Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)

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Cabeça de Martelo

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #765 em: Janeiro 04, 2017, 04:24:29 pm »
Indonesia suspends military cooperation with Australia after training material insult
By Indonesia correspondent Adam Harvey and Andrew Greene


 Members of the Indonesian Army's Kopassus special forces patrol.
PHOTO: Indonesia's Kopassus special forces train in Perth. (Reuters: Edgar Su )

Indonesia has suspended all military cooperation with Australia, allegedly over insulting training material on display at an Australian Special Forces base in Perth.

 :arrow: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-01-04/indonesia-suspends-all-military-cooperation-with-australia/8161362
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #766 em: Janeiro 14, 2017, 04:35:13 pm »
A Alemanha vai enviar quatro helicópteros NH-90 e quatro helicópteros de ataque Tiger para o Mali ainda no início deste ano como parte da missão das Nações Unidas. Vão substituir os Chinook e Apache holandeses que estavam até ao momento lá.

Germany to send Tigers and NH90s to Mali

Cumprimentos,
:snip: :snip: :Tanque:
 

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #767 em: Janeiro 17, 2017, 11:59:03 am »
American Women Are Signing Up for Combat in Unexpected Numbers
Women have qualified for combat jobs at double the rate U.S. Army officials expected, but their future is uncertain

by KEVIN KNODELL
“I have to admit that there was a time when I was on the other side of the argument,” Rachel Washburn said. “I thought, like maybe full integration isn’t what’s best.”
In college, she was a Philadelphia Eagles cheerleader before she commissioned as a U.S. Army intelligence officer. She’s hardly the traditional archetype of an American warfighter.
However, when the U.S. military’s Joint Special Operations Command launched a program to attach women to special operations units as members of “cultural support teams” to help with intelligence gathering, Washburn felt called to at least try.
“Even though I wanted to go in and I wanted to be close to combat, and I was obviously felt called to do something like the cultural support mission — or maybe if things had been different I would have branched infantry—[but with] the politics of integration, I was kind of hesitant about what does integration really look like?” she explained.
“[Then] I got on a team and saw how much value added there is to harnessing all sorts of talent regardless of gender.”

During Washburn’s first deployment as a junior officer, she was attached to a small U.S. Army Special Forces team doing when the Pentagon called “village stability operations.” She lived in a small mud compound and helped gather intelligence and track insurgents.
Along the way she got in firefights with the Taliban and navigated Afghanistan’s rugged landscape. Sometimes she would be accompanied by just one fellow soldier or an Afghan interpreter. It was a high risk, high stress assignment — and it transformed her view of herself and what she could do.

“All those stereotypical arguments people have against integration, I saw them first hand debunked,” Washburn said.
“You have the hygiene concerns, you have men wanting to defend women, you have women falling out of very long movements, women not reacting properly to a firefight — I saw all of those things not manifest in the way people are worried about, and it just made me incredibly passionate for the need for women to have the ability to pursue any job they want to in the military.”
Washburn is a member of a unique generation of women in the U.S. military’s history. In 2016, the Pentagon officially opened all military jobs to female applicants as part of an initiative laid out by the Obama administration.
The shift followed the repeal of the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy enacted under the Clinton administration. Those rules banned openly gay troops from joining or serving in the military. A separate rule — since repealed by Congress — criminalized consensual same-sex conduct within the military.
The integration process is already well underway. In December 2016, the Army reported that a higher number of women than expected had been joining and qualifying for ground combat jobs as both new recruits and transfers — double the number senior leaders had predicted. Many have already reported for duty at their units.
“The female attrition rate is lower or the same as men,” U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Hugh Van Roosen said. “These are women who are physically fit and absolutely prepared for this.”
In January 2017, the U.S. Marine Corps reported the first batch of female infantry Marines were arriving at their units at Camp Lejune, North Carolina, all of which had to meet the Corp’s new, tougher standards for combat units. Even though women are joining and succeeding at a higher rate than many military leaders predicted, it will still take time before full integration.
“Relatively small cohorts of female and male officers are currently being trained together and assigned to the same company as a way of gradually adjusting the culture in male-dominated units before female enlisted soldiers begin to graduate this summer,” an Army news release stated.
The prospect of full integration of women into ground combat jobs has evoked heated debate between those who argue it’s about equal opportunity and broadening the talent pool and those who argue it will threaten military readiness.
Donald Trump’s 2016 election victory cast some doubt on the potential future of a fully gender integrated force. Trump — a military high school graduate who got five draft deferments and once boasted that avoiding sexually transmitted infections was his “personal Vietnam” — suggested during the campaign that he might move to reinstate the military’s policy of combat exclusion.
As proponents of a gender integrated force prepare for a potential battle, a 2013 American Civil Liberties Union lawsuit against the U.S. government brought by several female veterans challenging the policy of combat exclusion could find new relevance.
Despite the Obama administration’s move to integrate women, the ACLU never dropped the suit.
“Both the Combat Exclusion Policy and the order repealing it are at the discretion of the Department of Defense,” Colleen Farrell, a Marine who was among the women party to the suit, explained. “The new administration’s Secretary of Defense could re-impose the ban on women in combat.”
“Additionally, a Republican congress could legislate a ban,” she continued. “Until women are fully integrated in every service, our lawsuit will remain relevant.”
However, whether in official combat jobs or not, women have already been fighting for years.

Despite the official ban on women in ground combat units that was in place for most of the post-9/11 era, women were regularly in the line of fire in both Iraq and Afghanistan.
There is a military maxim — the enemy always gets a vote. The chaotic nature of counterinsurgency warfare doesn’t allow for cleanly delineated boundaries between “combat” and “non-combat.” There was — and is — always the potential for a fight.
In March 2005, a group of around 50 Iraqi insurgents ambushed a U.S. military convoy. Members of the Army’s 617th Military Police Company fought back.
One of the soldiers in the unit was then-23-year-old Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester. For her actions, which included killing three enemy insurgents, Hester received a Silver Star, the third highest award a soldier can receive for valor in combat.
In Iraq, American commanders regularly sent military police units — not technically combat units — on patrols and to advise and train local police. These jobs took the military cops “outside the wire” and into harm’s way. Some soldiers called them the “co-ed infantry.”
“It was that one job where you can get out there and get dirty and be in an infantry-type environment,” Hester later told The Tennessean. “I guess it was one of the more exciting jobs in the military for women when I enlisted and it still is now.”

But it was far from the only job that took women into battle.
Women took part in convoy operations down bomb infested roads, diffused bombs as members of explosive ordinance disposal teams, worked with local officials as members of civil affairs teams and went out into insurgent territory as human intelligence gatherers.
Each job was potentially fatal.
“I really found that the formative years for me were when I was a captain,” said Kate Germano, a Marine veteran who’s now the chief operating officer of the Service Women’s Action Network, an advocacy group for women serving in uniform.
Germano is a combat veteran who served in Iraq and deployed on several emergency humanitarian operations during her time with the Marines.
“I would say that the Marine Corps is very, very good at putting differences aside when it needs to most and that’s what I take away,” Germano said. “My best memories are those types of bonding experiences with my peers.”
She said the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan fundamentally changed many of the discussions about the role of women in war.
“Women were operating in every MOS [Military Occupational Specialty] except for the ground combat jobs for the past 16 years, proving themselves more so than in any other combat environment in our history,” Germano explained. “It made it more difficult to defend women not being in combat.”
The questions for military professionals became less about whether women could endure combat. The conversation turned to how the military should deploy female troops in combat, and whether that meant incorporating women into traditionally male dominated fighting units.

For instance, the U.S. military had long included women on missions to help build trust among local populations, or if needed, to search local women for weapons or contraband. Over time, military leaders began creating specially trained teams of women that received extra combat training and were attached directly to combat units.
Cultural norms concerning relations between men and women are a complex matter in the Middle East and South Asia — where many of America’s recent wars have been fought. The Free Syrian Army at one time had more female combat leaders than the U.S. military. War Is Boring documented Kurdish women in combat in Iraq.
But many regions are much more conservative than others, and violating local norms can cause long lasting problems. For instance, a man putting his hands on a woman to search for weapons could be seen as an obscene violation.
Farrell, who followed her sister into the Marine Corps, originally trained as an air support control officer, akin to a military air traffic controller, but ultimately spent little time in the job. When she learned that newly formed Female Engagement Teams needed recruits for duty in Afghanistan, she jumped at the opportunity.
“I have always been an athlete and interested in the military,” Farrell explained. “I chose the Marine Corps because of the history and traditions, the discipline and physicality, and the esprit de corps.”
“As soon as I got to the fleet, I volunteered for the Female Engagement Team and spent a majority of the next three years training and deploying with the team,” she added. “All Marines want to fight at the tip of the spear, and the Female Engagement Team allowed me to do that.”
As part of these units, increasing numbers of women went on missions carrying the same equipment as men, sometimes for days at a time. Not all of the men were immediately on board with the idea.
When Washburn went to Afghanistan in a cultural support unit attached to an Army Special Forces team, she observed growing pains as the team’s male soldiers adjusted.
“We were the first females they’d ever worked with,” she said. “Frankly they weren’t sure how best to utilize us … we kind of had to win their hearts and minds first.”

...

 :arrow: https://warisboring.com/american-women-are-signing-up-for-combat-in-unexpected-numbers-7dc2fcef4390#.aamg0jsxr

7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

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HSMW

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #768 em: Janeiro 19, 2017, 11:01:20 am »
T-62M e BMP-1 para a Síria:

http://defence-blog.com/army/syrian-army-receives-the-upgraded-t-62m-main-battle-tanks-from-russia.html
Deve ser aquilo que os russos tinham a mais.
http://www.youtube.com/profile_videos?user=HSMW

"Tudo pela Nação, nada contra a Nação."
 

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #769 em: Janeiro 21, 2017, 12:18:16 pm »


Cá estão eles.
Sempre pensei com que material iria a Rússia apoiar o reequipamento do exército sírio e que uns T-62 ou T-64 da reserva com alguma modernização serviriam bem.
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mafets

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #770 em: Janeiro 23, 2017, 11:16:33 am »
http://www.janes.com/article/67088/china-enhances-pgz-07-capability
Citar
The PGZ-07 twin 35 mm self-propelled anti-aircraft gun (SPAAG) system currently in service with China's People's Liberation Army (PLA) has been upgraded with the addition of a new sensor pod.

The existing sensor pod is positioned above the tracking radar, which is mounted on the forward part of the turret, and includes a laser rangefinder to ensure that the target is within the effective range of the 35 mm cannon. The additional sensor pod is mounted to the right of the tracking radar.

The sensor pods contain a number of systems, including a charge-couple device (CCD) camera and a thermal imager, that enable the 35 mm cannon to be used in almost all weather conditions.

Furthermore, the pods can be used if electronic countermeasures are jamming the surveillance and tracking radars, or if adversaries are using anti-radiation missiles (ARM).

The 35 mm cannon used in the PGZ-07 are Chinese-manufactured versions of the Swiss Oerlikon (today Rheinmetall Air Defence) KDA, which are also used in the similar German Krauss-Maffei Wegmann Gepard twin 35 mm SPAAG.


Saudações
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

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mafets

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #771 em: Fevereiro 19, 2017, 02:14:44 pm »
http://www.janes.com/article/67827/finland-buys-k9-howitzers-from-south-korea

Citar
Finland will purchase K9 Thunder 155 mm self-propelled howitzers from South Korea, the country's defence ministry (MoD) confirmed on 17 February.

According to the MoD announcement, Finnish defence minister Jussi Niinistö has approved the purchase of 48 former South Korean Army K9s at a cost of EUR146 million (USD155 million). The MoD stated this includes training, spares, and maintenance. The contract also includes options for the procurement of additional K9s, the MoD added.

The move has been expected since the MoD announced in July 2016 it was beginning direct negotiations with South Korea to buy K9s. At the time, the MoD said the choice to pursue the K9 over other options on the market was due to price, and the compatibility of the system with a conscription-based military. The Finnish Defence Forces (FDF) have been conducting trials of the K9 since late 2016, some of which Jane's witnessed.

Deliveries of the howitzers to Finland are due to begin during 2017, in order to begin staff training this year. Finnish conscripts are due to begin being trained on the K9 in 2019, while deliveries of all 48 systems are due to be completed by 2024. This timeline accords with previously released Finnish plans to declare initial operating capability with a new howitzer in 2020 and full operating capability in 2025.

Purchasing the K9 will enable Finland to phase out the majority of its old Soviet-designed artillery systems. Currently the FDF operate a number of Soviet-era and -calibre artillery pieces, including the towed 130 mm M-46, self-propelled 152 mm 2S5 Giatsint-S, towed 122 mm D-30, and self-propelled 122 mm 2S1 Gvozdika. The K9s are expected to supplement the FDF's existing NATO-calibre artillery pieces, including its towed 155 mm 155 GH 52 APU systems.

Although not mentioned by the MoD, it is expected that the K9s will need to go through an overhaul, modification, and modernisation process before entering FDF service.


Cumprimentos
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

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mafets

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #772 em: Maio 29, 2017, 09:59:29 am »
http://www.janes.com/article/70561/first-danish-piranha-5-rolled-out-by-gdels-mowag
Citar
The first of 309 Piranha 5 armoured personal carriers (APCs) for the Royal Danish Army was rolled out on 17 May in a ceremony at the facilities of manufacturer General Dynamics European Land Systems - Mowag (GDELS-Mowag) in Kreuzlingen, Switzerland.

The Piranha 5 was selected by the Danish Defence Acquisition and Logistics Organization (DALO) for the Royal Danish Army's APC requirement in April 2015.

The first seven pre-series vehicles, which are built in the infantry combat vehicle (ICV) configuration, will be put through a comprehensive test programme, starting in the second half of 2017.

Upon successful completion of the test programme by the end of the year, deliveries will start in early 2018. All Piranha 5s are set to be in service by 2023, according to the Danish Ministry of Defence.


Saudações
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

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Lusitano89

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #773 em: Maio 29, 2017, 08:43:31 pm »
Suécia militariza Gotlândia com os olhos postos na Rússia


 

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perdadetempo

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #774 em: Maio 30, 2017, 09:13:54 pm »
 

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas) MOWAG PIRANHA5 A CAMINHO
« Responder #775 em: Junho 08, 2017, 06:01:07 pm »
Analysis: Can the Piranha devour the APC competition?

08th June 2017 - 13:00  by Christopher F Foss in Kreuzlingen


 
The first example of the Danish Army's Piranha 5 APC was rolled out in May (Photo: Christopher F Foss)


General Dynamics European Land Systems (GDELS-MOWAG) is hoping for increased sales of its latest 8x8 Piranha 5 armoured personnel carrier (APC) following the handing over of the first of 309 examples to the Danish Defence Acquisition and Logistics Organisation (DALO) in May.

Production is now underway at a new final assembly and integration facility in Kreuzlingen, Switzerland with some ten vehicles already on the production line.

In addition to the first contract for 309 Piranha 5s, there is also an option for an additional 141 vehicles, which would bring the fleet up to 450 units, although this is not expected to be firmed up for a number of years.

In addition, Spain has selected the Piranha 5 to replace its currently deployed 6x6 BMR-600 and four prototypes will be supplied by GDELS-MOWAG to GDELS Santa Barbara Sistemas in Spain where volume production will eventually be undertaken.

Now that the Piranha 5 is in quantity production for Switzerland and has been selected by Spain, GDELS is hoping for extra export sales to keep the production lines running.

The Swiss Army is due to order a batch of Piranha APCs fitted with the RUAG Defence 120 mm Cobra advanced mortar, and there is also another potential army requirement for several hundred APCs.

Romania continues to take delivery of the Piranha 3 and the vehicle has recently been demonstrated in Bulgaria to meet one of its requirements.


Verification acceptance tests should be concluded and user acceptance test completed by the end of 2017. This will allow for deliveries to start to the DALO early in 2018 followed by deliveries to the Danish Army in 2019.

In the APC role, the Danish Piranha 5 has a crew of three consisting of commander, gunner and driver plus nine dismounts.

As well as the APC version, the Danish Army will likely acquire five specialised versions of the Piranha 5 including ambulance, command, engineer, heavy mortar and recovery.

According to Pederson, ‘exact quantities of the specific numbers of each variant have yet to be decided’.

All the Piranha 5 vehicle variants will have the same roof line as the APC apart from the ambulance which will have a higher roof line for greater internal volume for its specialised role.

According to the Danish Army, the 120 mm heavy mortar version will be a turntable-type firing through open roof hatches rather than a turret-mounted mortar system. The mortar type has yet to be selected by the DALO.

The engineer variant will be fitted with a wide range of specialist equipment at the front of the hull including mine clearing devices, dozer blade and fascines on the roof to drop into ditches. Some of the Danish Piranha 5s will be fitted with a remote weapon station (RWS) armed with a .50 M2 HB machine gun (MG) on the right side of the roof.


The Danish Army currently uses the BAE Systems Bofors Lemur (RWS) armed with a .50 M2 HB MG on a number of platforms which were supplied from 2007 and there are potentially other options.

The RWS is provided as government furnished equipment (GFE) as is the communications equipment.

All of the Piranha 5s for Denmark are powered by a Scania diesel engine coupled to a ZF automatic transmission and feature powered steering on the first, second and four road wheel stations.

Like earlier Piranha variants, the latest Piranha 5 was developed as a private venture and was unveiled at Eurosatory in Paris in 2010 and, when compared to earlier vehicles, has more volume, payload and protection.

It can be fitted with a wide range of weapon systems including a Belgian CMI Defence Cockerill 3105 two-person armed turret with a 105 mm gun fed by an automatic loader.

Typical gross vehicle weight (GVW) for the Piranha 5 is around 33 tonnes, of which 15 tonnes is payload which includes armour package, weapons, ammunition, fuel and crew.

Standard equipment includes an air conditioning system, NBC system, cameras for situational awareness through 360 degrees, electronic architecture and height adjustable semi-active suspension.

The British Army also has a requirement for a mechanised infantry vehicle (MIV) for its Strike Brigades and the Piranha 5 could be one of the vehicles offered. This is actually one of the few remaining European 8x8 competitions, along with those mentioned above.

In addition to the Piranha 5, GDLS has also said that it could offer the UK a number of other 8x8 platforms – including the LAV 6.0 and LAV 700 – depending on exactly what the customer requires.

For Denmark, the DALO placed a contract in January 2016 for 309 Piranha 5 vehicles plus an integrated logistics support (ILS) package valued at DKK4.5 billion ($679 million).

According to Brig Gen Anders Pederson, Chief of Staff of the DALO: ‘The Piranha 5 programme is on time and on budget.’

Denmark is the launch customer for the latest Piranha 5, which was selected to replace the army’s current fleet of upgraded FFG M113 series of tracked APCs following trials with five tracked and wheeled APCs.

The competition included the BAE Systems Hagglunds CV90 Armadillo, FFG PMMC G5, GDELS-MOWAG Piranha 5, GDELS Santa Barbara Sistemas Pizarro 2 and Nexter Systems VBCI.

Production of the Piranha 5 for Denmark will run through to 2023 with the first company being operational by 2020 and the first battalion by 2021.

The first seven pre-series Piranha 5s in the APC configuration will be put through an extensive series of tests, which will include hot weather trials at Yuma Proving Ground in the US.


Abraços
« Última modificação: Junho 08, 2017, 06:11:15 pm por tenente »
 

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Cabeça de Martelo

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #776 em: Junho 22, 2017, 03:20:45 pm »
Citar
Canadian elite special forces sniper makes record-breaking kill shot in Iraq

A sniper with Canada’s elite special forces in Iraq has shattered the world record for the longest confirmed kill shot in military history at a staggering distance of 3,450 metres.

Sources say a member of Joint Task Force 2 killed an Islamic State insurgent with a McMillan TAC-50 sniper rifle while firing from a high-rise during an operation that took place within the last month in Iraq. It took under 10 seconds to hit the target.





Mais em:

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/canadian-elite-special-forces-sniper-sets-record-breaking-kill-shot-in-iraq/article35415651/

7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 
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Cabeça de Martelo

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #778 em: Julho 19, 2017, 04:31:11 pm »
Este general ainda os tem no sitio !!!!!!

http://observador.pt/2017/07/19/demitiu-se-chefe-do-estado-maior-das-forcas-armadas-francesas-em-protesto-contra-macron/

Ainda recentemente tivemos um CEME e dois outros Oficiais Generais a demitirem-se e o que eu mais ouvia era boquinhas foleiras sobre como o que eles queriam era tachos...
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

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Re: Notícias (Exércitos/Sistemas de Armas)
« Responder #779 em: Julho 19, 2017, 04:39:46 pm »
Este general ainda os tem no sitio !!!!!!

http://observador.pt/2017/07/19/demitiu-se-chefe-do-estado-maior-das-forcas-armadas-francesas-em-protesto-contra-macron/

Ainda recentemente tivemos um CEME e dois outros Oficiais Generais a demitirem-se e o que eu mais ouvia era boquinhas foleiras sobre como o que eles queriam era tachos...

como um dos instrutores me dizia no meu COM,  " os cães ladram e a caravana passa ".

Abraços
 
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