U. S. Navy

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U. S. Navy
« em: Outubro 06, 2004, 09:06:06 pm »
Caros companheiros

Vou abrir este post para nele serem centralizadas as notícias sobre a US Navy.
Começo com o abate do 1º Ticonderoga :

 
 USS Ticonderoga Decommissioned
 
 
(Source: US Navy; dated Oct. 1, web-posted Oct. 5, 2004)
 
 
 PASCAGOULA, Miss. --- Friends, family members, plankowners and former crew members said farewell to USS Ticonderoga (CG 47), as she was decommissioned in a traditional Navy ceremony at her homeport, Naval Station Pascagoula, Sept. 30.  
 
With current crew members manning the rails just prior to the ship's demanning, Rear Adm. Charles Bush, program executive officer for Integrated Warfare Systems on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations, told the crew and assembled guests, "We are not going to talk of sadness today. We are going to celebrate the storied accomplishments of the guided-missile cruiser Ticonderoga, the first AEGIS cruiser."  
 
Bush was the seventh commanding officer of Ticonderoga from June 1995 to December 1996, and was the commanding officer when Ticonderoga changed homeports from Norfolk, Va., to Pascagoula, Miss., in June 1996. He is also a Ticonderoga plankowner, serving as the ship's first operations officer when it was commissioned in January 1983, and was responsible for the firing of almost 100 surface-to-air missiles, completing the most extensive live-fire test and evaluation program ever undertaken in the history of surface combatant ships.  
 
"Ticonderoga has a proud record of service," he said. "Throughout her career Ticonderoga has served as an example of personal excellence, and excellence found in the hundreds of officers, chief petty officers and enlisted personnel who have served on her. Regardless of the missions or fleet assignment, the constants in Ticonderoga have been the pride and professionalism of the men and women who served her.  
 
"The people have made the difference. It was the men and women who brought life to this ship, manned its revolutionary combat systems, tended her gas turbine propulsion system, painted her decks," he added. "They are the reason Ticonderoga is the grand lady she is today, the day of her retirement."  
 
Ticonderoga was the first ship of the AEGIS guided-missile cruiser class, built locally at what is now Northrop Grumman Ship Systems, Ingalls Shipbuilding. Many of the people who helped build the ship still live in the Jackson County area.  
 
Ticonderoga’s adventures took her to duty in the Gulf of Sidra, off the coast of Beirut, to the Arctic Circle, the Equator, and through the Suez and Panama Canals. She was one of the first Navy ships to report on station in support of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm in 1990. She has been deployed to the Mediterranean Sea, the Caribbean Sea and the Eastern Pacific Ocean.  
 
"You represent the finest this Navy has to offer," Cmdr. Glenn Zeiders III, Ticonderoga's 11th and final commanding officer, told his crew. "I am proud to have served with you." He then gave the order to deman the ship.  
 
The crew walked off the ship to a standing ovation. The ship's commissioning pennant was lowered, and Lt. Perry Summers, the final officer of the deck, presented the ship's logbook and spy glass to Zeiders.  
 
"This ship's done it all," said Summers after the ceremony. "It's sad to see her go, but I am proud to have served on her."  
 
"We who served in Ticonderoga are the ship," concluded Bush. "We have taken in her lines, set sail for foreign shores, and returned home again, and again and again. For as long as we are around - those who served on her - there will always be a Ticonderoga."  
 
Immediately following the decommissioning ceremony, tug boats tied towing lines to the ship and pulled Ticonderoga away from the pier. She is being towed to the Inactive Ships' Maintenance Facility in Philadelphia. No decision has been made on the final disposition of the ship.  
 
The current Ticonderoga was the fifth U.S. Navy ship to bear the historic name. She was named in commemoration of the capture of Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain in eastern New York in May, 1775, by Ethan Allen and his 'Green Mountain Boys.' One of the first military successes of the American Revolution, the seizure provided desperately needed cannons and supplies to George Washington's army.  
 
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(sem assunto)
« Responder #1 em: Outubro 06, 2004, 09:09:48 pm »
Day Attack Harrier Retired in Flyby Ceremony
 
 
(Source: US Marine Corps; issued Sept. 30, web-posted Oct. 5, 2004)
 
 
 MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT, N.C. --- Marine Attack Training Squadron-203 retired the original AV-8B Day Attack Harrier in a flyby ceremony Sept. 30 at Cherry Point.  
 
Combining tactical mobility, responsiveness, reduced operating costs and flexibility the AV-8B Day Attack Harrier has been an essential element for the special combat and expeditionary requirements of the Marine Corps.  
 
“I’ve been flying AV-8B Harriers for 18 years,” said Lt. Col. Richard W. Regan, the Commanding Officer at VMAT-203. “They have been globally deployed since the summer of 1986. They served exceptionally well in Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm and during the Kosovo Conflict. During Desert Storm, they were the closest to the front of any tactical aircraft.”  
 
Harriers have been able to serve a special purpose flying off of aircraft carriers. Part of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Unit, they have been an invaluable element of strategic planning.  
 
“Flying off of aircraft carriers we give the MEU commander deeper striking ability,” said Regan. “This in turn changes the shape of the battlefield.”  
 
Employed as a ground-attack fighter-bomber they have proved there worthiness after 20 years of faithful service.  
 
“Over the years we have improved on the original model,” said Regan. “The updated AV-8B Day Attack Harriers have now become operationally obsolete, and will either be sold to foreign countries or scrapped for parts.”  
 
The original Harrier has been constantly improved. The AV-8B II Night Attack was designed for flying at night and has a forward looking infrared system. Its engine was upgraded from the 406 to the 408 engine, giving the aircraft more thrust, better performance and the ability to carry heavier ordnance loads. Another added feature is a multi-purpose color display, or a moving map.  
 
“The Harrier has changed over the years as the way the Marine Corps war-fighting tactics have changed,” said Regan. “The need for a more powerful engine is critical to the Harriers ability to fly off and land on air craft carriers. Smart bombs, advanced precision bombs, better censors are all changes that the Harrier has experienced over the years.”  
 
The AV-8B Night Attack II+ is the latest addition to the growing Harrier family. With radar installed, it’s the most advanced Harrier in VMAT-203’s arsenal.  
 
“At one time we had eight Squadrons of 20 Harriers each,” said Regan. “They have served us skillfully over the years, in fact the bird I landed today is fully operational and completely ready to fly right now.”  
 
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The Future of the Navy's Amphibious and Maritime Preposition
« Responder #2 em: Novembro 15, 2004, 11:37:28 pm »
The Future of the Navy's Amphibious and Maritime Prepositioning Forces

Source: Congressional Budget Office

Ref: no reference

Released Nov. 10, 2004

Today, the U.S. Navy numbers about 293 battle force ships, including 35 amphibious warfare ships, which are designed to carry marines and their equipment into combat. In addition, it operates 16 cargo ships that make up the maritime pre-positioning force, which carries equipment and 30 days’ worth of supplies for three Marine infantry brigades (though not the marines themselves).
The Navy plans to modernize both its amphibious and maritime pre-positioning ships over the next 30 years. Carrying out those plans would require the Navy to spend an average of $2.4 billion a year over the next three decades -- more than twice what it has spent on those categories of ships since 1980. At the same time, the Navy has modernization plans for other types of ships that, if fully implemented, would also require more resources than the Navy now spends on ship construction.
This Congressional Budget Office (CBO) study— prepared at the request of the Subcommittee on Seapower of the Senate Committee on Armed Services—looks at alternate ways of modernizing amphibious and pre-positioning forces at a lower cost.
It also evaluates four lower-cost options for those ships, two of which would cost roughly what the Navy has spent annually since 1980 and two of which would require a spending increase of a little over one-third.

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US Navy Shipbuilding Plans for Fiscal Year 2005
« Responder #3 em: Novembro 15, 2004, 11:47:24 pm »
US Navy Shipbuilding Plans for Fiscal Year 2005


(Source: Senate Armed Services Committee; issued March 4, 2004)


SENATE ARMED SERVICES COMMITTEE; SEAPOWER SUBCOMMITTEE

Statement of The Honorable John J. Young, Jr.
Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research, Development and Acquisition)
at the hearing on Future Navy & Marine Corps Capabilities and Requirements
March 3, 2004


SHIPBUILDING PROGRAMS

Our FY 2005 Budget request calls for construction of nine ships: three ARLEIGH BURKE (DDG 51) Class destroyers; one VIRGINIA (SSN 774) Class submarine; one SAN ANTONIO (LPD 17) Class Amphibious Transport Dock ship; two LEWIS & CLARK (T-AKE) Class Auxiliary Cargo & Ammunition ships; one DD(X); and one Littoral Combat Ship (LCS). If approved, this would increase to 38 the total number of ships authorized and under construction.

The FY 2005 Budget request represents an increase of two ships over the seven ships in the FY 2004 program. In addition, we have requested funding for advance procurement of the eighth and ninth VIRGINIA Class submarines, Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) material procurement for the eighth, ninth, and tenth VIRGINIA Class submarines, advance procurement for CVN 21 construction and CVN 70 refueling complex overhaul (RCOH), continued funding for SSGN Engineered Refueling Overhaul (ERO) and conversion, continued funding for LHD 8, funding for TICONDEROGA Class cruiser modernization, and the service life extension for five Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC) craft.
These shipbuilding programs are the leading edge of our Naval transformation to the Seabasing concept, which is modularly constructed on four capability pillars. Those pillars are SEA SHIELD, SEA BASE, SEA STRIKE and ForceNet.
SEA SHIELD is made up of those components that provide protection and assured access to our forces.
SEA BASE is the pillar of capabilities that allows naval forces to exploit the maneuver space provided by U.S. control of the sea.
SEA STRIKE includes all of the capabilities within the force that provide offensive fires and maneuver in a complementary synergistic fashion. This includes strike aircraft, missiles, surface fires, and expeditionary maneuver elements.
ForceNet is the network that ties these disbursed platforms together through C4ISR nodes to provide robust battle space awareness, precise targeting, rapid and precise fires and maneuver and responsive logistics.
We have grouped our shipbuilding programs into each of the four seabasing pillars based on their primary weapon systems however each platform has the ability to perform functions of other pillars as well.


1. SEA SHIELD

ARLEIGH BURKE (DDG 51) Class Destroyer
The FY 2005 Budget request includes $3.445 billion for the procurement of the final three ARLEIGH BURKE (DDG 51) Class destroyers. These ships are part of a 10 ship, FY 2002 through FY 2005 Multi Year Procurement (MYP) contract awarded in 2002, which finalized the DDG procurement profile and sustains our industry partners until we transition to DD(X)
production.

TICONDEROGA (CG 47) Cruiser Modernization Plan
The FY 2005 Budget request includes $166 million for systems that will add new mission capabilities and extend the combat system service life of the TICONDEROGA (CG 47) Class. The upgrade of these ships will add new, and enhance existing, combat system capabilities to improve compatibility in joint and coalition warfare environments. Furthermore, these improvements will upgrade the quality of life for our Sailors and lower the operating costs for those ships.

Littoral Combat Ship (LCS)
The LCS will be a networked, agile, mission focused, stealthy surface combatant with capabilities optimized for responsiveness to threats in the littorals. LCS will utilize core onboard sensors and weapons combined with reconfigurable mission packages employing manned and unmanned vehicles and modular sensors and weapons to execute assigned tasks and operate as a node in a network centric battle force.
Primary missions for the ship will include littoral Mine Warfare, littoral Surface Warfare and littoral Anti Submarine Warfare to ensure access of friendly forces in littoral regions. The LCS program awarded contracts to three industry teams in July 2003. The FY 2005 Budget request includes $352 million of RDT&E funding for LCS platform and mission system development and initial ship procurement.
The LCS spiral development acquisition strategy will support construction of multiple flights of focused mission ships and mission packages with progressive capability improvements. Flight 0 is comprised of four ships, with the first ship requested for authorization in FY 2005 using RDT&E, N funds with detail design and construction commencing in FY 2005. Mission modules will deliver in support of the Flight 0 seaframe delivery in FY 2007. Flight 0 will develop and demonstrate several new approaches to Naval warfare including suitability of large-scale modular mission technologies and new operational concepts in the littoral.
The industry teams submitted their proposals for final system design and detail design and construction phase in January 2004. The down select to one or two teams for final system design and detail design and construction of Flight 0 is anticipated in late Spring 2004.

VIRGINIA (SSN 774) Class Attack Submarines
With current construction progressing on schedule, the FY 2005 Budget request includes $2.5 billion for the seventh ship, advance procurement for the eight and ninth ships of the VIRGINIA Class, and Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) material procurement for the eighth, ninth, and tenth VIRGINIA Class submarines. There are a total of ten VIRGINIA Class submarines under contract. This year’s ship will be the second ship in the five-ship MYP. This MYP contracting approach provides the Navy savings of $80M per ship for a total savings of $400M compared to “block buy” procurement. These ships will continue to be built under the teaming approach adopted by Congress in 1998, which maintains two capable nuclear submarine shipbuilders. In accordance with FY 2004 Congressional direction, procurement of two VIRGINIA Class submarines per year is delayed until FY 2009.


2. SEA STRIKE

DD(X) Destroyer
The FY 2005 Budget request includes $1,432 million in RDT&E funds for DD(X) with $221 million for lead ship detail design and construction. The Navy is two years into the competitively awarded DD(X) design and technology development effort. The winning contractor has organized a National Team of industry experts to achieve the most innovative and cost-effective solutions for development of the DD(X) through spiral development of technologies and engineering, with promising systems being employed on existing platforms and other future ship classes. DD(X) will dramatically improve naval surface fire support capabilities. Planned technologies, such as integrated power system and total ship computing environment in an open architecture, will provide more affordable future ship classes in terms of both construction and operation. In a noteworthy partnership with industry, the Navy shifted the DD(X) volume search radar to S-band, providing increased capability and the future potential to support missile defense operations.

SSGN
The FY 2005 Budget requests $517 million of procurement funding for the continued conversion of the third OHIO Class submarine, and the Engineered Refueling Overhaul of the fourth and final submarine to be converted to SSGN. When completed, these submarines will provide transformational warfighting capability carrying up to 154 Tomahawk cruise missiles and support deployed special operating forces. The four SSGN conversions will be executed utilizing a public-private partnership conducting the work in Naval Shipyards, and are scheduled for delivery in FY 2007.


3. SEA BASE

CVN 21 Class
The CVN 21 program is designing the aircraft carrier for the 21st Century, as the replacement for the NIMITZ Class nuclear aircraft carriers. CVN 21 will be the centerpiece of tomorrow’s Carrier Strike Groups and a contribution to every capability pillar envisioned in Sea Power 21. CVN 21 will be a primary force in Sea Strike with enhancements such as a future air wing which will include the Joint Strike Fighter and Joint Unmanned Combat Air Systems. CVN 21’s transformational command centers will combine the power of FORCEnet and a flexible open system architecture to support multiple simultaneous missions, including integrated strike planning, joint/coalition operations and Special Warfare missions. The CVN 21 based strike group will play a major role in Sea Shield protecting United States interests, while deterring enemies and reassuring allies. CVN 21 will provide the United States the capability to quickly project combat power anywhere in the world, independent of land based support.
Overall, CVN 21 will increase sortie generation rate by nearly 20 percent, increase survivability to better handle future threats and have depot maintenance requirements that could support an increase of up to 25 percent in operational availability. The new design nuclear propulsion plant and improved electric plant together provide three times the electrical generation capacity of a NIMITZ Class carrier. This capacity allows the introduction of new systems such as Electromagnetic Aircraft Launching System, Advanced Arresting Gear, and a new integrated warfare system that will leverage advances in open systems architecture to be affordably upgraded. Other features include an enhanced flight deck, improved weapons handling and aircraft servicing efficiency, and a flexible island arrangement allowing for future technology insertion.
The FY 2005 Budget request includes $626 million for continued development of CVN 21. The Construction Preparation Contract, planned for 3rd quarter FY 2004, will be for design, advance planning, advance construction, non-nuclear advance procurement, and continuation of research studies to further reduce CVN 21 manpower requirements and total ownership costs.
The construction contract is scheduled for award in 1st quarter FY 2007, with ship delivery in 2014. The program is currently working toward a Milestone B review in 3rd quarter FY 2004.

NIMITZ Class
Refueling and Complex Overhauls (RCOH) provide a bridge between maintaining current readiness requirements and preparing the platform for future readiness initiatives in support of Sea Power 21 by leveraging developing technologies from other programs and platforms that support RCOH planning and production schedules for advantageous insertion during this major recapitalization effort.
The Navy negotiated a modification to the RCOH contract for USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER (CVN 69) in December 2003. The renegotiated contract provides incentives for Northrop Grumman Newport News (NGNN) and the Navy team to work together to manage the completion of this complex availability. The Navy and NGNN created a better incentive contract structure to contain cost risk and maintain schedule. It is expected that this improved acquisition model will be used in future contracts for aircraft carrier construction and overhaul. USS DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER overhaul is scheduled to complete by November 2004.
The USS CARL VINSON (CVN 70) RCOH start was delayed one year to November 2005. USS CARL VINSON will remain available for operations until Summer 2005. This added availability enables the Navy to maintain a flexible defense posture and at the same time bring increased capability to project credible, persistent Naval combat power globally. Other advantages for the move included maintaining a balanced and stabilized industrial base for Navy ship maintenance in both public and private yards and providing additional near-term funding for ongoing recapitalization efforts. The FY 2005 Budget request includes $333 million in advance procurement funding for the USS CARL VINSON overhaul.
Lastly, the Navy commissioned USS RONALD REAGAN (CVN 76) in July 2003, and laid the keel for GEORGE H. W. BUSH (CVN 77) in September 2003.

MPF(F)
Most prominent in highlighting the value and power of the nation’s naval expeditionary capability was the Marine Corps’ participation in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. Success in this operation was due to our naval dominance, our expeditionary nature, and our flexibility and adaptability to defeat the challenges posed by enemy threats. Among other naval assets, eleven strategically located Maritime Prepositioning Force (MPF) ships were unloaded in 16 days to provide the equipment and sustainment required for two Marine Expeditionary Brigades.
Exploiting the operational speed, reach, and inherent flexibility of seapower, the Navy-Marine Corps team achieved a rapid buildup of sustained warfighting power that was combat ready to support US Central Command.
We continue to revolutionize this invaluable capability. We are currently in the process of analyzing potential platform replacements. The Analysis of Alternatives for MPF(F) is complete.
Current guidance requires MPF(F) to provide the combatant commander highly flexible operational and logistics support for missions projecting power ashore from a sea base, or during independent operations. Unlike current pre-positioning ships, MPF(F) will greatly improve our forces’ flexibility by allowing operations that are fully interoperable with Naval and joint forces.
MPF(F) represents the link between forward deployed forces and their reach-back bases both in CONUS and overseas, and will be a crucial element to Enhanced Networked Seabasing both for Naval and joint forces. Unlike any other prepositioning ship, the MPF(F) will not be reliant on a port facility, greatly reducing our dependence on international support. The ability to rapidly close and employ a large force dramatically increase the flexibility and utility of the seabased force and present the Combatant Commander with more response options than ever before. A formal report of the results is expected in Spring 2004.

Landing Craft Air Cushion (LCAC)
Our fleet LCACs saw dramatically increased operational tempo supporting worldwide operations during the past year, underscoring the need for the LCAC Service Life Extension Program (SLEP). The program, designed to extend the service life of LCACs to 30 years, had several notable accomplishments during the past year: LCAC 25 delivered on time in November 2003, and LCAC 2 delivered on time in February 2004. We awarded a contract to Textron Marine and Land Systems New Orleans for the FY 2002 and 2003 SLEPs (six craft total) in December 2002 and all craft are currently on schedule. The award of the FY 2004 contract for four craft is anticipated in the second quarter of FY 2004. The FY 2005 Budget request includes $90 million for SLEP of five craft. We are continuing with our revised acquisition strategy to refurbish vice replace the buoyancy boxes and will competitively select the FY 2005 SLEP work.
The revised acquisition strategy will deliver the required LCAC capability and service life while providing a cost savings of $104 million through the FYDP for the program.

LPD 17
The SAN ANTONIO (LPD 17) Class of amphibious transport dock ships represents a critical element of the Navy and Marine Corps future in expeditionary warfare. The FY 2005 Budget request includes $966 million to fully fund the construction of the seventh ship. Four additional LPD 17s are included in the Future Years Defense Program (FYDP), with the final ship of the 12-ship Class planned beyond the FYDP. The FY 2005 Budget request reflects rephrasing of one ship from FY 2006 to FY 2005 that will result in a more efficient workload profile as well as a total FYDP savings of approximately $40M. Lead ship detail design is complete, lead ship fabrication is approximately 85% complete, and the lead ship was launched and christened in July 2003. Current efforts are focused on managing schedule and cost. LPD 18 construction began in February 2002. LPD 19/20 construction commenced in July 2001 and October 2002, respectively. We awarded the contract for LPD 21 in November 2003, named NEW YORK to honor the victims of the World Trade Center attack, and plan to award the contract for LPD 22 in 3Q FY 2004.

LHD 8
In accordance with Congressional direction to incrementally fund LHD 8, the FY 2005 Budget requests $236M for continued construction. LHD 8 will be the first big deck amphibious ship that will be powered by gas turbine propulsion, and all of its auxiliary systems will rely on electrical power rather than steam. This change is expected to realize significant lifecycle cost savings. The ship, recently named MAKIN ISLAND, had its keel laying ceremony on February 14, 2004.

LHA(R)
The FY 2005 Budget requests $44.2 million in R&D for LHA(R). LHA(R) concept designs are being evaluated within the context of Joint Seabasing and power projection. This ship will be the centerpiece of the Expeditionary Strike Group, a contributor to the Expeditionary Strike Force, and will carry expeditionary warfare through the middle of this century. The ship will leverage the future Sea Based environment and greatly enhance command and control capabilities and at sea training for embarked forces. The resulting design is planned to provide a transformational capability that is interoperable with future amphibious and Maritime Prepositioning Force ships, high-speed vessels, and advanced rotorcraft like the MV-22 and CH-53X, and the Joint Strike Fighter. This funding supports design development leading to a planned ship construction award in FY 2008.

Auxiliary Dry Cargo Ammunition Ship (T-AKE)
The FY 2005 Budget request includes $768 million for the seventh and eighth ships. The first four ships have been authorized and appropriated and are under contract with NASSCO for construction. Exercise of the option for the fifth and sixth ships occurred in January 2004. Lead ship construction commenced in September 2003, with a projected delivery date of October 2005.
The second ship is projected to deliver in FY 2006, while the third and fourth ship deliveries are projected for FY 2007.

Cobra Judy
The Navy successfully contracted with industry to develop and build a replacement for the aging Cobra Judy surveillance platform. Working in partnership with industry and leveraging Missile Defense Agency investments in radar technology, the Navy developed an innovative strategy which accelerated the acquisition of this essential capability while also creating the possibility to leverage the Cobra Judy program to create a competition for the radar for the Navy’s future cruiser, CG(X).


COMPLETION OF PRIOR YEAR SHIPBUILDING CONTRACTS

I am pleased to report that the Navy experienced zero growth on ship construction contracts over the last year. The management actions instituted to address shipbuilding contract shortfalls have been effective. Elimination of the prior year shipbuilding budget line is within our grasp. We are continuously working to review the scope and cost of ships under construction to avoid new bills. We are also working diligently to set valid cost targets for new ships and combining this with contract terms and conditions that reward good performance. The Congress provided $636 million in FY 2004 to address cost growth for ships contracted in 1999 and 2000.
The FY 2005 Budget request reflects $484 million to address similar shortfalls, resulting in a Prior Year Cost to Complete remaining balance of $46 million dollars. However, we are still reviewing the projected completion cost for CVN-77, a ship that was budgeted and contracted for under previous procedures. To avoid future prior year completion bills, it is essential that ships be budgeted at targets which reflect the material and labor cost escalation experienced by U.S. industry.


SUMMARY

Our Naval forces are unique in their contribution to the Nation’s defense. Versatile Naval expeditionary forces are the nation’s first responders, relied upon to establish the tempo of action, control the early phases of hostilities, and set conditions for decisive resolution. America’s ability to protect its homeland, assure our friends and allies, deter potential adversaries, and project decisive combat power depends on maritime superiority. The transformation of Naval forces is dedicated to greatly expanding the sovereign options available worldwide to the President across the full spectrum of warfare by exploiting one of our Nation’s asymmetric advantages – control of the sea. The transformation of our Naval forces leverages enduring capabilities for projecting sustainable, immediately employable joint combat power by facilitating the accelerated deployment and flexible employment of additional joint capabilities through a family of systems and assets afloat. Our FY 2005 Shipbuilding Budget request seeks to accelerate our investment in Naval Power 21 to transform our force and its ability to operate as an effective component of the joint war fighting team. Congressional support of this shipbuilding plan is essential to achieving this vision.

I thank you for your consideration.

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LPD 21 New York
« Responder #4 em: Novembro 15, 2004, 11:50:33 pm »
Northrop Grumman-built New York (LPD 21) Represents Nation's Resolve to Never Forget


(Source: Northrop Grumman Corp.; issued Sept. 10, 2004)


NEW ORLEANS --- In describing the Northrop Grumman-built amphibious transport dock ship New York (LPD 21) and her sister ships today, U.S. Navy Secretary Gordon England said, “These ships...these champions of freedom, stand for life, liberty and the pursuit of all who threaten it and will ensure that we will never forget 9/11.”

England spoke during a keel laying ceremony held at the company’s Ship Systems sector here. Naming LPD 21 New York honors the victims and heroes of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City on September 11, 2001.

“These ships will take the fight to the terrorists who threaten the peace and freedom of the world,” said England. “New York, the sailors and Marines who serve America, and the men and women of Northrop Grumman will never forget and will never fail. Today, we renew our grief and we renew our resolve to, in the words of the ship’s motto, ‘Never Forget’.”

“On behalf of all the sailors and Marines who will go to sea on USS New York and all the other great ships that are built here at Northrop Grumman, I just want to say thank you to all the workers here for what you do in building the best ships in the world for our sailors and Marines.”

England’s wife, Dotty H. England, the ship’s sponsor, declared the keel of New York to be “truly and fairly laid,” following the ceremonial welding of her initials onto a steel plate.

“This asset will further enable our expeditionary forces to maintain world peace and stability,” said Philip A. Dur, president, Northrop Grumman Ship Systems. “LPD 21 will provide the foundation for quick, decisive and effective response during times of crisis or conflict. As proud and patriotic Americans, Northrop Grumman shipbuilders are building New York with special care, pride and the dedication it deserves as a fitting memorial to the victims and heroes of New York.”

New York (LPD 21) is the fifth ship in the 12-ship LPD 17 series of San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ships being built by the company. Construction is taking place at the Ship Systems sector’s Avondale shipyard with fabrication support from the other three Ship Systems facilities in Pascagoula and Gulfport, Miss., as well as Tallulah, La.

In September 2003, more than 24 tons of World Trade Center steel was melted at a Louisiana foundry to cast the bow stem of New York (LPD 21). The World Trade Center steel was provided by the people of New York for use in construction of the ship. The bow stem is the forward most portion of the ship that slices through the water.

Six previous ships, including a battleship, have been named New York. One submarine was named for New York City.

The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ships are 684 feet (208.4 meters) long and 105 feet (31.9 meters) wide and will replace the functions of four classes of older amphibious ships. This new class of ship affords the U.S. Navy’s Expeditionary Strike Group with the technology and flexibility to launch and recover amphibious landing craft such as the Landing Craft, Air Cushion; operate an array of rotary-wing aircraft; and carry and launch the Marine Corp’s Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle.

Displacing nearly 25,000 tons, these ships will be the second-largest ships in the Navy’s 21st Century Expeditionary Strike Groups. New York will have a crew of 361 sailors and will be able to carry up to 699 Marines with a surge capability of up to 800 Marines.

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SSN 776 Hawaii
« Responder #5 em: Novembro 15, 2004, 11:53:13 pm »
Keel Laying of New Attack Submarine Hawaii (SSN 776)


(Source: US Naval Sea Systems Command; issued Aug. 27, 2004)


WASHINGTON --- A keel-laying ceremony for Hawaii (SSN 776) was held on August 27th at General Dynamic Electric Boat’s Quonset Point Facility in North Kingstown, RI.

By inscribing her initials, Hawaii Governor Linda Lingle, the ship’s sponsor, marked authentication of the submarine’s keel. Hawaii is the third ship in the 30-ship Virginia Class, the Navy’s newest class of nuclear-powered attack submarines.

The submarine is being built by a partnership between General Dynamics Electric Boat and Northrop Grumman Newport News. Hawaii will be delivered to the Navy by Electric Boat in Groton, Conn., in December 2006.

Keel laying of a Navy ship has traditionally signified the beginning of its construction, as historically the construction of ships began by setting the keel in place and fastening ribs to it, building the entire ship “from the keel up.” Today, submarine construction is so different that keel laying is ceremonial. The Sponsor will have her initials welded on a metal plate affixed inside the hull. This serves as an appropriate act for marking the early phases of the ship’s construction.

Hawaii is one of 10 Virginia Class submarines under contract. The Virginia Class submarine is the only major combatant ship ready for delivery that was designed with the post- Cold War security environment in mind. Unlike any other submarine in the world, the stealthy Virginia Class is specifically suited to dominate the battlespace both in the open ocean and close to shore.

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LPD 23 Anchorage
« Responder #6 em: Novembro 15, 2004, 11:56:27 pm »
Northrop Grumman Announces $107.1 Million Award for LPD 23 Advance Procurement


(Source: Northrop Grumman Corp.; issued Aug. 17, 2004)


NEW ORLEANS --- The U.S. Navy today awarded a $107.1 million advance procurement contract to Northrop Grumman Corporation that will provide funding for long-lead materials for the USS Anchorage (LPD 23), the seventh amphibious transport dock ship of the San Antonio class. The funds will be used to purchase major equipment such as the ship’s main engines, diesel generators and other long-lead material like steel plates and shapes, pipe, cable and other major equipment.

“The advance procurement contract allows us to purchase equipment at the best possible price before we begin ship construction,” said Dr. Philip A. Dur, corporate vice president and president of the company’s Ship Systems sector, the builder of LPD ships for the U.S. Navy. “The LPD program is critical to our Navy/Marine customer and we are determined to ensure these warships are delivered to the Fleet as efficiently and productively as possible.”

To date, the first five ships awarded in the Navy’s anticipated 12-ship LPD 17 program are under contract to Northrop Grumman. San Antonio (LPD 17), New Orleans (LPD 1, Mesa Verde (LPD 19), Green Bay (LPD 20) and New York (LPD 21) are each in various stages of construction at three Northrop Grumman locations: New Orleans, and Pascagoula and Gulfport, Miss.

The LPD 17 ship class is 208.4 meters (684 feet) long, 31.9 meters (105 feet) wide, and will replace the functions of the LPD 4, LSD 36, LKA 113, and LDT 1179 classes of amphibious ships. This new ship class affords the Navy’s Expeditionary Strike Group with the technology and flexibility to launch and recover amphibious landing craft such as the Landing Craft, Air Cushion (LCAC), operate an array of rotary-wing aircraft, as well as the ability to carry and launch the U.S. Marine Corps’ Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle.

Technological and design advances provide enhanced survivability, state- of-the-art command and control capability, modernized weapons stations and enhanced ergonomics, which greatly improve the quality of life at sea for the sailors and marines. With these advances, the LPD 17 class is becoming the most sophisticated and survivable amphibious ship ever produced, and as such, offers unparalleled amphibious war fighting capabilities.

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Tomahawk Block IV
« Responder #7 em: Novembro 15, 2004, 11:59:05 pm »
Raytheon Awarded Tomahawk Block IV Full-Rate Production Contract


(Source: Raytheon Co.; issued Aug. 18, 2004)


TUCSON, Ariz. --- Raytheon Company has been awarded $287 million in Fiscal Year 2004 as part of a full-rate production contract to supply the U.S. Navy with the next-generation Block IV Tomahawk cruise missile.

The Navy and Raytheon have entered into a multi-year procurement contract to replenish the Tomahawk inventory. The value of thiscontract could reach $1.6 billion once all of the procurement orders are placed over the next five years.

Work is expected to be completed on this initial missile order by December 2006. Work will be done at Raytheon's Missile Systems businesses in Tucson, Ariz., and Camden, Ark. The first low-rate production Block IV missiles were delivered to the Navy in May.

"The Navy-Raytheon team is very honored and excited to provide the warfighter the Block IV Tomahawk missile. This revolutionary weapon, with its flexible targeting and loitering capabilities builds on the tremendous 32-year tradition and success of the legacy Tomahawk program," said Navy Capt. Bob Novak, Tomahawk All-Up-Round program manager. "The Navy's first weapons multi-year contract ensures that the fleet will get the best possible cruise missile at the best price."

"Reaching this full-rate production milestone is a testament to the hard work and dedication of everyone who was part of the design, development, testing and now, production, of this next-generation system," said Louise L. Francesconi, Raytheon Missile Systems president. "This new Block IV missile is the result of the collective commitment of the Navy and Raytheon to provide affordable, operational capabilities for critical long-range, precision strike missions. This multi-year full-rate production contract confirms the Navy's -- and Raytheon's -- commitment to deliver this needed capability to the warfighter."

Block IV Tomahawk will be the centerpiece of the Navy's new Tomahawk Baseline IV Weapons System. The system integrates the Block IV missile with improved mission planning and platform weapons control capabilities. This latest version of the Navy's surface- and submarine-launched precision strike standoff weapon incorporates innovative technologies to provide unprecedented operational capabilities while dramatically reducing acquisition, operations and support costs. The Block IV missile will have a 15-year warranty and recertification cycle, compared to the Block III variant's eight-year recertification cycle.

The new capabilities that Block IV Tomahawk brings to the Navy's sea strike capability are derived from the missile's two-way satellite data link that enables the missile to respond to changing battlefield conditions. The strike controller can "flex" the missile in flight to preprogrammed alternate targets or redirect it to a new target. This targeting flexibility includes the capability to loiter over the battlefield awaiting a more critical target.

The missile can also transmit battle damage indication imagery and missile health and status messages via the satellite data link. For the first time, firing platforms will have the capability to plan and execute Global Positioning System-only missions. Block IV will also introduce an improved anti-jam GPS receiver for enhanced mission performance.

The Navy and Raytheon are entering into a five-year procurement contract to replenish Tomahawk inventory at the most affordable cost. The legacy program Tomahawk missile is the Navy's weapon of choice for critical, long-range precision strike missions against high value, heavily defended targets.

The Block IV costs about half the price of a newly built Block III missile.

Raytheon Company, with 2003 sales of $18.1 billion, is an industry leader in defense and government electronics, space, information technology, technical services, and business and special mission aircraft. With headquarters in Waltham, Mass., Raytheon employs 78,000 people worldwide.

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Standard SM-6 Block I/Extended Range Active Missile (ERAM)
« Responder #8 em: Novembro 16, 2004, 12:02:17 am »
Pentagon Contract Announcement


(Source: US Department of Defense; issued Sept. 3, 2004)


Raytheon Co., Tucson, Ariz. is being awarded a $440,120,857 cost-reimbursable contract with cost and technical/schedule performance incentives for the Systems Development and Demonstration (SDD) of the Standard Missile-6 (SM-6) Block I/Extended Range Active Missile (ERAM).

This includes the design, development, fabrication, assembly, integration, test and delivery of flight and non-flight assets. SM-6/ERAM will improve mission capabilities including protection against overland cruise missiles.

Work will be performed in Tucson, Ariz. (80 percent); Camden, N.J. (15 percent), and Andover, Mass. (5 percent), and is expected to be completed by December 2011. Initial funding in the amount of $5,039,821 will be provided at contract award. These funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured.

The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity. (ends)



U.S. Navy Awards Raytheon $440 Million Development Contract for New STANDARD Missile-6


(Source: Raytheon Co.; issued Sept. 3, 2004)


TUCSON, Ariz. --- The U.S. Navy awarded a $440 million contract to Raytheon Company to develop and produce the new STANDARD Missile-6 Extended Range Active Missile. SM-6 is being developed to meet the Navy's requirement for an extended range anti-air warfare missile (ER-AAW).

"SM-6 not only ensures that the U.S. Navy anti-air warfare combatants will defeat evolving and asymmetric air threats throughout its service life, but its inherent capabilities also provide the basis for highly cost effective spirals to meet future mission requirements," said Louise L. Francesconi, president of Raytheon Missile Systems, which will develop, design, test, produce and support SM-6.

The initial, baseline SM-6 program provides an ER-AAW missile capability against fixed and rotary wing aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles and land attack anti-ship cruise missiles in flight, both over sea and land. With a future integrated fire control, SM-6 will provide the surface Navy with an increased battlespace against over-the-horizon AAW (anti-air warfare) threats, taking full advantage of the kinematics available to STANDARD Missile.

SM-6 will employ Raytheon's STANDARD Missile-2 Block IV airframe and proven seeker and guidance technology from across the company's product lines.

Raytheon's STANDARD Missile-2 Block IV is the latest version of SM-2 to enter production and provides an extended range capability. The addition of state-of-the-art active radar guidance enables unprecedented performance into a highly reliable, lightweight, low-cost package.

"By employing our combat proven Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) technology on our widely deployed and ship certified STANDARD Missile-2 airframe, we have created a highly effective and affordable ER-AAW solution with minimum risk for our Navy customer," said Edward Miyshiro, Raytheon's Naval Weapons Systems vice president.

"We are capitalizing on and taking advantage of the synergies and benefits -- sharing technology, producing affordable systems and quick response time to our customers -- we expected to realize by consolidating virtually all of Raytheon's missile programs in Tucson several years ago, Miyashiro said.

The U.S. Navy announced its intention in January 2003 to award a contract to Raytheon Company to develop and produce a new extended range active missile.

Raytheon Company, with 2003 sales of $18.1 billion, is an industry leader in defense and government electronics, space, information technology, technical services, and business and special mission aircraft. With headquarters in Waltham, Mass., Raytheon employs 78,000 people worldwide.

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Novo lança-granadas de 40 mm dos Marines
« Responder #9 em: Novembro 16, 2004, 11:16:11 pm »
Rochester, N.Y., Native Tests Grenade Launcher
 
 
(Source: US Marine Corps; issued Nov. 12, web-posted Nov. 15, 2004)
 
 
 MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. --- The short, compact Marine fires a weapon he never employed before toward a bunker in the distance. The explosions sound like the steady beating of a bass drum before a song picks up.  
 
As dirt flies into the air, the Rochester, N.Y., native grins knowing his grenades were on target. Corporal Fidel A. Rodriguez, fired the 40 mm Multiple Grenade Launcher, a weapon the Marine Corps is currently testing for possible future employment.  
 
The rifleman with 8th Marine Regiment, instructing various officers and troops of 2d Marine Division on the MGL, believes it’s an effective weapon system.  
 
“From a squad perspective, you can send rounds down range faster, and it gives us more firepower that we need more often than not,” explained the 2001 Brockport High School graduate, comparing the MGL with the M203, another shoulder-fired grenade launcher the Marine Corps currently uses, which is a single shot, breach-load weapon.  
 
According to Rodriguez, the MGL is not a heavy weapon like the MK-19 40 mm automatic grenade launcher, which is a weapon system that is just as effective as the MGL, but it requires three Marines to operate it.  
 
The MGL is a combination of the M203 and the MK-19. One Marine can handle it without a problem and fires multiple rounds without reloading. It is simple to load, unload, maintain and use, which makes it easier to instruct Marines on the weapon and how to fire it.  
 
“Since the MGL is so easy to use, the class I teach is about two minutes long and then the Marines get some hands on training,” he said glancing back at the weapon, smiling.  
 
Rodriguez’s first use of the weapon was during the two-day training period, and he already enhanced his skills and knowledge of the weapon.  
 
“It feels good to hit the target, like with any weapon. All you have to do is get into a comfort zone and find your ‘sweet spot’,” explained the experienced squadleader as explosions in the background drowned out his deep, crisp voice.  
 
Rodriguez also helped instruct Marine officers from the 2d Marine Division on effectively employing the MGL in combat.  
 
The brown-eyed, stocky corporal will be guarding the Headquarters of 8th Marine Regiment when they deploy to Iraq early next year, which won’t be Rodriguez’s first time in the Middle Eastern country.  
 
Rodriguez deployed to Iraq with 2d Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment during Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003 and realizes now, after using this new grenade launcher, how helpful the MGL would be if they had it during this first deployment.  
 
“It can take out cars and weaken enemy armored vehicles faster than the 203. It shoots six rounds instead of one, so you can suppress fire for a longer period of time. It would be very effective during ambushes and infiltration.  
 
“It can destroy improvised explosive devices, which are commonly used by Iraqi insurgents, easily and safely,” explained Rodriguez, who plans to re-enlist after his first term.  
 
As 2d Marine Division prepares to deploy to Iraq early next year, Rodriguez is hopeful that the MGL will be adopted by the Marine Corps as one of its primary weapons.  
 
“With a rapid rate of fire of six grenades in two seconds, this weapon has the potential to accomplish the mission twice as fast. I hope the Marine Corps decides to use this weapon, because it does its job quickly and efficiently,” he explained, turning to the wooden barricade to stepup to the firing line.  
 
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« Responder #10 em: Novembro 18, 2004, 10:45:05 pm »
Navy Christens Amphibious Transport Dock Ship
 
 
(Source: US Department of Defense; issued Nov. 17, 2004)
 
 
 The Navy will christen the newest San Antonio Class amphibious ship, New Orleans, Saturday, Nov. 20, 2004, during an 11 a.m. CST ceremony at Northrop Grumman Ship Systems - Avondale Operations, Avondale (New Orleans), La.  
 
The New Orleans honors the largest city of Louisiana and one of the world’s three largest seaports. In the past century, three naval ships have carried the name New Orleans.  
 
Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Vern Clark will deliver the ceremony’s principal address. Carolyn Shelton, wife of Gen. Henry H. Shelton, former chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, is serving as the ship’s sponsor. The ceremony will be highlighted in the time-honored Navy tradition when Shelton christens the ship by breaking a bottle of champagne across the ship’s bow to formally name New Orleans.  
 
Cmdr. John B. (Brad) Skillman, born in Muncie, Ind., and raised in St. Paris, Ohio, will be the first commanding officer of the ship. The New Orleans’ crew will consist of 360 officers and enlisted Navy personnel and is capable of embarking a landing force of approximately 800 Marines. The ship is 684 feet in length, has an overall beam of 105 feet, a navigational draft of 23 feet and displaces approximately 24,900 tons. Four turbo-charged diesels power the ship to sustained speeds of 22 knots.  
 
New Orleans is the second ship in the Navy’s new San Antonio Class. As a critical element in future Expeditionary Strike Groups, the ship will support the Marine Corps “mobility triad,” which consists of the LCAC (landing craft air cushion), the expeditionary fighting vehicle, and the Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft (MV-22). Furthermore, the ship will provide improved warfighting capabilities including an advanced command-and-control suite, increased lift-capacity in vehicle and cargo-carrying capability, and advanced ship-survivability features.  
 
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Laser-Based Ship Collision Avoidance System
« Responder #11 em: Novembro 18, 2004, 10:53:50 pm »
U.S. Navy Places Order with Laser Atlanta for the Fleet's First Laser-Based Ship Collision Avoidance System
 
 
(Source: Laser Atlanta; issued Nov. 17, 2004)
 
 
 ATLANTA --- The U.S. Navy has placed its first commercial order for Laser Atlanta's Laser Proximity Measurement System for maintaining a safe distance between ships during underway replenishment, or UNREP. Laser Atlanta, a leading laser optics technology developer and provider of measuring systems for professionals, developed the system for the Naval Sea Systems Command.  
 
The first system will be placed on the USS Laramie.  
 
"We believe that this system will be the first of many onboard the Navy's fleet and that the Navy's enthusiastic response to our system's performance will lead to it becoming the universal standard for proximity and collision avoidance in the fleet," said James Kelly, Laser Atlanta CEO. "Through rigorous testing, our proximity system has proved the flexibility and inherent value of our underlying technology. The Navy's interest has also given us visibility into other marine navigation difficulties. We intend to pursue commercial shipping and pleasure cruise industries with similar solutions to improve close-proximity events and maneuvers."  
 
Underway replenishment is a method of transferring fuel, munitions, supplies, and personnel from one ship to another while the vessels are underway. The transfer requires ships to sail along side each other where sea conditions demand careful navigation to avoid a collision. Currently UNREP navigation control is a manual process that requires a line strung between the side-by-side vessels to mark inter-ship spacing: a process that taxes captain and deck personnel.  
 
The U.S. Navy pursued commercially available technology alternatives to reduce personnel drain and provide along-side positioning assistance. Laser Atlanta incorporated its laser-based distance measuring system and a large billboard display that continuously reports the distance between ships to the captains of both ships.  
 
The Department of the Navy, Naval Sea Systems Command has included the Laser Atlanta Proximity Measurement System in its Naval Warfare Publication, authorizing the sole use for the fleet.  
 
"(The Laser Atlanta) solution offers navigational data during approach, not just while side-by-side, therefore, reducing the potential for ship collisions and increasing the efficiency of UNREP operations," said Dick Gilbert, Technical Director for the Navy's McConnell Technology & Training Center.  
 
Laser Atlanta designs and manufactures laser measurement systems for professionals and is a major supplier to U.S. and international markets. Since 1989, several generations of laser sensors have been developed for mapping, facilities management, surveying, blast profiling, traffic monitoring and accident investigation applications.  
 
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« Responder #12 em: Novembro 22, 2004, 09:14:15 pm »
Enterprise Prepares for New Landing Gear
 
 
(Source: US Navy; issued Nov. 19, 2004)
 
 
 NEWPORT NEWS, Va. --- USS Enterprise (CVN 65) (Big E) is getting an upgrade to its landing gear. The state-of-the-art cross check system is being installed during the ship's ongoing Extended Selected Restricted Availability at Northrop Grumman Newport News shipyard to help improve the ship's ability to catch aircraft.  
 
Under the old method of catching planes, an observer in Primary Flight Control (Pri-Fly) identified the incoming aircraft and relayed that information to the engine operators in the arresting gear engine rooms. These operators would set the tension of the arresting cables to match the weight of the incoming aircraft, guaranteeing the plane would come to a complete stop within the length of the runway. With the cross-check system, the watch-stander in Pri-Fly will set the weight remotely from his station.  
 
The most recent upgrade to the cross-check system is still very new to the fleet. It's so new that USS George Washington (CVN 73) (GW) is the only ship on the East Coast to have it. With Enterprise currently installing the upgraded system, Big E's arresting gear engine operators are visiting GW for some firsthand experience on how it all operates.  
 
"Our Sailors are over there keeping their qualifications up," said Aviation Boatswain's Mate (Equipment) 1st Class (AW) Richard Gallagher of air department's V-2 division. "While they're working on their quals, they're learning the cross-check system."  
 
With the new cross-check system, the deck edge operator can see the information from Pri-Fly displayed on a panel installed onto the flight deck itself. While that data goes directly to the landing area, the engine operators still remain the human element needed to ensure things run smoothly.  
 
"You still need that human factor verifying everything," said Lt. John Vinyard, the arresting gear branch officer, "and they can override it in an emergency."  
 
According to Gallagher, the engine operator's role will move more towards troubleshooting than operation. In that role, they'll still be aided by the cross-check system, as the system's sensors will indicate where any problems might be.  
 
"Up until now, operators have been doing it by sight and sound," he said. "Now it's almost like the 'check engine' light in your car. It's definitely advanced from where we started from. It takes a lot of the guess-work out."  
 
Air department personnel have been rotating through George Washington, staying for a few weeks at a time to keep their qualifications current. There are about 20 people from Enterprise's V-2 Division currently aboard GW working with that ship's landing equipment.  
 
Gallagher himself just recently returned from his time aboard GW, where he became familiar with the new system.  
 
"Eventually, we'd like to get everyone over to the GW to get a chance to see it and operate it," said Gallagher.  
 
"This was a great opportunity to get some OJT (on-the-job training) and see it actually operating during flight conditions," added Vinyard.  
 
This experience will help when Enterprise gets its own upgrade, said Vinyard. Any new system will have kinks that need to be worked out, such as aligning the sensors. The hands-on experience will also give the operators something to build on when Enterprise has its own formal, in-house training once installation is complete.  
 
This isn't the first modernization the ship's arresting gear has seen over the years. Upgrades ranging from easier to read display dials to safety improvements of the engines themselves have been installed over the years. This latest upgrade is another example of how the Navy's oldest nuclear-powered aircraft carrier remains on the cutting edge of combat effectiveness.  
 
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« Responder #13 em: Novembro 22, 2004, 09:15:26 pm »
Submarine Jimmy Carter Completes First Voyage
 
 
(Source: General Dynamics; issued Nov. 19, 2004)
 
 
 GROTON, Conn. --- The Jimmy Carter (SSN-23), the nation's newest and most advanced nuclear-powered attack submarine, returned to the Electric Boat shipyard here today following the successful completion of its first voyage in open seas, called "alpha sea trials." Electric Boat is a wholly owned subsidiary of General Dynamics.  
 
Jimmy Carter is the third and final ship of the Seawolf class – the fastest, quietest, most heavily armed submarines in the world. While Jimmy Carter retains all of the operational capabilities of the Seawolf-class, a 100-foot hull extension called the Multi-Mission Platform provides enhanced payload capabilities, enabling the submarine to accommodate the advanced technology required to develop and test a new generation of weapons, sensors and undersea vehicles.  
 
The Jimmy Carter's alpha sea trials included a range of submarine and propulsion plant operations, submerging for the first time, and high-speed runs on the surface and submerged to demonstrate that the ship's propulsion plant is fully mission capable.  
 
Participating in the sea trials were U.S. Navy Adm. Kirkland Donald, director – Naval Nuclear Propulsion; Rear Adm. Jeffrey Cassius, commander – Submarine Group Two; and Rear Adm. John Butler, program executive officer (Submarines). Also participating in the sea trials were Capt. Jeffrey Reed, the Navy's supervisor of shipbuilding in Groton; and John Casey, president of Electric Boat. The Jimmy Carter is commanded by Capt. Robert D. Kelso of Gales Ferry, Conn.  
 
General Dynamics, headquartered in Falls Church, Va., employs approximately 71,600 people worldwide and anticipates 2004 revenue in excess of $19 billion.  
 
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« Responder #14 em: Novembro 23, 2004, 11:43:13 pm »
LPD 18 Transport Dock Ship Christened In New Orleans
 
 
(Source: Northrop Grumman Corp.; issued Nov. 22, 2004)
 
 
 NEW ORLEANS --- In celebratory tradition, Carolyn Shelton, ship's sponsor, smashed a champagne bottle across the hull of the amphibious transport dock ship LPD 18, officially christening the ship New Orleans on Saturday at Northrop Grumman Corporation's New Orleans shipyard.  
 
Mrs. Shelton, wife of U.S. Army Gen. Henry Hugh Shelton (Ret.), the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, exclaimed, "bless this ship and all who sail in her," prior to her christening in the presence of approximately 1,000 guests.  
 
Principal speaker, U.S. Navy Adm. Vern Clark, chief of Naval Operations said the ship "will be ready to take American sovereignty to the far corners of the earth, for the capability designed within this ship and for our Navy-Marine Corps team, is truly a bridge to the future."  
 
"As we plan for the security of our nation...," Clark continued, "we are searching for the most advanced capabilities we can deliver to the sons and daughters of America wearing the uniforms of this nation, who are representing our nation in this global war against those using the tactics of terror. We want them to have every advantage that we can deliver to them."  
 
The name New Orleans recognizes the largest city in Louisiana and honors one of the world's largest ports. Navy Cmdr. Brad Skillman, a native of Muncie, Ind., is New Orleans' prospective commanding officer. The ship is scheduled for commissioning in 2005 and will be homeported in San Diego.  
 
"We are all here together sharing in a special pride," said Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco.  
 
Blanco read a congratulatory letter from U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La) that included the following comments: "A pride that workers from Louisiana, welders and pipefitters here in this shipyard at Avondale, together with the executives of the Navy, produced this magnificent product. As an American, I'm proud knowing this ship will soon head out to protect this nation and the freedoms that we hold so dear."  
 
New Orleans (LPD 18) is the second ship in the San Antonio (LPD 17)-class of amphibious transport dock ships being built by Northrop Grumman for the Navy/U.S. Marine Corps team. Construction is taking place at the company's New Orleans shipyard with fabrication and additional support from three other company facilities in Pascagoula and Gulfport, Miss., and Tallulah, La.  
 
Displacing nearly 25,000 tons, these ships will be the second-largest ships in the Navy's 21st Century Expeditionary Strike Groups. New Orleans will have a crew of 360 Sailors and 3 Marines and can carry up to 699 troops with a surge capability of up to 800.  
 
"Like the people of New Orleans, with their diversity of culture and history, this ship represents a rich mix of systems, a tapestry of capabilities without peer," said Philip A. Dur, president, Northrop Grumman Ship Systems sector. "The San Antonio class will transform assault from the sea and bring new technologies into the fleet at a time when the fleet needs them most. This ship is built to operate and survive in hostile waters - to go into harm's way, even as she delivers lethal and precise blows in a contested littoral. New Orleans will be tough enough to meet the challenges of the next 35 years, wherever they arise."  
 
The San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ships are 684 feet (208.5 meters) long and 105 feet (31.9 meters) wide and will replace the functions of four classes of older amphibious ships. This new class of ship affords the Navy's Expeditionary Strike Group with the technology and flexibility to launch and recover amphibious vehicles such as the Landing Craft, Air Cushion, operate an array of rotary-wing aircraft, as well as the ability to carry and launch the Marine Corp's Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle.  
 
Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems is the ship systems integrator for the LPD 17 ship class, with prime responsibility for the design and integration of the innovative Shipboard Wide Area Network, the backbone of the LPD capability. Raytheon draws upon its experience and proven expertise to integrate all government and contractor furnished equipment, providing exceptional capabilities to the joint expeditionary forces who will serve onboard.  
 
Northrop Grumman Ship Systems includes primary operations in Pascagoula and Gulfport, Miss.; and in New Orleans and Tallulah, La., as well as in a network of fleet support offices in the U.S. and Japan. Ship Systems is one of the nation's leading full-service systems companies for the design, engineering, construction and life-cycle support of major surface ships for the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and international navies.  
 
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