Irish Naval Service

  • 17 Respostas
  • 6733 Visualizações
*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Irish Naval Service
« em: Outubro 20, 2015, 10:13:01 am »
Irish naval procurements

09 Oct 2015

The Irish government has issued a new White Paper that aims to modernise the Irish Naval Service (ISN) to include acquiring a multi-role vessel (MRV) and two new coastal patrol vessels (CPV).
The paper on defence covers the next 10 years and encourages the use of the new ships for maintaining an eight-ship INS fleet as Ireland looks to play an increasing role on the international stage.
The new vessels will replace Helicopter Patrol Vessel (HPV), LÉ Eithne, and two CPVs,  LÉ Ciara and LÉ Orla, acquired from the Royal Navy in 1988 and used primarily for inshore work.
“This will provide an enhanced capability for the Naval Service in meeting a broad range of ongoing requirements and contingencies, including the protection of Ireland’s vital sea lanes of communication,” said the Paper.
While the MRV replacement will not carry a helicopter, it will be enabled for such operations and will also be able to carry freight. Although not specified in the Paper, this could include container modules that would increase the ship’s operational versatility for roles such as disaster relief and search and rescue.
“It is the Government’s intent that this new vessel will provide a flexible and adaptive capability for a wide range of maritime tasks, both at home and overseas,” added the Paper.
The two existing CPVs, LÉ Ciara and LÉ Orla, will be replaced in the coming years with similar vessels, equipped with countermine and counter-IED capabilities.
 
By Rachael Doyle

http://www.maritimejournal.com/news101/ ... ocurements
« Última modificação: Outubro 20, 2015, 10:48:49 am por tenente »
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Irish Naval Service
« Responder #1 em: Outubro 20, 2015, 10:23:59 am »
A classe Samuel Beckett é a maior ao serviço na Marinha Irlandesa que para o ano irá adquirir a terceira unidade.
Os custos totais de aquisição destes três NPO's Irlandeses totalizam os € 200 milhões, um pouco mais de  € 65 milhões por unidade.



Samuel Beckett OPV design and features

The Samuel Beckett OPV features an extended monohull design based on the PV80 design of STX Canada Marine. The OPVs incorporate fin stabilisers and anti-heel tanks for roll and pitch reduction.

The vessel can carry two 8m Rigid Hull Inflatable Boats (RHIBs) at either side of the hull, while the third RHIB is housed in a cradle over the stern deck. The boats are launched and recovered by single point davits and can be operated at a maximum speed of 30kt up to Sea State 4.

The OPV has a length of 89.5m, beam of 14m, draft of 3.8m and displacement of 1,900t. It can complement of 54 personnel including 44 Ships Company and ten trainees and the carriage of containers. Accommodation is provided in single berths and four berth cabins.

Weapon systems fitted to the Irish OPV
The main gun of the vessel is a 76mm OTO Melara compact naval gun equipped with an electro optical fire control system. Two 20mm RH 202 Rheinmetall cannons fitted port and starboard abaft the bridge serve as secondary weapons.
The vessel is also provided with mountings on the main deck and 01 deck for two 12.7mm heavy machine guns (HMGs) and four 7.62mm general purpose machine guns (GPMGs).

Flight deck
The aft flight deck allows for the operations of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) from the vessel. The deck area can also accommodate three 20ft containers and is provided with a large 5t crane at 9.56m radius.

Propulsion
The diesel electric propulsion integrates two 5,440kW Wartsila medium speed diesel engines driving two five-bladed controllable pitch propellers via reduction gearboxes. The power take in (PTI) motor powered by the electrical alternators ensures low speed operation at speeds up to 8kt.
The offshore patrol vessel also integrates a 450kW bow thruster and rudders for high manoeuvrability in close quarter positions. The dynamic positioning (DP) system aboard the vessels maintains position and heading. The shipboard electricity is generated by three 630kW alternators, while emergency power is provided by a 320kW generator.
The propulsion system ensures a maximum speed of 23kt. The vessels have a range of 6,000nmi at a cruising speed of 15kt and are capable of conducting autonomous mission for up to 21 days.

http://www.naval-technology.com/project ... sels-opvs/

Cumprimentos
« Última modificação: Novembro 15, 2017, 01:36:42 pm por tenente »
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #2 em: Outubro 20, 2015, 05:56:26 pm »
Como Complemento do primeiro post

MARITIME SECURITY  
Ireland to renovate maritime capability by Beth Maundrill in London

 
Ireland is planning an overhaul of its maritime capability following the release of its Defence White Paper.
The white paper outlines plans for replacement of the nation’s maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) as well as upgrading its fleet of patrol vessels.
The paper, released on 26 August, expresses that the minimum requirement for the naval service is eight ships. Three offshore patrol vessels (OPV) are currently in the midst of a replacement programme, while another requirement would see a further three vessels replaced, including one helicopter patrol vessel (HPV) and two coastal patrol vessels (CPV).

Broken down this means that the current flagship and HPV, the LÉ Eithne, will be replaced by a multi-role vessel which although not suitable for helicopter embarkation will be enabled for rotorcraft operations.
Two of the existing CPVs, LÉ Ciara and LÉ Orla, will also be replaced with similar vessels with counter-mine and counter-IED capabilities.
The new ships will accompany the OPVs which are currently being delivered into service. The second of the three ships, the LÉ James Joyce, was commissioned on 1 September 2015.

In June 2014 the Irish Department of Defence (DoD) exercised the option under the original contract to place an order for a third OPV which is scheduled for delivery in the middle of 2016.
The value of the contract, including the third ship, is €199,358,000. The cost of the main armaments, for the three ships is €13.1 million.



The White Paper stated that if further funds were available the priority would be to secure additional vessels.

While budgets for the replacements have not yet been set out, the DoD is going to be working on a detailed capability development plan which will be completed as part of the White Paper process, a DoD spokesperson told Shephard.
The capability plan will join with the work of identifying and agreeing funding requirements for equipment across the services, and will include new ships, aircraft and armoured patrol vehicles.

Two air corps Casa 535 MPAs are due for replacement by 2019 according to the report. The aim will be to replace these with bigger, more capable aircraft to provide maritime surveillance as well as utility for transport and cargo carrying applications.
Plans also include replacing the current five Cessnas with three larger aircraft equipped for ISTAR tasks.

Repare-se no custo Final das três Oto melara 76mm e das seis Rheinmetall de 20mm RH 202, por € 13,1 milhões contra os quase € 3,7 milhões das nossas duas Oto melara Marlin 30mm !!!

Cumprimentos
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #3 em: Março 18, 2016, 07:55:32 am »
Irish Naval Service floats third OPV

16th March 2016 - 12:00 by Grant Turnbull in London



Irish Naval Service floats third OPV

The third and last offshore patrol vessel (OPV) built as part of the Irish Naval Service’s ship replacement programme has been floated for the first time.

LÉ William Butler Yeats, a Samuel Beckett-class OPV, was floated on 10 March at Babcock Marine & Technology’s shipyard in Appledore, England.

The 90m-long vessel has since been towed out of Appledore’s dry dock area and placed at a fitting-out quay where additional equipment will be installed, including the ship’s mast.

An Irish Department of Defence spokesperson told Shephard that fitting out of equipment and installation of the mast will continue while the vessel remains at Babcock Marine’s shipyard.

Sea trials are scheduled to take place in June or July 2016 and the vessel is expected to be formally named and commissioned into the Irish Naval Service in the summer, though no firm date has been set.

‘Irish Naval Service personnel will not commence training on the ship as the build is not complete,’ said the spokesperson. ‘Training has taken place on some sub-systems on the ship.’

When commissioned, the ship will be part of the Naval Service fleet which is based in Haulbowline, County Cork.

LÉ William Butler Yeats will join lead vessel LÉ Samuel Beckett, which was commissioned in 2014 and replaced LÉ Emer, and LÉ James Joyce, which was commissioned into the naval service last year and replaced LÉ Aoife.

A contract was placed in October 2010 with Babcock for the provision of two new OPVs, with the option for a third vessel subsequently being exercised in June 2014. The value of the Babcock contract, including the third ship, is €199 million with the cost of the main armaments for the three ships being €13.1 million.

The new OPVs are an updated and more advanced design of the Irish Naval Service’s existing 80m-long Róisín-class vessels, built in the late 90s. The class also shares design similarities with the New Zealand Navy’s Protector-class of OPVs.

Powered by two Wärtsilä 16V26 diesel engines, the vessel can reach a top speed of 23 knots and sail 6000nm at a cruise speed of 15 knots.

Its main armament is a 76mm gun from OTO Melara, which is supplemented with two 20mm Rheinmetall cannons, two 12.7mm heavy machine guns and four 7.62mm machine guns.

The OPVs are also fitted with SharpEye radars manufactured by Kelvin Hughes.

Once LÉ William Butler Yeats is delivered this year, the Irish Naval Service will have a total of five OPVs. In addition it has LÉ Eithne, which is the current flagship and a helicopter patrol vessel (HPV), and two coastal patrol vessels (CPV), LÉ Ciara and LÉ Orla.

In its defence white paper released last year, Ireland’s Department of Defence outlined its plans to replace the HPV with a multi-role vessel that, while not being able to embark a helicopter, will be capable of helicopter operations and freight carrying.

It also set out its ambitions to replace the two CPVs with ‘similar vessels with countermine and counter-IED capabilities’.

‘The replacement of the Helicopter Patrol Vessel and two Coastal Patrol Vessels is under review as part of the White Paper implementation process,’ said the spokesperson. ‘No decisions have been made yet in this regard.’

Cumprimentos
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #4 em: Junho 16, 2016, 08:12:54 pm »
Babcock’s Appledore to build fourth Irish offshore patrol vessel


Lead ship of the class, L.É. Samuel Beckett. Photo: Babcock International

The Irish Department of Defense has awarded Babcock and its Appledore shipyard a contract to build the nation’s fourth Samuel Beckett-class offshore patrol vessel.

All four vessels are built at the Appledore shipyard in North Devon at a unit price of around €54 million.

The first two vessels in the class, LÉ Samuel Beckett and LÉ James Joyce are already in service while a third ship, the LÉ William Butler Yeats is currently being built and is due to embark on sea trials in July 2016.

The yet unnamed fourth OPV is scheduled to be completed within the next two years.

At 90 metres long and 2256 tonnes, the ships have a top speed of 23 knots and a range of 6,000 nautical miles at a cruise speed of 15 knots.

The OPVs have a 76mm gun as the main weapon and are able to act as a mother ship for three fully independent Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats.

John Howie, Divisional CEO of Babcock’s Marine and Technology businesses said: “We are really delighted to continue to support the Irish Naval Service with these important vessels. Our firm role is to safely provide cost-effective, value for money naval platforms that underpin our customer’s increasing requirements to protect their coastline and Exclusive Economic Zone, further enhancing border control capability and maritime security.”

https://navaltoday.com/2016/06/16/babcocks-appledore-to-build-fourth-irish-offshore-patrol-vessel/

Tal e qual como nós fazemos em PORTUGAL.  :new_argue: :new_argue: :new_argue: :new_argue:

Abraços
« Última modificação: Novembro 15, 2017, 01:34:51 pm por tenente »
 

*

mafets

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 5062
  • Recebeu: 902 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 550 vez(es)
  • +61/-34
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #5 em: Junho 16, 2016, 10:27:02 pm »
Já agora um olhar mais atento ao Ireland Naval Service: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Service_(Ireland) 


Citar
Emer Class, Aisling P23

Citar
P31 LE Eithne - Eithne-class offshore patrol vessel

Citar
Peacock class - P42    - LÉ Ciara

Citar
Roisin Class -    LÉ Róisín/LÉ Niamh

Citar
Samuel Beckett class

Nota: A irlanda usava os Dauphin a bordo da class Eithne, mas estes foram retirados de serviço e vendidos. Os Ec135T e AB139 têm sido vistos em operações junto às forças navais irlandesas.


Citar
Irish Air Corps Dauphin onboard Irish Naval Service ship LÉ Eithne



Saudações
« Última modificação: Junho 16, 2016, 10:29:18 pm por mafets »
"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #6 em: Outubro 18, 2016, 02:00:27 pm »
Irish Navy commissions third OPV LÉ William Butler Yeats





The Irish Navy has commissioned its third offshore patrol vessel, LÉ William Butler Yeats, during an October 17 ceremony in Galway, Ireland.

The vessel was officially named by Caitriona Yeats, a granddaughter of the Irish 20th-century poet the ship is named after.

LÉ William Butler Yeats was built by Appledore Shipbuilders, a subsidiary of Babcock Marine, which floated out the vessel on March 10, 2016.





The Irish Navy has contracted Babcock in 2010 to deliver three offshore patrol vessels (OPV) for the Irish Naval Service with the work being carried out at Babcock’s Appledore facility in Devon.

LÉ Samuel Beckett, the lead ship of the class, has already performed its first active patrols and has attracted international attention with rescue missions in the Mediterranean Sea off the Libyan coast. LÉ James Joyce, the second OPV, joined the Irish Navy on September 1, 2015.



In June this year, The Irish Department of Defense awarded Babcock a contract to construct the fourth vessel in the class. The fourth OPV is scheduled to be completed within the next two years. The unit price is around €54 million.

Designed for fishery protection, search and rescue, anti-pollution and maritime security duties, the 90 metre, 2256 tonne OPVs have autonomous engine rooms and are capable of a top speed of 23 knots and have a range of 6,000 nautical miles at cruise speed.


Exactamente como nós sempre a adquirir novos meios Navais, e bem armados, de Patrulha !!! :bang: :bang: :bang: :headb: :headb: :headb: e já agora mais um bocadinho de info quanto ás novas aquisições do INS :

Acquisitions and future

In October 2010 contracts were signed for two new "Offshore Patrol Vessels" (OPVs). The contract provided an option for a 3rd vessel - which was later taken-up. A 4th vessel in the same class was ordered in June 2016. Constructed by Babock Marine in the UK to VARD Marine's PV90 design, the first ship, Samuel Beckett, was delivered in May 2014. The second ship, James Joyce, was delivered in 2015. The third, William Butler Yeats, was floated out in March 2016 and delivered later that summer. A fourth, as yet unnamed vessel, was ordered for delivery by 2018. These Samuel Beckett-class OPVs replace the older vessel classes, such as the Emer class.

A number of these purchases were informed by a Whitepaper on Defence which expected acquisition of three new naval vessels over 10 years from 2015 to 2025, As well as the acquired and ordered OPVs, the whitepaper covered a multi-role vessel (MRV), which would be potentially enabled for helicopter operations and have a freight carrying capacity - to replace the flagship LÉ Eithne. Plans expect that LÉ Ciara and LÉ Orla be replaced with similar vessels but with counter-mine and counter-IED capabilities.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_Naval_Service#Acquisitions_and_future

Abraços
« Última modificação: Outubro 18, 2016, 02:23:38 pm por tenente »
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Quarto OPV classe Samuel Beckett a caminho
« Responder #7 em: Março 01, 2017, 07:17:28 pm »
Irish Navy lays keel for fourth Samuel Beckett-class OPV

https://navaltoday.com/2017/03/01/irish-navy-lays-keel-for-fourth-samuel-becket-class-opv/


Photo: Irish Naval Service

The keel for the Irish Navy’s fourth Samuel Beckett-class offshore patrol vessel was laid in Babcock’s Appledore shipyard on February 28.

The yet unnamed vessel that will have pennant number P64 is being built under a contract signed between the Irish ministry of defense and Babcock in June 2016.

All four boats in the class will have been built by Babcock at a unit price of around €54 million.

The 90 metre, 2256 tonne OPVs have autonomous engine rooms and are capable of a top speed of 23 knots and have a range of 6,000 nautical miles at a cruise speed of 15 knots on a single engine.

The OPVs have a 76mm gun as the main weapon and are able to act as a mother ship for three fully independent Rigid Hulled Inflatable Boats.

LÉ Samuel Beckett, LÉ William Butler Yeats and LÉ James Joyce joined the Irish Navy in 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively. Samuel Becket-class are designed for undertaking a range of duties including fishery protection, ​drug interdiction, ​search and rescue, anti-pollution and maritime security duties.​

The fourth and last vessel planned to be built is expected to join by 2018.
« Última modificação: Novembro 15, 2017, 01:37:45 pm por tenente »
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #8 em: Novembro 05, 2017, 04:16:57 pm »
Irish Navy fotos do quarto navio da classe Samuel Beckett, ou seja  o George Bernard Shaw:





Abraços
« Última modificação: Novembro 05, 2017, 04:19:28 pm por tenente »
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #9 em: Novembro 15, 2017, 01:30:51 pm »
A construção do OPV George Bernard Shaw continua a bom ritmo:



Abraços
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #10 em: Abril 09, 2018, 09:47:44 am »
Enquanto que por cá a nossa MdG se vê Grega para ter mais NPO's, a Marinha Irlandesa lança o quarto OPV da classe Samuel Beckett.

Irish Navy’s fourth offshore patrol vessel enters water


Photo: Babcock

The Irish Navy’s fourth Samuel Beckett-class offshore patrol vessel (OPV), future LÉ George Bernard Shaw, was floated out at Babcock’s Appledore, North Devon, shipyard, the shipbuilder has announced.

The float out of the 90-meter ship was attended by representatives from the Irish Naval Service and Babcock’s workforce.

The ship was floated up within the main build hall and then moved out into the River Torridge at high tide to complete work at the tidal wharf.

Babcock is building the four OPVs under a contract signed with the defense ministry in June 2016.

The 90 metre, 2256 tonne OPVs have autonomous engine rooms and are capable of a top speed of 23 knots and have a range of 6,000 nautical miles at a cruise speed of 15 knots on a single engine.

The OPVs have a 76mm gun as the main weapon and are able to act as a mother ship for three rigid hulled inflatable boats.

LÉ Samuel Beckett, LÉ William Butler Yeats and LÉ James Joyce joined the Irish Navy in 2014, 2015 and 2016, respectively. LÉ George Bernard Shaw is expected to be completed in 2018.

The OPVs perform a range of duties including fishery protection, ​drug interdiction, ​search and rescue, anti-pollution and maritime security duties.​

Speaking about the float-up and undocking, Irish defense minister Paul Kehoe said he “looks forward to the completion of the ship later this year and its addition to the Naval Service fleet where it will be a key driver in the essential provision of defence capability in the maritime domain around our country.”

“This event marks a great moment as it once again showcases our workforce’s commitment and craftsmanship to designing and building first class highly capable and flexible ships,” said Craig Lockhart, managing director, Babcock Naval Marine. “We are proud of our work with the Irish Naval Service and the Department of Defence and look forward to delivering another cost effective and “state of the art” vessel that will support both protection and humanitarian activities long into the future.”



https://navaltoday.com/2018/04/09/irish-navys-fourth-offshore-patrol-vessel-enters-water/

Abraços
« Última modificação: Abril 09, 2018, 10:12:20 am por tenente »
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #11 em: Julho 23, 2018, 08:56:50 pm »
As trafulhices não acontecem só por cá, vejam lá esta :

Former Irish navy vessel that sold for €110,000 now on sale for €685,000

The naval service has said however that the vessel may not necessarily be sold for the stated price
By Pat Flanagan, 18:42, 15 MAY 2017



LÉ Aisling
 
The Government has been accused of a massive blunder after flogging a Naval Service vessel for €110,000 – which is now for sale for nearly €700,000 two months later.

The LÉ Aisling was sold at auction in March for €110,000 but is now up for grabs in Holland as a fisheries patrol vessel for $750,000 (€685,000).

PDFORRA, which represents Naval Service sailors, described it as “terrible deal” and the organisation cannot understand why a much higher reserve was not set at the time.

Independent TD Michael Fitzmaurice described the situation where a vessel is being sold for five times more than was recouped by the State as a “monumental error”.

He said: “We hear today that the Department of Defence sold off the LÉ Aisling for a fraction of the price the State could have received for the navy vessel.

“The ship was sold at auction in Cork for €110,000 earlier this year. It has been put on sale for a starting price of €683,000 by the private seller in Rotterdam.

“It is fairly obvious from this turn of events that whoever valued this ship made a major error and now it now represents a serious loss of money to the state.

“Will anyone be called to account for this? These monumental errors are being made in every Department and it is so frustrating as a public representative to be dealing with the fall out from these mistakes that are being made on an ongoing basis.”

While some industry experts believe there might be reasons why the original sale price would be slightly lower the massive discrepancy cannot be explained and will almost certainly to lead to an investigation by the Dail Public Accounts Committee.

After 36 years of service the vessel was decommissioned last summer and was replaced by a new ship.

It was bought by Dutch shipbroker Dick van der Kamp when it was put up for auction at the Carrigaline Court Hotel in Cork on March 23 last.

The ship is now moored in Rotterdam and is being offered for sale for around €680,000 but potential buyers are warned in the advert that the price is likely to go up.

The sale notice describes the vessel as being in “very good condition” adding “price will go up as owners will spend money on further improvements. Better be quick.”

Fine Gael Deputy Alan Farrell who is a member of the PAC said it is likely the sale will be looked into.

He said: “The difference between the value being sought at the moment on the open market versus the value achieved at a public auction a number of weeks ago presents a difficulty to me as a member of the Public Accounts Committee and as a former member for five years of the Defence Committee.”
 
https://www.irishmirror.ie/news/irish-news/former-irish-navy-vessel-sold-10428858

Abraços
« Última modificação: Julho 23, 2018, 09:00:14 pm por tenente »
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #12 em: Setembro 11, 2018, 07:05:37 pm »
O patrulha P64 George Bernard Shaw da marinha Irlandesa também foi entregue sem o seu Armamento principal.







Abraços
« Última modificação: Setembro 11, 2018, 07:25:03 pm por tenente »
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #13 em: Setembro 21, 2018, 08:40:07 am »
Irish Naval Service ship can't patrol Irish waters due to lack of sailors

"The lads are disgusted, they want to do their work but there is simply not enough sailors to take her to sea"
By Niall O'Connor


A picture of Naval ship Le Orla, alongside Cork city on August 18 Image: Irish Naval

A naval ship cannot patrol Irish waters as there are not enough sailors to man it.
The boat, normally tasked with defending a stretch of water off the coast inside the so-called Irish box, is tied up at Haulbowline Naval Base in Co Cork .

A whistleblower said: “The lads are disgusted, they want to do their work but there is simply not enough sailors to take her to sea.
“The Naval Service is at crisis point with staffing levels because of the extreme austerity suffered by the service.


Le Orla passing Spike Island Image: Joey Byrne 

 “There are also a lot of people leaving because of pay issues – it is a tough job but they have proven themselves at sea in the Mediterranean in recent years.”

Security sources also fear the lack of a vessel off the coast could see a bonanza for drug smugglers.
The source added: “LE Orla (P41), is involved in monitoring the fishing fleet using our waters but also is directly involved in anti-drugs operations.

“The fact she is not at sea at the moment has left a gaping hole in cover. The Air Corps CASA marine patrol aircraft is filling the gap but this is a resourcing issue and needs to be fixed.

“The Air Corps are struggling themselves with low numbers and retention of air crew so this is not an adequate solution.”
The Department of Defence did not respond to the Irish Mirror’s request for a statement.

However, the Defence Forces press office said: “While for security and operational reasons, details relating to the tasking of Naval Service vessels cannot be released, we can confirm the Naval Service, in conjunction with the Air Corps CASA maritime surveillance aircraft, continue to carry out their Maritime Security and Defence operational responsibilities.”

The Defence Forces are in the midst of a Industrial Relations meltdown as hundreds of personnel marched on the Dail in protest.
Figures have revealed there is at present a 9,000 head count which is the lowest in the history of the State – it is some 500 below agreed levels.

https://www.irishmirror.ie/news/irish-news/naval-ship-cant-patrol-irish-13280721

Abraços

PS : o P41 LE Orla tem uma guarnição de 39 elementos ! :o

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%89_Orla_(P41)






« Última modificação: Setembro 21, 2018, 08:45:24 am por tenente »
 

*

tenente

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 3081
  • Recebeu: 1336 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 503 vez(es)
  • +168/-7
Re: Irish Naval Service
« Responder #14 em: Outubro 30, 2018, 11:28:00 am »
Irish Navy starts P50-class midlife overhaul assessment



Navy photo of P50-class OPV LÈ Niamph

The Irish Naval Service has awarded marine and naval architecture consultancy Tymor Marine a contract to carry out a vessel mid-life extension survey.
The Aberdeen-headquartered company will survey the Irish Navy’s P50 class vessels to assess the condition of their structure, systems, equipment and machinery and provide a full analysis and report containing recommendations for integrity maintenance and upgrade activity.

According to Tymor Marine, the vessel survey will provide evidence of vessel integrity and where possible make an estimation of remaining endurance, highlighting priority sites requiring attention.

A review of planned maintenance and inspection activity, recommendations for cost-efficient preventative actions and upgrades, assessment of machinery hours linked to the vessel’s planned mode of operation over the course of its future activities will also be conducted. Tymor will thereafter advise on remedial action, taking into account the availability and cost of spares and repairs.
“Onboard asset integrity, maintenance and vessel life extension is critical to ensure that our high standards of operational excellence and safety are continued well into the future,” Lt Cdr Elaine Moloney, Irish Naval Service, commented. “We are looking forward to working with Tymor in support of this objective.”

“We are privileged to have been awarded such a prestigious contract to support the Irish Navy in their mission to extend the life of their active service vessels and onboard assets,” Kevin Moran, managing director of Tymor Marine, explained. “We have no ties with equipment manufacturers, vessel insurers or classification societies and make all recommendations in the best interest of the client.”

https://navaltoday.com/2018/10/30/irish-navy-starts-p50-class-midlife-overhaul-assessment/

Abraços
 

 

Os vasos de guerra mais "feios" da História Naval

Iniciado por soultrain

Respostas: 7
Visualizações: 3444
Última mensagem Fevereiro 22, 2005, 01:25:55 pm
por P44
ATUALIZAÇÃO CAMPO DE BATALHA NAVAL - SUBMARINO CLASSE AKULA

Iniciado por silversantis

Respostas: 1
Visualizações: 4249
Última mensagem Agosto 07, 2008, 10:13:08 pm
por nelson henriques
Exercicio Naval entre Itália e Rússia

Iniciado por P44

Respostas: 0
Visualizações: 1208
Última mensagem Setembro 21, 2004, 10:58:44 am
por P44
SCALP-Naval : a nova capacidade estratégica da UE.

Iniciado por JLRC

Respostas: 0
Visualizações: 3073
Última mensagem Outubro 28, 2004, 10:37:49 pm
por JLRC
Como quantificar o poder de uma unidade naval

Iniciado por papatango

Respostas: 2
Visualizações: 1491
Última mensagem Fevereiro 06, 2005, 11:05:02 am
por papatango