a commercial tanker.

The ship would have a commercial crew, although Navy personnel would operate communications equipment and the replenishment-at-sea systems that can transfer fuel to the warships. RCN personnel would eventually replace the commercial crews.

In the meantime, the Almirante Montt will be available to support training for Canada's Pacific naval forces. Canada is paying Chile CAN $6 million (US $4.8 million) for access to the ship for the 40 sea days, James said.

"The training that will be conducted using the Chilean replenishment vessel, which include replenishment-at-sea operations, is vital to maintaining the individual skill sets and core seamanship abilities within the Canadian Fleet that are essential to deployed operations," he said.

At one point the RCN examined the potential purchase of surplus US Navy ships, but that is no longer being considered because of the cost and the lack of availability of vessels.

The US Navy has also offered assistance and the RCN is working to better coordinate the movement of its ships with the USN's supply ship availability, Canadian Navy officers say.

In November 2014, Vice Adm. Mark Norman, the head of the RCN, estimated that Canada could rely on receiving help for at-sea resupply from its allies for about a year.

"The challenge we have now is that the gap is here today, and in addition to that, it's longer than 20 to 24 months, it's several years," Norman explained to journalists at the time. "No matter what we do, we don't see a long-term, sustainable solution coming from our allies."

The RCN removed from service its two supply ships, Preserver and Protecteur. Both carried fuel, food and ammunition for warships. They also provided medical services and helicopter support and maintenance

Norman noted the retirement of the two ships created "a significant gap for Canada that we need to look to mitigate as quickly and as cost-effectively as we can."

Joyce Murray, the defense critic for the opposition Liberal Party, said the gap in capability was caused by the Canadian government's mishandling of military procurement.

The joint supply ships were supposed to be in the water in 2012, but the CAN $2.6 billion project had to be restarted. Construction of the ships is now expected to begin at the Seaspan shipyards in Vancouver, British Columbia, late next year.

"There were delays and problems caused by the government's incompetent management of the procurement file," Murray said.

Canada has selected the German Navy's Berlin-class design for the ships. The Berlin-class ships are 20,200 tons and almost 600 feet long. The Canadian versions would carry two helicopters and be equipped with medical facilities.


http://www.defensenews.com/story/defens ... /29869123/
 
Os seguintes utilizadores agradeceram esta mensagem: NVF

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3796
  • Recebeu: 1728 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 662 vez(es)
  • +484/-68
Re: Marinha do Canadá
« Responder #12 em: Setembro 10, 2015, 06:33:37 pm »
Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS)

Context

Canada defends more coastline than any other country, as it is bounded by three oceans. Canada protects its maritime approaches from smuggling, trafficking and pollution, and also provides life-saving search and rescue as well as opportunities for scientific research. The fleets also act internationally to meet our commitments and protect our interests.

In June 2010, the Government of Canada announced the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy. Through this strategy, Canada will replace the current surface fleets of the Royal Canadian Navy and the Canadian Coast Guard, which are reaching the end of their operational lives. First in line will be the Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS) for the Royal Canadian Navy in the combat package. These will be followed by the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC). The Joint Support Ships (JSS) will be built for the Royal Canadian Navy under the non-combat work package.

The AOPS project will deliver six ice-capable offshore patrol ships that will conduct sovereignty and surveillance operations in Canada's Exclusive Economic Zone, including in the Arctic. The Royal Canadian Navy will also use the AOPS to support other units of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) in the conduct of maritime-related operations and to support other government departments in carrying out their mandates, as required. The AOPS project will also deliver associated jetty infrastructure in Esquimalt (BC), Halifax (NS) and Nanisivik,(NU).

The AOPS are key to the Government of Canada’s ability to deliver on three of our guiding strategies – the Canada First Defence Strategy, the Northern Strategy, and the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.
« Última modificação: Setembro 10, 2015, 06:37:21 pm por tenente »
 
Os seguintes utilizadores agradeceram esta mensagem: NVF

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3796
  • Recebeu: 1728 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 662 vez(es)
  • +484/-68
Re: Marinha do Canadá
« Responder #13 em: Setembro 10, 2015, 06:36:39 pm »
Canadian AOP's

http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/business-equ ... ships.page



Project Details

Project Deliverables

The project will deliver six fully supported AOPS capable of:
•conducting armed sea-borne surveillance of Canada's waters, including the Arctic;
•providing government situational awareness of activities and events in these regions; and
•cooperating with other elements of the CAF and other federal government departments to assert and enforce Canadian sovereignty, when and where necessary.

The AOPS project will also deliver associated jetty infrastructure in Esquimalt (BC), Halifax (NS) and Nanisivik,(NU).

Proposed Ship Capabilities

The AOPS will have a number of capabilities that will allow the ships to assist the Royal Canadian Navy in carrying out missions. The following high-level draft requirements are examples of these capabilities, and will be studied and refined during project definition. AOPS will:
•be capable of performing independent open ocean patrols on the east and west coasts of Canada, and in the Canadian Arctic during the navigable season;
•designed to a Polar Class 5 international ice classification standard which will allow for operations in first year ice up to one metre in thickness;  
•have a capability to manoeuvre in ice, however AOPS will not provide icebreaking services to others;
•be able to sustain operations for up to four months;
•have a range of at least 6 800 nautical miles at 14 knots;
•have a sufficient command, control and communication capability to exchange real-time information with the Canadian Armed Forces Maritime Security Operations Centres;
•have a cruising speed of at least 14 knots and a maximum speed of at least 17 knots;
•have a gun armament; and
•remain operational for 25 years beyond Initial Operational Capability.
•be capable of embarking and operating a variety of helicopter types up to and including the Royal Canadian Air Force’s Cyclone helicopterbe capable of embarking and deploying a variety of boat types to support activites such as boarding operations and transfer of cargo and personnel for ship-to-shore transfer as well as arrangements for cargo and container storage to support CAF and Other Government Departments operations.


Updates

On June 18, 2015, the Honourable Diane Finley, Minister of Public Works and Government Services, along with Scott Armstrong, Member of Parliament Cumberland—Colchester—Musquodoboit Valley, cut steel on a test module for the Harry DeWolf, the lead Arctic Offshore Patrol Ship (AOPS). Building this test module will enable the shipyard to test its new processes, get personnel familiar with the new equipment, and streamline construction for when full production begins in the fall of 2015.

On January 23, 2015, the Honourable Diane Finley, Minister of Public Works and Government Services, along with the Honourable Peter MacKay, Regional Minister for Nova Scotia, announced the awarding of the build contract with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. for the construction of six Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS) as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS).

On January 12, 2012, Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced that the Government of Canada has reached agreements with Irving Shipbuilding Inc. and Vancouver Shipyards Co. Ltd. This charts the course for construction of Canada’s combat and non-combat surface fleets under the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy.

The strategic sourcing arrangements, called umbrella agreements, with each of the selected shipyards have been signed. Individual ship construction contracts will now be negotiated with the respective shipyards.

On March 7, 2013, the first two tasks of the AOPS Definition Contract were awarded to Irving Shipbuilding Inc. With this contract, Irving Shipbuilding Inc. will refine and complete the AOPS design to a production-ready state. This contract will be followed by a construction contract in 2015.


Cumprimentos
 
Os seguintes utilizadores agradeceram esta mensagem: NVF

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3796
  • Recebeu: 1728 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 662 vez(es)
  • +484/-68
Re: Marinha do Canadá
« Responder #14 em: Setembro 10, 2015, 06:40:10 pm »
Harper Government Awards Shipbuilding Contract That Supports Jobs Across Canada

The Honourable Diane Finley, Minister of Public Works and Government Services, along with the Honourable Peter MacKay, Regional Minister for Nova Scotia, today announced the awarding of the build contract to Irving Shipbuilding Inc. for the construction of six Arctic Offshore Patrol Ships (AOPS) as part of the National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy (NSPS). This contract, valued at $2.3 billion, marks the start of the construction phase under the NSPS.

The contract has been designed to ensure best value for taxpayers and sets out the plan for the delivery of six ships within a ceiling price.

The AOPS build contract will sustain approximately 1,000 jobs at Irving Shipbuilding as well as many jobs at suppliers across Canada. For example, today, Member of Parliament Bryan Hayes highlighted that the majority (60 per cent) of steel plate for the first AOPS will be produced at the Essar Steel Algoma rolling mill in his riding of Sault Ste. Marie in Ontario. To date, 197 companies in Canada have already benefited from NSPS work.

Construction of an initial block for the first AOPS is scheduled for the summer, while full production will commence in September 2015. Delivery of the first HMCS Harry DeWolf-class ship is expected in 2018.

It was also confirmed that Irving Shipbuilding will be the prime contractor for the Canadian Surface Combatant project. As outlined in the NSPS Request for Proposals and the resulting umbrella agreement with the selected shipyards, Canada retains the right to determine if the shipyard will be designated as the prime contractor. After discussions with industry and a review by an independent third party, it was determined that Irving is best positioned to manage the contracts associated with the three decades of work to design and build these ships.

Quick Facts
•Industry analysts have estimated that government shipbuilding projects would create, both directly and indirectly, 15,000 jobs and generate $2 billion annually through the NSPS.
•To date, Irving Shipbuilding has made NSPS commitments in Canada totaling $370 million.
•The $3.5-billion budget for the AOPS includes acquisition costs (for vessel design and build), project office operations, a provision for infrastructure costs (e.g. for jetties), as well as initial spares and support.
•The build contract, valued at $2.3 billion, is a cost reimbursable incentive fee-based contract that provides incentives for Irving Shipbuilding to deliver six ships to the Royal Canadian Navy within a pre‑determined and not-to-exceed ceiling price.
•The new DeWolf-class AOPS will be equipped with state-of-the-art sensors and will also be able to operate and support the new Cyclone naval helicopters. Operating in conjunction with other capabilities of the Canadian Armed Forces and the Canadian Coast Guard, the DeWolf-class ships will play a critical role in protecting Canada’s offshore sovereignty in the Atlantic, in the Pacific as well as in the Arctic.
•The AOPS will have a number of capabilities, including: the ability to operate in first-year ice up to one metre in thickness; the ability to sustain operations for up to four months; command, control and communication capability to exchange real-time information with the Canadian Armed Forces Maritime Security Operations Centres; modern surface search radars; and a gun armament.

Cumprimentos
 

 

Marinha Francesa com "Escoltas" antiquadas?

Iniciado por Rui Elias

Respostas: 10
Visualizações: 5727
Última mensagem Agosto 11, 2005, 03:52:05 pm
por smaerd
"Navios da marinha russa, visitam Lisboa em Agosto"

Iniciado por P44

Respostas: 17
Visualizações: 8218
Última mensagem Setembro 16, 2004, 10:36:07 am
por P44
Novo trimaran da marinha dos Estados Unidos da America

Iniciado por dremanu

Respostas: 2
Visualizações: 1886
Última mensagem Maio 28, 2004, 09:13:04 pm
por Luso
6 novos patrulhas rápidos para a Marinha do Egipto

Iniciado por JLRC

Respostas: 0
Visualizações: 1466
Última mensagem Setembro 28, 2004, 02:11:53 am
por JLRC
Entrega do submarino U-33 (tipo A209A) à Marinha Alemã

Iniciado por Tiger22

Respostas: 2
Visualizações: 1515
Última mensagem Fevereiro 06, 2005, 03:07:16 pm
por Miguel