Exército dos EUA

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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #315 em: Outubro 19, 2018, 03:31:38 pm »
Army to Buy 500 New "Light Tank" Mobile Protected FirePower Vehicles

By Kris Osborn - Warrior Maven

The Army plans to arm its force with more than 500 medium-weight Mobile Protected Firepower combat vehicles engineered to bring heavy fire support, high-speed mobility and warzone protection for fast-maneuvering infantry.

The service plans to pick two vendors in the next few months to build prototype vehicles as an initial step toward having one vendor start full-rate production in 2025.

“Our plan is to award up to two contracts. Each vendor will build 12 vehicles and the we will down select from two to one. When we go into production, we will build 504 vehicles,” David Dopp, Army Program Manager, Mobile Protected Firepower, told reporters at the Association of the United States Army Annual Symposium.

Current Abrams tanks, while armed with 120mm cannons and fortified by heavy armor, are challenged to support infantry in some scenarios due to weight and mobility constraints - such as deploying rapidly by air or crossing bridges in a heavy firefight.

Senior Army leaders say that Infantry Brigade Combat Teams (IBCTs), expected to operate in a more expansive battlespace, will require deployable, fast-moving close-to-contact direct fire support. Service and industry developers say the MPF is being engineered with a medium-class, yet strong 105mm cannon; this will enable attack units to destroy some enemy tactical and combat vehicles as well as infantry formations and some buildings or support structures.

Also, while likely not able to match the speed of a wheeled Stryker vehicle, a “tracked” MPF can better enable “off-road” combat.


An M1A2 Abrams tank can typically be pushed to speeds just above 40mph - yet wheeled Strykers, Humvees and other combat vehicles can easily travel faster than 60mph. Therefore, engineering a vehicle which does not slow down a time-sensitive infantry assault is of paramount importance to MPF developers.

“MPF has to keep up with infantry. We did a lot of tracked and wheeled vehicle studies, and that is what led us to identify it as a tracked vehicle,” Dopp said.

The Army has a near-term and longer-range plan for the vehicle, which Dopp said still needs to integrate the best available Active Protection Systems. Service leaders

“We have a two pronged approach. We are trying to develop systems for the next fight and the fight after next with Next-Gen Combat Vehicle. At the same time, we want to modernize our current fleet to fight any war until we get there,” Maj. Gen. Brian Cummings, Program Executive Officer, Ground Combat Systems, told Warrior Maven in an interview.

Also, rapid deployability is of particular significance in areas such as Europe, where Russian forces, for instance, might be in closer proximity to US or NATO forces.

Tactically speaking, given that IBCTs are likely to face drones armed with precision weapons, armored vehicle columns advancing with long-range targeting technology and artillery, infantry on-the-move needs to have firepower and sensors sufficient to outmatch an advanced enemy.

On mobile protected firepower the Army said it wanted a 105 they were really interested in having alot of firepower down range for those light skinned medium kinds of tactical vehicles.


General Dynamics Land Systems, is one of several industry offerings for the Army to consider. GDLS weapons developers tell Warrior Maven their offering is an evolution of its MPF Griffin I demonstrator vehicle unveiled several years ago.

“We did it with Griffin 1 for Mobile Protected Firepower it was a powerful tool for us to go back and redesign what we thought the Army really wanted,” Michael Peck, GDLS Director of Business Development, told Warrior Maven in an interview.

While many details of the respective industry offerings are not available due to an ongoing competition, Peck did say their GDLS offering incorporates an Abrams turret, weighs roughly 38 tons and uses a crew of four.

Other industry bidders include BAE Systems and SAIC. BAE’s offering is based upon improvements to the Army’s M8 Armored Gun System.

“Our infantry fights in close terrain, urban areas and remote locations, so a smaller lightweight vehicle that still provides superior protection was essential to the design of our MPF offering,” Jim Miller, director of Business Development at BAE Systems Combat Vehicles business, said in a company written statement.


For its vehicle, SAIC has formed an industry partnership; its offering includes an ST Kinetics armored vehicle chassis and a CMI Defense turret, SAIC data says.

The Army’s new lightweight MPF armored vehicle is expected to change land war by outmatching Russian equivalents and bringing a new dimension to advancing infantry as it maneuvers toward enemy attack.

Long-range precision fire, coordinated air-ground assault, mechanized force-on-force armored vehicle attacks and drone threats are all changing so quickly that maneuvering US Army infantry now needs improved firepower to advance on major adversaries in war, Army leaders explain.

Senior Army leaders did not elaborate on any precise weight, but did stress that the effort intends to find the optimal blend of lethality, mobility and survivability. Senior Army leaders, however, ,do say that the new MPF will be more survivable and superior than its Russian equivalent.

The Russian 2S25 Sprut-SD air transportable light tank, according to Russian news reports, weighs roughly 20 tons and fires a 125mm smoothbore gun. It is designed to attack tanks and support amphibious, air or ground operations. The vehicle has been in service since 2005. US Army weapons developers have said their MPF will likely be heavier to ensure a higher level of protection for US soldiers.

When asked if the MPF deployment plans will mirror Army plans to send Strykers to Europe as a deterrent against Russia, Dopp did not rule out the possibility.

“MPF will go to support IBCTs….whatever they encounter,” Dopp said.

Kris Osborn became the Managing Editor of Warrior Maven in August of 2015 . Osborn previously served at the Pentagon as a Highly Qualified Expert with the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army - Acquisition, Logistics & Technology. Osborn has also worked as an anchor and on-air military specialist at CNN and CNN Headline News.

https://defensemaven.io/warriormaven/land/army-to-buy-500-new-light-tank-mobile-protected-firepower-vehicles-hfQIKlru8ESGlEiG_xiuDw/
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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #316 em: Outubro 20, 2018, 05:52:31 pm »
https://www.sofmag.com/10th-mtn-soldiers-learn-how-to-use-new-itws-on-m3-carl-gustaf/?fbclid=IwAR378IrGMZYZZxJcblMl1CcADTXBjcBOL3V74rC5y6uREH84bVxvNkuo52c
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10th MTN Soldiers learn how to use new ITWS on M3 Carl Gustaf

New Equipment Trainers of Project Manager Soldier Sensors and Lasers partnered with Project Manager Soldier Weapons and taught 2nd Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment Soldiers to use the Integrated Thermal Weapons Sight on the M3 Multi-role Anti-armor Anti-tank Weapon System Carl Gustaf Recoilless Rifle. The ITWS incorporates the AN/PAS-13E Thermal Weapons Sight and the AN/PSQ-23A Small Tactical Optical Rifle Mounted Laser Range Finder. The live-fire training occurred on a range on Fort Drum, New York.

PM SSL is part of Program Executive Office Soldier and equips Soldiers with sensors, lasers and precision targeting devices to dominate the battlefield through improved lethality, mobility, situational awareness and survivability in all operational environments. PM SW is also part of PEO Soldier and equips Soldiers with individual and crew served weapons to dominate the battlefield through improved lethality in all operational environments.

“We had a capability gap in that we could not effectively engage targets at night with the ‘Carl-G’ (M3),” said Capt. Alex Stewart, 2-22 Infantry Assistant Operations and Planning. “I expected our Soldiers to learn how to mount, operate, and make adjustments to the ITWS to give us that capability.”

“Our task, or rather challenge, was not just to train Soldiers to operate the system to engage targets at night,” Captain Stewart said. “It was two-fold: We needed to establish that capability, and equip leaders with the knowledge to train other Soldiers within our anti-tank sections. This training allowed us to do both.”

To train the Soldiers, the NET had two objectives, according to Lonnie Schnepp, Special Operations Training Instructor Lead with PM SSL. The first was to train the Soldiers on how to operate the TWS and the STORM laser range finder, and integrate both of those systems onto the M3.

The second objective, according to Schnepp, was to increase the lethality of the 2-22 Infantry’s AT section. Schnepp said the use of the TWS allows the detection and engagement of targets 24/7 including during limited visibility. Additionally, the TWS AN/PAS-13E variant is equipped with software that allows precise range and aiming calculations when used in conjunction with the STORM.





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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #317 em: Outubro 23, 2018, 06:17:43 pm »
 

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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #318 em: Outubro 27, 2018, 05:46:03 pm »
 

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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #319 em: Outubro 31, 2018, 02:44:33 pm »
Reactivated unit gives 82nd Airborne an armored component that packs a Marine Corps-style punch


Marines conduct a bridge crossing simulation with Light Armor Vehicles. Soldiers with a recently-reactivated unit in the 82nd Airborne Division will use the Marine LAV for airdrop missions. (2nd Lt. Larry Boyd Jr/Marine Corps)

More than three decades after getting out of the armor business, soldiers with the 82nd Airborne Division have reactivated a company that will add Marine Corps armored vehicles to its formation.

Last week, the All American Division reactivated Alpha Company, 4th Battalion, 68th Armored Regiment at Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

The unit had been deactivated in 1984 after having served as the United States' only “airborne tank battalion,” according to the Fayetteville Observer.

The unit was active in the division since 1968 and served as an armored unit for airborne forces. It included the M551 Sheridan tank in its arsenal.

But this time around, soldiers will be driving a vehicle in the Marine Corps inventory, the Light Armored Vehicle-25A2. Members of the division began training on and testing the LAVs in 2016, as reported by Marine Corps Times.

Soldiers conducted airdrop tests with the LAV and chose it over the Army’s Stryker vehicle due to its lighter weight, portability and firepower, officials said at the time.

Four LAVs can fit on a C-17, versus only three Strykers. The LAVs being used by the division come equipped with a 25mm cannon.

Across the Army, units have shifted from lighter equipment to heavier, more robust and lethal equipment to counter what has been called a return to “great power competition” with Russia and China.

In September, Army officials announced that it would convert one Stryker brigade combat team to an armored brigade combat team and an infantry BCT to an SBCT by 2020.

That followed a 2017 announcement that the 3rd Infantry Division’s 2nd IBCT would convert to an ABCT.

The changes give the Army a total of 31 BCTs in the regular Army — 11 armored, 13 infantry and seven Stryker. The Army National Guard will retain 27 BCTs — five armored, 20 infantry and two Stryker.

At nearly the same time as these changes are taking effect, U.S. Army Europe is adding 1,500 soldiers to the current 33,000 troops in Germany. Those soldiers will add a field artillery brigade headquarters, two multiple-launch rocket system battalions, a short-range air defense battalion and support to the Army’s footprint in Europe.

The firepower upgrades provide tactical and operational benefits for the core mission of the 82nd Airborne Division’s global response force, which includes providing a quick-reaction force anywhere around the world as needed.

The global response force mission requires a battalion-sized element from the division to deploy within 18 hours anywhere in the world — a scenario experts think could be likely should Russia push into the Baltic states or into the Balkans.


Paratroopers from 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division celebrated the activation of Alpha Company, 4th Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment on Fort Bragg, N.C. ( Sgt. Jesse Ledger/Army)

Capt. Aram Hatfield and 1st Sgt. James Grimes lead the newly reactivated Alpha Company. They’ll now share a connection with Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley, who the Fayetteville Observer reports started his career with A Company, 4th Battalion, 68th Armor Regiment as an assistant battalion maintenance officer and platoon leader.

The LAV is an eight-wheeled vehicle that weighs 31,000 to 38,000 pounds, depending its configuration. The vehicles also use a three-person crew and can carry an additional six troops, according to General Dynamics Land Systems.

The Observer reported that airdrop tests had been conducted on the LAV back in the late 1980s and early 1990s. The 82nd also experimented with the LAV-25s during Operation Desert Storm.

General Dynamics conducted its own airdrop tests on both the LAV and the Stryker in the early 2000s, said Michael Peck with General Dynamics.

That required some minor chassis modifications to accommodate parachute rigging attachments. Marines most often deploy with the vehicles loaded aboard ship.

Last year, Marine officials said that the division was interested in obtaining as many as 60 LAVs.

The Marine Corps is in a long-term process of developing a new vehicle to replace the LAV but has not publicly divulged detailed work on the project by the Office of Naval Research.

https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2018/10/30/reactivated-unit-gives-82nd-airborne-an-armored-component-that-packs-a-marine-corps-style-punch/
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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #320 em: Novembro 02, 2018, 11:30:51 am »
https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2018/11/01/heres-the-list-of-military-units-headed-to-the-border/?utm_campaign=Socialflow+MAR&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&fbclid=IwAR1DVm_IcBxN2FTTF2p9FJV9wkgMz71NMC0vFDcVPR5zKi4cZKcuZKbvwNQ

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The following military units are headed to the U.S.-Mexico border to meet President Donald Trump’s directive to deploy active duty forces through Texas, California, Arizona and New Mexico. DoD now reports more than 7,000 troops will be tasked to support the Department of Homeland Security.





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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #321 em: Novembro 30, 2018, 10:12:04 am »
Microsoft vai vender 100 mil HoloLens ao exército dos Estados Unidos da América

A Microsoft mudou de forma radical a indústria quando mostrou ao mundo os seus HoloLens. Este capacete de realidade aumentada vem alterar de forma completa a interacção com o mundo e com os computadores.

Focado principalmente na indústria, parece ter agora conseguido um novo espaço. A Microsoft terá conseguido um contrato com o exército dos EUA para a venda de 100 mil HoloLens.



As possibilidades de utilização do HoloLens são imensas e muito focadas na indústria. Dá espaço aos utilizadores para que estes tornem a sua experiência de utilização imersiva, ao mesmo tempo que conseguem ainda ter uma percepção e interagir com o mundo.

Um novo mundo de oportunidades para o HoloLens

Com estas capacidades, tornam-se a ferramenta perfeita para criar cenários de simulação e/ou de treino, sem que exista a necessidade de estar em ambientes reais e, em muitos casos, perigosos ou virtualmente impossíveis de aceder.

Foi precisamente com esta ideia em mente que o exército norte-americano estabeleceu um contrato com a Microsoft, para que o HoloLens seja usado em cenários de simulação, de treino dos soldados e até em cenários de guerra.



Um contrato muito importante para a Microsoft

Este contrato, que a Microsoft agora está a estabelecer com o exército dos Estados Unidos da América é avultado. Estima-se que poderá atingir um valor de 480 milhões de dólares, para a venda dos 100 mil HoloLens.

Para o conseguir, a Microsoft teve de bater alguns concorrentes bem conhecidos. Um deles foi a Magic Leap, muito mais virada para o mercado de consumo. A grande vantagem da Microsoft e do HoloLens é o seu foco na indústria.



Exército dos Estados Unidos da América tem versão especial

Sabe-se também que estes dispositivos que vão ser vendidos vão variar dos atuais HoloLens. Vão ter formas mais adaptadas aos campos de batalha e vão estar equipados com visão nocturna e sensores de calor. A Microsoft espera fornecer já, em apenas 2 anos, mais de 2500 unidades deste equipamento.

As relações das grandes empresas tecnológicas com as forças militares têm-se estado a fortalecer, mesmo com toda a reacção negativa de toda a opinião pública norte-americana e até dos funcionários destas mesmas empresas.

https://pplware.sapo.pt/microsoft/microsoft-hololens-exercito-estados-unidos-da-america/
 
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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #322 em: Dezembro 07, 2018, 03:57:51 pm »
he Pentagon is reviewing the special operations community after a series of high-profile scandals

This fall has been rough for headlines involving special operations troops.

Two Navy SEALs and two Marine Raiders face murder charges in the death of a Green Beret last year in Mali. Meanwhile, a Navy SEAL is under investigation for murdering an Iraqi detainee, and a dozen of his colleagues could be called as witnesses.

Now, after U.S. Special Operations Command has been entrenched in the Global War on Terror for going on two decades, Congress is calling on a Defense Department review of the entire organization, from its operational load to ― notably ― the state of its professionalism and ethics programs.

The most recent National Defense Authorization Act points to “growing congressional concern with misconduct, ethics, and professionalism," according to a Congressional Research Service report published in late October.

“That review is ongoing right now,” a defense official told Army Times on Wednesday.

Senior leaders within the Army have also taken notice, pushing out guidance ahead of DoD’s official report back to Congress.


In a Nov. 29 memo to the force, Army Special Operations Command boss Lt. Gen. Francis Beaudette called on his troops to take a hard look at themselves.

“Recent incidents in our formation have called our ethics and professionalism into question, and threaten to undermine the trust bestowed on us by the American people and our senior leadership,” he wrote.


Two Marine Raiders and two Navy SEALs have been charged in the murder of Green Beret Staff Sgt. Logan Melgar. The Defense Department is reviewing ethics and standards issues in its special operations community. (Army)
Leaders need to set a tone in their units that enables soldiers and civilians to make the right decision “left of bang,” before they’ve done something they can’t take back and have to face consequences.

“If we fail to meet the high standards expected of us, we fail in our duty to the nation,” he wrote.

Blockbuster stories like murder and corruption abroad have gotten major press attention, but further down in the weeds, there are countless stories of individual misconduct in operators' personal lives.

Just this year, Army Special Forces soldiers have been charged with attempting to smuggle cocaine back from Colombia, the murder of an estranged wife, the sexual assault of a family friend, and the rape of two young girls. Three of those four cases came out of 7th Special Forces Group at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.

The NDAA directs the office of the secretary of defense to study professional and ethics standards for SOCOM and its component commands, as well as those within each of the services available to their respective special operations troops.

https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-army/2018/12/05/the-pentagon-is-reviewing-the-special-operations-community-after-a-series-of-high-profile-scandals/
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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #323 em: Dezembro 18, 2018, 05:54:42 pm »
Army picks two companies to build prototypes for a new cannon-toting vehicle to back up infantry
By: Todd South


General Dynamics’ offering for the Army’s Mobile Protected Firepower combines a version of its latest Abrams turret with a chassis that leverages experience from the United Kingdom’s AJAX program. (Richard Watt/British Ministry of Defence)

The Army has selected two companies to provide prototypes of a new armored, tracked vehicle to give infantry units necessary firepower

Both Michigan-based General Dynamics Land Systems and BAE Systems will have the next 14 months to build and begin delivering 12 prototypes of the Mobile Protected Firepower vehicle.

BAE Systems will build an M8 Buford Armored Gun System with new capabilities and components.

GD submitted an offering that puts a version of its latest Abrams turret together with a chassis that uses past work on the United Kingdom’s AJAX program.

The ultimate product will be either a 105- to 120mm cannon and a tracked vehicle that can withstand a classified level of enemy fire.

At least two of the vehicles should be able to fit into the back of a C-17 aircraft.

The need is aimed at near-peer threats.

Brig. Gen. Ross Coffman, director of the Next Generation Combat Vehicle Cross Functional Team, said that the current and future battlefield will challenge the firepower of the infantry.

Right now, Infantry Brigade Combat Teams have artillery to knock out secured enemy positions.

“But there’s no precision munition to remove bunkers from the battlefield, to shoot into buildings in dense urban terrain,” Coffman said.

The MPF vehicle and weapon will be used to “disrupt, break in and breach those secure defensive zones,” Coffman said.

The requirement first emerged in the Army’s vehicle modernization strategy in late 2015


BAE System will build an M8 Buford Armored Gun System with new capabilities for its prototype for the Army's Mobile Protected Firepower vehicle. (BAE Systems)

The target was to give IBCTs a protected, long-range, cyber-resilient, precision, direct-fire capability for early or forcible entry operations.

In February, GD and BAE, along with SAIC partnering with Singapore’s ST Engineering and CMI Defense, all submitted proposals.

The SAIC team combined CMI’s Cockeril 3105 turret with ST Engineering next-generation armored fighting vehicle chassis.

Officials would not discuss the reasons behind the selection. They expect a final decision to be made by fiscal year 2022. Fielding to the first units is expected by fiscal year 2025.

The MPF is under the Army’s NGCV CFT program, which is overseen by the Army Futures Command.

The plans are for roughly 54 vehicles, initially. They will build 26 first, with an option to build 28 more and retrofit eight prototype vehicles.

For the existing vehicle fleet, there’s another program that’s been conducting recent testing to also enhance the combat vehicle firepower and protection.

The Army chose to evaluate two Active Protection Systems at a November live-fire rodeo, looking at whether either system could work as an interim protection system for one of its combat vehicles.

The APS will also go onto the MPF vehicle in development at this time.

The Israeli-made Trophy VPS by Rafael, a slimmer edition of the Trophy System already on the Abrams tank, and the German-made Active Defense System by Rheinmetall got a chance to showcase their products' abilities atop Strykers at the live fire, according to Military Times sister publication Defense News.

Rheinmetall partnered with Michigan-based Unified Business Technologies. They’ve dubbed their system “Strike Shield.”

Army representatives saw the Trophy VPS on a Bradley Fighting Vehicle at a demonstration in Israel in August, Defense News reported.

Earlier this year, the Army awarded a $193 million contract to Leonardo DRS for its Trophy APS on the M1 Abrams tank.

The program conducted four “soft kill” demonstrations using virtual threats with the system and controller.

The APS is an interim solution as the Army develops its Modular Active Protection System as part of a larger suite of Vehicle Protection Systems.

In late 2018, developers with the Tank Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center completed successful testing on the MAPS.

The MAPS base kit is an array of sensors and countermeasures used with the Modular Active Protection Systems Controller, giving vehicle crews a single solution to run APS for incoming threats such as enemy drones or anti-tank weapons.

Bill Beyer, MAPS Virtual Demonstrator lead, said in release following MAPS testing that the base kit would move into the vehicle program portfolio by mid-2019.

Rafael was selected to provide its Trophy APS for the Abrams while IMI, also an Israeli company, has put forth the Iron Fist for the Bradley.

Participants didn’t fully install their systems on the vehicle. They put up mock rigs for testing in front of Strykers mounted their system on a Stryker.

https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2018/12/18/army-picks-two-companies-to-build-prototypes-for-a-whole-new-cannon-toting-vehicle-to-back-up-infantry/
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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #324 em: Dezembro 20, 2018, 10:28:44 am »
Entretanto nos EUA...  :-P ;)

https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2018/12/19/armory-heist-ringleader-sentenced-for-stealing-grenade-launcher-machine-guns-m16s-nvgs/?utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=Socialflow+MAR&utm_source=facebook.com&fbclid=IwAR3Mwa5BAwyT1cAHzQHygBiJHKYjvcHAdcLusWPUmSdr8h3xHXBsQqVUgMY

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The leader of an armory heist that brought in a major haul, including machine guns, grenade launchers, rifles, pistols, night vision goggles and various other items, was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison, a Department of Justice release said.

Brandon Shane Polston, 33, admitted that on Thanksgiving Day 2017, he jumped the fence at an Army National Guard base in Lancaster, South Carolina, and entered the armory when he realized one of the building’s doors was unlocked and nary a soul was present.

With the military armament world as his oyster, Polston proceeded on his very own unlimited minute-shopping-spree jaunt through the aisles, except instead of filling a cart to the brim with food or toys, he accumulated weapons to sell for cash, cocaine and some of that ol' fashioned, South Carolinian meth.

“Gear adrift,” as the saying goes.

Polston then hid the stolen arsenal in some nearby woods before transporting select items to a motel for individual sales and trades, the report said.

Some of those transactions included:

Trading (1) 9mm pistol for heroin, which he then gave to a friend
Selling (2) M16s for cash, cocaine and marijuana
Selling (1) M16 to a woman for methamphetamine
Polston may have even gotten away with it had it not been for a generic traffic stop a few nights later, when an officer from the Lancaster Police Department pulled over a vehicle driven by Kimberly Denise Cannon, 40, after observing her tossing trash from the car.

Cannon and Austin Lee Ritter, 23, were assisting Polston with the transport and sales of the arsenal.

While preparing to confront Cannon about the environmental dangers of littering, the officer noticed the abundant weapons cache the 40-year-old was transporting. Among the items recovered by the officer were:

(1) M249 Squad Automatic Weapon light machine gun

2) M16 rifles
(1) M203 grenade launcher
(1) set of NVGs
(2) Beretta M9 pistols
... and a partridge in a pear tree.



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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #325 em: Janeiro 16, 2019, 06:00:28 pm »
 

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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #327 em: Março 05, 2019, 02:08:47 pm »
 

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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #328 em: Março 28, 2019, 11:53:39 am »
NGCV: Hard Choices In Bradley Replacement, RFP Out Friday
The Army will sacrifice some protection to fit two NGCVs on one Air Force C-17.
By SYDNEY J. FREEDBERG JR.
on March 27, 2019

HUNTSVILLE: The Army’s willing to make some tough tradeoffs to move fast and replace its 1980s-vintage M2 Bradley troop carrier. The service will issue a formal Request For Proposals Friday for a new Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV).

After industry warned the service that its original vision was too ambitious to build, Brig. Gen. Ross Coffman said here this morning, the Army made a difficult compromise: reduce the required protection to keep the vehicles small and light enough to fit two on the Air Force’s workhorse C-17 jet transport.

Contractors must submit prototype vehicles (blandly called “bid samples”) to be tested this fall.

The OMFV will have an add-on armor “b-kit” that can be shipped separately and installed by troops in the war zone, if commanders think the threat is great enough, Coffman told reporters at the Association of the US Army’s annual conference here. But the baseline OMFV will weigh roughly as much as the Bradley, about 33 tons in the latest version, which also fits two per C-17. That’s a weight target all three publicly proclaimed contenders — the BAE CV90, General Dynamics Griffin, and Rheinmetall-Raytheon Lynx — should all be able to meet.

By contrast, two cancelled prior programs either went too high or too low. The Ground Combat Vehicle would have weighed as much as an M1 Abrams, which fits one per C-17. The infamous Future Combat Systems tried to cram all its capabilities into a turboprop C-130, which can take off — barely — with 20 tons aboard.

“We went to school on our past failures as a service,” said Coffman, who heads the Army’s Cross Functional Team for Next Generation Combat Vehicles (NGCV), the service’s No. 2 modernization priority after long-range artillery. “You can write a requirement that is unattainable, and that’s why at least one major, major, major program for the United States army failed previously.”


A single C-17 (right column) can carry 1 M1 Abrams main battle tank, two M2 Bradley infantry fighting vehicles, or three partially disassembled AH-64 Apache helicopters. SOURCE: Lockheed Martin

No Blood For Unobtainium

Many in the defense industry were clearly anxious this latest attempt to replace the Bradley might go the way of its two predecessors and be canceled. A complaint that the OMFV requirements were unachievable was the first thing I heard on arrival in Huntsville for the conference — before I even left the airport — and the concern came up as a question for the first Army speaker, Futures Command chief Gen. John “Mike” Murray, who deferred to Coffman. Coffman and his team are confident they’ve solved that problem.

The plan was always to start with a highly ambitious draft requirement, then get industry feedback and dial back where necessary, Coffman said. If you start out too modest, he said, you don’t push industry to its utmost, so you might never find out they could have given you something better if only you’d asked. The whole point of writing a draft is to revise it, after all, and the whole point of releasing a draft for comment is to pay attention to the comments you get instead of ignoring them.

The problem was two-fold, Coffman said. One issue was sheer weight. The draft requirement called for so much protection on the baseline vehicle (as opposed to the bolt-on b-kit) that the OMFV came in too heavy for the C-17. The other issue was height, since ground clearance — the distance between the ground and the bottom of the hull — is the first line of defense against roadside bombs and land mines: The OMFV would’ve been too tall.

“There’s the triad, right: lethality survivability and mobility,” Coffman said. “We want two OMFVs per C-17. If you push the survivability standard so high, then you need incredible armor protection, you need incredible height of the vehicle, based on blast.”


Experimental robotic M113 armored vehicle (with human monitor aboard for safety) at Camp Grayling in 2017

More Compromises: From Guns To Robotics

The Army’s making other compromises to get the Bradley replacement faster and on budget. As previously announced, the service won’t require the vehicle to transport a full nine-soldier infantry squad, something the Bradley can’t do either but was a major driver of the cancelled Ground Combat Vehicle’s tremendous size.

Offensively, the service wants the OMFV to carry a 50mm cannon — the “objective requirement” — but it will accept 30 mm — the “threshold requirement.” (The current Bradley’s gun is 25 mm). That said, Coffman added, if a company comes in with a 30mm weapon, “they have to show us a path to 50.”

The Army will also accept a second-generation FLIR (Forward Looking Infra-Red) sight — found on many vehicles today — rather than waiting for third-gen FLIR, but again it wants to be able to upgrade later.

Defensively, the vehicle will also have the Army’s new Modular Active Protection System (MAPS), meant to disable incoming anti-tank missiles and rockets before they ever hit the armor. While the Army’s urgently adding off-the-shelf active protection like Rafael’s Trophy and IMI’s Iron Fist to its existing vehicles, it doesn’t want to be tied to any one contractor in the future. So MAPS is meant to be a plug-and-play open architecture that can easily be upgraded with new sensors, jammers, and “hard kill” mini-missiles, mixing and matching the best technologies available from any vendor.

The potential for future upgrades is especially critical because present-day active protection systems can’t stop everything a Russian or Chinese tank can shoot at you.

Today’s APS does pretty well against the most powerful weapons most guerrillas can muster: unguided rockets (RPGs) and anti-tank guided missiles (ATGMs), which both rely on high explosive warheads to breach the target’s armor. But modern APS can’t stop high-velocity solid shot, the so-called “long-rod penetrators” — essentially, giant steel darts with needle-like tips — that penetrate armor by applying tremendous kinetic energy to a single point.


How the Trophy Active Protection System works (Rafael graphic)

“You have RPGs, you’ve got missiles, and then you have long-rod penetrators,” Coffman said. “Our APS are going to have to defeat all of those three in the future, the third being the hardest.”

Overall, one thing the Army will not compromise on its upgradeability: The initial OMFV must have plenty of room for growth. “We’re not willing to take risk in our ability to have multiple increments of this vehicle,” Coffman said.

The other thing the Army won’t compromise, despite the tradeoffs to fit into the C-17? Protection for the soldiers aboard the vehicle.

“Survivability of our soldiers is paramount,” Coffman said. “It’s No. 1.”

While Coffman didn’t say this explicitly, survivability of the soldiers is distinct from the survivability of the vehicle itself. If the OMFV is totaled but everyone walks out of the wreckage alive, that’s a win.

In this wider understanding of survivability, the best way to protect the troops is to take them out of the vehicle altogether. That’s a big part of why the Bradley replacement will be the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle. Coffman’s NGCV team is also working on completely unmanned Robotic Combat Vehicles, with the first platoon-sized experiment — four robots and two manned command vehicles — scheduled for next year.

These aren’t sci-fi killer robots, however. At least initially, “unmanned” will mean “remotely controlled,” with two human operators — a driver and a gunner/sensor operator — teleoperating each unmanned machine. Over time, however, the Army expects to upgrade as technology improves, first getting down to one human remote-controlling one unmanned vehicle, then having one human supervise multiple robots. But the Army never wants to take the human out of the loop, so keeping communications open between man and machine is critical.

Current encrypted radio technology can communicate over about 20 kilometers (12.5 miles), Coffman said. It doesn’t yet have the massive bandwidth required to relay video of an unmanned vehicle’s surroundings, but he’s confident he and Army Futures Command‘s other Cross Functional Teams — the network, long-range firepower, et al. — can overcome that limitation.

“While it’s going to require a bigger pipe, I think technology’s going to get us to about 18 kilometers [11 miles],” Coffman said. That stand-off distance, he said, “when you combine it with all the CFT efforts, is about what we need to continue to fight the way we want to fight and to protect our soldiers.”

https://breakingdefense.com/2019/03/ngcv-hard-choices-in-bradley-replacement-rfp-out-friday/
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Re: Exército dos EUA
« Responder #329 em: Abril 04, 2019, 03:47:18 pm »
Sub Compact Weapon Production-Other Transaction Agreement

Contractor Awarded Name: B&T USA LLC

The P-OTA is awarded based upon successful completion of the prototype project proposed by B&T USA LLC in response to Sub Compact Weapon (SCW) Prototype Opportunity Notice: W15QKN-18-R-032M, evaluation of testing results, and subsequent updated proposal request letter for Follow-on Production Award. The purpose of this P-OTA is to purchase 350 SCWs, with an option for additional quantities of up to 1,000 SCWs, with slings, manuals, accessories, and spare parts.



https://www.bt-ag.ch/shop/eng/bt-apc9apc45/bt-semi-automatic-apc9-pro-k-cal-9-x-19-mm-bt-36090.pdf

Fonte: https://www.fbo.gov/index?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=e001bfaf6f293d0401029cd8052312ec&tab=core&_cview=0
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