Exército dos EUA

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« em: Dezembro 01, 2004, 04:23:38 pm »
Force Protection, Inc. Announces Army Contract for More Armored Vehicles
 
 
(Source: Force Protection; issued Nov. 29, 2004)
 
 
 LADSON, S.C. --- Force Protection, Inc., the leading U.S. manufacturer of mine- and blast-protected vehicles for military and security personnel, announced today that the U.S. Army has ordered an additional 15 Buffalo mine-protected clearance vehicles for use in the Iraq War. The total contract amount is estimated at $11.8 million.  
 
"The Army's new request for more than a dozen vehicles is indicative of the critical role the Buffalo is playing in keeping our troops safe," said Force Protection CEO Gale Aguilar. "Our vehicles are saving lives by protecting our troops against the threat of landmine attacks and improvised explosive devices (IEDs), which have been a deadly feature of the current combat."  
 
U.S. commanders have requested that the number of armored utility vehicles in Iraq be doubled to 8,000, stating that they are necessary to help defeat an insurgency that continues to strike troops.  
 
"Our armed forces require equipment that keeps them safe and allows them to accomplish their missions in the face of emerging threats," said Aguilar. "We are committed to providing vehicles that meet this ever-increasing need."  
 
The Buffalo is already being used by the Army Corps of Engineers in Iraq and Afghanistan. It has multiple mission configurations and is designed to be repaired quickly in the field. The unique technology of the Buffalo provides protection against multiple types of anti-tank mines as well as smaller anti-personnel mines.  
 
Force Protection, Inc. manufactures ballistic and mine protected vehicles through its wholly owned subsidiary. These specialty vehicles are protected against landmines, hostile fire, and Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs, commonly referred to as roadside bombs).  
 
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« Responder #1 em: Dezembro 01, 2004, 04:24:34 pm »
Pentagon Contract Announcement  
 
 
(Source: US Department of Defense; issued Nov. 29, 2004)
 
 
 Alliant Lake City Small Caliber Ammunition Co. L.L.C., Independence, Mo., was awarded on Nov. 24, 2004, a delivery order amount of $231,663,020 as part of a $303,040,883 firm-fixed-price contract for various Cal.22, Cal.30, 5.56mm, and 7.62mm small caliber ammunition cartridges.  
 
Work will be performed at Independence, Mo., and is expected to be completed by Sept. 30, 2006. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This was a sole source contract initiated on Oct. 5, 2004.  
 
The U.S. Army Field Support Command, Rock Island, Ill., is the contracting activity.  
 
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« Responder #2 em: Dezembro 01, 2004, 04:44:15 pm »
U.S. Army TARDEC Leading Transformational Science and Technology for Current and Future Forces
 
 
(Source: U.S. Army's Tank-Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center; issued Nov. 29, 2004)
 
 
 ORLANDO, Fla. and WARREN, Mich. --- The U.S. Army's Tank-Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) will demonstrate the latest developments in advanced military automotive technology at the 24th Army Science Conference in Orlando, Fla., November 29 - December 2, 2004.  
 
Highlights will include presentations made on power and energy, force protection and unmanned systems used in Operation Iraqi Freedom. In addition, TARDEC will showcase a Coalition Interoperability Experiment with Defence Research & Development Canada (DRDC).  
 
"Army science and technology developments are driven by an evolving 21st Century battlefield environment," said Dr. Richard McClelland, Director of TARDEC. "The breadth of TARDEC's emerging technologies highlighted in this year's Army Science Conference underscores our organization's relevance in transforming the Current and Future Forces."
 

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« Responder #3 em: Dezembro 01, 2004, 04:56:16 pm »
Remote Controlled Vehicle Clears Minefields
 
 
(Source: US Department of Defense; issued Nov. 29, 2004)
 
 
 FORWARD OPERATING BASE REMAGEN, TIKRIT, Iraq --- Recent technological advances have enabled the Army to protect its most valuable asset, the lives of its soldiers.  
 
The M1 Abrams Panther II is a 43-ton remote controlled vehicle designed to help clear minefields. A specially modified M1 Abrams Main Battle Tank stripped of its turret and installed with Omnitech's standardized tele-operation system and mine rollers allows this vehicle to mine-proof and clear hazardous area.  
 
The vehicle is also equipped with a magnetic "dog bone," which is designed to set off magnetic mines and tilt rods.  
During a recent media day, the 9th Engineer Battalion demonstrated how the remote controlled Panther II clears a 50,000 square-foot minefield in one hour.  
 
The Panther can be driven manually with two soldiers operating the vehicle as driver and tank commander. The driver sits in the traditional tank driver position, the tank commander, who guides the driver, sits inside the crew compartment, which originally housed the turret.  
 
The Panther, used by the 9th Engineer Battalion, was operated both manually and by remote, making multiple passes on the simulated mine field.  
 
"Usually it will make one pass, turn around and overlap the same pass by maybe about four inches," said 2nd Lt. David C. McKelvin, platoon leader of 3rd Platoon, Bravo Company, 9th Engineer Battalion. "The first pass doesn't always get the entire area. You're always making multiple passes."  
 
According to the Web site, www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems ... anther.htm, the system was developed and built in response to a need for an improved route proofing system in Bosnia. Now, nearly 60 vehicles are equipped with standardized tele-operation system kits for unmanned operation, including tanks, tractors, high-mobility multipurpose-wheeled vehicles, Skytrak forklift, all-terrain vehicles and trucks.  
 
Previously deployed to Bosnia, Capt. Christopher T. Simpson, commander of Bravo Company, 9th Engineer Battalion, knows firsthand the Panthers effectiveness. The Panthers are more successful here because the terrain is flat; it's ideal for the desert environment, said Simpson.  
 
The 9th Engineer Battalion has the only operational Panther with robotics in Iraq. Boasting two of the six Panthers that the army owns, the 9th engineers uses them to clear ammo supply points left by the former regime.  
 
It's a great piece of equipment that clears a large area and allows another option besides using engineers with mine detectors and probes, said McKelvin.  
 
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« Responder #4 em: Dezembro 14, 2004, 10:49:23 pm »
Pentagon Contract Announcement
 
 
(Source: US Department of Defense; issued Dec. 13, 2004)
 
 
 Oshkosh Truck Corp., Oshkosh, Wis., was awarded on Dec. 10, 2004, a delivery order amount of $51,868,571 as part of a $51,868,571 firm-fixed-price contract for an additional 237 Family of Heavy Tactical Vehicles.  
 
Work will be performed in Oshkosh, Wis., and is expected to be completed by Feb. 28, 2006. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This was a sole source contract initiated on Sept. 28, 2004.  
 
The U.S. Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command, Warren, Mich., is the contracting activity (W56HZV-04-D-0322).  
 
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« Responder #5 em: Dezembro 14, 2004, 10:54:40 pm »
Army Announces Patriot Missile System’s Performance in Operation Iraqi Freedom
 
 
(Source: US Army; issued Dec. 10, 2004)
 
 
 The U.S. Army announced today its investigation into the Patriot Missile System’s performance in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), which found the system was successful in performing its mission protecting troops and assets against enemy tactical ballistic missiles (TBM).  
 
Patriot systems intercepted all nine Iraqi TBM missiles they engaged, with nine of nine intercepts resulting in destruction of the incoming enemy missile. The Patriot system undoubtedly saved many lives and prevented significant damage or destruction of millions of dollars of coalition property or to neighboring countries.  
 
Patriot missile operations were conducted on an extremely dense and complex battlefield where more than 41,000 sorties were flown by coalition air forces. Forty-one active duty Army and 13 coalition Patriot batteries were deployed to OIF, serving in 8 countries.  
 
Two unfortunate incidents of fratricide or “friendly fire,” involving U.S. Navy F/A-18 and British Royal Air Force Tornado aircraft resulted in three fatalities. The U.S. Army regrets the loss of life and expresses condolences to the family members.  
 
In a third incident a U.S. Air Force F-16 fired on a Patriot battery but there were no deaths or injuries.  
 
United States Central Command (USCENTCOM) concluded their investigations into these incidents and results are posted on the CENTCOM web site at www.centcom.mil. Application of lessons learned in OIF has already improved upon Patriot’s performance and the system will be continuously refined. Improvements include combinations of hardware modifications, software changes and updates to tactics, techniques and procedures.  
 
Some changes include the integration of satellite radio technology at the Battalion Information Coordination Central which provides improved situational awareness through voice and data connectivity with higher headquarters Identification and Engagement Authority as well as enhanced command and control; and software improvements that enable better identification, classification and correlation of airborne objects. In addition the Army continues to explore and evaluate new opportunities to improve performance and reduce the risk of fratricide.  
 
Patriot remains an important part of an integrated joint air defense system and its Soldier operator’s receive extensive training in a highly realistic, joint service environment. The system is a unique and viable weapon that is continuously being upgraded and improved to defend against rapidly evolving threats to the U.S. and its allies.  
 
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« Responder #6 em: Dezembro 16, 2004, 11:45:23 pm »
Army Pushes Forward on Up-Armoring Wheeled Vehicles
 
 
(Source: US Department of Defense; issued Dec. 15, 2004)
 
 
 WASHINGTON --- Up-armoring tactical wheeled vehicles continues to be a priority for the Army, officials involved in the effort told reporters today at the Pentagon.  
 
Maj. Gen. Stephen Speakes, an Army force-development official, said vehicles are armored at three different levels. "Level 1 means that the vehicle cab was built in the factory with a much higher level of armor protection," he explained. Level 2 takes the existing fleet and puts more protection on vehicles. Level 3 is simply another add-on armor kit that is locally fabricated in theater, the general said.  
 
"We can't automatically swap out all of the equipment that we have out in theater, but what we can do is develop programs where we take kits and put them onto existing pieces of equipment," Speakes said. "This is an interim solution, but it's a darn good solution that's been very, very effective as we take a look at what we've done to protect the force."  
 
Today, 61 percent of the vehicles in the theater have been up-armored, said Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sorenson, director of Army systems management at the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology.  
 
"I would point out here, though, that with respect to the light tactical vehicles -- and that's the vehicles that have been suffering the majority of casualties and the majority of incidents -- we're now at 80 percent," Sorenson said. By March, 98 percent of the light tactical vehicles – the Humvees – and the heavy-truck fleet will be armored, he added.  
 
Sorenson said the Army is about to project 35,000 vehicles to be up-armored. Of that number, there is currently funding for 29,000 vehicles, with plans to "shoot ahead of the duck," and obtain funding for 38,000 vehicles.  
 
"The fundamental point that I would like to communicate is that at this point, once the theater commander establishes a requirement, money is not the issue," Speakes said.  
 
It is an expensive program, though, the general admitted. "As you look at our forecast both of what we have already spent and what we're immediately forecasting to spend here over the next six or eight months or so, it's several billion dollars."  
 
According to Speakes, "several" is exactly $4.1 billion dollars.  
 
The funding for the add-on armor kits is about $2 billion, Sorenson said. The budget for the up-armored vehicles themselves is about the same, he added. Those figures cover fiscal 2003 through 2005, Speakes said.  
 
The manufacturer producing the up-armored Humvees for the Army has determined that by March, it can increase its production to 550 a month. That's 100 more per month than the anticipated top production number. The extra vehicles were planned for, so there is no extra cost for the modification to the existing contract, Sorenson said.  
 
Col. John Rooney of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md. said that testing of kits is ongoing to ensure that the armor solutions are meeting the changing threats on the battlefield.  
 
Proposals come in from the theater based on attacks that have taken place, Rooney explained, and they're tested at Aberdeen. He added that any one of these solutions can be turned around within 24 to 48 hours to determine results on how it performs against specified threats. The results also be immediately compared to the other solutions that have been tested against that particular threat.  
 
Speakes said it was necessary in all of this not to forget the broader strategy to protect troops. "The entire effort that we've focused on is a holistic approach, not only the armoring," he said. The effort also focuses on the importance of changing the tactics, techniques and procedures by which convoys are conducted, and introducing systems to pre-detonate particular explosive devices, he said.  
 
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« Responder #7 em: Dezembro 23, 2004, 10:42:16 pm »
Textron Systems Awarded U.S. Army Contract for 212 More Armored Security Vehicles to Protect Troops in Iraq
 
 
(Source: Textron Systems; issued Dec. 22, 2004)
 
 
 WILMINGTON, Mass. --- Textron Marine & Land (TM&L) of New Orleans, Louisiana, an operating unit of Textron Systems Corporation, today announced that it has been awarded a contract modification by the U.S. Army Tank-Automotive & Armaments Command (TACOM) to manufacture an additional 212 M1117 Armored Security Vehicles (ASV).  
 
All 212 vehicles have been designated for use by the U.S. Army and are potentially worth up to $155 million, subject to final contract terms. The newly contracted 212 vehicles are scheduled to be delivered by April 2006.  
 
Textron Systems president Dick Millman said "We are proud to be building high quality armored vehicles that provide outstanding protection for our soldiers fighting in Iraq. We have already significantly increased our production rate and, with this order, will achieve a rate of 36 vehicles a month by the 4th quarter of next year. We've been working closely with the Army since the summer to more quickly get these important vehicles to our soldiers and are nearing completion of the investments needed to increase capacity."  
 
Textron Marine & Land, based in New Orleans, has been making changes to its production line, expanding its manufacturing space and hiring the necessary workforce. "We hired more than 180 new employees to get the production lines ready for this contract," said B. Clay Moise, Textron Marine & Land vice president of marine and combat vehicles. "And we anticipate hiring 200 more employees by this time next year," added Moise. "The company has been building and expanding facilities to meet our customers' needs."  
 
"The Army has had all available ASVs in Iraq for some time, protecting our soldiers. We have received numerous thank you letters from soldiers who have survived enemy attack and have come out of the incidents unharmed. It's a rewarding and humbling experience to be a part of manufacturing such a powerful lifesaving tool," Moise added.  
 
The ASV is a 4x4 wheeled armored vehicle that offers exceptional crew protection with multiple layers of armor that provide defense against medium caliber armor-piercing machine gun fire, large artillery fragments, and land mines. This advanced armor is exceedingly lightweight and allows the vehicle to be able to "roll on/roll off" military transport aircraft. The ASV possesses superior mobility, agility, handling and ride quality through the utilization of a new all-wheel independent suspension. Textron's Cadillac Gage has equipped the ASV with a specially designed dual-weapon station that, unlike many other vehicles, enables all ammunition reload to be performed under armor and allows the crew to remain protected from enemy fire.  
 
Textron Systems Corporation, a Textron company, provides innovative technology solutions to meet the needs of the global aerospace and defense industries. The company supports military precision engagement and dominant maneuver with strike weapons, mobility and surveillance systems. The Textron name is well known in the areas of advanced weapons, surveillance systems, aircraft control components, specialty marine craft and armored vehicles.  
 
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« Responder #8 em: Janeiro 08, 2005, 12:02:34 am »
U.S. Army Sees More Work on Modernizing Aircraft
 
 
(Source: Reuters; issued Jan. 6, 2005)
 
 
 ARLINGTON, Va., Jan 6 (Reuters) - U.S. Army helicopters, unmanned planes and other aircraft are performing well in Iraq and Afghanistan, but top Army leaders on Thursday said more work remains in an aggressive drive to modernize the fleet.  
 
Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Schloesser, who heads the Army Aviation Task Force, said its No. 1 priority was adding weapons and equipment to protect aircraft from rocket-propelled grenades and other guerrilla attacks.  
 
At the same time, Schloesser said the Army was hurrying to replace older aircraft with new armed reconnaissance, light utility and heavy-lift cargo helicopters.  
 
"We have underfunded our programs in many cases ... for decades," Schloesser said, noting that cancellation of the $14.6 billion Comanche helicopter had freed up funds to pay for more Apache AH-64 helicopters and other programs.  
 
For instance, the Army worked with Lockheed Martin Corp. to develop a new type of blast fragmentation Hellfire II missile that would be more effective in the urban battlefields of Iraq. Hellfire missiles were initially developed to hit tanks, but would pass through concrete block buildings in Iraq without exploding, because they did not contain metal reinforcements.  
 
Army helicopters successfully used the new Hellfire missiles just last week to kill 20 Iraqi insurgents, Schloesser told an Association of the U.S. Army conference.  
 
He gave no details on where the attack occurred, but said 72 Hellfire missiles had arrived in Iraq in November and the Army planned to convert 100 older Hellfires and buy 900 more. It also planned to purchase a so-called thermobaric version for use against deeply buried targets.  
 
Army acquisitions chief Claude Bolton said Army airplanes and helicopters, including CH-47F Chinooks and Apaches, had flown a combined total of 476,936 hours between February and December in Iraq. In Afghanistan, flight hours totaled just over 66,000 hours, he said.  
 
Brig. Gen. E.J. Sinclair, commanding general of the Army Aviation Center, predicted modernization efforts would be largely completed by late 2006 or early 2007. He announced a new review of Army unmanned aerial vehicles in March.  
 
The Army was also working to speed up maintenance of aircraft used in the war.  
 
Defense companies are due to submit proposals this month to build 368 new armed reconnaissance helicopters to replace the Army's OH-58 Kiowa warrior, with a contract likely to be awarded sometime in the third quarter of 2005.  
 
Bell Helicopter, a unit of Textron Inc., which built the Kiowa, is expected to bid for the new helicopter, as is Europe's EADS and possibly Boeing Co., teamed with another company.  
 
Bolton said the Army planned to order a significant number of light utility helicopters, with a preference for commercial technologies, which should speed delivery of the aircraft.  
 
The Army will kick off a competition to build a new heavy-lift helicopter that could carry about 25 tons.  
 
Sikorsky Aircraft, a unit of United Technologies Corp., Bell and Boeing have already done some work on heavy-lift helicopters and will likely vie for that project.  
 
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« Responder #9 em: Janeiro 17, 2005, 10:19:22 pm »
Rainbow Division Deploys 'Intel Snipers’ to Iraq
 
 
(Source: US Department of Defense; issued Jan. 15, 2005)
 
 
 FORT DRUM, N.Y. --- The 42nd Infantry Division has deployed to Iraq with what leaders term a powerful, yet subtle, combat-multiplier — the sniper-trained Soldiers of the division’s 173rd Long Range Surveillance Detachment, and their newly-issued M-14 rifles.  
 
The rifles are “part and parcel” of the changing LRS(D) mission, said the unit’s commander, Capt. Michael Manning.  
 
“This is not a detachment of snipers,” said Manning. “This is a detachment of highly trained intelligence collectors. We have sniping capability. Now we can acquire targets, identify targets, and destroy targets with organic direct fire weapons. That’s the big change. That’s what these weapons allow us to do.”  
 
Manning said LRS(D)’s mission used to be strictly reconnaissance and surveillance ? working in small groups 80 to 100 kilometers beyond friendly lines, reporting information on enemy movements and the battlefield to a higher command. The enemy and battlefield have changed, so the mission has changed, according to Manning.  
 
“We’re not training for the Fulda Gap anymore,” said Manning, referring to the area in Germany that NATO forces were assigned to defend against Russian maneuver brigades. “We’re fighting insurgents who operate in small groups. That drives the way we conduct operations.”  
 
Manning described the new mission as reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition ? in other words, LRS(D) will be assigned to observe areas for improvised explosive devices and indirect fire activity and, if ordered by the combatant commander, eliminate insurgents with their sniper rifles. The M-14, commented Manning, has redefined the unit's mission. “It’s a tremendous force multiplier. It’s a tremendous asset on the battlefield.”  
 
Equipping and training LRS(D) on the M-14 rifles was a joint effort of the 42nd Infantry Division, the 1215th Garrison Support Unit at Fort Drum, the First Army Small Arms Readiness Group, or SARG, and FORSCOM, according to Lt. Col. Richard Ellwanger, chief of personnel, 1215th Garrison Support Unit.  
 
“Our mission is to support the mobilization of the National Guard and Reserves,” said Ellwanger. “We work with the post to provide an infrastructure for the National Guard and Reserves while they’re here at Fort Drum.”  
 
The M-14 rifles will increase LRS(D) Soldiers’ ability to neutralize targets without collateral damage, said Ellwanger. “The rifle gives the Soldiers the ability to engage targets out to 800 meters. Once the word gets out to the insurgents that the Soldiers have that capacity, they will be less likely to get inside the 400- to 500-meter range and engage with RPGs (rocket-propelled grenades) or medium machine guns.”  
 
The instruction of the SARG team was superb, according to Manning. “These guys are superb marksmen. They instilled in LRS(D) the techniques, tactics and procedures that make them good marksmen. They’re professional. To a man, they’re first-rate marksmen.” Most of the training took place at Fort Drum’s Range 21, where the sniper-trained LRS(D) Soldiers zeroed and engaged targets with their iron sights, and zeroed the scopes on their rifles.  
 
“By virtue of going through this training, LRS(D) Soldiers now have the confidence in themselves that they can effectively operate this weapon system,” said Manning. “What the 42nd Division has done, by virtue of outfitting LRS(D) with M-14 rifles, is make us the cutting edge of the LRS(D) community.”  
 
But the real edge in LRS(D)’s sniping capability are the LRS(D) Soldiers behind the newly issued M-14 rifles — graduates of the four-week National Guard Sniper School at Camp Robinson, Ark. With their M-14 training complete, the LRS(D) soldiers became trainers themselves, turning Soldiers from other 42nd Infantry Division units into designated marksmen.  
 
“We’re a combat multiplier because we can give the division planners nearly real-time information, and a picture of the battlefield,” said LRS(D) sniper-trained Staff Sgt. Tim Halloran. “If we’re on a mission and we acquire a high-value target, we can not only report it to higher [headquarters], we can eliminate it.”  
 
“Hopefully we can interdict the people placing the IEDs,” said LRS(D) Assistant Team Leader Cpl. Wayne Lynch, who, along with LRS(D) Team Leader Staff Sgt. Thomas O’Hare, served a tour in Iraq last year.  
 
“That’s all I thought about when we were in Iraq last year: ‘how do we stop these people who are placing the IEDs?’ Now that we’ve got snipers in LRS(D), we’re able to do surveillance and take direct action,” Lynch said.  
 
Deployed to Iraq with the 119th Military Police Company, Rhode Island National Guard, Lynch said he and O’Hare made it their job to find IEDs. Lynch said he hopes LRS(D) will be tasked with interdicting terrorists placing IEDs. He’s been a member of the unit for nine years and loves it. He does not regret going back to Iraq. “I’m going with a unit I’ve trained with,” he said. “I’m honored to go to war with them.”  
 
Based in Rhode Island, LRS(D) ruckmarches to the north summit of New Hampshire’s Mount Mooslacki every year. All members of LRS(D) are airborne qualified, and nine are ranger qualified. They have to do a jump every three months to maintain their airborne status.  
 
“We train on a higher plain,” said LRS(D) sniper-trained Soldier Spc. Richard O’Connor. “Most units do five-mile rucksack marches. We do 15-mile rucksack marches. Other units have 45-pound rucksacks. We have 80-pound rucksacks. We have to march farther and faster than anyone else.”  
 
O’Connor was a scout/sniper with the 3rd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division. He’s been on real-world missions to Tunisia and Liberia, and took part in the rescue of Air Force Pilot Capt. Scott O’Grady, who was shot down over Bosnia in 1995.  
 
“Anticipation of the mission is awesome,” said O’Connor. He described the job as a “rush”, and said LRS(D) team members must be physically fit, mature, and disciplined, and must know each other’s jobs. Part of that job is going “subsurface”? patrolling to a location outside friendly lines, digging a hole, and living in it while observing enemy activity.  
 
“They might live in that hole for two to four days,” said Manning. “It takes an unbelievably disciplined individual to do this job.”  
 
“We’re just guys with rifles,” said O’Connor. “You have to have absolute confidence in everyone on your team. There’s nothing else in the Army I want to do.”  
 
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Forças Armadas Americanas: menos "mariquices"?
« Responder #10 em: Janeiro 26, 2005, 10:58:13 pm »
"Pentágono planeja reduzir alta tecnologia das forças armadas
Quarta, 26 de janeiro de 2005, 18h51

 
Pentágono planeja restruturar suas forças armadas para dar maior peso às unidades terrestres e ao pessoal em vez de unidades de alta tecnologia e custo elevado, como novas gerações de aviões ou navios.
O jornal The Washington Post publica hoje que a reestruturação estudada pelo secretário de Defesa, Donald Rumsfeld, é um reconhecimento implícito da falta de preparação das forças armadas americanas para a guerra de guerrilhas travada no Iraque.

O documento, intitulado "Termos de Referência", pressupõe que os próximos conflitos que os EUA vão enfrentar não provêm das chamadas "ameaças militares convencionais", mas de grupos terroristas ou "estados fora da lei".

Em conflitos clássicos, como os antecipados durante a Guerra Fria contra o bloco soviético, as forças militares confiam em sua superioridade sobre o inimigo pela quantidade e qualidade do equipamento militar, aviões de combate, tanques, navios e outros materiais.

Mas o conflito no Iraque deixou evidente que as forças armadas americanas estão cheias de "bombas inteligentes", mas com poucos soldados especializados em tarefas concretas.

Em um futuro imediato, a mudança de orientação das prioridades militares americanas pode se traduzir no corte dos orçamentos de sistemas de armas avançadas, como o novo avião de combate F-22 Raptor, o transporte C-130J ou um porta-aviões para a marinha.

O maior beneficiado seria o exército, que poderia receber 25 bilhões de dólares adicionais nos próximos seis anos para sua reestruturação. No conjunto, as forças armadas teriam que reduzir seu orçamento nesse período em 55 bilhões de dólares.

Entre as medidas adotadas, estaria a redução do tamanho das atuais divisões em brigadas mais flexíveis que contariam com elementos mais especializados, desde especialistas em operações psicológicas até a polícia militar.
 
 
EFE

Agência Efe - Todos os direitos reservados. É proibido todo tipo de reprodução sem autorização escrita da Agência Efe S/A."

Eu gosto é do último parágrafo! :mrgreen:
Ai de ti Lusitânia, que dominarás em todas as nações...
 

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« Responder #11 em: Janeiro 29, 2005, 09:05:50 pm »
Citar
Eu gosto é do último parágrafo!

Qual :?:  :


Citar
Agência Efe - Todos os direitos reservados. É proibido todo tipo de reprodução sem autorização escrita da Agência Efe S/A."

hauhauhauha! :twisted:
"Eu não tenho que lhes dizer. Quem ganhou a Guerra os senhores sabem: foi a Artilharia"
(PATTON - sobre a 2ª GM)
 

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« Responder #12 em: Janeiro 31, 2005, 11:22:36 pm »
Fort Benning Tests Current M-9 Sidearm, Future Alternatives
 
 
(Source: US Army; issued Jan. 28, 2005)
 
 
 FORT BENNING, Ga. --- The Directorate of Combat Developments and Soldier Battle Lab began an experiment Jan. 24 analyzing the current-issue M-9 handgun and possible alternative weapons.  
 
“I want to make it clear, this is not a selection of a new pistol,” said Charley Pavlick, project officer with DCD’s Small Arms Division. “We are responding to concerns we have from (Soldiers deployed for Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom) that report a lack of confidence in the M-9 for several reasons. This is an analysis of different features and characteristics that are available with other weapons platforms.”  
 
Some of the concerns with the M-9 include many stoppages, uncomfortable function control and the low lethality of the 9mm ball round, Pavlick said.  
 
The Army hasn’t made an official decision to make a move from the M-9 to a new sidearm, Pavlick said. DCD will rewrite the draft requirements documents after the experiment is complete, and then officials will make a decision.  
 
Army officials decided to switch from a .45-caliber sidearm to the 9mm in 1954, but that change wasn’t fully implemented until 1984, Pavlick said. It was only when the supply of rebuilt .45s began running out that the Army finally started the 9mm Personal Defense Weapon program.  
 
“The decision to switch was strictly logistical,” he said. “The United States was trying to move toward NATO joint operability, and we were fighting the Cold War. Target effect wasn’t a factor in that decision. Now it is.”  
 
The performance of better sights, larger calibers and double-action-only firing mechanisms are what DCD analysts will be taking a look at.  
 
The test firers for the experiment are representative of the force, Pavlick said. Soldiers of varying rank, military-occupation specialty and gender are included.  
 
The testing started this week with a baseline qualification to assess the basic marksmanship of the firers with the M-9 and familiarization fires with alternative weapons.  
 
Staff Sgt. Michael Morten is one of the test firers. He fired the .45-caliber version of the Smith and Wesson 99.  
 
“You can really feel the difference,” he said of the Smith and Wesson. “It fits better in my hand. The sights are easier. I thought it would have more kick being a .45, but the recoil is the same as the 9mm. I thought it was excellent.”  
 
-ends-
 

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Luso

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« Responder #13 em: Fevereiro 01, 2005, 09:45:47 am »
Interessante. Provavelmente se desenvolverá munição "sabotada" para penetração de protecção individual...
E o .45 é melhor para uso com silenciador.
Ai de ti Lusitânia, que dominarás em todas as nações...
 

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Wildcard_pt

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« Responder #14 em: Fevereiro 01, 2005, 12:18:14 pm »
Citar
Interessante. Provavelmente se desenvolverá munição "sabotada" para penetração de protecção individual


Luso, o que quer dizer com sabotada? Está a querer dizer munição SABOT?
Se assim é a munição vai ser basicamente uma "flechette", não?
Perguntai ao inimigo quem somos
 

 

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