U. S. Navy

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« Responder #60 em: Abril 06, 2005, 10:16:59 pm »
Modernized Jayhawk Revised USCG Deepwater Plan  
 
 
(Source: Sikorsky Aircraft Corp.; issued April 5, 2005)
 
 
 STRATFORD, Conn. --- The United States Coast Guard will upgrade and modernize its current Sikorsky HH-60J Jayhawk helicopter fleet to meet its expanded Homeland Defense responsibilities, according to the revised Deepwater Implementation Plan recently presented to Congress.  
 
Deepwater outlines the USCG’s long-range acquisition strategy across its entire inventory of cutters and aircraft to provide improved systems for command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) and innovative logistics support.  
 
An earlier version of Deepwater called for the purchase of a new and smaller aircraft to replace the Jayhawk as the Coast Guard’s Medium Range Recovery (MMR) Helicopter. In light of the USCG’s post 9-11 requirements, Deepwater now forgoes the new aircraft and calls for upgrading the current HH-60J Jayhawk.  
 
The newly-designated MH-60T will be fitted with a new state-of-the-art cockpit, new search /weather radar and Electro-Optics/IR units, upgraded engines and airframe, and an Airborne Use of Force Package to provide more firepower and protection from small arms fire.  
 
The Jayhawk is a variant of the Sikorsky H-60 product line currently used by all five branches of the US military along with 25 governments across the world.  
 
“We are honored that the Coast Guard has shown confidence in the JAYHAWK to help meet the nation’s Homeland Defense requirements,” said Joseph Haddock, Sikorsky Vice President for Government Business Development. “The Jayhawk is a rugged, proven, versatile multi-mission military aircraft well suited to the task.”  
 
Sikorsky Aircraft delivered 42 HH-60Js to the Coast Guard for search and rescue (SAR), offshore law enforcement, drug interdiction, aids to navigation and environmental protection.  
 
Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, based in Stratford, Conn., is a world leader in helicopter design, manufacturing and service. Sikorsky is a subsidiary of United Technologies Corporation, of Hartford, Conn., which provides a broad range of high-technology products and support services to the aerospace and building systems industries.  
 
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« Responder #61 em: Abril 12, 2005, 11:01:51 pm »
Northrop Grumman Successfully Launches Virginia-Class Submarine
 
 
(Source: Northrop Grumman Corp.; issued April 11, 2005)
 
 
 NEWPORT NEWS, VA --- Northrop Grumman Corporation reached a construction milestone on April 9 by launching the second Virginia-class submarine, Texas (SSN 775). This was the company's first submarine launching in nearly a decade.  
 
Northrop Grumman's Newport News sector is teamed with General Dynamics Electric Boat to build the first 10 ships of the Virginia class. Current plans call for 30 Virginia-class submarines in the fleet. The first ship of the class, the USS Virginia (SSN 774) was delivered on Oct. 12, 2004. Virginia is the first major combatant delivered to the U.S. Navy that was designed with the post-Cold War security environment in mind.  
 
Becky Stewart, vice president of submarine programs for Northrop Grumman Newport News, was among 150 employees and 40 sailors who participated in the launch. “Watching Texas take her first journey into the water was an exciting event for all of the people who have been involved in constructing the ship,” Stewart said. “It's a milestone that the entire team, shipbuilders and crew members, have been working hard to achieve. This crucial accomplishment is a testament to the great talent, skill and dedication of our employees and the Texas crew.”  
 
Preparations for the launch began April 6 when the sector's floating dry dock, a transportable dock used to launch and dock ships, moved into position behind the Texas. The following morning a transfer car system raised the 7,800-ton submarine off its keel blocks and transported it 500 feet to the floating dry dock. On April 8, the floating dry dock, with Texas on board, moved into launch position and shipyard employees and Texas crew members completed final launch preparations. On April 9 the floating dry dock began to slowly fill with water and after seven hours, Northrop Grumman Newport News successfully launched Texas into the James River. Once in the water, tugboats moved Texas to the shipyard's submarine pier where final outfitting and testing will take place.  
 
Captain John Litherland, Prospective Commanding Officer of the Pre-Commissioning Unit Texas, rode in Texas' sail as it touched water for the first time. “It's great to finally get the Texas into the water, her natural environment,” said Litherland. “My crew and I are excited about achieving this significant milestone, and look forward to continuing our joint efforts with the men and women of Northrop Grumman Newport News to complete the construction and testing of this great ship and take her to sea.”  
 
Texas is the second ship of the Virginia class. With improved stealth, sophisticated surveillance capabilities and special warfare enhancements, it will provide undersea supremacy well into the 21st century.  
 
The keel for Texas was laid on July 12, 2002 and the ship was christened on July 31, 2004. First Lady Laura Bush is the ship's sponsor and attended both ceremonies. The ship is scheduled to be delivered in 2006.  
 
Northrop Grumman Newport News, headquartered in Newport News, Va., is the nation's sole designer, builder and refueler of nuclear-powered aircraft carriers and one of only two companies capable of designing and building nuclear-powered submarines. Newport News also provides after-market services for a wide array of naval and commercial vessels. The Newport News sector employs about 19,000 people.  
 
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« Responder #62 em: Abril 18, 2005, 03:06:57 pm »
Pentagon Contract Announcement
 
 
(Source: US Department of Defense; issued April 15, 2005)
 
 
 Titan Corp. Unidyne Group, Norfolk, Va., is being awarded a $26,401,635 firm-fixed-price contract for five Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) craft.  
 
The LCAC is an essential element within the current and future United States Navy/Marine Corp amphibious warfare triad that provides heavy lift capability. The LCAC SLEP will extend service life from twenty to thirty years. Modifications include repair/refurbishment of the hull, main engine upgrades, installation of a new skirt system and upgrades to the communication navigation systems.  
 
Work will be performed in Camp Pendleton, Calif. (80 percent) and Norfolk, Va.(20 percent), and is expected to be completed by August 2007. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The contact was competitively awarded and advertised via the Navy Electronic Commerce on Line website, with three offers received.  
 
The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.  
 
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« Responder #63 em: Abril 22, 2005, 03:51:02 pm »
Boeing Debuts Super Hornet with Advanced Radar System  
 
 
(Source: Boeing Co.; issued Apr. 21, 2005)
 
 
 ST. LOUIS --- Boeing will debut the F/A-18E/F Block II Super Hornet equipped with the revolutionary APG-79 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar system at a ceremony at Boeing's St. Louis facilities today.  
 
The AESA radar will provide Super Hornets with significantly improved reliability, situational awareness, target detection and tracking range.  
 
"AESA will revolutionize the Super Hornet's warfighting capability," said Capt. Donald "BD" Gaddis, the F/A-18/EA-18G program manager for the U.S. Navy. "This will dramatically enhance the force commander's ability to prosecute targets, support our troops and protect our facilities and ships."  
 
Featuring a fixed array with an agile beam that scans near the speed of light, the AESA will, for the first time, enable aircrews to conduct simultaneous air-to-air and air-to-surface operations with independent dual-cockpit operation. In air-to-air mode, the radar allows targets to be engaged at very long ranges, permitting weapons launch at maximum range and enhancing warfighter survivability and lethality. The system also offers high-resolution ground mapping at long standoff ranges for air-to-surface tracking.  
 
"The AESA-equipped Super Hornet represents a quantum leap in operational technology and capability," said Chris Chadwick, Boeing vice president for F/A-18 programs. "With the integration of the APG-79 radar, the Super Hornet today has unsurpassed precision strike capability and situational awareness."  
 
This milestone marks the latest step in the block upgrades designed into the Super Hornet. This method of procuring weapons systems ensures the Navy has the latest technology to continuously improve the aircraft's capabilities for today's battlefield.  
 
The aircraft will be used as part of the AESA radar flight test program prior to entering Operational Evaluation (OPEVAL) in 2006.  
 
The AESA radar, built by the Raytheon Corporation of El Segundo, Calif., is part of the F/A-18E/F Block II upgrade, which includes integration of advanced mission computers, high speed data network, cockpit controls and displays, environmental control system upgrade and forward fuselage affordability improvements. It works with several existing elements of the weapon system, such as the stores management system, the gun director, and AIM-120 and AIM-9 missiles, to enhance the lethality, survivability and affordability of the F/A-18E/F. The AESA radar and the Block II upgrades are being delivered under two multiyear contracts, providing the Navy increasing capability at a decreasing price.  
 
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« Responder #64 em: Abril 25, 2005, 01:52:23 pm »
UH-1Ys to Be Built New Starting in 06  
 
 
(Source: US Naval Air Systems Command; issued April 22, 2005)
 
 
 NAVAIR PATUXENT RIVER, MD --- The UH-1Y Huey light utility helicopter, part of the Marine Corps' H-1 Upgrades program, was approved April 15 by the Defense Department acquisition chief to be built as new helicopters rather than be remanufactured from UH-1N's currently in use.  
 
The Honorable Michael Wynne, undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, signed the Acquisition Decision Memorandum that will provide new-built UH-1Y's to the Marine Corps starting in 2008 as part of the third lot of low-rate initial production aircraft.  
 
"A new-build UH-1Y better meets the pressing littoral warfare needs of the Marine Corps," stated Col. Keith Birkholz, the H-1 program manager. "Both in today's battle space and for tomorrow's requirements. This gives us the acquisition strategy to give it to them."  
 
Program officials estimate production costs for building the helicopters new to add approximately $100,000 per aircraft, and non-recurring engineering costs to add approximately $8.1 million, to the program for a total increase of $17.4 million for the 90 UH-1Ys.  
 
Per the President's 2005 budget, the H-1 Upgrades total program cost is estimated to be approximately $5.5 billion.  
 
Although the H-1 Upgrades program originally planned to remanufacture 180 AH-1W Super Cobras and 100 UH-1N Hueys into the 84 percent identical AH-1Z/UH-1Y configuration, the UH-1N fleet has subsequently experienced a surge in operational tempo that is not expected to abate in the near term. Coupled with the average age and attrition rate of the aircraft, as well as the marginal cost difference between a remanufactured UH-1Y and a new-build UH-1Y, the program concluded, and DoD acquisition leadership agreed, that building UH-1Ys new better supports the needs of the Marine Corps.  
 
With the current size and availability of the UH-1N fleet, having a number of them out of the fleet for two years to accommodate the remanufacture process severely and adversely impacts the Marine Corps' speed, persistence, precision and reach in conducting expeditionary maneuver warfare in support of the Global War on Terrorism and other operations around the globe.  
 
Program officials are currently studying the feasibility and cost of also building the AH-1Z's new. A date for that decision is yet to be determined.  
 
Currently, 10 UH-1Y and six AH-1Z aircraft are in production at Bell Helicopter's production facilities in Fort Worth and Amarillo, Texas. By 2014, the Marine Corps will have procured 100 UH-1Y Hueys and 180 AH-1Z Super Cobras.  
 
The H-1 Upgrades program to date has achieved approximately 2,800 flight test hours since Dec. 7, 2000. One of the test AH-1Zs recently flew to Yuma, Ariz., where it is currently testing weapons accuracy. The program is scheduled to begin its final operational evaluation later this year for both the UH-1Y and AH-1Z aircraft.  
 
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Millenium Gun
« Responder #65 em: Maio 05, 2005, 10:18:43 pm »
U.S. Navy Completes Initial Testing of Lockheed Martin Naval Gun
 
 
(Source: Lockheed Martin ; issued May 3, 2005)
 
 
 AKRON, Ohio --- The U.S. Navy recently completed initial testing of Lockheed Martin's Millennium Gun as part of its effort to validate and qualify new naval cannon technology for fleet self protection.  
 
The gun's capabilities -- including its high rate of fire and air-bursting Advanced Hit Efficiency And Destruction (AHEAD) ammunition - were evaluated during two weeks of testing. The Millennium Gun is a multi-mission, close-in weapon system capable of engaging multiple fast-attack surface craft and near- shore land targets in littoral and riverine waters, as well as defending against anti-ship missiles and aircraft.  
 
The U.S. Navy-funded ground testing familiarized Navy personnel on the system and validated the AHEAD lethality at various target ranges. Lockheed Martin supplied the gun system and technical assistance for this testing. The gun system will continue testing and qualifications next year with at-sea tests that will validate the system's capability against multiple targets in various sea states.  
 
"The U.S. Navy recognizes that force protection against multiple small craft and unmanned air vehicle threats is an essential mission capability in the modern asymmetric warfare environment," said John Wojnar, director of Business Development for Lockheed Martin's Akron facility. "These test results will prove that the high rate of fire combined with accurately fused airbursting ammunition provides the needed capability for ship self protection. The Millennium Gun is an effective inner-layer defense that extends ship self-protection to ranges greater than any other close-in weapon system."  
 
The Millennium Gun fires 35-mm ammunition, including the AHEAD round, at 1,000 rounds per minute. Each AHEAD dispenses 152 subprojectiles that form a cone-shaped pattern to destroy a target's control surfaces, seeker and other vital components as it moves through this lethal cloud. The Millennium Gun is equipped with a low-cost, unmanned, remotely controlled gun mount and is compatible with modern and legacy sensor and fire control systems. Designed as a modular system without through-deck penetration, the Millennium Gun can be fitted on a number of ship classes, and is especially well suited for smaller combatant and patrol ships.  
 
Lockheed Martin is the U.S. licensee to Oerlikon Contraves for sale and manufacture of the gun systems. Oerlikon Contraves is part of Rheinmetall DeTec, an established military products company. It specializes in land and naval air defense systems and medium-caliber guns and ammunition. It has delivered over 3,000 gun systems and more than 35 countries now use its products.  
 
Headquartered in Bethesda, MD, Lockheed Martin employs about 130,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture and integration of advanced technology systems, products and services.  
 
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« Responder #66 em: Maio 10, 2005, 03:16:18 pm »
Navy's First Littoral Combat Ship Honors Freedom  
 
 
(Source: US Department of Defense; issued May 9, 2005)
 
 
 Secretary of the Navy Gordon England has selected the name Freedom for the Navy’s first new Littoral Combat Ship (LCS).  
 
The future USS Freedom acknowledges the enduring foundation of our nation and honors American communities from coast to coast which bear the name Freedom. States having towns named Freedom range from New York to California, and include Indiana, Maine, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Wyoming.  
 
“These new, fast and capable ships will increase the effectiveness of our naval forces and provide us with an ability to operate in the littoral areas of the world where the enemies of freedom seek to operate and hide” England said. “The USS Freedom and her crew will defend the noble cause for which they are named,” he added.  
 
LCS is an innovative combatant designed to counter challenging shallow-water threats in coastal regions, specifically mines, submarines and fast surface craft.  
 
LCS ships will be fast, agile, and networked surface combatants and will utilize focused-mission packages that deploy manned and unmanned vehicles to execute a variety of missions.  
 
In May 2004, the Department of Defense awarded both Lockheed Martin and General Dynamics - Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, separate contract options for final system design with options for detail design and construction of up to two LCS ships.  
 
In December 2004, the Department of Navy awarded Lockheed Martin Corp., Maritime Systems & Sensors, Moorestown, N.J., a contract for detail design and construction of the first LCS. Lockheed Martin’s teammates include Gibbs & Cox, Arlington, Va.; Marinette Marine, Marinette, Wis.; and Bollinger Shipyards, Lockport, La.  
 
A keel laying ceremony is scheduled for June 2, 2005, at Marinette Marine, Marinette, Wis.  
 
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« Responder #67 em: Maio 12, 2005, 10:38:29 pm »
LPD 17 Successfully Completes Builder's Sea Trials
 
 
(Source: US Naval Sea Systems Command; issued May 11, 2005)
 
 
 PASCAGOULA, Miss. --- San Antonio, first ship of the LPD 17 Class, returned to Northrop Grumman Ship Systems (NGSS) Pascagoula facility after successfully demonstrating performance during Builder's Sea Trials. Having accomplished significant pier-side systems testing and dock trials, this underway testing was a critical milestone on the path to ship delivery.  
 
NGSS conducted a complete range of tests including ship maneuvering and steering, propulsion and propulsion controls, mission systems, auxiliary systems, and combat systems. The Shipboard Wide Area Network and Engineering Control System, which comprise the cornerstone of this highly complex new amphibious ship, were also demonstrated.  
 
Close coordination between the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV), Naval Sea Systems Command, ship's force, NGSS shipbuilder and integrator, suppliers, and government program office (PMS 317) ensured success of the trial.  
 
The future USS San Antonio will be commissioned in Ingleside, TX, this fall. The next three ships of the class, New Orleans, Mesa Verde, and Green Bay are all scheduled to undergo Builder’s Trials in 2006. The future USS New York, the fifth ship of the class, continues construction at the NGSS facility in Avondale, LA.  
 
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« Responder #68 em: Maio 19, 2005, 01:02:22 pm »
AH-1Z/UH-1Y Complete First Sea Trials
 
 
(Source: US Naval Air Systems Command via Bell Helicopters; dated May 17, 2005)
 
 
 NAVAIR PATUXENT RIVER, MD --- The Marine Corps' newest utility and attack helicopters, the UH-1Y and AH-1Z, made their first shipboard landings May 7 while conducting shipboard compatibility testing, or "sea trials."  
 
Operating aboard the Multipurpose Amphibious Assault Ship USS Bataan off the Virginia Capes, the two aircraft made 267 landings during nearly 30 flight hours in both day and night operations to test their ability to operate in the shipboard environment.  
 
Program officials are satisfied with the results.  
 
"We met all the test objectives we hoped to accomplish," said Matt Funk, the H-1 lead flight test engineer for sea trials testing. "The idea was to verify shipboard compatibility by looking at the aircraft's ability to operate in the maritime environment and during all aspects of shipboard operations."  
 
The testers weren't completely happy, though. "The weather was too good," he explained. "We conducted launch and recovery operations in winds up to 35 knots over the deck. The only thing preventing testing in higher wind conditions was a lack of higher winds."  
 
Despite the curse of beautiful weather, partially salved by the Bataan's mess serving the flight test crew lobster and steak meals while aboard, testers put the two aircraft through a wide array of tasks designed to evaluate the aircraft's degree of marinization, including day and night aided and unaided launches and recoveries, refueling, shipboard handling (with the ship pitching and rolling in the ocean swells), rotor blade folding and unfolding in winds up to 25 knots, and flight deck crew familiarization training.  
 
"The whole idea was to demonstrate the platform's marinization," explained Lt. Col. David Anderson, the H-1 program's assistant program manager for systems engineering. "We need to know that when we go aboard the boat, we can live there. The test team did just that."  
 
As Marine Corps aircraft, the AH-1Z and UH-1Y must be marinized to support the Corps' mission of assault from the sea. "Marinization" refers to the unique capability of Navy and Marine Corps aircraft to withstand the daily punishment of temperature extremes, salt water, high structural loads and harsh conditions associated with shipboard/austere location operations in the expeditionary environment.  
 
Specific aspects of marinization can include blade and tail folding, ruggedized avionics and airframe structure, improved corrosion resistance for both the aircraft and support equipment, ability to withstand salt water ingestion by the engines, and close quarters deck-handling ability.  
 
To date, the H-1 Upgrades program has more than 2,900 flight test hours tallied since Dec. 7, 2000. Other current testing includes AH-1Z weapons accuracy testing at the Army's Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona and UH-1Y firing loads and vibrations testing here. More than 870 2.75-inch rockets have been fired during testing, as well as 13,662 rounds of machine gun and automatic cannon ammunition, 11 Hellfire anti-armor missiles and three AIM-9 Sidewinder air-to-air missiles.  
 
The AH-1Z and UH-1Y are slated to replace the current fleet of AH-1W and UH-1N aircraft which have been operating at sea with the Marine Corps for many years. The H-1 program provides over 80% parts commonality for the two aircraft.  
 
A change to the program that will build UH-1Ys completely new, rather than remanufacturing them from aging UH-1N's, received approval by the Defense Department's acquisition chief in April 2005. The first new build UH-1Ys will start production in 2006 as part of the third lot of low-rate initial production aircraft. First deliveries of the new aircraft are scheduled to begin in 2008.  
 
Currently, 10 UH-1Y and six AH-1Z aircraft are in production at Bell Helicopter's Fort Worth and Amarillo, Texas facilities. By 2014, the Marine Corps will have procured 100 UH-1Y Hueys and 180 AH-1Z Super Cobras.  
 
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« Responder #69 em: Maio 23, 2005, 11:51:53 pm »
NASSCO Launches the USNS Lewis and Clark, First T-AKE Ship
 
 
(Source: National Steel and Shipbuilding Company; issued May 22, 2005)
 
 
 SAN DIEGO --- National Steel and Shipbuilding Company (NASSCO), a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics, has joined with the U.S. Navy to launch the USNS Lewis and Clark (T-AKE 1), the lead ship in the Navy's new T-AKE Class.  
 
The name Lewis and Clark was selected to honor the two legendary explorers who led a visionary project from 1804 to 1806 to explore the American West. Two descendants from the families of Captain Meriwether Lewis and then-Lieutenant William Clark -- Jane Lewis Sale Henley and Lisa Clark -- served as sponsors of the ship. At precisely 8 p.m., they christened the ship by breaking bottles of champagne across its bow as it slid into San Diego Bay to the cheers of thousands of San Diego residents and NASSCO employees in attendance.  
 
Chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, Congressman Jerry Lewis (R-Calif.), delivered the ceremony's principal address. Congressman Randy "Duke" Cunningham (R-Calif.) introduced Congressman Lewis. Other featured speakers included Admiral Vernon Clark, the Navy's chief of naval operations; Rear Admiral Charles Hamilton II, program executive officer for ships; and Richard Vortmann, president of NASSCO.  
 
The T-AKE is a dry cargo/ammunition ship that will be operated by the U.S. Navy Military Sealift Command, providing logistic lift from sources of supply either in port or at sea. The ships will transfer cargo -- ammunition, food, fuel, repair parts, and expendable supplies and material -- to station ships and other naval forces at sea. The T-AKE will substantially upgrade the Navy's ability to maintain its forward-deployed forces, replacing aging T-AE ammunition ships and T-AFS combat stores ships that are nearing the end of their service lives.  
 
Construction on the Lewis and Clark began in September 2003 and delivery is scheduled for early next year. The second T-AKE, to be named the USNS Sacagawea, is now in full-rate production for delivery in 2006. Eight ships have been awarded to NASSCO under this program. The T-AKE contract includes options for four additional ships.  
 
The T-AKEs are 210 meters (689 feet) in length and 32.2 meters (105.6 feet) in beam, with a design draft of 9.12 meters (29.9 feet). The ships will carry almost 7,000 metric tons of dry cargo and ammunition and 23,500 barrels of cargo fuel. The T-AKEs will be the first modern Navy ships to combine proven international marine technologies such as an integrated electric-drive propulsion system that can achieve a speed of 20 knots and commercial design features that will minimize their cost of operation and maintenance over their expected 40-year life.  
 
General Dynamics, headquartered in Falls Church, Va., employs approximately 70,100 people worldwide and had 2004 revenue of $19.2 billion. The company is a market leader in mission-critical information systems and technologies; land and expeditionary combat systems, armaments and munitions; shipbuilding and marine systems; and business aviation.  
 
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« Responder #70 em: Maio 27, 2005, 01:44:22 pm »
Ike, French Carrier Work Together During Multinational Maritime Exercise
 
 
(Source: US Navy; issued May 26, 2005)
 
 
 ABOARD USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER --- USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) (Ike) opened her flight deck to the French navy May 25 during Multi-National Maritime Exercise (MNME) 05-1.  
 
A multi-role strike fighter Rafale M jet performed landings, and an E-2C Hawkeye from the French aircraft carrier Charles De Gaulle (R 91) trapped and launched from Ike’s deck during MNME 05-1. It is the first time in more than four years Ike has worked with multinational forces.  
 
MNME 05-1, which incorporates more than 17,000 Sailors from Canada, France, Great Britain, Spain and the United States, is one step in the certification of forces for the NATO Response Force (NRF).  
 
Ike, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Carrier Strike Group and other U.S. Navy units are representing the United States as all five countries conduct coalition strike training, tactical air cross-deck training, anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and related unit training events.  
 
For Ike to be a participant in such a multinational exercise is historic, in the sense that the warship has only been to sea five times since completing her four-year, mid-life overhaul. Not since 2001, when Ike last completed a Mediterranean cruise, has the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier taken on an active role with NATO forces.  
 
Ike’s role in MNME 05-1 was to provide a platform for allied navies to use as the United States and other countries continue to build relationships, which are vital to the overall success of any military operation. In addition to fixed wing operations, French Puma and Dauphin helicopters also landed aboard Ike.  
 
Ike also hosted 15 French sailors for a 24-hour period. The French Sailors were able to tour most of the ship, including the gyms, ship’s stores, various work centers, the bridge, primary flight control and the flight deck during flight operations.  
 
“I was very impressed because there was so much activity,” said Petty Officer Sebastien Laurent of Charles De Gaulle from Normandy, France. “There is always aircraft flying, landing and launching — it never stops.”  
 
Laurent said he and his French shipmates were amazed at the complexity of Ike, since De Gaulle is not as compartmentalized as U.S. aircraft carriers. De Gaulle has two catapults and holds 40 aircraft, so the French Sailors were amazed at Ike’s size.  
 
“It’s very, very big. It’s three times bigger than the De Gaulle,” said Laurent. “I think it’s very great.”  
 
Lt. Cmdr. Jason Rimmer was one of three Ike crew members, in addition to eight Carrier Air Wing 7 representatives, who flew over to De Gaulle to experience how their French ally conducts carrier operations, and to offer assistance regarding the launching and recovery of several U.S. Navy aircraft, including an F/A-18 Hornet, E-2C Hawkeye and C-2 Greyhound.  
 
This was the first time an F/A-18 landed aboard De Gaulle.  
 
“I thoroughly enjoyed my trip to the Charles De Gaulle and the chance to participate in joint operations with the two navies,” said Rimmer. “Their commanding officer put it best, saying that he hoped this exercise would prove our interoperability and readiness for tasking wherever and whenever. The French were excellent hosts and extremely professional operators.”  
 
As Ike continues to move forward toward becoming surge ready under the Fleet Response Plan, the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier will take on a more active role in exercises such as MNME 05-1.  
 
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« Responder #71 em: Junho 02, 2005, 12:18:10 pm »
DD(X) Quarter Scale Model Underwater Explosive Testing Successful
 
 
(Source: DD(X) National Team; issued Jun 1, 2005)
 
 
 ABERDEEN, Md. --- The DD(X) National Team, led by Northrop Grumman and in partnership with Raytheon, General Dynamics, United Defense and Lockheed Martin, announces the successful completion of Underwater Explosion (UNDEX) testing on the DD(X) Quarter Scale Model.  
 
This test provided a critical step in demonstrating that the DD(X) wave piercing tumblehome hull form fully meets the operational requirements set forth by the U.S. Navy.  
 
The primary purpose of the testing was to determine the DD(X) hull form's reaction to an UNDEX to demonstrate the validity of the DD(X) design. Explosive charges were placed at predetermined distances from the DD(X) Model. Intensity of the charges increased as the test series progressed. A large plume resulted from the explosions and the DD(X) wave-piercing bow, tumblehome cross section, step deck area and rising stern responded as envisioned.  
 
"The successful completion of this event increased the overall confidence level in the DD(X) hull design and was carried out at a fraction of the cost for testing a full-size model," said Brian Cuccias, Northrop Grumman Vice President and DD(X) Program Manager. "We are meeting Phase III exit criteria and are eager to begin detail design of this truly revolutionary ship."  
 
The 150 foot DD(X) Quarter Scale Model was built at the Northrop Grumman Ingalls Shipyard in Pascagoula, MS. This scaled down model mitigates risks associated with a new design at a nominal investment. The UNDEX tests were conducted by Northrop Grumman employees with the support of U.S. Army personnel and under the auspices of the U.S. Navy. Data collection and analysis continue and the knowledge of the hull form response, as well as lessons learned will be applied to Phase IV of the DD(X) program.  
 
In partnership with the United States Navy, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, General Dynamics, Lockheed Martin and United Defense are leading a premier National Team to design DD(X) -- a revolutionary multi-mission destroyer. DD(X) technologies are currently in an advanced state of development and are destined to influence ship design efforts around the world for the remainder of this century.  
 
The National Team, which includes more than 100 U.S. companies from 45 states, understands the importance of the rapidly maturing DD(X) Program to our nation, and is proud of the historic role this vessel will play in the advancement of ship -- and ship systems -- design.  
 
The DD(X) National Team has successfully completed nearly a dozen incremental design review milestones, highlighting the DD(X) National Team's commitment to staying on schedule and on cost, as well as the extraordinary maturity and discipline of the program's approach to integrating unprecedented advanced technologies into the platform.  
 
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« Responder #72 em: Junho 03, 2005, 08:59:58 pm »
Lockheed Martin LCS Team Lays Keel on FREEDOM, Nation's First Littoral Combat Ship
 
 
(Source: Lockheed Martin; issued Jun 2, 2005)
 
 
 MARINETTE, Wis. --- Today the keel was laid for FREEDOM (LCS 1), marking a significant milestone in production of the U.S. Navy's first Littoral Combat Ship (LCS). LCS is a new class of surface combatant, designed to defeat enemy threats in shallow coastal waters. FREEDOM is under construction at Marinette Marine and will be delivered to the Navy in late 2006.  
 
"It was barely three years ago that we dared to dream of a new vision for our Navy's future," said Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Vern Clark. "Today that vision of American seapower will be welded into the keel of the very first Littoral Combat Ship - and that ship shall be called the United States Ship Freedom."  
 
"This is a rewarding day for the entire LCS team and signifies a major milestone in the LCS program," said Fred Moosally, president of Lockheed Martin Maritime Systems & Sensors. "We are proud to be the team bringing FREEDOM to the U.S. Navy fleet."  
 
Before more than 200 guests, Birgit Smith, the ship's sponsor, and Clark authenticated the keel, assisted by veteran Marinette Marine welder Jim Renner. Smith was selected as sponsor for FREEDOM (LCS 1) by Secretary of the Navy Gordon R. England. She is the widow of Sgt. 1st Class Paul Ray Smith, who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his bravery and gallantry above and beyond the call of duty in Operation Iraqi Freedom.  
 
LCS, a revolutionary naval combatant designed to dominate the world's coastal waters, provides the Navy with fast, maneuverable and shallow draft ships aimed at maximizing mission flexibility. The ship's first missions will include mine warfare, anti-submarine warfare and surface warfare.  
 
The Lockheed Martin team design, a proven semi-planing steel monohull, provides outstanding agility and high-speed maneuverability with known seakeeping characteristics to support launch and recovery operations of manned and unmanned vehicles, mission execution and optimum crew comfort. The team designed a low-risk, affordable solution that provides the Navy with a maneuverable, flexible, networked surface combatant.  
 
The Lockheed Martin team was awarded a contract for final design in May 2004, with options for up to two Flight 0, or initial production, ships.  
 
The Lockheed Martin-led team includes naval architect Gibbs & Cox, ship builders Marinette Marine, a subsidiary of The Manitowoc Company, Inc., and Bollinger Shipyards, as well as best-of-industry domestic and international teammates to provide a low-risk, affordable LCS solution.  
 
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« Responder #73 em: Julho 13, 2005, 01:47:21 pm »
Navy Takes Possession of Fastest Experimental Ship
 
 
(Source: US Navy; issued July 8, 2005)
 
 
 ARLINGTON, Va. --- The U.S. Navy took delivery of its newest experimental ship, Sea Fighter (FSF 1), at Naval Station Everett, Wash., in July. The Navy's fastest ship, Sea Fighter will operate at greater than 50 knots and has a range of approximately 4,000 nautical miles.  
 
The ship will move to San Diego and continue experimentation while assigned to Commander, Naval Surface Forces and Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet.  
 
“Sea Fighter will serve as the platform to test the technologies and manning concepts that will allow the Navy to operate more effectively around the world," said Vice Adm. Terry Etnyre, commander, Naval Surface Forces. “It will fill a critical role as the bridge between current ships and future surface combatants as we introduce Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) to the fleet.”  
 
The ship will also be used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, structural behavior, mission flexibility, and propulsion system efficiency of high-speed vessels, and will also serve as a test bed for developmental mission packages. The ship can accommodate two helicopters on its flight deck and has bays for 12 flexible mission modules, a stern ramp/cradle that can be lowered at sea to launch and recover a variety of manned and unmanned vehicles, and a small crew of 16 Navy Sailors and 10 Coast Guardsmen.  
 
The keel of the aluminum catamaran was laid in June 2003 at Nichols Bros. Boat Builders, Whidbey Island, Wash., and Sea Fighter was christened in February 2005. The ship is 262 feet in length and displaces 1,400 tons (at full load), with a beam of 72 feet and a navigational draft of 11.5 feet. Two gas turbine engines and two propulsion diesels power Sea Fighter’s four waterjets.  
 
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« Responder #74 em: Julho 13, 2005, 01:51:30 pm »
Lockheed Martin Delivers First Update II.5 P-3C Aircraft with AIP Upgrades
 
 
(Source: Lockheed Martin; issued July 12, 2005)
 
 
 EAGAN, MN. --- Lockheed Martin has delivered to the U.S. Navy the first Update II.5 P-3C aircraft modified under the Anti-Surface Warfare Improvement Program (AIP). Under contracts received in 2004 and 2005, Lockheed Martin will install the AIP upgrade kits on five of the service's Update II.5 aircraft.  
 
Update II.5 aircraft are older P-3C models which, in many cases, have seen less operational use than subsequent production aircraft. The AIP update program first concentrated on the Update III model P-3C aircraft, and is now focusing on the earlier aircraft. This Update II.5 P-3C aircraft initially will be an additional asset for the U.S. Navy's Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 20 (VX-20) and will be the sea trial demonstration aircraft.  
 
In addition to the AIP modifications, this aircraft will receive various networked communication upgrades and planned Anti-Submarine Warfare Maritime Improvement Program (AMIP) enhancements that satisfy Sea Power 21 and FORCEnet constructs. The first sea trial demonstration is planned for November 2005 during the Trident Warrior exercise.  
 
"We are pleased to continue providing the Navy with these essential upgrades to ensure that the P-3 aircraft remain an integral part of our nation's defense systems," said Richard F. Ambrose, president of the Lockheed Martin Maritime Systems & Sensors' (MS2) Tactical Systems line of business. "Extending the upgrades to the Update II.5 aircraft further improves their surveillance role in military and humanitarian missions."  
 
Lockheed Martin has been the prime contractor and systems integrator for the aircraft's avionics, including non-acoustic sensors, communications, survivability and displays and controls since 1994. To date, Lockheed Martin has upgraded 66 P-3C aircraft with AIP upgrade kits; the U.S. Navy plans to upgrade a total of 73 aircraft. The AIP upgrade draws on commercial-off-the-shelf and non-developmental technology to provide the next generation of mission capability for the U.S. Navy P-3C.  
 
The P-3 is the primary maritime surveillance aircraft operated by the U.S. Navy and 15 allied nations. Its roles include anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; command, control communications, computers and intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance; search and rescue, drug interdiction, and exclusive economic zone protection.  
 
New workstations, satellite communication capabilities, enhanced radar, and electro-optics and infrared sensors significantly increase the aircraft's surveillance role over land as well as over water. The new acoustic processing suite enables greater ASW capabilities in blue water and littoral regions. The capabilities provided enable the aircraft to be used extensively in all major U.S. combined forces operations, including those overland in Iraq, Afghanistan, Kosovo, Bosnia, and others associated with the global war on terrorism.  
 
Lockheed Martin MS2 Tactical Systems performs engineering, integration, and major contract work in Eagan, MN; MS2 Undersea Systems in Manassas, VA, provides the acoustic processing suite and Lockheed Martin Aircraft and Logistics Center in Greenville, SC, completes the aircraft installation.  
 
Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Lockheed Martin employs about 130,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture and integration of advanced technology systems, products and services. The corporation reported 2004 sales of $35.5 billion.  
 
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