U. S. Navy

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MATRA

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #585 em: Maio 31, 2019, 01:00:13 pm »
Este é um assunto ao qual tenho dedicado algum tempo.

É interessantíssimo, porque já são 2 gerações de militares a reportar o mesmo.
 

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dc

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #586 em: Maio 31, 2019, 01:36:09 pm »
Não seria o mais lógico que utilizassem equipamento para gravar/filmar tais fenómenos, já que ocorrem há 2 gerações?
 

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asalves

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #587 em: Junho 03, 2019, 02:38:17 pm »
Não seria o mais lógico que utilizassem equipamento para gravar/filmar tais fenómenos, já que ocorrem há 2 gerações?

secalhar já gravam, mas dai a sair cá para fora vai um grande passo, para além disso li algumas noticias que a Marinha Americana recentemente atualizou o manual de procedimentos de reports de UFO's, manual esse que a ultima versão era de 2015.


PS: encontrei o artigo com video do "encontro"
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/26/us/politics/ufo-sightings-navy-pilots.html
 

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NVF

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #588 em: Junho 20, 2019, 06:02:06 pm »
RAM Block 2A missiles made by Raytheon ready for the US Navy

http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php/news/defence-news/2019/june/7215-ram-block-2a-missiles-made-by-raytheon-ready-for-the-us-navy.html

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The U.S. Navy successfully completed a series of guided-flight tests with the Raytheon's RAM (Rolling Airframe Missile) Block 2A short-range, surface-to-air missiles. Testing occurred at the Naval Air Warfare Center in California, and from the Navy's self-defence test ship off the coast of Southern California.

The RAM™ guided missile weapon system is the world's most modern ship self-defence weapon and is designed to provide exceptional protection for ships of all sizes. It's currently deployed on more than 165 ships in 11 countries, ranging from 500-tonne fast attack craft to 95,000-tonne aircraft carriers.

A supersonic, lightweight, quick-reaction, fire-and-forget weapon, the RAM system is designed to destroy anti-ship missiles. Requiring no additional direction upon launch, its passive radio frequency and infrared guidance design provide high-firepower capability for engaging multiple threats simultaneously. The missile is continually improved to stay ahead of the ever-evolving threat of anti-ship missiles, helicopters, aircraft and surface craft.

The Block 2 variant, the latest evolution in the development of the RAM missile, has a larger rocket motor, advanced control section and an enhanced RF receiver capable of detecting the quietest of threat emitters. The improvements make the missile two and a half times more manoeuvrable, with one and a half times the effective intercept range. This provides the Block 2 variant with the capability to defeat highly stressing threats, increasing the survivability of the defended ship. Raytheon Company expects to deliver the first RAM Block 2A missiles to the U.S. Navy by the end of 2019.

The MK 44 guided missile round pack and the MK 49 guided missile launching system, which hold 21 missiles, comprise the MK 31 guided missile weapon system. The system is designed to be easily integrated into many different ships. A variety of existing ship sensors can readily provide the target and pointing information required to engage the anti-ship threat.

The MK 44 missile is also used in the SeaRAM® anti-ship missile defence system, replacing the M601A1 Gatling gun in the Phalanx® close-in weapon system with an 11-round launcher. The Phalanx system’s sensor suite and internal combat management system reduces dependency on the ship’s combat system and enables a fast reaction to stress anti-ship missiles. The RAM Block 2 missile has been successfully fired from a SeaRAM system.


AM Block 2A missiles to be ready for the US Navy (Picture Source: Raytheon)
Everyone you will ever meet knows something that you don't.
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NVF

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #589 em: Junho 24, 2019, 10:38:13 pm »
The U.S. Navy’s Newest Frigate Can’t Carry Enough Missiles

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/us-navy’s-newest-frigate-can’t-carry-enough-missiles-63936

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The U.S. Navy’s new frigate may not be armed with enough missiles to defeat Russian and Chinese warships, according to a new report.

FFG(X) is the Navy’s attempt to resurrect frigates, which are essentially small destroyers. The last frigates in the American fleet was the Cold War Oliver Hazard Perry class, which was retired by 2015. The Navy wants 20 of the new frigates, with the first acquired in late 2020. The Navy has asked for $1.3 billion in the FY2020 defense budget for the first vessel.

The Navy has not fixed on a design, though five American and European shipbuilders have offered their versions, which range from a trimaran hull to 6,000- and 7,000-ton vessels.

But regardless of which design is chosen, one issue could be a lack of missile launchers, according to a report by the Congressional Research Service, which is Congress’s analytical arm. The FFG(X) will only have 32 Mark 41 Vertical Launch System tubes, which are missile launchers – actually more like silos – embedded in the deck.

An arsenal of 48 missiles sounds formidable, but the DDG-51 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers mount 96 VLS tubes, which raises the question of how much bang for the buck the FFG(X) provides. “Supporters of requiring the FFG(X) to be equipped with a larger number of VLS tubes, such as 48, might argue that the FFG(X) is to be roughly half as expensive to procure as the DDG-51 destroyer, and might therefore be more appropriately equipped with 48 VLS tubes, which is one-half the number on recent DDG-51s,” CRS said in its typically guarded language. “They might also argue that in a context of renewed great power competition with potential adversaries such as China, which is steadily improving its naval capabilities, it might be prudent to equip the FFG(X)s with 48 rather than 32 VLS tubes, and that doing so might only marginally increase the unit procurement cost of the FFG(X).”

To be fair, CRS also presents the case for a 32-tube frigate. “Supporters of requiring the FFG(X) to have no more than 32 VLS tubes might argue that the analyses indicating a need for 32 already took improving adversary capabilities (as well as other U.S. Navy capabilities) into account,” says CRS. “They might also argue that the FFG(X), in addition to having 32 VLS tubes, is also to have a separate, 21-cell Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) missile launcher [an anti-aircraft system] and that increasing the number of VLS tubes from 32 to 48 would increase the procurement cost of a ship that is intended to be an affordable supplement to the Navy's cruisers and destroyers.”

Before Congress approves funding for the FFG(X), CRS recommends legislators ponder several questions. How much more expensive would the frigate be with 48 instead of 32 VLS tubes? Could the ship be inexpensively designed to go from 32 to 48 tubes at a later date?

The question boils down to this: should a warship be packed to the gills with weapons? The Soviet navy, and today’s Russian fleet, opt for ships far more heavily armed than their Western counterparts. But that can come at the expense of other desirable qualities, such as endurance at sea and ammunition reloads (Soviet warships were essentially one-shot weapons).

Ironically, if the FFG(X) project runs into headwinds, there is an alternative. And that would be the Littoral Combat Ship, a troubled design that itself may be one reason why the Navy needs frigates in the first place.

Everyone you will ever meet knows something that you don't.
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Cabeça de Martelo

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #590 em: Julho 03, 2019, 04:00:15 pm »
The Navy’s new plan to fix Ford’s elevator failures
By: Mark D. Faram

The Navy is vowing a “full court press” to overcome delays and finally field all the Advanced Weapons Elevators needed by the aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford.

“We have a full court press on the advanced weapons elevators,” said Jim Geurts, the assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition in a Monday press release.

With only two of Ford’s 11 elevators operating — and no firm schedule for delivering the remaining nine — the Navy brought a “team of experts” from both the government and private industry on board the Ford to fix the snafus, according to Geurts.

The sea service also announced Monday that officials will build a pair of testing facilities to help engineers fix problems and prep sailors to operate and maintain the elevator technology.

Navy spokesman Capt. Danny Hernandez told Navy Times on Monday that the ongoing bugs include “construction challenges” caused partly by “very tight tolerances, physical structural adjustments and software refinement” needed to make “weapons movement sustainable and reliable."

“Getting the doors and hatches installed was not enough. There has been learning on the sequence of building them,” Hernandez said.

He said that operations must be checked and rechecked to ensure they’re “working according to specs,” as when the elevators need to maintain “holding water tightness” as they move through the decks.

“Doors and hatches have to be moving in the right sequence and as you’d expect. They have to be aligned,” Hernandez said. “Mr. Geurts feels once we get the uppers and lowers working, it’s just a matter of improving efficiency.”

Guerts told Congress in March that Ford’s expected yearlong post-shakedown maintenance availability would be extended three months. That will delay the carrier’s return to sea until October.

Officials wanted all the elevators operating before heading back to sea so the Navy could begin to fully test the $13 billion Ford’s flight deck capabilities.

On Monday, Geurts indicated that the team of experts, working with Huntington Ingalls Industries, will find “the most efficient timeline possible” for getting Ford’s elevators to work.

They will identify systemic problems and “recommend new design changes” for the installation of the elevators on board other Ford-class carriers, he added.

If the team can get the elevators to work in concert with Ford’s revolutionary arresting gear and electromagnetic catapults, officials hope to hike the number of aircraft sorties by 33 percent compared to the previous Nimitz class of warships.

Those elevators are expected to tote 24,000 pounds of ordnance at 150 feet-per-minute compared to a Nimitz carrier’s 10,500 pounds at 100 feet-per-minute.

Ford’s elevators rely on electromagnetic technology instead of cables and pulleys.

For testing and virtual technology training, officials want to replicate the Ford’s technology ashore at Naval Surface Warfare Center Division Philadelphia and a “digital twin” test site at the Newport News shipyard.

https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-navy/2019/07/01/the-navys-new-plan-to-fix-fords-elevator-failures/
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

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mafets

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #591 em: Julho 10, 2019, 01:51:44 pm »
Qual UAV qual quê...  :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

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Air Power

On this day: 60 years ago, the US Postal Service entered the missile age, when a Vought RGM-6 Regulus missile fired from the submarine USS Barbero (SSG-317) in the Atlantic Ocean delivered a payload of 3,000 stamped envelopes to the Naval Auxiliary Air Station at Mayport, Florida (July 8, 1959). Beat that Amazon!



Saudações
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

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Cabeça de Martelo

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #592 em: Julho 12, 2019, 05:02:12 pm »
Defense Department to ban beer and pizza? Mandatory keto diet may enhance military performance
By: Kristine Froeba 

The controversial ketogenic or “keto” diet may be the future of the military, some defense officials say.

Service members, and Navy SEALS especially, may have to forgo beer and burritos for skinny cocktails and avocado salad (forget the tortilla chips) if a proposal from Special Operations Command gains momentum.

While a nutritionally enhanced future could eventually be put into effect for all branches, the SEALS and other underwater dive-mission specialists might be the first groups targeted for the change in nutritional guidelines.

Lisa Sanders, the director of science and technology at U.S. Special Operations Command, presented an Ohio State University study that recommends the nutritional change based on the keto diet, which is high in fat and low in carbohydrates. The diet works to deprive the body of glucose needed for energy and forces it to burn stored fats instead. The study was conducted on the university’s Army ROTC cadet population.

“One of the effects of truly being in ketosis is that it changes the way your body handles oxygen deprivation, so you can actually stay underwater at depths for longer periods of time and not go into oxygen seizures,” Sanders said at the Special Operations Forces Industry Conference in May.

Discussion of new dietary guidelines for service members comes at a time of growing concern about obesity in the military and its potential threat to readiness.

The possibly controversial change for the military is not without problems, not the least of which are questions about whether the military has the legal and ethical authority to control and monitor a service member’s diet 24/7.

Service members are familiar with physical training in boot camp and their routine Physical Fitness Tests, but are they ready for daily dietary ketosis testing?

For the keto nutritional plan to be successful, it has to be followed strictly, and that includes after-hours and weekends. Even a service member on leave would possibly face a restricted diet because it simply takes too long for the body to readjust and function in the ketosis stage after a weekend of dietary backsliding and binging on pizza, burritos, and beers.

The keto diet requires the body to be in a constant state of ketosis. Daily urine or blood tests using strips are necessary to measure glucose or ketone levels.

Revamping MREs?


For the diet to be implemented laterally across the military, produce choices and meat quality at military dining facilities across the world would have to change significantly, not to mention the high-carb and sugar content of MRE’s. The popular pepperoni pizza MRE would be a thing of the past.

Although one benefit of formulating a new high-fat food ration is that it would be a lighter weight for service members to carry.

“You can carry even more calories because fats weigh less, which is an advantage,” said Kinesiologist Jeff Volek, a professor at Ohio State University’s Department of Human Sciences and author of the study.

On military bases, the dietary change could result in future dining facilities serving Ezekiel bread, zucchini “pasta spirals” to replace pasta, mashed cauliflower as a substitute for potatoes and rice, and avocado-heavy salad bars replacing soft-serve ice cream machines and dessert bars.

No fries with that at the DFAC

In addition to the regulatory and privacy questions about the proposed dietary change, there are also economic questions. Not only would DFACS and the military have to change, military households would have to follow suit as the diet requires higher quantities and quality of vegetables, fats, and proteins throughout the day.

If a keto meal plan became the required diet of the military’s future, some say military budgets, salaries and allowances may also have to rise to meet the economic demands required to follow the dietary guidelines on duty and off. But Volek, author of the study, disagrees.

“The ketogenic diet is high in fat, which is less costly," Volek said. The majority of the diet is based on fat, and fat calories can be very cheap. “Meats, eggs, fish, chicken, cheese, butter, seeds, nuts, and non-starchy vegetables are the basis of the diet. Fat is the key or primary nutrient.”

If the plan is adopted, it remains to be seen if the Skinnygirl margarita and the low-glycemic sugar-free vodka-tonic favored by Bravo TV’s Real Housewives become the new cocktails of choice for infantrymen and SEALS.

https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2019/07/01/defense-department-to-ban-beer-and-pizza-mandatory-keto-diet-may-enhance-military-performance/
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

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goldfinger

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #593 em: Julho 19, 2019, 12:04:08 pm »
 :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o :o

Casi 1000 millones en adquirir casi 1 millón de sonoboyas.

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ERAPSCO to Produce Sonobuoys for Navy Under Potential $1B IDIQ
Matthew Nelson  July 19, 2019   Contract Awards, News

Jeff Brody
ERAPSCO, a joint venture of Sparton and Ultra Electronics, has been awarded a potential $1.04B contract to build and deliver sonobuoys to the U.S. Navy from fiscal 2019 through fiscal 2023.

The indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract covers the production of:

-932,500 AN/SSQ-62F, AN/SSQ-53G, AN/SSQ-36B and AN/SSQ-101B sonobuoys, the Department of Defense said Thursday.

Fifty-one percent of work will occur in De Leon Spring, Fla., and the remaining 49 percent will take place in Columbia, Ind.

The Pentagon expects ERAPSCO to finish services under the contract by September 2025.

Sonobuoys are designed to transmit underwater audio to submarines and ships using built-in electromechanical acoustic sensors.

No es otra liga....es otra galaxia.. :( lanzandolas en fila pueden ir andando de Norfolk a Lisboa.. :mrgreen:
A España servir hasta morir
 
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mafets

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #594 em: Julho 20, 2019, 07:17:57 pm »
Pelo menos já não tem aquele aspecto de torradeira a óleo...  :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/navys-6th-generation-fighter-could-put-f-35-museum-67782?fbclid=IwAR3EZQpgs8kwfYZT96ZIdDUP2yylamsWR6lSmkNyCqsz4GdfG2K7e4lHRpU

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New much-longer range sensors and weapons, incorporating emerging iterations of AI, are expected to make warfare more disaggregated, and much less of a linear force on force type of engagement. Such a phenomenon, driven by new technology, underscores warfare reliance upon sensors and information networks. All of this, naturally, requires the expansive "embedded ISR" discussed by the paper. Network reliant warfare is of course potentially much more effective in improving targeting and reducing sensor-to-shooter time over long distances, yet it brings a significant need to organize and optimize the vast, yet crucial, flow of information.

The Navy is currently analyzing air frames, targeting systems, AI-enabled sensors, new weapons and engine technologies to engineer a new 6th-Generation fighter to fly alongside the F-35 and ultimately replace the F/A-18.



Cumprimentos
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

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NVF

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #595 em: Julho 21, 2019, 01:35:56 am »
 ;D

Everyone you will ever meet knows something that you don't.
- Bill Nye
 

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mafets

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #596 em: Julho 29, 2019, 11:15:33 am »
https://navaltoday.com/2019/07/29/us-navy-names-third-towing-salvage-and-rescue-ship/?fbclid=IwAR3-oOnVGBGTUQqnp9kuqgV4zi8tcFLYDxyzckhdqTzA1tkWzxsALSzm8ZM
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The third unit in the US Navy’s new class of towing, salvage, and rescue ships will be named Saginaw Ojibwe Anishinabek in honor of the history, service and contributions of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan, the US Navy secretary has announced.

The Saginaw Chippewa people are comprised of Saginaw, Black River, and Swan Creek bands. Ojibwe is also referred to as Chippewa and Anishinabek means “original people.”

“I am deeply honored to announce that the history of the Saginaw Chippewa people will once again be part of Navy and Marine Corps history,” said navy secretary Richard V. Spencer.

“The future USNS Saginaw Ojibwe Anishinabek honors the original people of modern day Michigan, with their original name, and will carry the proud Ojibwe legacy for decades to come.”


Saudações
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

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Lusitano89

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Re: U. S. Navy
« Responder #597 em: Agosto 08, 2019, 04:05:38 pm »
 

 

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