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Normando

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Marines with helicopter shortage
« Responder #75 em: Agosto 22, 2005, 02:32:39 am »
http://www.newsobserver.com/news/ncwire ... 9401c.html :

N.C. aircraft mechanics help Marines with helicopter shortage

The Associated Press

CHERRY POINT MARINE CORPS AIR STATION, N.C. - The Marine Corps is coping with a shortage of heavy cargo helicopters by dusting off choppers that have been mothballed in the Arizona desert for a decade and retrofitting them for service.

Civilian maintenance workers at the Naval Air Depot at the Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station this week will start cleaning and updating three shelved Navy MH-53E Sea Dragons. It could take 20 months to transform them into the Marine version of the aircraft, the Super Stallion.

The Marines have been forced into taking the extraordinary step because they have only 150 of their only heavy-lift workhorses left in their fleet. Six Super Stallions have been destroyed in crashes since 2001 and the rest are logging long hours in the air in war zones in Iraq and Afghanistan.

"They're coasting on legacy fleets," said Richard Aboulafia, an analyst with the Teal Group, an aerospace and defense consulting company in Fairfax, Va. "They planned to coast indefinitely ... and it would have worked just fine if it hadn't been for Afghanistan and Iraq."

The Super Stallion can carry up to 55 Marines long distances and can use slings to transport heavy equipment such as Humvees or even small armored vehicles.

A replacement helicopter, designated the CH-53X, is in the works but it will probably be at least a decade before the new choppers are deployed, said John Milliman, a helicopter acquisition programs spokesman at Patuxent River Marine Air Station in Maryland. The problem is that current estimates are that the Marines will have to start parking about 15 Super Stallions a year in 2010 as the choppers reach the end of their service lives.

That means the Marine Corps' fleet of heavy lift helicopters will dwindle for about five years before replacements start coming into service.

"We will cover it somehow. I know we've got great minds working on it." Milliman said.

Aboulafia also blames the soaring costs of the long-troubled V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor development program for the failure to replace the Super Stallions sooner.

The Osprey was never intended to replace the Super Stallion. It carries fewer troops and less cargo, and it's planned as the replacement for the Marine Corps' smaller CH-46 chopper.

Yet the Osprey has been in development since 1983, a process marred by two crashes in 2000 that killed 23 Marines and a scandal over falsified maintenance records. The nearby New River Marine Corps Air Station is home to the only Marine squadron that is testing Ospreys.

The Marines have spent $13.4 billion on the Osprey, said Ward Carroll, a spokesman for the program. They have spent or obligated $111.8 million for the replacement for the Super Stallion, Milliman said.

Marine Corps officials thought buying other aircraft would divert money from the Osprey long seen by the Marines as their most important aircraft program, Aboulafia said. A new heavy-lift chopper also could reduce the need for the vulnerable Osprey in the eyes of budget makers in Washington, he said.

Milliman said the Osprey's problems have made it a convenient target for critics.

At least part of the solution to the Super Stallion shortage, Milliman said, could involve the 14 other rebuildable helicopters sitting in Arizona's Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center. The site, picked for the low rainfall and humidity and the alkaline soil that holds corrosion to a minimum, is a combination junkyard and storage lot for military and Coast Guard aircraft that can be brought back into U.S. service or sold to allies.

Last week, three dark-gray Sea Dragons sat on a concrete apron outside the Cherry Point depot's hangars after arriving from Arizona. Their rotor blades, exterior fuel tanks and various hatches were detached. Their rear loading ramps bared the interiors, which contained larger parts such as tail fins.

The depot's civilian workers perform major maintenance on helicopters for the Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps as well, as the Marines' vertical takeoff Harrier jets and the presidential helicopter fleet. They are adept at maintaining aircraft that have been out of production for decades by building new parts or devising techniques to replace components.

The reconditioning task on the Sea Dragons is so unusual that the depot workers will start with just one aircraft this week and build a body of experience before starting on the other two, said Dan Anthony, who schedules work on the aircraft.

The depot expects to put all three helicopters back in service in top condition for $15 million, operations director Lt. Col. A.P. Camele said. That compares with the $105 million estimated cost for each Osprey or the $30 million the last new Super Stallions cost when production ended in 1999.

The refurbished helicopters should last as long as others in the fleet with the same hours. One has about half its service life left, the others about one-third.
"If you don't have losses, you're not doing enough" - Rear Admiral Richard K. Turner
 

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JLRC

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« Responder #76 em: Setembro 05, 2005, 08:51:32 pm »
U.S. Sub Collides With Cargo Ship

Associated Press  |  September 05, 2005

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates - A U.S. Navy submarine collided early Monday with a Turkish merchant ship in the Gulf, the U.S. Navy reported. No one was hurt on either vessel.

The USS Philadelphia was traveling on the surface of the Gulf when it hit the Turkish-flagged M/V Yaso Aysen, a cargo ship, at around 2 a.m. local time, the U.S. Navy 5th Fleet Headquarters in Bahrain reported in a statement.

No sailors or merchant seamen were injured, the Navy said.

The Philadelphia was conducting surface operations on its way to Bahrain for a scheduled port visit, the Navy said.

The submarine continued to Bahrain where inspectors will check it for damage. There were no immediate reports of damage to the Turkish ship.

The Navy statement did not say exactly where the collision took place.

The Philadelphia is part of a fleet of U.S. and allied navy vessels patrolling the Gulf, conducting what are called "maritime security operations" against weapons and drug smuggling.
 

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Rui Elias

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« Responder #77 em: Setembro 06, 2005, 09:33:25 am »
Algum dos colegas daqui poderá confirmar ou ter mais informações sobre notícia que anda a correr em certos meios de que os EUA estão na disposição de oferecer ao Paquistão a possibilidade de aquisição de 2 OHP Long Hull?

Se se confirmar é estranho, já que tinha lido em tempos que para já, os EUA apenas tinham para ceder OHP's short hull, semelhantes às nossas FFG12 e FFG14 que chegarão (esperemos) para o ano de 2006.
 

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JLRC

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« Responder #78 em: Setembro 25, 2005, 06:35:21 pm »
DD(X) Advanced Gun System Demonstrates Sustained Rate of Fire
 
 
(Source: US Naval Sea Systems Command; issued Sept. 21, 2005)
 
 
 WASHINGTON --- The DD(X) National Team and the Navy successfully conducted a rate of fire test for the 155 mm Advanced Gun System (AGS) on Aug. 31. Preliminary results indicate the gun and magazine-handling equipment met or exceeded requirements.  
 
As the primary battery for DD(X), the fully automated AGS is designed to fire up to 10 precision-guided munitions per minute at ranges up to 83 nautical miles. The test took place on the AGS Land Based Test Site at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground, Utah.  
 
“The combination of a 155mm rapid fire gun and long-range, precision munitions will provide DD(X) with a potent strike weapon that will quickly create lethal effects ashore,” said Rear Adm. Charles Goddard, the DD(X) program manager. “AGS and the Long-Range Land Attack Projectile (LRLAP) are meeting or exceeding our expectations, and the success of our test program is testament to the effort of the National Team and U.S. Government personnel. The Army has been an excellent host at Dugway.”  
 
The test successfully demonstrated a sustained maximum rate of fire of at least ten rounds per minute in eight round bursts, and unloaded eight complete rounds from a pallet in 45 seconds or less. The event also tested a sustained firing capability and reliability by demonstrating the AGS Engineering Development Model gun and magazine are capable of unloading several pallets of ammunition.  
 
BAE Systems conducted the test event under subcontract with the DD(X) design agent Northrop Grumman Ship Systems.  
 
DD(X) is the Navy’s next-generation destroyer, tailored for land attack and inland support of joint and coalition forces. Each DD(X) will be armed with two advanced guns and an expandable magazine that can hold up to 920 rounds. AGS has a 10-meter barrel and is specifically designed to fire LRLAP, which uses a rocket motor, canards, and a Global Positioning Satellite guidance system, to maneuver in flight.  
 
During testing this year off of Pt. Mugu, Calif., LRLAP has made successful guided flights up to a world-record distance of 63 nautical miles and has demonstrated accuracy to within meters of the intended target. With an increased rate of fire combined with LRLAP’s precision long-range strike capability, AGS provides three times the fires coverage of today’s shipboard guns.  
 
-ends-
 

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Marauder

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« Responder #79 em: Agosto 02, 2006, 11:18:19 am »
 

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Marauder

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« Responder #80 em: Agosto 03, 2006, 09:36:51 am »
Marinha e DARPA juntas no desenvolvimento de novo submarino - Projecto Tango Bravo, com metade do tamanho dos Virginia
http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/200 ... x.php#more
 

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Marauder

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« Responder #81 em: Agosto 04, 2006, 05:54:51 pm »
Futuros porta-aviões mais pequenos e compactos?
http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htnava ... 60728.aspx
 

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« Responder #82 em: Agosto 04, 2006, 08:22:23 pm »
Marines vão ter novo veiculo de assalto anfíbio
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Marines to get new landing vehicles

The military acquisition agency said yesterday it will soon produce additional amphibious landing vehicles to replace the Marine's outdated landing equipment.

The Defense Acquisition Program Administration said it has finalized production contracts for the new amphibious armored personnel carriers with Samsung Techwin Co., one of Korea's leading defense firms, and the world's fourth-largest defense contractor BAE Systems plc.

The domestically produced equipment will completely replace the Marine's U.S.-made LAV amphibious vehicles by 2010, the DAPA said. About $150 million will be spent on the project until the target year, it said.

The military has been developing the new amphibious vehicle since 1998 in partnership with U.K.-based BAE Systems. Under the acquisition project, codenamed KAAV, 124 units have been deployed for landing missions.

The KAAV vehicle is used for landing missions from sea and mechanized troop-maneuvering missions on land. It is equipped with K-4 and K-6 machine guns, and carries 24 personnel.

The 23-ton tracked armor runs at a maximum 72 kilometers per hour on land and 13 kilometers in the sea.



koreaherald.co.kr
 

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luis filipe silva

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« Responder #83 em: Setembro 27, 2006, 03:34:20 am »
Lançamento do LHD 8 uss Makin Island.
http://www.makin-island.navy.mil/default.htm

Lançamento do 1º Littoral Combat Ship.

Navy Christens Littoral Combat Ship Freedom


(Source: US Navy; issued Sept. 21, 2006)

The U.S. Navy will christen Freedom, the first Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) at 10 a.m. CDT on Saturday, Sept. 23, during a ceremony at Marinette Marine Corp. in Marinette, Wis.

The future USS Freedom acknowledges the enduring foundation of our nation and honors American communities from coast to coast which bear the name Freedom. States having towns named Freedom include California, Indiana, Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Wyoming. The 378-foot Freedom will be the first U.S. Navy ship to carry this class designation.

Birgit Smith will serve as ship’s sponsor. She is the widow of Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul Ray Smith, who was killed in action in Operation Iraqi Freedom and was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. The ceremony will be highlighted by Smith breaking a bottle of champagne across the bow to formally christen the ship, which is a time-honored Navy tradition. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Mullen will deliver the principal address at the ceremony.

A fast, agile, and high-technology surface combatant, Freedom will act as a platform for launch and recovery of manned and unmanned vehicles. Its modular design will support interchangeable mission packages, allowing the ship to be reconfigured for antisubmarine warfare, mine warfare, or surface warfare missions on an as-needed basis. The LCS will be able to swap out mission packages pierside in a matter of hours, adapting as the tactical situation demands. These ships will also feature advanced networking capability to share tactical information with other Navy aircraft, ships, submarines and joint units.

Freedom is the first of two LCS seaframes being produced. Freedom is an innovative combatant designed to operate quickly in shallow water environments to counter challenging threats in coastal regions, specifically mines, submarines and fast surface craft. The LCS is capable of speeds in excess of 40 knots and can operate in water less than 20 feet deep.

Freedom will be manned by one of two rotational crews, blue and gold, similar to the rotational crews assigned to Trident submarines. The crews will be augmented by one of three mission package crews during focused mission assignments. The blue crew commanding officer is Cmdr. Donald Gabrielson, who was born in northern Minnesota and graduated from the U.S. Navy Academy in 1989. The gold crew commanding officer is Cmdr. Michael Doran, who was born in Harrisonville, Mo., and graduated from Villanova University in 1989. Upon the ship’s commissioning in 2007, Freedom will be home-ported at Naval Station San Diego, Calif.

In May 2004, the Department of Defense awarded both Lockheed Martin Corp., Maritime Systems & Sensors in Moorestown, N.J., and General Dynamics - Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine, separate contract options for final system design, with options for detail design and construction of up to two flight 0 LCS ships.

In December 2004, the Navy awarded Lockheed Martin Corp. the contract for detail design and construction of the first LCS. Lockheed Martin’s teammates include Gibbs & Cox in Arlington, Va.; Marinette Marine Corp. in Marinette, Wis., where the ship is being built; and Bollinger Shipyards in Lockport, La.
-----------------------------
saudações:
Luis Filipe Silva
 

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luis filipe silva

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« Responder #84 em: Setembro 27, 2006, 03:46:29 am »
-----------------------------
saudações:
Luis Filipe Silva
 

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Cabeça de Martelo

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« Responder #85 em: Setembro 27, 2006, 10:12:58 am »
Citação de: "Marauder"
Marines vão ter novo veiculo de assalto anfíbio
Citar
Marines to get new landing vehicles

The military acquisition agency said yesterday it will soon produce additional amphibious landing vehicles to replace the Marine's outdated landing equipment.

The Defense Acquisition Program Administration said it has finalized production contracts for the new amphibious armored personnel carriers with Samsung Techwin Co., one of Korea's leading defense firms, and the world's fourth-largest defense contractor BAE Systems plc.

The domestically produced equipment will completely replace the Marine's U.S.-made LAV amphibious vehicles by 2010, the DAPA said. About $150 million will be spent on the project until the target year, it said.

The military has been developing the new amphibious vehicle since 1998 in partnership with U.K.-based BAE Systems. Under the acquisition project, codenamed KAAV, 124 units have been deployed for landing missions.

The KAAV vehicle is used for landing missions from sea and mechanized troop-maneuvering missions on land. It is equipped with K-4 and K-6 machine guns, and carries 24 personnel.

The 23-ton tracked armor runs at a maximum 72 kilometers per hour on land and 13 kilometers in the sea.


koreaherald.co.kr


Eu vi um video desse veiculo, não me lembro muito bem onde foi. Tenho que dizer que é muito superior ao veiculo que vai substituir. Comporta-se como barco em água (é capaz de atingis velocidades alucinantes para um anfibio) e é um veiculo perfeitamente capaz em terra. É sem dúvida um excelente projecto.
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

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P44

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« Responder #86 em: Setembro 29, 2006, 01:57:40 pm »
Citação de: "Rui Elias"
Algum dos colegas daqui poderá confirmar ou ter mais informações sobre notícia que anda a correr em certos meios de que os EUA estão na disposição de oferecer ao Paquistão a possibilidade de aquisição de 2 OHP Long Hull?

Se se confirmar é estranho, já que tinha lido em tempos que para já, os EUA apenas tinham para ceder OHP's short hull, semelhantes às nossas FFG12 e FFG14 que chegarão (esperemos) para o ano de 2006.


as duas únicas short-hull ainda em posse dos EUA são precisamente as FFGs 12 e 14.

Todas as outras short-hull foram já cedidas a outras Marinhas.

============================================


Leveraging America's Aircraft Carrier Capabilities:
 
 Source: The Rand Corporation
 
 Ref: ISBN: 0-8330-3922-9
 
 Released Sept. 8, 2006
 
 120 pages in PDF format  
 
As the United States seeks ways to stretch its defense dollars, it is highly likely that policymakers will increase their reliance on aircraft carriers, using them more often and in more situations than they have in the past, especially if the vessels have the additional capabilities to respond appropriately.  
The current and expected use of aircraft carriers led the United States Navy in fall 2004 to commission RAND to explore new and nontraditional ways that the United States might be able to employ aircraft carriers in pursuit of traditional and emerging military and homeland defense missions. Over six months, RAND created and convened two Concept Options Groups (COGs) to explore possible nontraditional roles for aircraft carriers. One COG explored and identified new ways that aircraft carriers could be used in combat operations; the second COG examined ways that the vessels could be used in noncombat, homeland security missions or to help the nation recover from terrorist attacks or natural disasters in U.S. territories.  
Among the combat recommendations to come from the COG insights are that abilities need to be enhanced to reconfigure carrier air wings; among noncombat recommendations are that the availability of nonready carriers to respond to unforeseen crises needs to be improved. This monograph summarizes the activities, findings, and recommendations of both carrier COGs. It should be of special interest to the Navy and to uniformed and civilian decisionmakers with responsibilities related to naval and carrier operations, maritime domain awareness, or homeland security.  
 
 
 (PDF format)
texto completo

Fonte
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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SSK

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« Responder #87 em: Maio 31, 2007, 08:14:14 pm »
Citar
Say 'Bye, Bye' in Swedish!
Norman Polmar | May 25, 2007
The Swedish Navy submarine Gotland, which has worked with U.S. naval forces off San Diego since June 2005, will soon be returning to Sweden. The U.S. Navy had “leased” the submarine -- the Swedes note that only actual expenses have been charged -- to help train U.S. anti-submarine forces to cope with modern, non-nuclear submarines.

The Gotland is a modern submarine, completed in 1996, with Air-Independent Propulsion (AIP) in which two Stirling 75-kilowatt external combustion engines propel the craft and/or charge her batteries without the need to operate (noisy) diesel engines. Submarines with various forms of AIP are being acquired by several countries.

Late in June the Gotland will be loaded aboard a heavy-lift ship and returned to Sweden. While she was operating from San Diego the Gotland was manned by crews that rotated on a regular basis by air from Sweden. Her crew included female officers and sailors. The submarine provided more than 250 underway days during the two years.

While details of the Gotland’s performance against U.S. fleet units is classified, earlier Lieutenant Commander Jan Westas, captain of the Gotland’s Blue Crew, said that U.S. ASW forces “have had a very difficult time finding us.”

Unofficial reports cite a total failure of U.S. carrier battle groups to locate the submarine until the Gotlandsignaled her position.

Negotiations are now underway with Chile to provide a diesel-electric submarine to operate from San Diego for 90- to 120-day periods. On the Atlantic coast, Colombia and Peru have been sending submarines north for sustained ASW training, normally operating out of Mayport, Florida, for periods up to 180 days.  Currently negotiations are underway to assign a Brazilian submarine to the Atlantic Fleet for sustained periods for ASW training.

However, these submarines are not AIP craft, hence they must use their diesel engines (snorkel) on a regular basis, making them vulnerable to detection by U.S. ASW forces.  Most experts agree that the current U.S. anti-submarine forces cannot cope with advanced AIP-type submarines.


Cuidado que os russos também já têm AIP!!! :?
"Ele é invisível, livre de movimentos, de construção simples e barato. poderoso elemento de defesa, perigosíssimo para o adversário e seguro para quem dele se servir"
1º Ten Fontes Pereira de Melo
 

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Duarte

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« Responder #88 em: Maio 31, 2007, 08:24:08 pm »
Citação de: "SSK"
Citar
Say 'Bye, Bye' in Swedish!
Norman Polmar | May 25, 2007
The Swedish Navy submarine Gotland, which has worked with U.S. naval forces off San Diego since June 2005, will soon be returning to Sweden. The U.S. Navy had “leased” the submarine -- the Swedes note that only actual expenses have been charged -- to help train U.S. anti-submarine forces to cope with modern, non-nuclear submarines.

The Gotland is a modern submarine, completed in 1996, with Air-Independent Propulsion (AIP) in which two Stirling 75-kilowatt external combustion engines propel the craft and/or charge her batteries without the need to operate (noisy) diesel engines. Submarines with various forms of AIP are being acquired by several countries.

Late in June the Gotland will be loaded aboard a heavy-lift ship and returned to Sweden. While she was operating from San Diego the Gotland was manned by crews that rotated on a regular basis by air from Sweden. Her crew included female officers and sailors. The submarine provided more than 250 underway days during the two years.

While details of the Gotland’s performance against U.S. fleet units is classified, earlier Lieutenant Commander Jan Westas, captain of the Gotland’s Blue Crew, said that U.S. ASW forces “have had a very difficult time finding us.”

Unofficial reports cite a total failure of U.S. carrier battle groups to locate the submarine until the Gotlandsignaled her position.

Negotiations are now underway with Chile to provide a diesel-electric submarine to operate from San Diego for 90- to 120-day periods. On the Atlantic coast, Colombia and Peru have been sending submarines north for sustained ASW training, normally operating out of Mayport, Florida, for periods up to 180 days.  Currently negotiations are underway to assign a Brazilian submarine to the Atlantic Fleet for sustained periods for ASW training.

However, these submarines are not AIP craft, hence they must use their diesel engines (snorkel) on a regular basis, making them vulnerable to detection by U.S. ASW forces.  Most experts agree that the current U.S. anti-submarine forces cannot cope with advanced AIP-type submarines.



Isto para mim só realça o verdadeiro valor dissuasão dos subs com AIP.
Espero que se realize a opção por um terceiro sub.
__
«Os chamados partidos políticos, por definição e exigências da sua vida própria, não representam nem podem servir a unidade nacional» Salazar
 

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SSK

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« Responder #89 em: Maio 31, 2007, 08:25:52 pm »
Citar
Espero que se realize a opção por um terceiro sub.

Esqueça, a data já "espilrou"... :cry:  :cry:
"Ele é invisível, livre de movimentos, de construção simples e barato. poderoso elemento de defesa, perigosíssimo para o adversário e seguro para quem dele se servir"
1º Ten Fontes Pereira de Melo
 

 

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