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zocuni

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« Responder #30 em: Janeiro 17, 2008, 02:34:20 am »
Citação de: "P44"
Brasil? Chile? Algum país de Leste?

Portugal não é de certeza


De repente se duplicarmos a exportação de vinho do porto,quem sabe?


Abraços,
zocuni

"Este governo não cairá porque não é um edifício,sairá com benzina porque é uma nódoa"Eça de Queirós
 

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ShadIntel

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« Responder #31 em: Janeiro 17, 2008, 09:42:31 am »
Citação de: "zocuni"
Citação de: "P44"
Brasil? Chile? Algum país de Leste?

Portugal não é de certeza

De repente se duplicarmos a exportação de vinho do porto,quem sabe?


Abraços,

 :lol: Mesmo se o preço do Vinho do Porto subisse tanto como o do petróleo sem abrandamento da procura, haveria melhores utilizações para tanto dinheiro.
Para quê mais uma classe de fragatas multirole ?
 

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zocuni

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« Responder #32 em: Janeiro 17, 2008, 10:56:24 am »
Citação de: "ShadIntel"
:lol: Mesmo se o preço do Vinho do Porto subisse tanto como o do petróleo sem abrandamento da procura, haveria melhores utilizações para tanto dinheiro.
Para quê mais uma classe de fragatas multirole ?


É verdade.
zocuni

"Este governo não cairá porque não é um edifício,sairá com benzina porque é uma nódoa"Eça de Queirós
 

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P44

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« Responder #33 em: Janeiro 17, 2008, 11:44:11 am »
não me admirava nada que a T-23 excedente fosse para o Chile :twisted:
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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JLRC

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« Responder #34 em: Janeiro 17, 2008, 04:19:38 pm »
Citação de: "P44"
não me admirava nada que a T-23 excedente fosse para o Chile :twisted:


E também a minha crença.
 

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P44

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« Responder #35 em: Fevereiro 14, 2008, 02:16:18 pm »
Defense Secretary Des Browne underlines his commitment to Scottish shipyards

London February 11, 2008 - The Defense Secretary Des Browne today visited Babcock Marine in Rosyth to witness the start of a £50 million investment project to the dockyard in preparation for the two Royal Navy super carriers.

Des Browne witnessed the signing of a £35m contract by Babcock Engineering Services with Glasgow-based subcontractors Edmund Nuttall Limited to modify the docks in anticipation of the future carrier work.

In addition to modifying the dock to accommodate the building of the carriers, key equipment will be purchased, such as the 'Goliath' crane, the largest in the UK. The total investment in Rosyth will amount to £50 million.

Defense Secretary, Des Browne said:

"This is a significant investment for shipbuilding in Rosyth and a symbol of our commitment to the two new aircraft carriers which will be the largest ships ever sailed by the Royal Navy.

"I am delighted to see this boost for the maritime industry in Scotland and jobs for Scottish workers."
The CEO of Babcock International Group plc, Peter Rogers and the Babcock Marine CEO, Archie Bethel OBE were also on hand to witness the start of this important project.

Peter Rogers said:

"The award of this contract is the culmination of a great deal of hard work by the Babcock Marine team and Edmund Nuttall Limited together with our colleagues in the Aircraft Carrier Alliance including the Ministry of Defense to ensure that the Rosyth site is ready to play its part in what is the most exciting and physically largest defense project for many years."

Martin Rogers, Chief Executive of Edmund Nuttall Limited, said:

"We are understandably delighted to have secured this major package of work, extending a long standing and successful relationship between Nuttall Limited and Babcock at Rosyth. We are looking forward now to starting work on site."


  www.seawaves.com
................................................................

£35m Contract Allows Assembly of Navy Super Carriers

London February 11, 2008 -The start of an investment project to modify the dockyard at Rosyth, in preparation for the assembly of the two Royal Navy super carriers was witnessed today, 11 February 2008, by Defense Secretary Des Browne.


The two 65,000 tonne aircraft carriers, HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales, are to be constructed in sections in shipyards at Portsmouth and Barrow-in-Furness, Glasgow, with final assembly at Babcock's Rosyth in Scotland.

Des Browne witnessed the signing of a £35m contract today by Babcock Engineering Services with Glasgow-based subcontractors Edmund Nuttall Limited to modify the docks in order to accommodate the building of the carriers and widen its direct entrance.

The total investment in Rosyth will amount to £50m which will also provide for the necessary equipment to be purchased, such as the 'Goliath' crane, the largest in the UK, and hauling gear.

Defense Secretary, Des Browne said:

"This is a significant investment in shipbuilding in Rosyth and a symbol of our commitment to the two new aircraft carriers, which will which will be the largest ships ever sailed by the Royal Navy."

The CEO of Babcock International Group plc, Peter Rogers and the Babcock Marine CEO, Archie Bethel OBE were also on hand to witness the start of this important project. Peter Rogers said:

"The award of this contract is the culmination of a great deal of hard work by the Babcock Marine team and Edmund Nuttall together with our colleagues in the Aircraft Carrier Alliance including the Ministry of Defense, to ensure that the Rosyth site is ready to play its part in what is the most exciting and largest defense project for many years."





"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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AMRAAM

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« Responder #36 em: Junho 26, 2008, 01:27:21 pm »
Pensaba,que esta noticia ya habia sido tratada aqui,pero me he dado cuenta de que no,o al menos en este topic.Pues nada ahi va(Es de algunos dias atras):
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Government cancels two warships
Royal Navy's new Type 45 Destroyer HMS Daring
The Royal Navy does not have "unlimited resources"

The government has cancelled plans to build an extra two Type 45 Destroyers for the Royal Navy.

Armed Forces Minister Bob Ainsworth told the Commons it would not be taking up the option to build the seventh and eighth warships.

Already, six high-tech £600m Type 45s have been ordered and will be based in Portsmouth, Hampshire.

Mr Ainsworth said there were not "unlimited resources" for the Navy but the fleet had "sufficient capability".

A spokesman for Portsmouth-based VT Group, which builds the bows, funnels and masts for the ships, said it was not surprised and had not budgeted for the order - therefore the decision would have no impact on jobs.

Mr Ainsworth, opening a Commons debate on defence, said: "The reality is we do not have unlimited resources.
   
The six destroyers already on contract will provide a formidable capability
Armed Forces Minister
Bob Ainsworth MP

"We have to prioritise between a range of competing requirements, focusing on the balance between current operations and future capability.

"That is why I can confirm that we have taken a decision not to take the option to order the seventh and eighth Type 45 destroyers.

"The six destroyers already on contract will provide a formidable capability."

The ships are assembled at BAE Systems shipyard on the Clyde in Scotland.

The first of the Type 45s, HMS Daring, is due to go into service next year.

Mr Ainsworth added that work on new vessels to replace the Type 22 and 23 frigates would, also be accelerated.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/hampshire/7464085.stm


Bueno,como todo no han de ser malas noticias os dejo un bello regalito :wink:
"Con la sangre de un guerrero y el primer rayo de sol, hizo Dios una bandera, y se la dio al pueblo español"
 

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nelson38899

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« Responder #37 em: Agosto 15, 2008, 03:08:58 pm »
boas

Depois de ter lido a noticia que vou por a seguir fiquei com a ideia, que ja não falta muito para termos navios de guerra com peças de artilharias iguais aos da 2ª grande guerra.

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BAE to Build 155mm Naval Gun for U.K

LONDON - The possibility of British warships firing 155mm artillery is a step closer to reality after an announcement from BAE Systems that it has signed a deal with the Ministry of Defence to build a gun to undertake land-based firing trials next year.

CORDA, BAE's consulting arm, together with the company's Land Systems business in Britain and defense research company QinetiQ, hope to start live-firing trials in fall 2009 with a 155mm naval gun based on the British Army's AS90 self-propelled howitzer system.

BAE said it is also exploiting the capabilities of other company business units such as Armament Systems in the U.S. and Bofors in Sweden.

The Armament Systems division is already in the latter stages of developing a similar system for the U.S. Navy - the 155mm Advanced Gun System destined for the force's DDG 1000 destroyer program.

No more than two DDG 1000s are likely to be built rather than the seven planned, but the AGS could find its way onto up-rated Arleigh Burke DDG-51 destroyers likely to be built in their place.

If the 4 million pound ($7.55 million) British contract goes according to plan, BAE hopes to move to a full technology demonstrator program ahead of possible retrofitting of the gun to existing Type 23 frigates and Type 45 destroyers, as well as an upcoming generation of warships known as the Future Surface Combatant.

This latest contract is the third phase of work that kicked off in 2006 as part of a three-year MoD research program known as Maritime Surface Effects. Eight different study programs are looking at issues such as coastal suppression, naval fire support, offensive and defensive surface warfare, and the role of unmanned surface vehicles.

BAE said in a statement that replacing the current 4.5-inch gun with a 155mm system would increase the range and effect on targets while also reducing costs by using the same gun and ammunition as the British Army.

Previous study phases examined the feasibility of fitting the 155mm gun into the existing Mk8 Mod 1 turret and considered some of the technology risks of the proposed solution.

"In addition to providing the Royal Navy with a potential low-cost route to a significant enhancement in capability, this program will help to sustain the U.K. industrial capacity to design, upgrade and manufacture artillery and gunnery systems," BAE Land System executive John Kelly said.


http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i= ... =EUR&s=SEA
"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
Agostinho da Silva
 

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Nuno Bento

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« Responder #38 em: Agosto 15, 2008, 06:14:25 pm »
Não vejo grande utilidade numa peça de elevado calibre hoje em dia, são os misseis são mais eficazes contra navios, e as peças de calibres mais pequenas permitem cadencias de tiro superiores, para alem de serem mais baratas.

A unica vantagem que vislumbro é para bombardeamento de terra.
 

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jmg

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« Responder #39 em: Agosto 15, 2008, 06:50:58 pm »
As peças para mim fazem sentido para missões de interdição em que podem ser usadas para dissuadir embarcações civis de penetrarem num determinado espaço marítimo ou como foi dito para apoio à operações terrestres, bombardeando a costa.
Para mim não deve ser descurada bem pelo contrário.
Não te fies de mim, se te faltar valentia.
(Inscrição gravada num antigo punhal.Autor desconhecido)

ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ
 

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nelson38899

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« Responder #40 em: Novembro 20, 2008, 09:29:21 pm »
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BOTADO EL CUARTO DESTRUCTOR TYPE 45
El Lunes 17 de Noviembre era botado el destructor Dragon, cuarto del Tipo 45 para la Royal Navy. La ceremonia tuvo lugar en los astilleros de BVT del río Clyde. El Dragon estuvo decorado con un gran dragón de Gales en su proa.
De los otros tres destructores botados, el Daring ha finalizado las pruebas del constructor, el Dauntless las acaba de iniciar hace unos días y el Diamond se encuentra finalizando su construcción en los astilleros y empezará sus pruebas de mar dentro de un año. El quinto está aún en construcción en grada y del sexto se inició el corte de metal en Febrero de este año.
Una de las características de estos destructores es la posibilidad de transportar 60 Marines completamente equipados y operar un helicóptero Chinook desde su plataforma de vuelo.
http://eltiradorsolitario.blogspot.com/


"Que todo o mundo seja «Portugal», isto é, que no mundo toda a gente se comporte como têm comportado os portugueses na história"
Agostinho da Silva
 

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P44

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« Responder #41 em: Dezembro 09, 2008, 11:10:28 am »
novos CVF britânicos possivelmente adiados 2 anos:

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Navy faces aircraft carriers delay
By Sylvia Pfeifer and Alex Barker

Published: December 4 2008 23:32 | Last updated: December 4 2008 23:32

The Royal Navy will have to wait up to two years longer for its £4bn aircraft carriers under cost-cutting plans being finalised by John Hutton, defence secretary.

The decision to push back one of the government’s sacrosanct defence equipment programmes represents a sharp reversal. Ministers have always insisted the two ships would be in service by 2014 and 2016.


According to industry insiders, the Ministry of Defence is considering two options: delaying the in-service date of the first carrier by 12 months or delaying the second ship by up to two years.
Mr Hutton’s willingness to delay such an important programme underlines the severity of the cash crisis facing the MoD. He has expressed determination to make the department “live within its means” while prioritising support for frontline troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.

He is expected to stress that investment will not stop and there will be no impact on jobs. The delay, intended to spread costs, will also help synchronise the project with the expected delivery in 2017 of the F-35 Lightning II or Joint Strike Fighter, the aircraft being built to fly from the ships.

Industry executives think the earlier in-service dates unrealistic given the contract for the programme was signed this year.

The results of a review of the equipment programme are expected early next week. No major programmes will be cancelled but most will face some delay. The moves will not be enough to allow the MoD to balance its budget for 2009.

Future Lynx, the £1bn helicopters programme, is safe although the final number ordered will be cut marginally. AgustaWestland, the defence contractor, will be awarded an additional contract to upgrade existing Lynx helicopters for use in Afghanistan.

A £16bn programme to build armoured vehicles for the army will be revamped. The MoD is expected to prioritise investment in the Scout reconnaissance vehicle rather than the Fres utility vehicle, in a blow to General Dynamics, the US contractor that this year won a provisional contract for the design.

The Society of British Aerospace Companies wrote to Alistair Darling, chancellor, and Peter Mandelson, business secretary, before last month’s pre-Budget report urging them to consider the contribution the sector could make to an economic stimulus package.

On Thursday night the MoD said it hoped to make an announcement “in due course”.

Additional reporting by James Blitz


http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/bb1b9392-c252 ... ck_check=1
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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Vicente de Lisboa

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« Responder #42 em: Dezembro 09, 2008, 04:14:33 pm »
As imagens da Daring deviam vir com um aviso prévio, de tão feia que a coisa é.
 

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P44

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« Responder #43 em: Dezembro 10, 2008, 08:46:18 am »
mais um corte....

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Falkland Islands to be left without warship

The Falkland Islands are to be left without the protection of a British warship for the first time since the war with Argentina because the Royal Navy no longer has enough ships to meet all its commitments.




Sean Rayment, Defence Correspondent
Last Updated: 1:32PM GMT 07 Dec 2008


HMS Northumberland has been pulled off Falkland duties because of Navy outstretch


The frigate HMS Northumberland, which is armed with guided missiles, torpedoes and a Lynx helicopter, was due to be sent on patrol to the islands this month. But it will now be replaced by a Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) vessel not equipped for offensive combat operations.
The controversial decision was forced on senior naval commanders by the increasing problem of overstretch facing the Royal Navy.
Cuts to the size of the fleet over the last 10-years – the Royal Navy has just 22 frigates and destroyers compared to 65 in 1982 – has left the service with too few ships to meet its responsibilities.
The Telegraph also understands that the Royal Navy is likely to face more cuts in the near future while major projects such as the £3.9bn new carrier programme could be delayed. Ageing vessels such as Type 23 frigates, which were commissioned in the late 1980s, will have their service life extended by up to 20-years.
The last time the British government reduced its naval presence in the South Atlantic was in 1982 when the ice patrol vessel HMS Endurance was withdrawn from patrolling the area around the Falkland Islands. The move prompted an invasion by the Argentine military and led to the Falklands War.
HMS Northumberland was due to begin a six-month voyage in the South Atlantic but has been diverted to take part in the European Union counter-piracy mission off the coast of east Africa.
In its place, RFA Largs Bay, a landing ship which is crewed by civilian sailors, will arrive in the South Atlantic this week to begin its mission of protecting the islands from the potential threat posed by Argentina, which still claims sovereignty of the islands.
The vessel will be equipped with a Lynx Mark 8 helicopter and Sea Skua anti ship missiles for self-defence. The landing ship has a small number of Royal Navy sailors who are responsible for manning a helicopter flight deck as well as a boarding party made up of lightly-armed Royal Marines but Royal Navy sources have said that the ship would be able to do little more than protect itself in the event of an emergency.
The size of the military force on the Falklands has been dramatically reduced since the end of the war in 1982. The islands are garrisoned by just 50 soldiers, composed of infantry, engineers and signallers. The RAF has four Tornado F3 air defence aircraft and crews to maintain them while the naval component consists of just one ship.
The Royal Navy has some 22 frigates and destroyers in the fleet, however only a third are available for operations at any one time and the seven currently available for operational service are already taking part in deployments.
One senior naval source said that successive cuts by the government had left the Royal Navy vulnerable and unable to properly defend its interests overseas.
He said: "The Royal Navy has been pared to the bone. The fleet is now so small that the Royal Navy can't even send a proper warship to guard the Falklands. By the time the Royal Navy has met all of its operational obligations there is nothing left and that is why a civilian-crewed Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship has been sent to the Falklands.
"In any shooting war with a serious enemy the Royal Navy would cease to exist within a few weeks. Rock bottom is an appropriate description of where the Royal Navy now is."
A Ministry of Defence document leaked to The Telegraph last year revealed that the Royal Navy would struggle to fight a war against a "technologically capable adversary". The report also stated that the Royal Navy was an "under-resourced" fleet composed of "ageing and operationally defective ships".
Admiral Sir Alan West, a former Chief of the Naval Staff, and who is a security minister in the Lords, has previously warned that the reduction in the fighting capability of the Royal navy could cost lives and gave warning that Britain would end up with a "tinpot" Navy if more money were not spent on defence.
Liam Fox, the shadow Tory defence spokesman, said: "The Government needs to explain how this won’t impact on the security of the Falklands. What on earth are we doing putting EU flag waving ahead of our own security priorities?
"It is outrageous that the British Government would ever diminish the protection of our strategic interests in order to pay homage to the politics of the EU."
A spokesman for the MoD, said: "The government is fully committed to the defence of the Falkland Islands. There is a whole package of assets – air, sea and land assigned to the region, not simply one ship. The Royal Navy maintains the flexibility to redeploy its ships to where they will have maximum effect."
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

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P44

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« Responder #44 em: Dezembro 11, 2008, 01:27:10 pm »
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Carriers to enter service late  
 

The two new carriers would be the biggest in Royal Navy history

Defence Secretary John Hutton has said that the Royal Navy's two new aircraft carriers are likely to enter service a year or two later than planned.

In a statement to MPs, he added there would be no delay in construction - but work would continue at a slower pace, sustaining jobs for longer.

The £4bn shipbuilding project is due to begin next spring.

The announcement affects shipyards in Appledore, in north Devon, Portsmouth, Barrow-in-Furness, Glasgow and Rosyth.

'Workforce stability'

Mr Hutton said: "We have concluded that there is scope for bringing more closely into line the introduction of the Joint Combat Aircraft and the aircraft carrier. This is likely to mean delaying the in-service date of the new carriers by one to two years.

"We are in close consultation with the Aircraft Carrier Alliance on how this might best be done. Construction is already under way and will continue.

"The programme will still provide stability for the core shipyard workforce, including 10,000 UK jobs."

Des Browne gave the green light for the construction of HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales in May, when he was defence secretary. Contracts worth about £3.2bn were signed in July.

'Financial chaos'

BBC defence correspondent Caroline Wyatt said the government did not view cancelling major defence projects as an option, but considered delays as a way of controlling the Ministry of Defence's (MoD) spiralling budget.

Liberal Democrat MP Mike Hancock, a member of the Commons Defence Committee, said the MoD was in financial "chaos".

Meanwhile, hundreds of jobs in Somerset are to be secured due to a new government order for 62 Future Lynx helicopters from Agusta Westland, BBC West has learned.

An immediate contract will also be awarded to upgrade existing Lynx helicopters to prepare them for battlefield sites such as Afghanistan.

The order, worth £1bn, has been delayed for more than two years.






http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7776695.stm
"[Os portugueses são]um povo tão dócil e tão bem amestrado que até merecia estar no Jardim Zoológico"
-Dom Januário Torgal Ferreira, Bispo das Forças Armadas
 

 

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