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US Marine Corp
« em: Março 07, 2018, 03:14:12 pm »
Where are the female Marines?
By: Shawn Snow

Two years after the Defense Department ordered the Marine Corps to open all combat arms career fields to women, less than 100 women have successfully entered those previously male-only jobs.

A total of 92 women are operating in a multitude of combat billets across the Corps, from rifleman to armored reconnaissance to combat engineers.

Yet only 11 enlisted women are serving today in the traditional “03” infantry career fields, Marine Corps officials said. No women have even attempted the Basic Reconnaissance Course or Amphibious Reconnaissance Course, and there are no female snipers, according to data provided by Manpower and Reserve Affairs.

Of the women serving in combat billets, most of them are in less physically demanding roles such as light air defense and artillery, commonly referred to as a non-load bearing job field, according to data obtained by Marine Corps Times.

On the officer side, only one female officer has graduated the grueling Infantry Officer Course and is serving currently as an 0302 infantry platoon commander. A total of 23 female officers are serving in previously restricted combat jobs.

“There is no target number or quota for how many female Marines should be in ground combat fields or units; the focus is on combat effectiveness,” said Maj. Brian T. Block, a Marine spokesperson.

“We are systematically executing the Marine Corps Force Integration Plan.”

Block said the Corps’ approach to gender integration is not just focused on the number of women in combat billets but a force-wide endeavor that includes marketing and recruitment of top female talent and new efforts by the Corps that has male and female recruits training side by side, a first for the Marines.

As the Corps continues to push its gender integration plan it has been resolute on maintaining “standards, while leveraging every opportunity to optimize individual performance, talent, and skills in order to maximize the Corps’ warfighting capabilities,” Block said.

Gender integration is bringing about some growing pains for the Marine Corps. Officially, the Marines want more women in the Corps overall, targeting a goal to make the force 10 percent women by the end of next year.

Yet the number of women who have broken the gender barrier in the Marine Corps’ combat arms remains far fewer than the those in the Army. And many advocates for female service members say the Marines’ numbers paint a disappointing picture of gender integration progress across the Corps.

Still, it’s a historic achievement for the 92 individual women who are now in the Marine Corps combat arms. The groundbreaking cadre of women met unquestionably rigorous standards and personally maneuvered around the cultural barriers they confronted along the way.



Yet questions persist inside and outside the Marine Corps about whether the service is doing enough to ameliorate barriers to the combat arms and making women feel more welcome.

The Marine Corps has made gestures and policy decisions that appear unwelcoming to women. And that was reinforced by last year’s “Marines United” scandal, when a large online community of male Marines was sharing nude photographs of women, including female Marines.

The Marines were the only branch to ask for a waiver when the Pentagon ended the policy that excluded women from combat jobs. In 2015, the Pentagon’s civilian leaders rejected the Corps request that some jobs remain restricted to men.

That sent a signal to women that they were not welcome in the Corps, said Lorri Manning, a director at the Service Women’s Action Network and retired Navy captain. It “gives women second thoughts, you don’t want to go where you’re not welcome.”

STANDARDS

Few women are even trying to enter the Marine Corps combat arms job field.

Only 51 female recruits entering boot camp during the eight-month period between October 1, 2016, and May 31, 2017, entered with a combat arms job field. Of those, 13 passed the MOS Classification Standard test.

As the initial cadre of women arrived at boot camp, nearly three out of four women were failing new Military Occupation Specialty Classification Standard physical fitness requirements for combat job fields forcing them to be reclassed into other fields, Marine Corps officials said in August 2017.

Yet women who make it through boot camp and pass that initial test are performing well.

After boot camp, Marines take another series of gender-neutral job specific physical fitness tests called the MOS-specific physical standards, or MSPS. These are gender-neutral standards specific to job fields and are taken at the MOS school house.

Nearly 90 percent of women have passed the MSPS standards, Marine Corps officials said.

Nevertheless, more than half the women serving in ground combat billets today are serving in fields with less physical demanding requirements.

On the enlisted side, there are currently six female rifleman (0311), one machine gunner (0331), and three mortarman (0341). Though women have attempted the screening to become a Marine special operator, none have yet passed.

The majority of women have fallen into artillery, combat engineers, and low altitude air defense gunners, where the physical requirements are less stringent.

Though, the Corps has made strides in boosting fitness results of female Marines. The Marines employed certified fitness instructors as part of the Force Fitness Instructor program to help boost knowledge of the science behind physical training.

And efforts by Marine Corps Maj. Misty Posey to help institute a training routine to prepare women to do pull ups in lieu of the traditional flexed arm hang are also bearing fruit as female Marines have seen notable success in the pull-up portion of the PFT, according to the annual report by Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Services.

But, by comparison the Army has had fewer problems bringing women into ground combat jobs. Nearly 500 women are serving in various combat billets throughout the Army, officials said.

Moreover, 10 women have graduated from the Army’s grueling Ranger course and one is serving as an officer with a Ranger regiment. Nearly 74 women have graduated from Infantry or Armor Basic Officer Leader’s Course.

One reason for the Army’s success: prior to the opening of combat fields, the Army started pushing women noncommissioned officers and leaders to previously excluded job fields to boost the ranks of female cadre members before new female soldiers entered the infantry schoolhouses. The initiative was known as Leaders First.

The Corps implemented a similar strategy after the Army that saw over 200 female Marine leaders sent to formerly restricted units. An effort the Corps says has been successful.

NEEDED: MORE WOMEN

Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Robert B. Neller said in late January he wanted to grow the number women in the entire Marine Corps to 10 percent, up from today’s 8 percent female force.

That would likely boost the number of women in the combat arms.

But it’s a lofty goal.

There are only 3,500 slots for women in recruit training, and that limits the Corps’ ability to grow the number of women, Lorri Manning explained.

That limit on the number of beds for women at recruit training at Parris Island, South Carolina, would be mitigated if the Corps fully integrated men and women into the same recruit training programs.

Manning believes that standards can be used to create a perception that women in the Corps are not being put through the same gauntlet as their male counterparts, which ultimately leads to disrespect of female Marines and a treatment of them as second-class Marines.

Manning says the Corps also sends signals that training of male Marines is a higher priority over women that ultimately inhibits a drive to enter physically demanding combat job fields.

The Marines Corps’ culture also has more intangible barriers to female integration, including a tightly-knit social fabric that values comradery and brotherhood amongst male Marines at the expense and sidelining of women, said Nora Bensahel, an expert on defense at American University. Bensahel pointed to the “Marines United” scandal that rocked the Corps last year after revelations about a secretive Facebook highlighted the deep issues within the Corps. It highlighted a Corps as a “culture that devalues women in the ranks.”

“The entire culture of the Marine Corps is a hyper-masculine culture,” said Bensahel.

The Marine United Facebook page distributed thousands of sexual and explicit images of female Marines and some civilians, many without the consent of the victims. Sexually harassing and even violent messages accompanied many of the posts.

Since then, the Corps has updated policies to help police social media misconduct and to aid the Corps in its effort to prosecute those committing offenses.

Those efforts are starting to bear fruit, though maybe not as fast as some like.

A year after Marines United, 119 culprits have been identified, 22 non DoD civilians and 97 Marines.

And prosecutors have taken some of these culprits to town. To date there have been 80 dispositions, seven total courts martial, 14 NJP [ non- judicial punishment], 6 administrative separations, and 28 adverse administrative actions, according to the Judge Advocate Division, HQMC.

GROWING THE RANKS OF WOMEN

To achieve the commandant’s goal of a Marine Corps with 10 percent women by the end of next year, Marine Corps Recruiting Command is ramping up a plan to entice more qualified female Marines.

However, there are a myriad of problems attaining those numbers.

“More than 90 percent of America’s youth are disinterested in military service and less than 8 percent of females are interested in military service,” said Jim Edwards, a spokesman with Marine Recruiting Command.

To hit the 10 percent mark, the Corps needs to ship 3,400 women to recruit training annually. “During FY17, Marine recruiters shipped 3,355 women to entry-level training, which was 8.9% of all new recruits,” Edwards said.

The Corps argues that fallout from Marines United has not impacted any recruitment efforts, and data provided by the recruiting command backs that claim.

On the enlisted side of the house, the Corps managed to recruit 3,355 women in FY17, slightly up from 3,201 from the previous year. The Corps has had steady but tepid growth in the number of female enlisted Marines each year since FY 2013.

The swings in the officer pool have been much smaller. FY17 saw 166 females officer recruits, slightly up from 149 in FY 2013. On average, female officer recruits are hitting just over 9 percent out of all recruits on average.

But the Marines are still short of their mark. That’s why Recruiting Command has embarked on an aggressive marketing blitz targeting women.

“We have increased the amount of female-inclusive and female-specific marketing and advertising initiatives to generate awareness about what it means to be a Marine and to highlight opportunities for women in the Marine Corps,” Edwards said.

Some of those initiatives include reflecting on the inclusiveness of Marine occupational specialties, and portraying female Marines more accurately. And updating websites to remove gender-qualifying language.

In 2014 the Corps began sending direct mail to female high school juniors and seniors, something they used to only do for males. Now more than 30 percent of that mail targets female high school students.

And in 2017, the Corps released its “Battle Up” commercial, inspired by the “Battles Won” campaign. It was the first Marine Corps commercial with a female lead.

“These commercials feature women in a more authentic and representative manner alongside their male counterparts and clearly communicates who we are as Marines, what we do in support of our Nation’s interests, and why it should be important and aspirational to our country’s citizens.” Edwards said in an emailed response to Marine Corps Times.

The Corps is also targeting athletic women in sports programs in high school and college to best recruit women that can meet the rigorous physical requirements across all job fields. That includes evolving partnerships with USA Rugby and the National Wrestling Coaches Association.

“Notably, about 10 percent of all youth wrestlers are female and that number continues to increase,” Edwards said.

“These are resilient individuals who know how to fight and win.”

“We remain steadfast in our commitment to ensure that the men and women who earn the title “Marine” will be ready, and will provide America with an elite crisis-response force that is ready to fight and win,” Block said.

https://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/2018/03/05/where-are-the-female-marines/?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=Socialflow
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Cabeça de Martelo

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #1 em: Março 07, 2018, 03:20:09 pm »
Female Marines to enter MCT at Camp Pendleton for first time

A group of 40 female Marines are about to start training at a combat school reserved for non-infantry Marines aboard Camp Pendleton, California, a first in Marine Corps history.

The group of women will embark on a 29-day course, known as Marine Combat Training Battalion, or MCT, in infantry training and tactics alongside male Marines. The new female students are expected to check in today, according to Training Command.

MCT is a condensed replica of the School of Infantry that produces 0311 riflemen. After completion of recruit training, Marines not holding an infantry job attend MCT to maintain the Corps’ mantra of “every Marine a rifleman.”

The other of the two MCT schools is located on Camp Geiger at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

Gender integration at MCT isn’t a new concept — male and female Marines have been training together at Camp Lejeune for some time now. With all female recruits trained at MCRD Parris Island, South Carolina, attending MCT just one state away made sense.

But as the Corps continues to push gender integration across combat arms and recruit training, including the West Coast in that effort has become necessary.


Sgt. Hannah S. Jacobson, machine gunner with Weapons Company, Ground Combat Element Integrated Task Force, and her machine-gun team maneuver to their support by fire position in preparation to engage targets during a Marine Corps Operational Test and Evaluation Activity assessment at Range 107, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, March 10, 2015.

Boot camp at MCRD San Diego is still all male, and until now, males attending follow on training wound up in all-male MCT courses at Camp Pendleton.

One of the oft repeated criticisms of the Corps’ attempts at gender integration has been the lack of exposure for young male Marines to female colleagues and female leadership early in training. That isolation, some believe, has led to a perception by some junior male Marines that females cannot meet the same standards.

Slow and steady strides at basic training and MCT have been made, to include some integrated training with male and female Marines at Parris Island, but none of these changes have migrated west — until now.

“The Marines will be fully integrated at the platoon and squad level with their male counterparts as part of Lima Company,” Marine Corps Training Command said.

Besides the integration, no other changes are being made to the MCT program, Marine officials say.

The Corps expects to train 1,700 women there annually once the integration at MCT-West is complete.

https://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/your-marine-corps/2018/03/06/female-marines-to-enter-mct-at-camp-pendleton-for-first-time/
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Cabeça de Martelo

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #2 em: Março 10, 2018, 03:20:36 pm »
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

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Vitor Santos

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #3 em: Março 10, 2018, 08:06:15 pm »








 

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Vitor Santos

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #4 em: Março 10, 2018, 08:21:31 pm »



 ??? ::)  :D ;)
 

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Vitor Santos

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #5 em: Março 10, 2018, 08:32:05 pm »
 

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HSMW

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #6 em: Março 10, 2018, 08:47:22 pm »
http://www.youtube.com/profile_videos?user=HSMW

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NVF

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #7 em: Março 10, 2018, 09:52:11 pm »
O bujão da KK já chegou ao FD  :D
Everyone you will ever meet knows something that you don't.
- Bill Nye
 

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Vitor Santos

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #8 em: Março 11, 2018, 02:34:14 am »
O bujão da KK já chegou ao FD  :D

Que KK, homem? Só vejo o LAV-25!  ;D
 
Os seguintes utilizadores agradeceram esta mensagem: NVF

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Vitor Santos

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #9 em: Abril 20, 2018, 03:34:22 pm »
Novo veículo anfíbio ACV 1.1 dos US Marines está dentro da programação


Citar
Por Chad Garland

Um esforço do Corpo de Fuzileiros Navais dos Estados Unidos (US Marines), para substituir sua velha frota de veículos de assalto anfíbio permanece dentro do orçamento e está a caminho de entrar na fase de produção, constatou um órgão de fiscalização do governo, apesar de alertar para o potencial atraso ou aumento de custo.

O US Marines lançou o programa para substituir seu Veículo Anfíbio de Assalto, que foi lançado pela primeira vez em 1972, por um Veículo de Combate Anfíbio – anunciado como uma maneira mais protegida e mais rápida de transportar tropas de navio para terra.

Os custos de desenvolvimento estão agora estimados em US$ 60 milhões bem abaixo das projeções originais de US$ 810,5 milhões, segundo um relatório do Government Accountability Office (GAO).

Um protesto pela seleção de dois protótipos contratados peo US Marines em novembro de 2015 – o SuperAV da BAE Systems e o Terrex 2 da SAIC – causou uma paralisação que atrasou brevemente o cronograma, mas não há mais atrasos e autoridades da Marinha estão decididas sobre quais dois encomendará seu primeiro lote de 30 veículos em junho.

O GAO, que o congresso encarregou de monitorar o programa de aquisições, havia previamente advertido o Congresso sobre o potencial de aumento de custos ou atrasos no cronograma devido à abordagem agressiva do Corpo de Engenheiros. O programa é um sucessor do extinto programa de Veículos Expedicionários de Combate do serviço anfíbio, que foi cancelado em 2011 devido à sua acessibilidade econômica.


Antes de ser morto, o programa acumulou quase US$ 4 bilhões em custos. Quando o Pentágono permitiu que os fuzileiros navais procurassem um veículo para substituição, seus novos requisitos enfatizavam como meta, o custo.

O GAO creditou o serviço pela gestão do novo programa em seu último relatório. Mas as autoridades expressaram preocupações de que o serviço estava planejando prosseguir com a produção sem garantir que os processos de fabricação do fabricante estivessem totalmente prontos, o que, segundo o relatório, poderia levar a problemas de qualidade e custos mais altos ou atrasos.

Em uma resposta, o Pentágono disse que monitoraria a produção e tentaria limitar os riscos de produção, mas essa espera poderia resultar em contratempos de fabricação.


Os fuzileiros navais querem 208 novos veículos anfíbios até 2022, com rodadas iniciais de corridas de baixa taxa produzindo 30 veículos em 2018 e 2019. Isso equipará duas das 10 Cias de assalto anfíbio do Corpo.

Cada veículo deve custar entre US $ 4 milhões e US $ 7 milhões, de acordo com um relatório de 2015 do GAO.

O GAO disse que não poderia dizer publicamente mais sobre a prontidão de fabricação ou o desempenho técnico dos veículos, uma vez que os dois fabricantes ainda estavam competindo.

O novo veículo melhora as capacidades de blindagem e manobras terrestres do AAV, com capacidades anfíbias limitadas que serão abordadas em uma segunda rodada de fabricação; no entanto, autoridades da Marinha disseram que o veículo inicial já está perto de atender aos requisitos.

Ambos os projetos de protótipos apresentam veículos de 8 rodas com cascos em forma de V projetados para minimizar o efeito de explosões. Ambos também possuem projetos de assentos absorvedores de energia para proteger ainda mais os passageiros, apesar de transportarem muito menos tropas que o AAV original.


Os veículos serão armados com uma metralhadora calibre .50 e lança-granadas de 40mm, o mesmo que o AAV, mas as armas serão operadas remotamente.

O primeiro modelo, chamado ACV 1.1, não substituirá totalmente o AAV de 46 anos, que os oficiais chamam de “quase obsoleto”, de modo que o Corpo de Fuzileiros Navais também está modernizando 400 de seus 1.060 veículos para proteção contra ameaças de bombas terrestres a um custo estimado de US $ 1,7 milhão por veículo. O Corpo planeja substituir os AAVs atualizados até 2035.

O US Marines planeja colocar em campo quase 500 do segundo modelo do programa até 2026 para equipar quatro das 10 Cias de assalto anfíbio em atividade.

Espera-se que um terceiro modelo, chamado ACV 2.0, possa navegar tenha uma velocidade duas vezes maior do que o antigo AAV, permitindo que os fuzileiros navais sejam lançados dos navios além da vista da costa sem o auxílio de embarcações de desembarque para transportar os veículos.

Os dois novos protótipos, comparados
BAE Systems SuperAV: Baseado em um projeto da Iveco, empresa italiana proprietária da Chrysler e da Ferrari, este veículo de 8 rodas acomoda três tripulantes e 13 fuzileiros navais embarcados. Seu sistema de acionamento H permite a tração nas 8 rodas e seu casco em forma de V e assentos absorventes de energia são projetados para proteger as tropas de explosões. Pode navegar a 7 mph no mar e mais de 65 mph em estradas pavimentadas, de acordo com um boletim informativo da BAE Systems.

SAIC Terrex 2: Baseado em um veículo usado pelos militares de Cingapura e Turquia, este veículo de oito rodas pode acomodar três tripulantes e 11 fuzileiros navais embarcados. Ele possui um casco em forma de V para proteger contra explosões, bem como assentos de mitigação de explosões. Um sistema central de inflação de pneus aumenta a tração. Pode navegar a 7 mph em mares com ondas de até 3 pés e a 55 mph em terra.

TRADUÇÃO E ADAPTAÇÃO: DAN

FONTE: Star and Stripes
FONTE: http://www.defesaaereanaval.com.br/novo-veiculo-anfibio-acv-1-1-dos-us-marines-esta-dentro-da-programacao/
 

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Cabeça de Martelo

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #10 em: Fevereiro 01, 2019, 04:49:22 pm »
he USMC Already Wants To Up-Gun Its New Amphibious Combat Vehicle With A 30mm Cannon
The Corps is looking to fast-track plans for a 'lethality upgrade' for at least some of the forthcoming family of wheeled armored vehicles.



he U.S. Marine Corps is following the U.S. Army’s lead and is now looking for a contractor to develop and install a turret with a 30mm cannon in a portion of its forthcoming Amphibious Combat Vehicle fleet. The move is part of a larger trend in both services to up-gun existing and future armored vehicles in light of parallel developments among potential conventional opponents, especially Russia.

Marine Corps Systems Command announced plans for the 30mm-armed variant of the Amphibious Combat Vehicle, or ACV-30, in a contracting notice on the U.S. government’s main contracting website, FedBizOpps, on Jan. 28, 2019. The Marines also want command and armored recovery versions, known as ACV-C and ACV-R respectively, as part of what the service is now calling the ACV family of vehicles.

In June 2018, the Marines revealed they had picked the SuperAV 8x8 wheeled armored vehicle as the winner of what it had called the ACV 1.1 competition. BAE Systems and Italy’s Iveco had partnered together on the proposal. Afterward, the Corps said it would look to begin a follow-on “lethality upgrade” for the vehicles, then known as ACV 1.2.



USMC
A US Marine Corps ACV during testing. This variant only has a remote weapon station able to hold a .50 caliber machine gun or a 40mm automatic grenade launcher.

“The program office tested the vehicle to all of the ACV 1.2 transition requirements, and even subjected the vehicle to 9-foot waves without issues,” U.S. Marine Corps Colonel Kirk Mullins, the program manager for Advanced Amphibious Assault at the Marine Corps Systems Command’s Program Executive Office for Land Systems, said according to an official news story on Jan. 29, 2019. “Because of this, the Marine Corps now was [sic; has] the opportunity to combine the program into a singular ACV family of vehicles program.”

The contracting notice does not specify a particular 30mm cannon or turret for the ACV-30, but there are a number of weapon systems that could work with the SuperAV platform. Italian defense contractor Leonardo already offers its HitFist Overhead Weapons Station (OWS) for the 8x8 vehicle, which consists of an unmanned turret that can accept various 20mm or 30mm cannons. Iveco markets the SuperAV/HitFist combination as the VBA.

It also features a co-axial 7.62mm machine gun and can accommodate a two-tube anti-tank guided missile launcher on the side. It can mount various electro-optical and infrared sensors for both target engagement and general reconnaissance, as well as self-defense smoke grenade launchers.

The Cockerill 3030 turret from Belgium’s CMI Defense is another option. The Marines might be able to leverage the work CMI Defense did for the Army to integrate the turret onto a Stryker vehicle.

...

http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/26229/the-usmc-already-wants-to-up-gun-their-new-amphibious-combat-vehicle-with-a-30mm-cannon
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Lusitano89

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #11 em: Fevereiro 11, 2019, 09:07:50 pm »
 

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mafets

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #12 em: Março 07, 2019, 10:46:53 am »
https://www.military.com/dodbuzz/2019/03/06/last-marine-corps-prowler-squadron-will-deactivate-week.html?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR0_W0nv4X-g2Qs7VdzYr2BnyrD5wJj42BIR3b0xafo9tylcUiNIH-OBoxQ#Echobox=1551883656

Citar
The Marine Corps is deactivating its last EA-6B Prowler squadron this week, marking an end to 42 years of service for the electronic warfare aircraft.

Marine Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 2 will hold its deactivation ceremony Friday, officials announced Tuesday. The squadron was the last to fly the Prowler in combat, supporting troops who were taking on Islamic State group terrorists in the Middle East late last year.



Cumprimentos
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

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Cabeça de Martelo

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7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

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HSMW

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Re: US Marine Corp
« Responder #14 em: Março 27, 2019, 05:03:22 pm »
Que raio de teatro....  ???
http://www.youtube.com/profile_videos?user=HSMW

"Tudo pela Nação, nada contra a Nação."
 

 

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