Royal New Zealand Navy

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Royal New Zealand Navy
« em: Outubro 23, 2015, 04:40:15 pm »
Lockheed Martin Canada Announces Latest Achievement On New Zealand ANZAC Frigate Systems Upgrade Project

(Source: Lockheed Martin; issued Oct 22, 2015)



OTTAWA, Ontario --- Lockheed Martin Canada marked an important milestone toward modernizing the Royal New Zealand Navy's two ANZAC Class ships. The company announced that the ANZAC frigate systems upgrade project has successfully completed the combat system critical design review on schedule and to New Zealand's satisfaction.

The government-mandated review proves a contractor's progress and planning for all elements of a program. It covered in detail all of Lockheed Martin Canada's plans for shipboard systems and designs. With the successful review, Lockheed Martin Canada can begin implementing detailed designs and plans for the system's key components, which will in turn lead to ship installation. The milestone is the latest achievement for Lockheed Martin Canada's ANZAC team in the 16 months since contract award.

In April 2014, following an extensive worldwide competitive tender, Lockheed Martin Canada was selected as the Prime Systems Integrator by the New Zealand Ministry of Defence to upgrade the combat systems on their ANZAC class ships. Lockheed Martin Canada's Combat Management System 330 is the backbone of the technical solution for this project and many of the sub-systems to be supplied by Lockheed Martin Canada are common to the Royal Canadian Navy's Halifax Class Modernization Project.

"Our success on this program is a direct result of our collaborative approach to building relationships and demonstrated ability to manage multiple stakeholders through complex projects," said Rosemary Chapdelaine, vice president for Lockheed Martin Canada Mission Systems and Training.

Echoing this sentiment of collaboration, New Zealand Ministry of Defence project director Gary Collier added, "I continue to be impressed with Lockheed Martin Canada's flexibility, responsiveness and pragmatic approach to achieving a successful outcome for both parties. We are pleased to have Lockheed Martin Canada as the prime contractor and partner for this critical project for New Zealand's Ministry of Defence and the Royal New Zealand Navy."

Lockheed Martin Canada's combat management system was also down-selected as one of two solutions qualified to compete for the Royal New Zealand Navy's Maritime Sustainment Capability – the future replenishment tanker - which will maintain afloat replenishment capability for the New Zealand Defence Force.

Rosemary Chapdelaine continued, "This project has truly placed our products and capability in a global spotlight and positioned us for future international growth, demonstrating our ability to create jobs and economic growth for Canada. ANZAC leverages the expertise and record of success established through Canada's Halifax Class Modernization Project – and now other customers can take full advantage of the modern combat system integration methodology and lessons learned from both of these sophisticated programs."

Lockheed Martin Canada, headquartered in Ottawa, is the Canadian-based arm of Lockheed Martin Corporation, a global security and aerospace company. Lockheed Martin Canada specializes in the development, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. The company employs more than 850 employees at major facilities in Ottawa, Montreal, Dartmouth, Calgary, and Victoria, working on a wide range of major programs spanning the aerospace, defence and civil sectors.

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #1 em: Novembro 06, 2015, 06:33:34 am »
Sei que esta entrevista é de Abril 2015 mas se puderem leiam, pois as previsões de aquisição ou substituição de meios existentes, Por exemplo Fragatas e Helis, são exatamente como nós prevemos serem as nossas......... :sil: :sil: :sil:.
A Importância/Valor que a Nova Zelândia dá sua Marinha é mesmo idêntica á que Portugal dá á sua MdG...... :nice: :nice: :nice:

Interview: Rear Adm. Jack Steer By Nick Lee-Frampton 4:30 p.m. EDT April 20, 2015




New Zealand's Chief of Navy




(Photo: Royal New Zealand Navy)

 WELLINGTON — For a relatively small Navy, with just over 2,100 personnel, the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) covers a lot of sea, with even its offshore patrol vessels (OPVs) ranging from Antarctica to almost the equator. Women have served in the RNZN for decades, and it is expected that a woman will soon command one of the Navy's Anzac-class frigates.

 Both frigates now have new and more powerful diesel engines, thanks to midlife upgrades, and a weapons upgrade that begins next year will arm them with the MBDA Sea Ceptor surface-to-air missile. The Navy's latest missile, though, is the anti-ship Penguin carried by the eight Kaman SH-2G(I) Seasprite helicopters currently being delivered.

 The Navy's flagship is the amphibious support ship Canterbury, recently dispatched to provide the people of Vanuatu with humanitarian aid and disaster relief.

 A replacement tanker needs to be ordered soon — the Ministry of Defence issued a request for tender for a "maritime sustainment vessel" in March — and will be helicopter-capable, unlike the present tanker.

 New Zealand's next defense white paper, due this year, will likely provide an indication of what sort of platform could replace the Anzac frigates and, crucially, how many ships will be ordered. Three is definitely better than two for a viable combat force, argues Chief of Navy Rear Adm. Jack Steer.

Q. How is the recruiting and retention of sailors?

 A. We're doing pretty well at the moment. Attrition rate's about 7.8 percent, down from 23 percent in 2012. There were about seven people applying for each position in the last intake, so we have no shortage of the right people. We still have some gaps in certain areas: engineers, watch keepers, combat systems specialists and divers. We're getting the ships to sea; it just puts, in some areas, a lot of strain on a few people. But we'll grow out of that.

Q. Is it deliberate that you have so many women sailors?

 A. It's deliberate — I love telling other navies that we have 23 to 24 percent of women in our Navy. We're working to make it even higher. We've had women at sea for about 30 years. There's no jobs in the Navy they can't do, and we're a better Navy because of it. After we made just about every mistake you could think of, we are now in a place where women are a full part of our Navy. There will be a frigate commanded by a woman in the future; it's not that far off.

Q. What's the status of the Joint Task Force?

 A. It's progressing reasonably well. By 2020 our vision for the NZ Defence Force is to have an enhanced combat capability, and the Joint Task Force is part of that.

 The Army's new MAN trucks have been tested on Canterbury. We now know we can embark them and take them on and off, using the ramps, the crane — and with LCMs [mechanized landing craft].

 The Seasprite helicopters work fine off Canterbury. We know we can get the NH90 on and off, we just need to go and do more of it.

 A better radar for helicopter control has been sorted, the ops room [is] much better, more functional and we've improved the hospital. The [rigid hull inflatable boat] launching and recovery [process] has been resolved. The line handling for the LCM — 60 tons of unhelpful metal at times — is a work in progress, but it's coming along well.

 You'll never see Canterbury storming onto a hostile beach; that's not what we do. When it sailed to Vanuatu [for humanitarian assistance and disaster relief] a few weeks ago, that's a great example of what we can do. It's for doing things in a joint way. We are a long way along a very long road.

Q. How are the Army's soldiers on board Canterbury?

 A. It's a strange marriage. When soldiers first came on, they didn't really know how to be on a ship; sailors didn't know how to treat soldiers. We spoke different languages.

 Now we have soldiers come on board, they know where to eat, what the routines are like. We understand as sailors how to help them [fit in] on a ship. It's not perfect, but we can work together very well now.

 We're growing a capability that we always dreamed Canterbury would give us, and now it's becoming a reality, it really is good.

Q. Any UAV news?

 A. Under an Air Force umbrella probably, Navy will have UAVs of different types. Perhaps something like the Schiebel helicopter, which has been on the back of other nations' OPVs. It just gives [you] a much greater horizon.

 So we have a keen interest. But they cost a lot of money and we don't have a lot of that, but it is the future.

Q. What about the acquisition of eight new Kaman SH-2G(I) Seasprites ?

 A. It's a bit of a success story. It's pretty much on budget, and came reasonably quickly. And we got a simulator, glass cockpit, better avionics, better communications, [longer] range, bigger missile. It's a better capability for our Defence Force, with the same airframe that we [already] know how to maintain, so it was a pretty smart buy. We've got three here now, and the rest arrive before the end of the year. And Peru's buying the old ones.

Are there better [naval helicopters] around? Yes, there are; they cost a hell of a lot more, they require much more to operate. We're really happy with what we've got. We've got great pilots, great maintainers. It's upgraded our aviation capability for the next 10 years.

Q. Any issues with Seasprite maintenance personnel?

 A. Yes, there is. But they're not show-stoppers. Look, in our Army, Navy and Air Force, we always have personnel number challenges. That's how we live, and that's fine, but we don't have a surplus of maintainers, or pilots, or aircrew. But we have enough.

Q. Next year, you'll have the Sea Ceptor missile?

 A. Yeah, cool, eh? The frigate [combat] systems upgrade is a huge step, starting the middle of next year with HMNZS Te Mana. Sea Ceptor is good at what it does. The British have it, Brazil just bought it, the Chileans are thinking about it, so it's gaining momentum as an alternative to the Standard missile that the Australians will stick with.

 We've upgraded the [frigate's] engines already. We get a higher speed out of our diesels, so we have much bigger legs on our Anzacs now. It's a significant difference. So the next step is to upgrade the sensors and the weapons. We've restructured the operations room. The frigate upgrade project is really cool.

Q. Are you confident there will be two new frigates replacing the two Anzac frigates?

 A. No. I would like to think that whatever we get, we get three of them. Then you have a better availability. With two, you might get two available — but you might get none as well. With three, you have a good chance of at least having one and maybe two.

 We are a maritime nation with a huge ocean around us. We also have a large commitment to a number of [defense] arrangements; we are expected to have a combat capability in our Navy. Three slightly used combat platforms is fine; three brand new ones is fine. I just think we need to get away from two. I'd like to think that whatever replaces our combat capability is here in time for the other two to move on gracefully, so we don't have a gap. That's my only concern.

 If you look at a New Zealand-centric map, there's a lot of water around us and we tend to forget that. Oceans are the bridges that link us. Our Navy would change fundamentally if we didn't have combat-capable platforms. It's a maritime century, after all.

Q. What are the plans for acquiring the Endeavour tanker's replacement?

 A. Yep, the project's in place, the [request for tender] has been issued. It will carry more fuel than Endeavour, it will be able to take an NH90 helicopter and some containers. There is a quite a lot of interest, so I think we'll get a good product out of this. The other option [is] to make it more ice-capable, so that it can resupply the McMurdo and Scott bases in Antarctica.

Q. What lessons has the Navy learned from the piracy mission?

 A. We've learned a lot taking part in anti-piracy stuff off the Gulf of Aden. There's a lot fewer hostages now and a lot less of it going on. The concern is that if we stop, will the [pirates] come back out?

 We're working with Pakistanis, Chinese, Americans, British and others. We've commanded Task Force 151 twice. There's only about 30 hostages [being held by pirates in that region] at the moment. There were over 700 at one stage.

Q. How are the patrol vessels performing?

 A. Our offshore patrol vessels are fantastic. They're our work horses, they go from just south of the equator to the Antarctic. They really are capable, sea-worthy, very, very useful ships for New Zealand. We have dog kennels on them, we can carry extra boats, other government agency people. We can do boardings by day and by night. They're a very capable asset for us. Our inshore patrol vessels provide our young people [with] command opportunities you normally don't get before you go to a bigger ship.

Email: nframpton@defensenews.com

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« Última modificação: Novembro 06, 2015, 06:40:13 am por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #2 em: Novembro 07, 2015, 11:47:07 am »
New Zealand Defence Force Inducts Three Super Seasprites Into The Helicopter Fleet

http://www.ibtimes.com.au/new-zealand-defence-force-inducts-three-super-seasprites-helicopter-fleet-1428926


New Zealand Defence Force Inducts Three Super Seasprites Into Helicopter Fleet, IN PHOTO: A Serbian Mi-8 helicopter gunship fires unguided rockets on targets during a training exercise in the village of Nikinci, west from Belgrade, November 14, 2014. Reuters/Marko Djurica


As part of the process to upgrade the helicopter fleet, the New Zealand Defence Force has begun adding newly acquired helicopters. The process started in the late 1990s, estiamted to cost of over $1 billion.
 
On March 6, the New Zealand Defence Force held a ceremony at the Royal New Zealand Air Force Base in Auckland and accepted three new Super Seasprite SH-2G(I) helicopters built by Kaman Aerospace. The helicopters had arrived in the country in January and five more are expected to be delivered by September 2015, the NZDF said in a statement.
 
Rear Admiral Jack Steer, Chief of the Royal New Zealand Navy described the helicopters' acceptance as a significant milestone in New Zealand's maritime aviation capabilities. “The Seasprites perform a vital function for the navy and enhance the roles of ships at sea by undertaking a range of tasks including maritime surveillance, search-and-rescue, counter-terrorism, and utility lift," he said.
 
Deployment
 
The RNZN is expected to deploy the Seasprites on board the multirole vessel HMNZS Canterbury and two of its Otago-class offshore patrol vessels and two ANZAC class frigates.  The helicopters will be jointly operated between the Navy and Air Force with the aircraft flown by navy personnel and maintenance vested with Force engineers and technicians from the RNZAF's No. 6 Squadron at Whenuapai base, Auckland. Though officially, no information has been given out on its operational plans, it is expected that the aircraft when made fully operational will be armed with Penguin Mk 2 Mod 7 anti-ship missiles.
 
 Modernisation
 
The maritime Seasprites topped the shopping list of helicopters by New Zealand. They also include the medium utility NH90s that will be replacing the Iroquois. Des Ashton, Deputy secretary for Acquisition, Ministry of  Defence said a lot of work has gone into the helicopter programmes. He said the helicopters would meet the Government's objectives for many years to come, reports Radio Nz.
 
The new acquisitions will also address the need for external link compatible machines for the new 9,000t multi-role vessel HMNZS Canterbury. It was built under Project Protector, as part of the RNZN’s future plans to replace the F-421 HMNZS Canterbury frigate. It has space for two helicopters on board with extra capability to transport up to four more via tie-downs on the flight deck.
 
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mafets

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #3 em: Novembro 07, 2015, 05:55:54 pm »
Por enquanto está é a realidade:
Citar
http://www.navy.mil.nz/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_active_Royal_New_Zealand_Navy_ships

Citar
Anzac Class

Citar
hmnzs canterbury LPD

Citar
HMNZS ENDEAVOUR A11

Citar
Offshore patrol   Protector class

Citar
HMNZS Hawea, Protector-class IPV

Citar
Diving tender HMNZS Manawanui   

Citar
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No._6_Squadron_RNZAF

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"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #4 em: Novembro 16, 2015, 09:59:02 pm »
Boas,

Não resisti e coloquei estas duas fotos dos OPV's da Marinha Neo Zelandesa.





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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #5 em: Abril 26, 2016, 01:38:13 pm »
Maritime Security rss feed 

Southern Ocean focus for new OPV



 
An new OPV for New Zealand will include features that will allow it to operate in the Southern Ocean and near to Antarctica.

The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) want to increase their maritime presence in this region, so the ship will have to have an ice strengthened double-hull.

At present the RNZN operates nine vessels in total, following the decision by the government to sell two of its four small inshore patrol vessels. The fleet incorporates a duo of high-end frigates and two other 85m Protector-class OPVs, pictured above, during New Zealand Defence Force exercises.

The third OPV will take the lessons learned from operating existing vessels according to Cdr Phil Bradshaw, director naval engineering, capability branch at the RNZN, particularly the environmental challenges in deploying from the topics to the far south. The vessel is expected to be delivered by around 2020.

‘[The OPV] would require much greater compartmentalisation and redundancy. We are operating in sea temperatures of -2 degrees up to plus 35, there has been chilling on the liquid content on the side of the vessel and mini-icebergs forming inside the tanks,’ he told delegates at the Offshore Patrol and Surveillance conference in Portsmouth last week.

The vessel would likely need an endurance of around 30 days, in order to enable the vessel to transit down to the Antarctic sea and stay on station there for a considerable period of time.

With the Antarctic Treaty due for renewal negotiations before 2050, nations with claims on the continent will look to spend more time deployed in the region.

It is not known whether the new OPV will feature an unmanned aerial capability, although Bradshaw said that manned rotary would remain vital in the RNZN, particularly for activities like search and rescue.

The New Zealand government’s White Paper on defence is due to be released shortly and will outline defence procurement and strategy.


https://www.shephardmedia.com/news/imps-news/southern-ocean-focus-planned-rnzn-opv/

PS : mais uma marinha que aos poucos, se vai reforçando !
« Última modificação: Abril 26, 2016, 01:41:44 pm por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #6 em: Abril 26, 2016, 03:01:13 pm »
Já agora em 2010 era esta a planificação: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_New_Zealand_Navy_plans
Citar
Defence White Paper[edit]
The Defence White Paper was released by the New Zealand Government in November 2010.[1] Policy intentions include:

Short term (next five years):

Naval Combat Force: Self-defence upgrade for the existing Anzac class frigates.
Replacement of HMNZS Endeavour. The navy has indicated a desire for a multi role logistics vessel.
Upgrade or replacement of the Kaman SH-2G Super Seasprite.
Replacement of HMNZS Manawanui and HMNZS Resolution with a single Littoral Warfare Support Ship.
Beyond five years

Replacement of the Anzac frigates that will take account of the wider range of naval combat options expected to be available then.
Other proposals

Consider an upgrade of the armament and sensors on Ocean Patrol Craft and Inshore Patrol Craft.



Citar
New Sea Sprite helicopters for New Zealand Navy arrive in Auckland (jan 2015)

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P.S. Ainda a malta fala do armamento dos NPO 2000  ;D ;)
« Última modificação: Abril 26, 2016, 03:03:30 pm por mafets »
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #7 em: Junho 08, 2016, 03:31:43 pm »
New Zealand confirms plans to acquire third OPV with ice-strengthened features

 Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly  08 June 2016


New Zealand's two Otago-class vessels. The country is planning to acquire a third OPV platform. Source: RNZN

Key Points

• New Zealand is planning to acquire a third ice-capable offshore patrol vessel
• Platform will bolster maritime security in waters around New Zealand, South Pacific states

 The New Zealand Ministry of Defence confirmed in a white paper released on 8 June that the country is planning to acquire a third offshore patrol vessel (OPV) to bolster its navy's maritime surveillance and fisheries inspections support capabilities.

 The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) currently relies on a fleet of two 85 m Otago-class OPVs, HMNZS Otago (P 148) and HMNZS Wellington (P 55), for these operations. The vessels were commissioned in February and May 2010 respectively.

 An indication that the service was considering a third OPV was first revealed during a May 2014 talk in Singapore delivered by a senior official from the New Zealand Defence Force (NZDF), as reported by IHS Jane's .

 "We learned that offshore patrol vessels cost a lot less to run [than frigates]," said Lieutenant Commander Owen Gee, who is from the NZDF capabilities branch, at the MilSatCom Asia Pacific 2014 conference. "If acquired, we plan to utilise it in a constabulary role and this releases our frigates for other operations," he added.

 Besides stating that the planned third OPV will feature ice-strengthened features, no further details were given in the 2016 white paper on the platform that the government is looking into. According to IHS Jane's Fighting Ships , the RNZN's existing OPVs can reach a top speed of 22 kt and feature a standard range of 6,000 n miles at 15 kt. The 1,600-tonne ships can accommodate a core crew of 35 and a SH-2G Super Seasprite helicopter on its flight deck.

 Otago and Wellington are deployed by the RNZN in long-range patrol missions around New Zealand, Pacific, and Southern Oceans.

http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?534-RNZN-News/page8

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« Última modificação: Junho 08, 2016, 03:35:36 pm por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #8 em: Julho 01, 2016, 08:56:07 am »
NZDF to test out new missile

Thursday 30 Jun 2016 2:39 p.m.

The New Zealand Defence Force has arrived at Pearl Harbour to take part in an international maritime exercise where it'll test out a new weapon for the first time.
Royal New Zealand Navy frigate Te Kaha and almost 400 defence personnel will join 26 other nations and around 25,000 other defence staff for the biennial Exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC).
The vessel is one of 45 ships and five submarines involved.

As part of the event, the Te Kaha will test launch a Penguin anti-ship missile from the Defence Force's new Seasprite helicopter.


HMNZS Te Kaha (NZ Defence Force)

"This will be a first for the RNZN and will demonstrate that we are a capable military partner," Te Kaha commanding officer Commander Steve Lenik says.
Cdr Lenik says RIMPAC is a good chance for the Defence Force to train across a wide range of activities which it could be asked to do in future coalition operations.
The vessel left Devonport on May 3 to take part in exercises with the HMNZS Endeavour and the Royal Australian Navy to prepare for RIMPAC.
It then left Australian waters with HMAS Canberra earlier this month for Hawaii.


Te Kaha arrives at Pearl Harbour (NZ Defence Force)

RIMPAC started in 1971 and involved the Australian, New Zealand, Canadian, UK and US navies.
New Zealand was a frequent attendee until the ANZUS dispute in the 1980s over the country's nuclear-free stance.
The NZDF took part in an observer role in 2010, but were full participants in 2012 and 2014.

http://www.newshub.co.nz/nznews/nzdf...#ixzz4D7wTPLRw

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« Última modificação: Julho 01, 2016, 09:01:41 am por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #9 em: Julho 18, 2016, 08:20:54 am »
Government spends nearly $500 million on new navy ship

ROSANNA PRICE  Last updated 14:10, July 18 2016
 


The South Korean-built naval tanker will be "ice-strengthened" and "winterised".
A new naval tanker has cost taxpayers almost $500 million but won't get here until 2020.

The Government has approved the purchase of the ship which will be "ice-strengthened" and "winterised" for operations in Antarctica.

Hyundai Heavy Industries, a South Korean company, have been commissioned to build the vessel. The project will cost $493m and was expected to be finished in four years.



 The new Navy vessel will be able to carry helicopters, fuel and bulk goods for New Zealand operations.

 The new ship would replace the 30-year-old HMNZS Endeavour tanker, continuing its job of getting fuel to the navy's and other allied ships, as well as fuel and fresh water to land operations.


http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?534-RNZN-News/page8

Tal qual Nós !!!!
« Última modificação: Julho 18, 2016, 08:26:56 am por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #10 em: Setembro 05, 2016, 03:38:46 pm »
RNZN qualifies SH-2G(I) Super Seasprite helicopter on OPV HMNZS Otago

 Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - IHS Jane's Navy International  05 September 2016


Crew members of HMNZS Otago conduct inflight refuelling with a Super Seasprite SH-2G(I) helicopter. Source: Royal New Zealand Navy


The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) has certified its lead Otago-class offshore patrol vessel (OPV) to embark the service's new Super Seasprite SH-2G(I) naval combat helicopter.

A series of qualification procedures, which culminated in an activity referred to by the navy as an 'Aviation Safety and Readiness Check', were completed in late August onboard HMNZS Otago (P 148) in and around the Hauraki Gulf.

The procedures included winching operations for goods and personnel, inflight refuelling trials, and a series of simulations for various operational emergencies, the navy said.

" Otago will embark a Seasprite for Operation 'Havre' to the Kermedec Islands, which will significantly aid in the transfer of the amount of stores [that] need to be transferred to the [Department of Conservation] station on Raoul Island", said the navy, in reference to the routine resupply tasks undertaken by the RNZN to the remote marine reserve.

The RNZN signed a contract for ten SH-2G(I) helicopters in May 2013 to replace its existing fleet of five older Super Seasprites that have been in service since 2001. The service formally accepted the first three airframes, which feature improved sensor, flight control, and communications systems, in March 2015.

Besides transportation of stores and maritime surveillance duties, the helicopters are also capable of carrying Penguin Mk 2 Mod 7 anti-ship missiles and lightweight torpedoes, giving the Otago-class ships improved offensive capability.

http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?534-RNZN-News/page10

Assim os nossos Viana do Castelo tivessem esta valência e pouparíamos muitos milhares de € em muitas missões de salvamento em que empenhamos, um C130/C295, uma Corveta ou outro Navio e ainda um EH101 para a fase final de evacuação, e já nem falo sobre o último paragrafo deste artigo, capacidade ofensiva de um NPO em Portugal,...... SACRILÉGIO !!!!

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« Última modificação: Setembro 05, 2016, 03:47:16 pm por tenente »
 

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #11 em: Setembro 05, 2016, 03:48:03 pm »
RNZN qualifies SH-2G(I) Super Seasprite helicopter on OPV HMNZS Otago

 Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - IHS Jane's Navy International  05 September 2016


Crew members of HMNZS Otago conduct inflight refuelling with a Super Seasprite SH-2G(I) helicopter. Source: Royal New Zealand Navy


The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) has certified its lead Otago-class offshore patrol vessel (OPV) to embark the service's new Super Seasprite SH-2G(I) naval combat helicopter.

A series of qualification procedures, which culminated in an activity referred to by the navy as an 'Aviation Safety and Readiness Check', were completed in late August onboard HMNZS Otago (P 148) in and around the Hauraki Gulf.

The procedures included winching operations for goods and personnel, inflight refuelling trials, and a series of simulations for various operational emergencies, the navy said.

" Otago will embark a Seasprite for Operation 'Havre' to the Kermedec Islands, which will significantly aid in the transfer of the amount of stores [that] need to be transferred to the [Department of Conservation] station on Raoul Island", said the navy, in reference to the routine resupply tasks undertaken by the RNZN to the remote marine reserve.

The RNZN signed a contract for ten SH-2G(I) helicopters in May 2013 to replace its existing fleet of five older Super Seasprites that have been in service since 2001. The service formally accepted the first three airframes, which feature improved sensor, flight control, and communications systems, in March 2015.

Besides transportation of stores and maritime surveillance duties, the helicopters are also capable of carrying Penguin Mk 2 Mod 7 anti-ship missiles and lightweight torpedoes, giving the Otago-class ships improved offensive capability.

http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?534-RNZN-News/page10

Assim os nossos Viana do Castelo tivessem esta valência e pouparíamos mitos € em muitas missões de salvamento em que empenhamos, um C130/C295, uma Corveta ou outro Navio e ainda um EH101 para a fase final de evacuação !!!!

Abraços
E algures andavam para aí a dizer que estes "helicópteros estavam velhos e não prestavam"...  :o ::)



Cumprimentos
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

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tenente

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #12 em: Setembro 05, 2016, 03:54:49 pm »
RNZN qualifies SH-2G(I) Super Seasprite helicopter on OPV HMNZS Otago

 Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - IHS Jane's Navy International  05 September 2016


Crew members of HMNZS Otago conduct inflight refuelling with a Super Seasprite SH-2G(I) helicopter. Source: Royal New Zealand Navy


The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) has certified its lead Otago-class offshore patrol vessel (OPV) to embark the service's new Super Seasprite SH-2G(I) naval combat helicopter.

A series of qualification procedures, which culminated in an activity referred to by the navy as an 'Aviation Safety and Readiness Check', were completed in late August onboard HMNZS Otago (P 148) in and around the Hauraki Gulf.

The procedures included winching operations for goods and personnel, inflight refuelling trials, and a series of simulations for various operational emergencies, the navy said.

" Otago will embark a Seasprite for Operation 'Havre' to the Kermedec Islands, which will significantly aid in the transfer of the amount of stores [that] need to be transferred to the [Department of Conservation] station on Raoul Island", said the navy, in reference to the routine resupply tasks undertaken by the RNZN to the remote marine reserve.

The RNZN signed a contract for ten SH-2G(I) helicopters in May 2013 to replace its existing fleet of five older Super Seasprites that have been in service since 2001. The service formally accepted the first three airframes, which feature improved sensor, flight control, and communications systems, in March 2015.

Besides transportation of stores and maritime surveillance duties, the helicopters are also capable of carrying Penguin Mk 2 Mod 7 anti-ship missiles and lightweight torpedoes, giving the Otago-class ships improved offensive capability.

http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?534-RNZN-News/page10

Assim os nossos Viana do Castelo tivessem esta valência e pouparíamos mitos € em muitas missões de salvamento em que empenhamos, um C130/C295, uma Corveta ou outro Navio e ainda um EH101 para a fase final de evacuação !!!!

Abraços
E algures andavam para aí a dizer que estes "helicópteros estavam velhos e não prestavam"...  :o ::)



Cumprimentos

No concurso para aquisição dos nossos Helis para a MdG os Seasprite estiveram na corrida com os Lynx.
Os Kiwis estiveram muito bem ao adquirir os dez disponibilizados pela RAN, muito bem mesmo, e agora possuem unidades suficientes para os classe OTAGO, para as ANZAC e para o NPL, só nós andamos de cavalo para burro e a toda a força.

Abraços
 

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mafets

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #13 em: Setembro 05, 2016, 04:04:11 pm »
RNZN qualifies SH-2G(I) Super Seasprite helicopter on OPV HMNZS Otago

 Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - IHS Jane's Navy International  05 September 2016


Crew members of HMNZS Otago conduct inflight refuelling with a Super Seasprite SH-2G(I) helicopter. Source: Royal New Zealand Navy


The Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) has certified its lead Otago-class offshore patrol vessel (OPV) to embark the service's new Super Seasprite SH-2G(I) naval combat helicopter.

A series of qualification procedures, which culminated in an activity referred to by the navy as an 'Aviation Safety and Readiness Check', were completed in late August onboard HMNZS Otago (P 148) in and around the Hauraki Gulf.

The procedures included winching operations for goods and personnel, inflight refuelling trials, and a series of simulations for various operational emergencies, the navy said.

" Otago will embark a Seasprite for Operation 'Havre' to the Kermedec Islands, which will significantly aid in the transfer of the amount of stores [that] need to be transferred to the [Department of Conservation] station on Raoul Island", said the navy, in reference to the routine resupply tasks undertaken by the RNZN to the remote marine reserve.

The RNZN signed a contract for ten SH-2G(I) helicopters in May 2013 to replace its existing fleet of five older Super Seasprites that have been in service since 2001. The service formally accepted the first three airframes, which feature improved sensor, flight control, and communications systems, in March 2015.

Besides transportation of stores and maritime surveillance duties, the helicopters are also capable of carrying Penguin Mk 2 Mod 7 anti-ship missiles and lightweight torpedoes, giving the Otago-class ships improved offensive capability.

http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?534-RNZN-News/page10

Assim os nossos Viana do Castelo tivessem esta valência e pouparíamos mitos € em muitas missões de salvamento em que empenhamos, um C130/C295, uma Corveta ou outro Navio e ainda um EH101 para a fase final de evacuação !!!!

Abraços
E algures andavam para aí a dizer que estes "helicópteros estavam velhos e não prestavam"...  :o ::)

Cumprimentos

No concurso para aquisição dos nossos Helis para a MdG os Seasprite estiveram na corrida com os Lynx.
Os Kiwis estiveram muito bem ao adquirir os dez disponibilizados pela RAN, muito bem mesmo, e agora possuem unidades suficientes para os classe OTAGO, para as ANZAC e para o NPL, só nós andamos de cavalo para burro e a toda a força.

Abraços
Que nada. Estamos a espera da disponibilidade destes que concerteza já serão do agrado dos mais "difíceis". Agora coisas "velhas e obsoletas" ...  ;D 8)


Saudações
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

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tenente

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Re: Royal New Zealand Navy
« Responder #14 em: Setembro 13, 2016, 01:26:08 pm »
NZDF’S New Seasprite Helicopter Off to Kermadecs

 (Source: NZ Defence Force; issued Sept 12, 2016)


One of the New Zealand Defence Force’s new fleet of Seasprite helicopters has joined the Royal New Zealand Navy’s HMNZS Otago on a resupply mission to the remote Kermadec Islands. (NZDF photo)

 One of the Royal New Zealand Air Force’s (RNZAF) newly acquired fleet of Seasprite helicopters will help transport 23 government staff and about seven tonnes of vital equipment and supplies to the remote Kermadec Islands on its first operational mission with an offshore patrol vessel (OPV).

 An SH-2G (I) Seasprite, one of eight that are being introduced into service this year, has joined the Royal New Zealand Navy’s HMNZS Otago on a resupply mission to the Kermadec Islands from 12-23 September.

“Although the newer-model Seasprite was deployed on a frigate for a multilateral exercise in June, their deployment on an OPV is a major step forward in increasing the NZDF’s ability to support other government agencies in New Zealand and in the Pacific region. This also marks a major milestone in the modernisation of the Navy’s fleet,” Captain Dave McEwan, the Acting Maritime Component Commander, said.

 Lieutenant Commander (LTCDR) Andrew Sorensen, the Commanding Officer of Otago, said the ship’s first stop would be at Macauley Island, where the Seasprite will drop off a Department of Conservation (DoC) representative and two dogs trained to detect rats and other pests.

 Otago will travel next to Raoul Island, to resupply the DoC outpost there. About seven tonnes of goods, including food supplies, general equipment and a light utility vehicle, will be flown to the island in underslung loads.

“The NZDF provides logistical support to other government agencies and the resupply operation to the Kermadecs is a good example of that,” LTCDR Sorensen said.

 National Maritime Coordination Centre manager Kevin Arlidge said the Seasprite’s deployment with an offshore patrol vessel would allow them to reach more inaccessible and remote parts of the Kermadecs and would widen the scope of the NZDF’s work in support of DoC and GNS Science.

 Fourteen DoC staff, including mechanics, builders and specialists involved in the agency’s weed-eradication programme, will be flown from the ship to Raoul Island by the Seasprite.

 Otago is also transporting three MetService personnel, who will carry out routine maintenance work on the automatic weather station on the island, two electronic technicians and three commercial divers from GNS Science, who will check the tsunami gauges, seismograph and Global Positioning System equipment, and a volcano chemist, who will check the volcano and crater lakes for seismic activity.

“The tsunami gauges are the first line of defence against tsunamis and are vital for public safety in New Zealand,” GNS Science volcanologist Brad Scott said. “The seismograph and GPS help GNS monitor for large earthquakes and submarine volcanic eruptions. So without NZDF support, we may not be able to keep this going.”

MetService staff will also install a lightning detection sensor on the island to serve as an early detection and warning system to mitigate against lightning hazards.

É exactamente como cá, os nossos OPV's tem essa valência de poderem embarcar e operar um heli para ajudar as populações em casos de necessidade. :G-beer2: :G-beer2: :G-beer2: :G-beer2:

Abraços
« Última modificação: Setembro 13, 2016, 01:40:20 pm por tenente »
 

 

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