Exército Britânico

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JLRC

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Exército Britânico
« em: Dezembro 17, 2004, 05:11:03 pm »
Radical Changes to Fit '21st Century Amy'
 
 
(Source: UK Prime Minister’s Office; issued Dec. 16, 2004)

(See our Feature Stories section for full MoD statement)
 
 
 Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon has outlined radical plans to modernise the British Army so that it will be more 'deployable, agile and flexible'.  
 
The changes will enable the army to meet the challenges of the 21st Century. The number of battalions will be reduced by four from 40 to 36, following an extensive consultation.  
 
Changes announced today include:  
 
--the Royal Scots and The Kings Own Scottish Borderers will merge, along with another four to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland  
 
--the King's Own Royal Border Regiment, the King's Regiment and the Queen's Lancashire Regiment will amalgamate to form two new battalions within the new King's Lancashire and Border Regiment  
 
--the 19 Mechanised Brigade will start to change into a new 'light brigade' in January 2005, ready to be deployed, if required, in 2006 when it will serve as the contingent NATO response force  
 
--the Royal Welch Fusiliers and the Royal Regiment of Wales will combine to form the Welsh Regiment  
 
--the Parachute Regiment, Gurkhas, Royal Anglians, Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, Princess of Wales Royal Regiment, Royal Green Jackets and Light Infantry will continue as multi-battalion regiments  
 
--the Guards Regiment and Royal Irish will continue to be organised on their current basis  
 
The process will see around 3,000 people move into 'high demand' roles like engineers, logisticians and intelligence operators to allow the army to deliver robust expeditionary warfighting.  
 
The Defence Secretary said:  
 
"These plans will make the Army more robust and resilient, able to deploy, support and sustain the enduring expeditionary operations that are essential for a more complex and uncertain world.  
 
"The move to larger, multi-battalion regiments that these changes bring about is the only sustainable way in which to structure the infantry for the long term.  
 
"The Army has always evolved to meet current and future challenges. I am convinced - and so is the Army - that this transformation is the right course. The future Army structure will deliver an Army fit for the challenges of the future."  
 
The plans will also further integrate the Territorial Army and Reserves with the Regular Army - increasing the sense of identity, improving overall readiness and meeting the concerns of TA personnel and their employers.  
 
The Government's Spending Review in July resulted in a £3.7bn increase to the defence budget over the next three years. This represents the longest period of sustained real growth in defence spending for over 20 years.  
 
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JLRC

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« Responder #1 em: Dezembro 17, 2004, 05:29:53 pm »
Future Structure of the Army  
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Dec. 16, 2004)
 
 
 Details of radical modernisation plans to develop a more deployable, agile and flexible Army were announced by Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon today.  
 
The Future Army Structure (FAS) will ensure we have:  
 
--an Army for the challenges of today and tomorrow - it is essential that the Army changes to meet the demands of current and future operations, is fit for the challenges of the 21st Century and remains amongst the best in the world.  
 
--an Army structured for warfighting - the changes will provide the most powerful organisation and capability possible from the available resources.  
 
--a more effective Army overall - FAS enables the Army to re-invest around 3000 people into high demand roles such as engineers, logisticians and intelligence operators - the key enablers that allow the Army to deliver a robust expeditionary warfighting capability.  
 
--improved stability - the whole Army will be on a system of individual postings. It will improve the career development and effectiveness of our soldiers and their ability to balance their professional commitments against those they have to their families.  
 
--more battalions, available to use, not less - by ending the arms plot, the out-of-date system of moving regiments around the country, or the world, approximately every two years and the improved security situation in Northern Ireland.  
 
 
Changes to the infantry  
 
Following the consultation into the future of the infantry announced in July, there will the reduction of four battalions from 40 to 36, one each from:  
 
-- the Scottish Division (the Royal Scots and The Kings Own Scottish Borderers will merge. The resulting new battalion and the other four will become part of a new large, single-cap badge regiment, to be called the Royal Regiment of Scotland);  
 
-- the area west of the Pennines (The King's Own Royal Border Regiment, the King's Regiment and the Queen's Lancashire Regiment will amalgamate to form two new battalions within the new King's Lancashire and Border Regiment); and  
 
-- the Prince of Wales's Division in the South of England (by merging components of the Royal Gloucester, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment with, in the case of the Glosters, the Devon and Dorsetshire Regiment (which will then transfer to the Light Infantry) and, in the case of the remainder, the Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment)  
 
-- the Parachute Regiment.  
 
The highly trained manpower released from the Parachute Regiment will form the core of a new, joint dedicated tri-Service "Ranger" unit which will be developed over the coming years. This will be structured, trained and equipped to provide direct support for Special Forces.  
 
The infantry will also be restructured into large multi-battalion regiments. This reflects the decision to phase out the Arms Plot and in future, battalions will be fixed by role and largely by location:  
 
-- The Royal Welch Fusiliers and the Royal Regiment of Wales will combine as the Welsh Regiment. They will be known respectively as 1st Battalion The Royal Welsh (The Royal Welch Fusiliers) and 2nd Battalion The Royal Welsh (The Royal Regiment of Wales).  
 
-- The Staffordshire Regiment, Cheshire Regiment and Worcester and Sherwood Foresters will combine as the Mercian Regiment, and be known as 1st battalion the Mercian Regiment (Cheshires), 2nd Battalion the Mercian Regiment (Worcesters and Foresters) and 3rd Battalion the Mercian Regiment (Staffords) respectively.  
 
-- The Duke of Wellington's Regiment, The Prince of Wales' Own Regiment and The Green Howards will come together to form The Yorkshire Regiment and be known as 1st battalion The Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own), 2nd Battalion The Yorkshire Regiment (Green Howards) and Third Battalion the Yorkshire Regiment (Duke of Wellington's).  
 
-- The Guards Regiment and Royal Irish will continue to be organised on their current basis.  
 
-- The Parachute Regiment, Gurkhas, Royal Anglians, Royal Regiment of Fusiliers, Princess of Wales Royal Regiment, Royal Green Jackets and Light Infantry will continue as multi-battalion regiments.  
Changes to the Army's future structure  
 
FAS changes involve a shift from the current mix of light and heavy forces to a more graduated and balanced structure of light, medium and heavy forces. They will provide the most capable organisation possible from within the available resources.  
 
As part of the rebalancing 19 Mechanised Brigade will begin to re-role to form the new 'light brigade' in January 2005. It will be ready to be deployed, if required, in 2006 when it will serve as the contingent NATO response force.  
 
4 Armoured Brigade will begin to convert to a Mechanised Brigade in 2006. Other brigades will adopt their new structures around the same time - taking forward our commitment to create a more balanced force structure of light, medium and heavy forces.  
 
The manpower freed up by the reduction in battalions will be re-invested into key enabling capabilities, such as communications, engineers, logisticians, intelligence experts, that allow the Army to deliver a robust expeditionary warfighting capability.  
 
The FAS has enabled plans to be put in place to create new capabilities including:  
 
-- an additional commando engineer regiment;  
-- a new port and maritime unit;  
-- an additional strategic communications unit;  
-- a new logistic support regiment for each deployable brigade; and  
-- a number of new sub-units including surveillance and target acquisition, bomb disposal and vehicle maintenance capabilities.  
 
The plans will further integrate the TA and Reserves with the Regular Army - increasing the sense of identity, improving overall readiness and meeting the concerns of TA personnel and their employers.  
 
-- The TA will remain the same size as it is today.  
-- The future TA structure will ensure a more relevant, capable and usable TA.  
-- The Infantry TA will reduce from 15 to 14 battalions and will integrate into the new infantry structure restoring a true sense of identity at TA battalion level. They will complement the new regular infantry structure, drawing them closer together to improve operational and training affiliations, greater integration and readiness.  
 
Mr Hoon said,  
 
"These plans will make the Army more robust and resilient, able to deploy, support and sustain the enduring expeditionary operations that are essential for a more complex and uncertain world.  
 
"The move to larger, multi-battalion regiments that these changes bring about is the only sustainable way in which to structure the infantry for the long term.  
 
"We must consider these changes to the infantry in the wider context of the need to rebalance the Army, and the opportunity it affords to reallocate manpower to those areas that we need to develop.  
 
"The Army has always evolved to meet current and future challenges. I am convinced - and so is the Army - that this transformation is the right course. The future Army structure will deliver an Army fit for the challenges of the future."  
 
 
Army Bands  
 
Mr Hoon also announced a reduction in the Corps of Army Music (CAMUS) by around 280 posts. This will result in the reduction of six Army bands and reduce the size of a seventh.  
 
Bands will continue to be identified primarily with regiments and corps and, given the importance of military music to the maintenance of esprit de corps and regimental spirit, will continue to be organised on the basis of their primary role - the provision of Army music.  
 
 
Implementation  
 
Work is in hand to ensure that individuals affected by all the changes are provided with the chance to retrain and re-role to take on new tasks. However the reductions in infantry and bandsmen will require a limited redundancy programme.  
 
The Army will continue around its current size. At around 102,000 strong it will continue to require over 11,000 new recruits every year, and offer a wide range of high quality employment and training opportunities.  
 
General Sir Michael Jackson, Chief of General Staff, said:  
 
"The planned Future Structure is good news for the Army. It is about setting the Army on the right track to meet the challenges of the future.  
 
"While the Army cherishes tradition, it cannot base future capability on tradition alone. It has a proud history of embracing necessary change. Now is one such time. That is why the British Army is, and will remain amongst the best in the world.  
 
"We have not stopped recruiting. In fact there has never been a more exciting time to join. We will still need to recruit around 12,400 personnel this year and next year around 13,800."  
 
 
BACKGROUND NOTES:  
 
1. Radical modernisation plans for the UK's Armed Forces were announced by Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon on 21 July 2004 (MoD press release ref. 110/2004).  
 
2. Today's announcements form a further step in transforming the Armed Forces which began with the 1998 Strategic Defence Review. They will ensure that the Armed Forces are equipped and trained to continue to perform with success in the future those tasks which they have so admirably undertaken in recent years.  
 
3. The Spending Review announced in July resulted in a £3.7 billion increase to the defence budget over the next three years. This represents the longest period of sustained real growth in defence spending for over 20 years. We plan to use these additional resources to drive forward the modernisation of our Armed Forces to meet the challenges of the 21st Century.  
 
4. Following the announcement in July, a consultation period of 2 months was initiated to allow the infantry divisions to plan how they wished to adapt to the new structure and to express their views on constructing FIS. These views were collated and put together by the Director of Infantry, and then presented to ECAB as recommendations. ECAB then presented its advice to the Defence Secretary.  
 
5. The changing nature of the threat facing the UK was a key driver in the evolution in Defence. The threat from terrorism, for example, was considerably raised, whilst the need to defend against submarine or air attack was vastly reduced and the security situation in Northern Ireland was approaching normalisation.  
 
6. Reductions in Army bands:  
-- The Scottish Division, Queen's Division, King's Division and Prince of Wales' Division will each have one Army Band instead of their current two.  
-- The number of Royal Armoured Corps bands will reduce from 4 to 2.  
-- Additionally, the Light Division band will be brought into line with the rest of the line infantry, so that the band will have 35 posts, rather than 49.  
-- There will be a reduction by one further band, dependent on progress towards peace in Northern Ireland. We would then have to assess how the requirement for musical support to the forces stationed in the Province could be met.  
-- Further work is being set in hand to examine options for finding the remaining posts and we will report on this in due course. It is for the Infantry and the Armoured Corps to work out respectively, in conjunction with the Corps of Army Musicians which Bands will be affected.  
 
7. In order to sustain the Army's strength and ensure the optimum level of manning against the revised structures, around 12, 500 personnel (just under 11,600 soldiers and just over 900 officers) will need to be recruited this year to balance those who either leave voluntarily or at the end of their service. Next year, we will need to recruit around 13,800 army personnel (around 12,900 soldiers and 900 officers).  
 
8. In future, the means of providing variety of experience and posting for individuals to sustain the operational flexibility for which our infantry units are rightly famed will be provided through individual posting. The only means of doing that within the framework of the regimental structure is by having regiments of more than one battalion.  
 
9. Nearly half the infantry is already organised in this way and operates extremely effectively. Multi-battalion regiments will allow individuals to move between battalions while at the same time maintaining the sense of regimental identity that is so critical to the Army's ethos and fighting effectiveness.  
 
10. The TA will remain broadly the same size as today but with a structure that is more capable and relevant to future operations. There will be some internal changes to meet new requirements and best support the regular army on operations. The TA will reflect the changes in the Regular Army's structure and will provide TA manpower for new specialist areas (e.g. Intelligence, Engineers, Military Provost Staff and Attack Helicopter support teams).  
 
11. Tens of billions of pounds worth of new hardware will be procured to help the military to continue to perform so outstandingly. Incoming systems include: Skynet 5, Cormorant and Falcon communications systems, the Watchkeeper unmanned aircraft, the Astute class submarine, the Type 45 Destroyer, the FRES family of armoured vehicles, and the large CVF aircraft carriers.  
 
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JLRC

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« Responder #2 em: Janeiro 17, 2005, 10:07:13 pm »
First Major Future Integrated Soldier Technology Trials a Success  
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Jan. 14, 2005)
 
 
 UK Ministry of Defence's Defence Procurement Agency (DPA) and Thales UK have successfully concluded the first major experimental trial of the current phase of the Future Integrated Soldier Technology (FIST) project.  
 
FIST is a programme which treats UK soldiers engaged in Dismounted Close Combat (DCC) as a system in their own right. This marks the first time that soldiers are being equipped in an integrated way. The trials demonstrated significant time reductions to complete activities such as reporting, navigation, casualty finding and communication of tactical information, as well as showing the potential for reducing casualties.  
 
In addition FIST equipped soldiers will suffer less from the impact of fatigue and strain than their non-FIST equipped colleagues.  
 
The recent trial, part of the Assessment Phase, took place at the Army's Salisbury Plain Training Area and involved some 70 soldiers, representing the organisational structure of an infantry company. 15 specialist engineers collected the trial data for subsequent analysis. This is the latest of a series of trials that will assess the requirements for the FIST system and identify the factors that will influence the next phase.  
 
Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Macnaughton, the FIST Project Manager at the DPA's Dismounted Close Combat Integrated Project Team, said, "the combined MoD and Thales UK team have worked together closely to undertake this critical trial. The data gathered will provide an essential input to the forthcoming V2 development phase."  
 
Graeme Howorth, the FIST Project Director for Thales UK, added, "field trials using real soldiers are an essential element of the project's system requirement and design process, reflecting the importance of Human Factors to FIST. All design decisions are made with careful consideration of the individual soldier's needs. We are very grateful for the professionalism displayed by the troops of the 2nd Battalion The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment, which took part in the trials."  
 
Each soldier was equipped with experimental FIST systems, comprising a combination of "Off The Shelf" modules, including radios, computers, GPS, weapon sights and cameras. The equipment is linked together to form an integrated soldier system. These experimental systems are designed to answer a series of questions concerning the functionality required by individual members of the infantry section, such as riflemen and commanders, in particular relating to their information needs during operations.  
 
The soldiers were put through a number of scenarios, typical of those encountered by infantry soldiers, including a night patrol, rural defence and urban assault. Their effectiveness was compared with that of other soldiers equipped with conventional infantry equipment. The resulting trials data will be analysed and used to inform the major design decisions during the development of a FIST V2 system, which will be a further step toward the final FIST system that ultimately enters service. This V2 system will be optimised for weight, power consumption, human factors, cost and reliability and will be the subject of a major trial in the second half of 2005.  
 
Thales is the world's leading soldier systems company and is already contributing to major soldier modernisation programmes for NATO countries, including the Netherlands, Germany and Norway.  
 
FIST's selective use of high technology modules focused to meet the needs of soldiers will enhance their ability to move, find and engage the enemy and also conduct effective peace support operations. Usability and weight reduction are key factors in the programme.  
 
The major investment decision will be taken after the conclusion of the current Assessment Phase in 2006. FIST is currently planned to enter service around the end of the decade.  
 
-ends-
 

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JLRC

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« Responder #3 em: Abril 06, 2005, 10:20:00 pm »
New Special Forces Regiment for the British Army  
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued April 5, 2005)
 
 
 The formation of a new UK Special Forces Regiment was announced today by Defence Secretary, Geoff Hoon.  
 
In a written statement to Parliament, Mr Hoon declared the 'Special Reconnaissance Regiment' (SRR) will be operational from April 6th, 2005.  
 
Defence Secretary Geoff Hoon said:  
 
"The creation of the Special Reconnaissance Regiment demonstrates our commitment to shaping our Armed Forces to meet the ongoing challenge of tackling international terrorism. The new Regiment will help to meet the growing need for special reconnaissance capability."  
 
The new Regiment has been formed to meet a growing worldwide demand for special reconnaissance capability, as announced in the Strategic Defence Review New Chapter in July 2002.  
 
The Regiment will ensure improved support to international expeditionary operations at a time when it is most needed in the ongoing fight against international terrorism. Special reconnaissance covers a wide range of specialist skills and activities related to covert surveillance.  
 
The SRR will draw personnel from existing capabilities and recruit new volunteers from serving members of the Armed Forces where necessary. Due to the specialist nature of the unit it will come under the command of Director Special Forces and be a part of the UK Special Forces group.  
 
 
BACKGROUND NOTE:  
 
The need to enhance SF capability was announced in the Strategic Defence Review New Chapter, published in July 2002 - "we can confirm that we are also planning to enhance the capabilities of our Special Forces and their enablers to maximise their utility and flexibility."  
 
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Yosy

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« Responder #4 em: Abril 07, 2005, 03:55:13 pm »
 

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JLRC

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« Responder #5 em: Maio 26, 2005, 03:23:25 pm »
First Apache Helicopter Regiment Becomes Fully Operational
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued May 25, 2005)
 
 
 9 Regiment Army Air Corps, part of 16 Air Assault Brigade, has been fully trained, tested and exercised as the lead Apache Helicopter Regiment and is now available for operations.  
 
Adam Ingram, Minister for the Armed Forces, said he was delighted the Regiment had achieved this important milestone:  
 
"The Apache Attack Helicopter is a formidable fighting platform that will improve the Army's ability to conduct the hard-hitting land operations of the future.  
 
"But the introduction of a full Apache Regiment means far more than the provision of a new weapons platform. The successful completion of this exercise, in which the Apache was integrated with infantry artillery and engineers within 16 Air Assault Brigade, represents the arrival of the Army's air manoeuvre capability."  
 
Brigade Commander, Brig Ed Butler, added:  
 
"As the modern battlefield becomes more complex, dispersed and technical, we need to evolve our military capability correspondingly.  
 
"The Apache Attack Helicopter will give the British Army a genuine advantage over contemporary and future adversaries in the battlefield air space."  
 
At the conclusion of Exercise Eagles Strike Mr Ingram announced the award of two new contracts worth over £300 million to AgustaWestland that will significantly enhance the Apache Mk1's night vision capability and provide a new four year support solution for the helicopter.  
 
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JLRC

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« Responder #6 em: Maio 26, 2005, 03:24:41 pm »
AgustaWestland Awarded £194m M-TADS Apache Modernisation Contract
 
 
(Source: AgustaWestland; issued May 25, 2005)
 
 
 The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) has awarded AgustaWestland, a Finmeccanica company, a £194 million contract to upgrade the Apache AH MK1 sighting and targeting system.  
 
This system, known as M-TADS/PNVS (Modernised Target Acquisition Designation Sight / Pilot Night Vision Sensor), will provide Apache pilots with greater situational awareness and combat effectiveness. It will also enable significant whole life cost savings to be generated over the operational life of the Apache.  
 
The M-TADS system has been designed and developed by Lockheed Martin and Boeing for the US Apache fleet. The TADS Electronic Display and Control (TEDAC), which is already in service in the US, and the Improved Helmet and Display Sighting System (IHADSS21), will also be fitted to the UK fleet to achieve maximum reliability and capability benefits.  
 
Brigadier Nick Knudsen, the MoD Attack Helicopter Integrated Project Team Leader said “This is the most significant Invest-To-Save acquisition for Apache and I am proud of the team who have achieved success under the concept of Smart Acquisition. We look forward to M-TADS entering service, to enhancing the capability of this potent helicopter and to realising the predicted savings.”  
 
Alan Johnston, Military Programmes Managing Director, AgustaWestland said “This is another important achievement for AgustaWestland this year which demonstrates our continued focus on providing a Total Helicopter Capability to the UK MoD. This success is a credit to a joint MoD and Industry team and symbolises the close working relationship upon which the success of the Apache programme has been built. We shall continue to work with the Attack Helicopter IPT and our key suppliers to maintain our record of on time delivery on the Apache Programme”  
 
Work on the M-TADS programme starts immediately with design and software activities, followed by flight trials in the UK in 2007. The first modified aircraft will be delivered to the MoD in January 2009 and the retrofit of the entire fleet of 67 aircraft will be completed by the end of 2010.  
 
AgustaWestland, a Finmeccanica company, is one of the largest helicopter companies in the world. The company offers an unrivaled range of helicopters to satisfy the requirements of civil and military customers. AgustaWestland has its primary operations in Italy, United Kingdom and the United States of America.  
 
-ends-
 

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Cabeça de Martelo

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« Responder #7 em: Julho 12, 2005, 01:56:54 pm »
É engraçado ver a Grã-Bretanha a fazer uma unidade que a nível de missões tem tudo a ver com os nossos Comandos, saber que Espanha estava (ou ainda está) a ver se vale a pena tb fazer uma unidade deste tipo e quando se levantou o Batalhão de Comandos na serra da Carregueira houve individuos (militares) que não percebiam a necessidade disso e até levantavam questões acerca da real capacidade em combate dos Comandos em relação às nossas OEs.  :?
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

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komet

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« Responder #8 em: Julho 12, 2005, 04:53:44 pm »
Se eles se dedicarem tanto no campo de batalha como se dedicam aos exercícios internacionais... coitadinhos  :twisted:
"History is always written by who wins the war..."
 

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Marauder

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« Responder #9 em: Agosto 04, 2006, 05:22:33 pm »
RU gasta 1,35 milhões de libras em novos camiões, juntando 2.077 camiões aos já previamente pedidos
http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/200 ... x.php#more

[re-routing, a ferramenta de procura do fórum já levava uns upgrades :roll: ]
 

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Marauder

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« Responder #10 em: Agosto 04, 2006, 11:03:05 pm »
L86 reciclada como arma sniper
http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htweap ... 60731.aspx

Exército Britânico recebe 50 Panthers até 2007  [re-routing das notícias]
http://www.janes.com/regional_news/euro ... _1_n.shtml

Piranha IV vai concorrer ao concurso para o “British Army's Future Rapid Effect System (FRES)” [re-routing das notícias]
http://www.janes.com/regional_news/euro ... _1_n.shtml
 

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Bravo Two Zero

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« Responder #11 em: Setembro 16, 2006, 08:48:41 am »
Novo veículos para os britânicos no Afeganistão e Iraque:

Citar
The British Army’s new Mastiff armored patrol vehicle, seen here on Salisbury Plain, is fitted with extra vertical armor plates that block crew vision and prevent use of firing ports. (UK Ministry of Defence photo)New vehicles designed to help protect British forces in Iraq and Afghanistan were demonstrated on Salisbury Plain on 13 September 2006.  
 
The Minister for Defence Procurement, Lord Drayson, said the Cougar and Vector vehicles were a significant step forward in helping troops in Iraq and Afghanistan to carry out their tasks more safely.  
 
"We are one hundred per cent committed to giving our troops what they need," he said.  
 
"Within force protection there is no perfect solution, it is a high risk business, but these vehicles are really excellent and will offer increased protection."  
 
Vector provides good protection and, importantly, increased mobility and capacity compared to Snatch Landrovers which makes it very suitable for the rugged terrain and long patrol distances in Afghanistan. It is expected that deliveries of Vector will begin early in 2007.  
 
The Mastiff PPV (a variant of the US Cougar) meets the requirement for a well protected, wheeled patrol vehicle with a less intimidating profile than tracked vehicles like Warrior or FV430.  
 
The vehicles will be customised with essential Bowman radios and electronic counter-measures – and then fitted with additional armour beyond the standard level, to ensure they have the best possible protection. They are expected to arrive in Iraq by the end of 2006.  
 
Before the recent announcement of new vehicles, the Ministry of Defence had already spent over £527m on Urgent Operational Requirements for Iraq and Afghanistan designed to improve force protection. This is in addition to the planned £6bn annual defence procurement budget. (ends)  
 
 
(EDITOR’S NOTE: Compared to the original Cougar vehicle, Mastiff has been fitted with large, vertical armor plates which cover the large vision blocks and weapon firing ports. As the basic Cougar is already protected against RPG warheads, it is unclear why these plates were considered necessary by the British, especially as they totally block the crew’s vision and make it impossible to use the firing ports. The crew is thus blind and disarmed, which does not make much sense in an urban combat context.)  




defense-aerospace

Mais um derivado do Cougar americano.........interessante a nota do editor
"Há vários tipos de Estado,  o Estado comunista, o Estado Capitalista! E há o Estado a que chegámos!" - Salgueiro Maia
 

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Viriato - chefe lusitano

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« Responder #12 em: Setembro 16, 2006, 11:20:21 am »
Não acham que tem linhas muito direitas para resistir aos RPG's ou tem uma blidagem bastante resistente????????
"Viriato, ao Pretor romano Caio Vetílio lhe degolou 4000 soldados; a Caio Lucitor matou 6000; a Caio Plaucio matou Viriato mais de 4000 e prendeu 2000 soldados, Pretor Cláudio Unimano lhe deu batalha e de todo foi destruído por Viriato da Lusitânia..."
 

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Marauder

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« Responder #13 em: Setembro 16, 2006, 12:12:46 pm »
Concordo plenamente com as críticas do editor. Não dá muito jeito para reagir a amboscadas ou em acções ofensivas.

Aliás, bastaria IED para parar o veículo e uma equipa de snipers para tratar do veículo. Sim, a meu ver seria um Turkey Soot na porta de trás do veículo (também possivel com muitos outros veículos também é verdade). Ao menos se metessem uma torre no topo já não seria tão..inofensivo.
 

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Cabeça de Martelo

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« Responder #14 em: Novembro 17, 2006, 05:27:18 pm »
Toughing it out army diver-style
By Simon Brown
 
All photos by Simon Brown

Lying on the concrete dressed in frayed, olive, drab overalls, the diver-training aid was like no other I had ever seen. Missing a head, the mannequin looked more like a missing prop from a horror movie, but I was assured it was an important part of army diver training.

'That's Diver Hunt,' Scouse announced, giving the prostrate figure a prod with his boot. 'If trainees cock up they have to carry him for the whole day. Try picking him up.'

The lifeless lump of rubber and rope weighed as much as my 10-litre 300-bar twin-set. 'His first name is Mike, and he has two twin brothers. All of them are coming on the beach run this afternoon,' Stottie chipped in. Behind me the steep, loose shingle slopes of Chesil Bank stretched 7km as the crow flies along the Fleet, and back towards Portland in Dorset. As I looked on, the memory of a shore dive off Chesil - specifically, the effort required to get kit up and down the beach - played on my mind.

Just as Diver Hunt was a unique mannequin, the course instructors were like no other instructors I had met. Nicknamed Stottie and Scouse, the dive instructors held the ranks of Sergeant and Lance Corporal respectively, and it was apparent from the glint in their eyes that Diver Hunt was held in high regard. Stottie and Scouse clearly enjoyed the job of weeding out those who were on the course for the money (divers receive enhanced pay), from those who wanted to be an army diver.

The British Army - specifically, the Royal Engineers and Royal Logistical Corps - has around 350 trained divers at its disposal. The opportunity to train as an army diver is open to any recruit who has completed combat and specialist trade skills training, and selection for diver training is by aptitude test. The aptitude test is tough; civilian diver-training agencies take as little as four days to train a diver, the army takes five days - not to teach anything, just to assess the mental and physical potential of a recruit.

On the morning I joined them, Class Two diver trainees were on the dockside, unloading the truck and preparing kit for a morning dive in Portland Harbour. Class Two divers are on the bottom rung of the army diver-training ladder and, halfway into the five-week course, the men looked tired and fatigued, working in an almost mechanical way assembling scuba gear. With the kit assembled, Stottie lined up the trainees for a briefing, detailing the task of surveying the wreck of a tank landing craft that sat just inside the harbour wall, adding for my benefit a request not to disturb the silt. Diving in two waves, one group surveyed the wreck while the other provided surface support in the form of safety swimmers and operated the underwater communications.

Alongside the wreck I awaited the arrival of the first divers. The briefing about 'Don't touch the silt' was clearly forgotten as the first pair descended and set about kicking up a brown soup around themselves. Unlike civilian divers, army divers do not view buoyancy skills as a high priority. Army divers have a job to do and stirring up the silt is considered secondary to completing the task. In addition, army divers are always roped to a surface buoy. Used as a back up if the underwater comms fail, the 8mm rope is much thicker than delayed surface marker buoy string, and can be used in an emergency to recover a diver, or help recover an object. Diving without a rope is a strict no-no, and the only time anyone could remember a non-tethered dive being authorised was a body recovery operation from a trawler draped in fishing nets.

As I clambered back into the RIB I could hear a diver being hauled over the coals. The neoprene hood couldn't hold back Scouse's choice words as he let fly into one of the trainees, leaving the individual clear about what he thought of the last dive, and in particular the ascent rate used. I felt it was perhaps not a good time to mention the complete disregard for maintaining good visibility and not stirring up silt that was explicitly requested in the briefing…

Later that afternoon the divers demonstrated their fast-water search technique in the Fleet, a narrow channel of water behind Chesil Beach. The Army measures 'fast' as being any flow too strong to fin against, and judging from the rush of water on the flood tide trying to rip my fingers from the descent line, this dive would qualify. Working either side of a jackstay the pair of divers faced into the current, slowly moving downstream. Amid seaweed that was bent almost flat by the tide, they were conducting a fingertip search for lost equipment - a diving unit is always in attendance when the Royal Engineers bridge a river, providing both safety cover and a search-and-recovery capability.

For the next exercise trainees were ferried across the Fleet to the waiting instructors. Each trainee carried an empty sandbag.

'We like to look after the beach,' Scouse remarked. 'The boys are collecting litter. They can ditch the bag at Ferry Bridge. As long as it's full.'

The trainees set off for their run along the bank, zigzagging every 50m or so down to the shoreline and then back up to the top of the shingle. Taking the easy option I drove to Ferry Bridge with the Land Rover, which carried both a resuscitation unit and the 'Brothers Grimm' - Diver Hunt times three!

The trainees ran into the car park drenched in sweat, and dropped off the rubbish-filled sandbags before collecting Diver Hunt. Scouse grinned as they departed and reminded them, 'It's not over until you are in the shower,' as Messrs Hunt and the team headed back towards the beach and the finish in Portland.

The eight-week Class One course takes an army diver beyond kit and skills not unfamiliar to civilians and firmly into the commercial world of hard-hat surface-supply diving, including skills to handle an impressive array of tools and construction techniques. Underwater concreting skills are taught at the Defence Diving School at nearby Horsea, with liquid concrete piped underwater into a mould. The diver works by feel; once the concrete starts to flow, visibility is reduced to zero, but the concrete must be laid evenly.

As soon as the concrete block has set, the jackhammer is brought out and trainees are tasked with reducing the concrete block to rubble. Other tools (see box) are equally impressive, but the chainsaw is in a class of its own and, as far as the Royal Engineers are concerned, there is no substitute when it comes to clearing wooden obstacles.

The training an army diver receives is a long way from the touchy-feely world of civilian dive agencies, but it needs to be. The Royal Engineers have operated in conflict zones the world over, and going for a run with Diver Hunt and his brothers is just one way of preparing a diver to perform beyond their personal limits, if the job requires. On a personal note, if I ever find Stottie or Scouse being introduced as 'my instructor' on my next BSAC course I will run a mile. And without Diver Hunt for company!

TOOLED UP

Army divers have a wide range of tools at their disposal, both hydraulically and electrically powered. Disc-cutters, jackhammers and drills are used, but the most dramatic piece of equipment is the underwater chainsaw. Invoking memories of 1970s horror movies (with the added fear of drowning or being hacked to death!) the hydraulic chainsaw is used anywhere where a wooden obstacle needs to be cleared. The chainsaw does not have an on or off switch. Control of the tool is managed by the surface team running the hydraulic pump, with the diver asking for power as required.

Cutting through steel with the minimum of effort calls for the Broco. This underwater thermal cutting tool is powered by a surface generator which pumps 100 amperes of electricity and 100-per-cent oxygen through a hollow magnesium and steel rod. Once fired up, the underwater flame cuts through steel like a knife through butter.

BACK IN THE WATER

The Royal Engineers have been working in the underwater world since 23 April 1838, when a Colonel Pasley donned the primitive dive gear of the period, slipped below the waters of the River Medway in Kent and made history by becoming the first member of the British armed services to dive. In 1842 Pasley detached a member of his diving team to HMS Excellent to train the Navy in the science of diving - a fact that the Royal Engineers are quick to point out - and the initial training tank at the combined Defence Diving School in Horsea, Portsmouth, is named in the Colonel's honour. The Royal Engineers always travel with a dive team, and in recent conflicts, dive teams have helped clear debris from Kosovan hydro-electric plants, searched wells in Bosnia for evidence of ethnic cleansing - a particularly grim task - and have dealt with a Second World War vintage German bomb found in the bottom of a gasometer in London's East End.

KIT CHECK

The army uses a lot of off-the-shelf civilian dive kit, but with modifications to suit specific needs. The SABA (Swimming Air Breathing) unit comprises a standard BC and a standard 12-litre cylinder plus 3-litre bail-out. For communications and comfort, full-face masks are used - there is a valve block allowing the diver to switch from main to bail-out cylinder without swapping regulators. The valve block also has an external connection point, allowing the standby diver to connect a 7-litre emergency bottle into another diver's air supply.

Although divers are issued with Suunto dive watches, the entire dive is managed and controlled from the surface, with the diver being told when to ascend or make a decompression stop.

For serious underwater work, the industry standard Kirby Morgan hard hats are used for surface supply work, with the umbilical cord supplying air and communications.

http://www.divemagazine.co.uk/news/arti ... N=3325&v=1
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

 

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