Royal New Zealand Navy

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #30 em: Dezembro 14, 2017, 06:42:23 pm »
Government resolves Defence cost blowout

By Live News  /  December 14, 2017  /  Comments Off on Government resolves Defence cost blowout   
 
Source: New Zealand Government

Headline: Government resolves Defence cost blowoutDefence Minister Ron Mark has announced that a revised contract has been signed with Lockheed Martin Canada to deliver the installation phase of the Anzac Frigate Systems Upgrade (FSU) project.
 The project, which had a budget of $491 million after contract signature in 2014, has experienced a cost overrun of $148 million, around 30 per cent of the budget. The revised project budget now sits at $639 million.
Mr Mark said that the FSU cost overrun was the largest example of procurement overspends under the previous Government yet identified.
“This Government has discovered a range of cost pressures and procurement overspends across several portfolios. This Defence project is the largest such example to date.
“This project is the biggest commitment of a series of mid-life upgrades on the frigates that have taken place since the mid-2000s, which have kept systems up to date with modern technology,” he said.
“There has been a series of inaccurate estimates and project management errors by the Ministry of Defence, compounded by a failure to act by previous Ministers.
“The scale of this overrun is deeply disappointing, and I have made it clear to officials that under this Government, Defence procurement must and will be accurately costed, scoped and delivered on time and within budget. This is not good enough.
“While this Government has acted quickly on this issue, through making a fiscally neutral transfer within the Defence Budget allocation at no additional cost to taxpayers, the same cannot be said about the previous Government.
“After first becoming aware of this issue in September 2016, when additional costs were first estimated at between $65-74 million, they failed to resolve it over a year, while costs continued to increase, and schedule delays became longer and longer.
“Crucially, the contractor provided a final fixed firm price in June 2017, and this was not taken up in the run-up to the election. This decision imposed a real further cost to taxpayers and the Navy, with the contract having to be reopened and renegotiated, causing additional costs to be incurred, and a significant delay to the point at which installation of this essential equipment on the frigates could begin.”
To fund the cost overrun, and consistent with the Coalition’s commitment to fiscal prudence, Cabinet has agreed to reallocate a portion of the money that was provisioned in Budget 2017 for the Littoral Operations Support Capability project. This trade-off will mean that a contemporary, off-the-shelf commercial dive and hydrographic vessel will be procured, rather than a more advanced, specifically designed military vessel.
“While this is a trade-off in capability for Defence, this innovative response means that a dive and hydrographic vessel will be able to be delivered to the Defence Force sooner than the military-specification option,” Mr Mark said.
“It will be significantly more capable than HMNZS Manawanui and HMNZS Resolution, the two vessels it is replacing, particularly in regards to support to underwater search and recovery operations, and in capacity, speed, and versatility in response to domestic and regional natural disasters. This trade-off was made on the advice of DefenceMIL OSI New Zealand –

https://livenews.co.nz/2017/12/14/government-resolves-defence-cost-blowout/

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PS mais valia começarem a pensar em Trocar as duas FFG's 639 Milhões Nzd ??!!!
« Última modificação: Dezembro 15, 2017, 11:41:34 am por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #31 em: Dezembro 15, 2017, 11:39:10 am »
New Zealand Navy decommissions HMNZS Endeavour after 30-year service


Photo: Twitter

The Royal New Zealand Navy has decommissioned its tanker HMNZS Endeavour after almost 30 years of service.

The decommissioning ceremony took place at Devonport Naval Base in Auckland on December 30.

HMNZS Endeavour flew her white ensign for the last time earlier this month as she entered Auckland Harbour, flying her 148-meter decommissioning pennant.
Endeavour also made a final visit to its homeport in Taranaki in November this year with the tanker’s crew exercising their freedom of entry, marching through the city with drums beating, band playing and colors flying.

HMNZS Endeavour started her service in April 1988 after being built in South Korea. She is the third ship of this name to serve in the Royal New Zealand Navy and is named after James Cook’s HM Barque Endeavour on his first voyage to New Zealand.
Crewed by 50 officers and sailors, Endeavour spent her years in service refueling ships at sea, enabling other navy vessels to operate over long distances for extended periods of time.
She will be replaced by the future HMNZS Aotearoa which will have twice the displacement of HMNZS Endeavour and will carry 30 per cent more fuel.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/12/15/new-zealand-navy-decommissions-hmnzs-endeavour-after-30-year-service/

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #32 em: Janeiro 08, 2018, 10:06:22 am »
 Zealand Navy to decommission diver support ship HMNZS Manawanui


Royal New Zealand Navy photo of HMNZS Manawanaui

Royal New Zealand Navy diving support vessel HMNZS Manawanui is scheduled to pay a final visit to her homeport city later this month before being officially decommissioned in February.

The town of Whitianga in the Waikato Region of New Zealand’s North Island, is the home port for Manawanui, though it is not based there.

The ship will be in Whitianga from January 30 to February 5 for ceremonies and parades before it is decommissioned on February 23 at Devonport.

Manawanui is the Royal New Zealand Navy’s diving and mine counter-measures ship and was commissioned into the Navy in 1988. She was built in the UK in 1979 as a diving support vessel, the Star Perseus, for North Sea oil rig operations.

She is fitted with a triple lock compression chamber, a wet diving bell, a 15 tonne crane and workshop facilities including electric and gas welding equipment and a lathe. She has a four-point anchoring system to keep the ship in position when undertaking diving operations.

Manawanui is the third ship of this name to serve in the Royal New Zealand Navy. The name translates as “Big Heart”.

Manawanui, and the hydrographic ship HMNZS Resolution which was decommissioned in 2012, are being replaced by a single ship which will carry out both functions.

https://navaltoday.com/2018/01/08/royal-new-zealand-navy-to-decommission-diver-support-ship-hmnzs-manawanui/

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #33 em: Fevereiro 01, 2018, 10:39:48 am »
First steel cut for Royal New Zealand Navy’s new tanker


Photo: Royal New Zealand Navy

Construction of the Royal New Zealand Navy’s largest ever vessel, the HMNZS Aotearoa, officially started on January 31 with a steel cutting ceremony at Hyundai Heavy Industries’ Ulsan shipyard in South Korea.

The ice-going tanker will be launched in March next year, and enter service in 2020.

The tanker acquisition was approved by the New Zealand government in June 2014 allowing for a tender to be released in March 2015. The contract was awarded to Hyundai Heavy Industries in July that year for $493 million.
Aotearoa will be able to refuel two ships at the same time while underway, carry and refuel New Zealand Defence Force helicopters, produce and store water, and store and transport bulk goods.

HMNZS Aotearoa has twice the displacement of its decommissioned predecessor HMNZS Endeavour and will carry 30 per cent more fuel.

HMNZS Aotearoa will also be a world-first naval “Environship”, with Hyundai using the Rolls-Royce Environship concept design under licence. The design incorporates a new wave-piercing hull, which reduces resistance and lowers fuel use, while its combined diesel electric and diesel propulsion plant has lower fuel emissions than older vessels.

The design and capabilities of HMNZS Aotearoa were announced by the Ministry of Defence in 2016. The cost includes the tanker’s enhanced “winterisation” capabilities, such as ice-strengthening for operations in Antarctica, including resupplying McMurdo Station and Scott Base. HMNZS Endeavour was not Antarctic-capable.
The Defence White Paper 2016 identified Antarctica as a “focus on increasing international interest” while noting the New Zealand Defence Force’s “critical role” in supporting personnel in the Ross Dependency and monitoring activity in the Southern Ocean.

https://navaltoday.com/2018/02/01/first-steel-cut-for-royal-new-zealand-navys-new-tanker/

PS Ainda temos muito que aprender com algumas Nações, como é que a Nova Zelândia consegue:
1º Adquirir;
2º Melhorar e;
3º Substituir as suas unidades navais com a cadência que tem feito nas últimas duas a três décadas enquanto nós andamos a encanar a perna á RÃ há mais de quatro décadas, será só mesmo planeamento e investimento na MdG ou também uma questão de necessidade e acima de inteligência pois sabem que tem de proteger os seus vastos recursos Marítimos ???
E se calhar não sabem o que são cativações e a corrupção instalada, leia-se demora em decidir que equipamentos e, quando devem ser substituídos, por exemplo caso da substituição da G3, são menores por lá !!!
Temos mesmo que melhorar, e muito, a começar pelas opinião e visão que os políticos tem, sobre as mais valias que as nossas FFAA representam para a Nação, em termos de protecção dos nossos recursos, maritimos e não só, e em termos de segurança Nacional !!
As palavras dos nossos políticos, em nada se coadunam com as acções/investimentos que tem vindo a fazer nas FFAA, o desinvestimento tem sido NOTORIAMENTE ELEVADO !!!


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« Última modificação: Fevereiro 01, 2018, 10:47:20 am por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #34 em: Março 11, 2018, 08:02:08 pm »
New Zealand Navy frigate HMNZS Te Kaha arrives in Canada for combat system upgrade


Royal New Zealand Navy file photo of HMNZS Te Kaha

Royal New Zealand Navy frigate HMNZS Te Kaha has arrived in Canada where she will undergo combat management system upgrades at Seaspan’s shipyard in Victoria, British Columbia.

The 25-day passage to British Columbia was marked by a brief port visit in Hawaii’s Pearl Harbor where Te Kaha and her crew represented New Zealand as part of the United States’ commemoration of Presidents’ Day.

For the final leg of the voyage, the crew was supplemented by a group of 10 Royal Canadian Naval Reserve personnel who had an opportunity to experience working life on board the frigate.

During her time in Canada, HMNZS Te Kaha will be fitted with updated equipment and systems including the combat management system, radar and underwater sonar.

The contract for the upgrade of the Royal New Zealand Navy’s two Anzac-class frigates was signed between the New Zealand government and Lockheed Martin Canada on April 29, 2014.

Under the terms of the contract, Lockheed Martin Canada is responsible for the design, installation and integration of the CMS and a combat system trainer for the Devonport Naval Base in Auckland, as well as the procurement of new sensor and weapon systems for HMNZ ships Te Mana and Te Kaha.

Lockheed Martin Canada’s CMS 330 combat management system was initially developed for Canada’s Department of National Defence and then modified for the Royal New Zealand Navy with Canada’s support.

“There is a significant programme of work to upgrade or replace New Zealand’s defence equipment that aims to maintain the safety of our military personnel and the country’s ability and readiness to deploy when needed, both in this country and overseas,” New Zealand defense minister Ron Mark said announcing the frigate’s arrival in Canada.

An additional $148 million was approved by the New Zealand government to ensure the upgrade could proceed, bringing the total project budget to $639 million.

“The government’s decision reflects the value placed on our frigates and their ability to operate across and support a wide range of operations,” Mark said.

In addition CMS upgrades, the frigates will also be receiving MBDA’s Sea Ceptor vertical launched, active Common Anti-Air Modular Missile (Maritime) – CAMM(M) which will replace the current RIM7P NATO Seasparrow missile system.

The upgrade of the second frigate, HMNZS Te Mana, is scheduled to take place in 2019.

https://navaltoday.com/2018/03/06/new-zealand-navy-frigate-hmnzs-te-kaha-arrives-in-canada-for-combat-system-upgrade/

A fragata em questão entrou ao serviço em 1997, tem vinte e um anos e vai iniciar o MLU, este mês, exactamente como está a acontecer com as nossas VdG e BD !!!   ::) ::) ::)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMNZS_Te_Kaha_(F77)

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« Última modificação: Março 11, 2018, 08:05:08 pm por tenente »
 
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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #35 em: Abril 27, 2018, 12:42:37 pm »

Lockheed marks start of New Zealand Navy frigate refit


Royal New Zealand Navy file photo of HMNZS Te Kaha

Royal New Zealand Navy frigate HMNZS Te Kaha has been handed over to Lockheed Martin Canada and Seaspan Victoria Shipyards for combat management system upgrade.

Following the ship’s arrival, the shipyard industrial refit phase of the ANZAC Frigate Systems Upgrade project will now commence.

As explained, this marks the first time that a foreign warship has been modernized in Canada since the Second World War.

“For the past four years, Lockheed Martin Canada’s Combat System Integration team has been preparing for this day by designing, integrating and testing the combat system as well as the ship platform design changes for HMNZ Ships Te Kaha and Te Mana next year. Installation of an advanced combat system will ensure New Zealand has a credible maritime combat capability,” Gary Fudge, Acting Vice President and General Manager of Lockheed Martin Canada Rotary Mission Systems (RMS), commented.

HMNZS Te Kaha arrived in Canada on March 6, where it proceeded to the Royal Canadian Navy’s Fleet Maintenance Facility (FMF) Cape Breton for de-storing of equipment and preservation of ship systems in preparation for the handover and start of the industrial refit.

Back in 2014, the contract for the upgrade of two Anzac-class frigates was signed between the New Zealand government and Lockheed Martin Canada. Under the terms of the contract, Lockheed Martin Canada is responsible for designing and supplying the upgraded combat system for each frigate, including a new combat management system along with the supply and integration of various sensors, a missile system and a combat systems trainer.

Lockheed Martin Canada is also responsible for the platform design and implementation and has subcontracted Seaspan Victoria Shipyards in Victoria, BC, to install the new systems on the ship platforms.

Under Lockheed Martin Canada supervision, Seaspan Shipyards will refit and install the new systems with an expected completion date of 2020 for the entire contract.

The second frigate, HMNZS Te Mana, is scheduled to arrive in 2019.


https://navaltoday.com/2018/04/27/lockheed-marks-start-of-new-zealand-navy-frigate-refit/

PS entrou ao serviço em 1997 tem 21 anos !!!!

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« Última modificação: Abril 27, 2018, 12:45:35 pm por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #36 em: Maio 21, 2018, 04:10:59 pm »
New Zealand helping Fiji Navy patrol its Exclusive Economic Zone waters


HMNZS Taupo departing Auckland, New Zealand, May 21, 2018, for a three-month deployment to Fiji. Photo: Royal New Zealand Navy

The Royal New Zealand Navy has deployed its inshore patrol vessel HMNZS Taupo to help Fiji patrol its vast Exclusive Economic Zone and train its navy sailors for the second consecutive year.

Taupo left Auckland on Monday to spend the next three months conducting maritime patrols in Fiji.

The patrols by HMNZS Taupo, in support of the Republic of Fiji Navy, will involve the usual compliance monitoring activities, which include two Fishery Officers from New Zealand’s Ministry for Primary Industries assisting with boarding and inspection of vessels.

In 2017, the NZDF sent inshore patrol vessel HMNZS Hawea to Fiji to help patrol the country’s Exclusive Economic Zone, which encompass more than 1.1 million square kilometres.

Major General Tim Gall, the Commander Joint Forces New Zealand, said the combined maritime surveillance operations with Fiji would contribute to the multinational effort to ensure sustainable management of fishery resources in the South West Pacific.

“We also expect the patrols to deepen collaboration between New Zealand and Fiji government agencies and strengthen defence cooperation between the two countries,” Major General Gall said.

The combined maritime patrols with Fiji last year achieved strong results, the RNZN said. The operation resulted in about 550 vessels boarded and 110 alleged infringements detected. About 50 Fiji Navy sailors, 27 customs officers and 19 fishery officers also trained on Hawea.

Royal New Zealand Navy Captain Dave McEwan, the Maritime Component Commander, said learning was a two-way process and the New Zealand sailors learnt as much from their Fiji Navy partners.

“We hope to replicate the success of last year’s combined patrols and contribute to Fiji’s maritime security,” he said.

https://navaltoday.com/2018/05/21/new-zealand-helping-fiji-navy-patrol-its-exclusive-economic-zone-waters/

PS Num futuro próximo, diria três a quatro anos, quando o terceiro OPV estiver operacional, as forças Navais NZ passarão das actuais onze unidades para oito, os quatro patrulhas costeiros serão desactivados, com 12 ou 13 anos de serviço.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protector-class_inshore_patrol_vessel

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« Última modificação: Maio 21, 2018, 04:21:36 pm por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #37 em: Agosto 14, 2018, 10:57:54 am »
HHI lays keel for New Zealand Navy tanker ‘Aotearoa’


Two pieces of Aotearoa’s keel are joined at the symbolic keel-laying ceremony in Ulsan, South Korea. Photo: New Zealand Defence Force

Hyundai Heavy Industries hosted a keel laying ceremony for the Royal New Zealand Navy’s future tanker HMZS Aotearoa at its shipyard in Ulsan, South Korea, on August 13.

Aotearoa’s keel laying consisted of more than 500 tonnes of carefully constructed keel blocks being positioned together in the dry dock, where she will continue to expand upwards and outwards until her launch date early next year.

Aotearoa represents the first of a new fleet of RNZN ships built specifically to address the global requirements of the New Zealand Defence Force and government agencies for deployment from Antarctica to the Arabian Gulf.

The keel laying ceremony took place some seven months after first steel was cut for the New Zealand Navy’s largest vessel ever.

This is an exciting time for our Navy,” said Chief of Navy Rear Admiral John Martin.

“It is filled with challenges and opportunities as we ready ourselves for Aotearoa, as well as our modernized frigates. It is these three ships on which our combat capability will be based.”

HMNZS Aotearoa is designed to provide logistical support to New Zealand and coalition maritime, land and air units.

Her primary purpose is to conduct fuel resupply but she will also be capable of supplying dry goods, water, spare parts or ammunition. Her missions will include humanitarian and disaster relief, support to United Nations security operations, support to a coalition naval task group and Antarctic resupply.

The 173.2-meter-long ship will have the ability to carry 12 20-foot shipping containers, high-capacity freshwater generation plants, self-defense systems, aviation and marine fuel cargo tanks, dual all-electric replenishment-at-sea rigs and will be able to carry a Seaspite or NH90 helicopter. Aotearoa will displace 26,000 tonnes and will be operated by a crew of 64.

The ship’s $493 million price tag includes the tanker’s enhanced “winterization” capabilities, such as ice-strengthening for operations in Antarctica, including resupplying McMurdo Station and Scott Base. Predecessor tanker HMNZS Endeavour was not Antarctic-capable.


The tanker will feature Rolls Royce’s wave-piercing hull form

https://navaltoday.com/2018/08/14/hhi-lays-keel-for-new-zealand-navy-tanker-aotearoa/

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« Última modificação: Agosto 14, 2018, 11:00:03 am por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #38 em: Agosto 22, 2018, 03:00:11 pm »
New Zealand Navy getting Norwegian OSV for dive and hydrographic ops

The ship is expected to be in service with the RNZN by November 2019.


Photo: New Zealand Defence Force

The New Zealand government has approved NZ$103 million for the purchase and refit of a second-hand multi-role offshore support vessel that will be used as a dive and hydrographic support vessel by the Royal New Zealand Navy.

Following purchase, the 85-meter Norwegian-built survey vessel MV Edda Fonn will be outfitted with the dive and hydrographic systems required by the defense force.

MV Edda Fonn will replace hydrographic ship HMNZS Resolution and dive support ship HMNZS Manawanui. The two vessels were decommissioned from the RNZN in 2012 and 2018 respectively, following several decades of service.

“This vessel will ensure that the current capability gaps for diving and hydrography are filled as quickly as possible, with a proven, well tested platform,” says Minister of Defence Ron Mark.

The ship is scheduled to be delivered to Devonport Naval Base in May 2019. It will feature a 100t salvage crane, a remotely operated vehicle and a contemporary dynamic positioning system, which will allow Navy’s specialist divers to achieve greater levels of effectiveness and safety, in a greater range of conditions.

The New Zealand Navy was initially scheduled to receive a custom, new-build vessel but an NZ$148 million cost blowout in the country’s frigate upgrade project forced the government to consider a used vessel.

Defense officials identified the MV Edda Fonn, owned and operated by Norwegian company Østensjø Rederi, as the most suitable option from an initial list of over 150 candidate offshore and subsea support vessels.

“Defence officials have subjected the Edda Fonn to considerable scrutiny ahead of purchase,” says Ron Mark. “We have been assured by independent experts that it is in excellent condition, and will handle well in the operations the Defence Force will use it for,” says Ron Mark.

The vessel generally operates in the North Sea, and is under lease until the end of 2018, following which the modification process will begin.

Once delivered, final modifications will be undertaken in New Zealand. It is expected that New Zealand industry will be involved in this part of the project. The ship is expected to be in service with the Navy by November 2019.

The NZ$103 million project budget is for the purchase, modifications and introduction into service.


https://navaltoday.com/2018/08/22/new-zealand-navy-getting-norwegian-osv-for-dive-and-hydrographic-ops/

https://www.ship-technology.com/projects/edda/

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« Última modificação: Agosto 22, 2018, 03:02:27 pm por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #39 em: Agosto 22, 2018, 05:12:27 pm »
New Zealand Navy getting Norwegian OSV for dive and hydrographic ops

The ship is expected to be in service with the RNZN by November 2019.


Photo: New Zealand Defence Force

The New Zealand government has approved NZ$103 million for the purchase and refit of a second-hand multi-role offshore support vessel that will be used as a dive and hydrographic support vessel by the Royal New Zealand Navy.

Following purchase, the 85-meter Norwegian-built survey vessel MV Edda Fonn will be outfitted with the dive and hydrographic systems required by the defense force.

MV Edda Fonn will replace hydrographic ship HMNZS Resolution and dive support ship HMNZS Manawanui. The two vessels were decommissioned from the RNZN in 2012 and 2018 respectively, following several decades of service.

“This vessel will ensure that the current capability gaps for diving and hydrography are filled as quickly as possible, with a proven, well tested platform,” says Minister of Defence Ron Mark.

The ship is scheduled to be delivered to Devonport Naval Base in May 2019. It will feature a 100t salvage crane, a remotely operated vehicle and a contemporary dynamic positioning system, which will allow Navy’s specialist divers to achieve greater levels of effectiveness and safety, in a greater range of conditions.

The New Zealand Navy was initially scheduled to receive a custom, new-build vessel but an NZ$148 million cost blowout in the country’s frigate upgrade project forced the government to consider a used vessel.

Defense officials identified the MV Edda Fonn, owned and operated by Norwegian company Østensjø Rederi, as the most suitable option from an initial list of over 150 candidate offshore and subsea support vessels.

“Defence officials have subjected the Edda Fonn to considerable scrutiny ahead of purchase,” says Ron Mark. “We have been assured by independent experts that it is in excellent condition, and will handle well in the operations the Defence Force will use it for,” says Ron Mark.

The vessel generally operates in the North Sea, and is under lease until the end of 2018, following which the modification process will begin.

Once delivered, final modifications will be undertaken in New Zealand. It is expected that New Zealand industry will be involved in this part of the project. The ship is expected to be in service with the Navy by November 2019.

The NZ$103 million project budget is for the purchase, modifications and introduction into service.


https://navaltoday.com/2018/08/22/new-zealand-navy-getting-norwegian-osv-for-dive-and-hydrographic-ops/

https://www.ship-technology.com/projects/edda/

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Dava um certo jeito ter uma plataforma destas a operar por cá. E 59,5 M € para aquisição, reequipamento e entrada em operação não parece algo assim tão exagerado. Há por aí mais destes? E, mais importante, aceitam receber em 3 prestações de 20 milhões?  :)

Cumprimentos, 
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #40 em: Agosto 22, 2018, 05:22:56 pm »
Se, para colocar ao serviço, por 28 milhões, os quatro Classe Tejo, previstos, será provável que o 5º Navio adquirido, também seja colocado ao serviço em vez de ficar paradinho, para doar peças aos seus irmãos, é o filme que é, pois já lá vão três anos e quatro meses, e, apenas estão três unidades ao serviço, nem sei quanto tempo demoraria a colocar operacional, um navio como este que os Kiwis, vão adquirir !! ;)

https://dre.pt/application/file/67101490

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« Última modificação: Agosto 22, 2018, 05:27:40 pm por tenente »
 
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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #41 em: Agosto 28, 2018, 06:03:19 pm »
New Dive and Hydrographic Support Vessel for Royal New Zealand Navy

Posted On Tuesday, 28 August 2018 11:15

On 22 August, New Zealand's Minister of Defence Ron Mark announced the purchase of the 85-metre Edda Fonn, a 15-year-old offshore support vessel from Norwegian firm Østensjø Rederi AS, as the replacement for decommissioned dive tender HMNZS Manawanui and hydrographic survey ship HMNZS Resolution.


Image of what the future HMNZS Manawanui will look like.

The new ship will be renamed HMNZS Manawanui, the fourth RNZN ship to bear that name. The former Manawanui’s home port was Whitianga.

Gisborne was chosen as the home port for the new Manawanui because it was the home port of HMNZS Resolution and HMNZS Monowai. Resolution paid a final visit to Gisborne before she was decommissioned on 27 April, 2012.

The practice of home ports relates to the awarding of charters to individual ships and the name of the ship. HMNZS Resolution had a charter with Gisborne, which gave permission for the ship’s company to conduct formal parades in the district.

Ships such HMNZS Otago and HMNZS Wellington would automatically have Dunedin and Wellington respectively as their home ports.

Commander Matt Wray, a Hydrographic Survey officer and the last Commanding Officer of HMNZS Resolution, said a ship’s visit to its home port was an occasion the ship’s company looked forward to.

“Gisborne always made Resolution welcome and it is wonderful the Navy is reconnecting with the district after six years. I said to the Mayor, Meng Foon, when the Resolution had its last visit that the Navy won’t forget Gisborne,” Commander Wray said.

“It’s really pleasing for me to see our traditional link with Gisborne renewed with the hydrographic trade, and now the diving trade.”

The Edda Fonn was chosen as the most suitable option from a list of 150 vessels reviewed.

The Ministry of Defence procurement team has had an excellent relationship with the owner, Østensjø Rederi AS, which will undertake the first RNZN-required modifications before the ship sails for New Zealand in March 2019.

Once commissioned in New Zealand, HMNZS Manawanui will have final modifications and be in service by November 2019. The budget for the project is $103 million.

Mr Mark described the vessel as a great addition to the RNZN, filling capability gaps in diving, salvage and hydrography.

“It will be in service three years earlier than a purpose-built ship would have been."

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=272

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #42 em: Dezembro 21, 2018, 07:00:52 pm »
Em 2019 o novo navio hidrográfico junta-se á frota seguido do novo AOR em 2020, e, do terceiro OPV em 2023.



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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #43 em: Fevereiro 13, 2019, 04:25:22 pm »
New Zealand’s future hydrography ship begins conversion into naval platform

Jane's Navy International 11 February 2019


MV Edda Fonn, pictured at Haugesund, Norway. Source: Royal New Zealand Navy

The Royal New Zealand Navy's (RNZN's) future hydrographic and diving support vessel, MV Edda Fonn , has arrived in Frederickshavn, Denmark, for a fitting-out process that will be conducted according to naval requirements.

The 85 m vessel, which will be in service as HMNZS Manawanui once commissioned, departed its previous homeport of Haugesund, Norway, on 31 January, and arrived in Frederickshavn on 1 February, according to data from IHS Markit's Maritime Portal.

Edda Fonn was acquired by the New Zealand government in 2018 for NZD103 million (USD69 million) to fulfil existing gaps in the RNZN's diving support and hydrographic survey capabilities.

These operational gaps arose following the decommissioning of the hydrographic ship HMNZS Resolution in 2012 and the retirement of the RNZN's namesake dive tender HMNZS Manawanui in 2018.

Edda Fonn has an overall length of 84.7 m, an overall beam of 18 m, and a hull draught of 6.3 m. It is equipped with a 100-tonne salvage crane that can be used to launch and recover remotely operated vehicles (ROVs).

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=272

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #44 em: Março 04, 2019, 11:04:58 am »
New Zealand’s Second ANZAC-class Frigate Underway for Mid-Life Upgrade in Canada


ANZAC-class Frigate Te Mana setting sail for her Mid-Life Upgrade in Canada. Royal New Zealand Navy picture.

HMNZS Te Mana will undergo extensive upgrades to its surveillance, combat and self-defence capabilities. This will allow the vessel to face future threats and address obsolescence of some of the frigate’s current systems.

HMNZS Te Mana is the second of two ANZAC-class frigates of the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN). The vessel and her crew are heading north to Hawaii before proceeding to Esquimalt, Canada to commence the upgrade.

As Prime Systems Integrator for the “Frigate Systems Upgrade” program, Lockheed Martin Canada is responsible for designing and supplying the upgraded combat system for the two ANZAC-class Frigate of the RNZN, including a new combat management system – based on Lockheed Martin Canada’s Combat Management System 330 – along with the supply and integration of various sensors, a missile system and a Combat Systems Trainer.

Lockheed Martin Canada is also responsible for the platform design and implementation and has subcontracted Seaspan Victoria Shipyards Co. Ltd in Victoria, BC, to install the new systems on the ship platforms.

 
Artist impression of an ANZAC class frigate launching a Sea Ceptor missile. MBDA image.

MBDA is in charge of providing the Sea Ceptor, active Common Anti-Air Modular Missile (Maritime) – CAMM(M) which will replace the current RIM7P NATO Seasparrow missile system.
Thales is responsible for providing the Broadband Sonar Advanced Processing System (BSAPS) for the Spherion B hull-mounted sonar and the TUUM-6 multi-channel Digital Underwater Communication System (DUWCS).

Airborne Systems Limited is providing anti-ship missile defence soft kill subsystems, along with training and support, spares, support and test equipment.
Ultra Electronics Limited is providing the torpedo defence system, along with training and support spares, support and test equipment, and full documentation.
Northrop Grumman will supply new Inertial Navigation Systems and OSI Maritime Systems will provide a navigation radar system based on two Furuno 3000 series X band radars for each ship.
First ship of the class, HMNZS Te Kaha, arrived in Canada on March 6 2018 for its mid-life upgrade. The entire contract (upgrade of both ships) is expected to be completed in 2020.

https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2019/02/new-zealands-second-anzac-class-frigate-underway-for-mid-life-upgrade-in-canada/

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