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Forças Armadas e Sistemas de Armas => Armadas/Sistemas de Armas => Tópico iniciado por: JLRC em Agosto 28, 2004, 01:03:03 am

Título: Royal Navy
Enviado por: JLRC em Agosto 28, 2004, 01:03:03 am
Production Begins On Second 'Next-Generation' Destroyer  
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Aug. 26, 2004)
 
 
 First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Alan West today officially launched production of the second Type 45 Anti-Air Warfare Destroyer at BAE Systems' shipyard at Govan in Glasgow.  
 
Admiral West signalled the start of production by cutting the first sheet of steel for HMS Dauntless, the second of six ships ordered by the MoD to be built by BAE Systems on the Clyde and by VT Group at Portsmouth.  
 
Admiral West said: "This is a really momentous occasion, because the steel I am cutting today officially starts the building of a ship which will form part of the most advanced air destroyer fleet in the world, and will provide a crucial capability for our powerful and modern Royal Navy.  
 
"It's also not just about ships, it's about people. Clearly the MOD's UK shipbuilding programme is sustaining hundreds of jobs in Scotland, and creating tremendous opportunities for the 100 new apprentices starting work here today. These men and women are making a major and worthwhile contribution to Defence in the UK and throughout the world, whilst continuing the proud history of ship-building on the Clyde for many years to come. I wish them the very best."  
 
At around 7,350 tonnes in weight and over 150 metres long, the Type 45s will be the biggest and most powerful air defence destroyers ever built for the Royal Navy. The current contract, with BAE Systems as the Prime Contractor, is for six ships.  
 
The Type 45 will be equipped with the world-leading Principal Anti-Air Missile System (PAAMS), and will provide a huge advance in technology when it enters service later in the decade.  
 
Minister for Defence Procurement, Lord Bach said: "It is extremely satisfying that production of the second-of-class is now underway. The Type 45 will give our forces a truly world-class destroyer, complete with one of the most advanced air defence systems available.  
 
"There is no doubt this new class of Destroyer will set new standards. The Type 45 represents a 21st Century response to the most sophisticated threats that might face UK or Allied ships in the years to come.  
 
"When combined with the new aircraft carriers, our new attack submarines, and a range of other new amphibious vessels currently under construction, this demonstrates our firm commitment to maintaining and enhancing our maritime capabilities. This programme of new warship construction is the largest in the country for years and is creating and sustaining large numbers of jobs at shipyards across the UK."  
 
The current forecast cost of the six ships is £5.5bn and their construction is expected to sustain around 2,000 jobs on the Clyde and around 650 at Vosper Thornycroft in Portsmouth. In addition, many other UK companies are benefiting from work on the programme, including over 30 who are sub-contracted to the prime contractor.  
 
 
BACKGROUND NOTES:  
 
-- BAE Systems Electronics is the prime contractor for the delivery of the first six Type 45 Destroyers. Vosper Thornycroft at Portsmouth and BAE Systems Sea Systems Group will both build and outfit substantial sections of the ships.  
 
-- The Type 45 Destroyer will replace the capability currently provided by the T42. The first of class ship is planned to enter service later in the decade.  
 
-- The class is to be known as the 'D' Class. HMS Daring, HMS Dauntless, HMS Diamond, HMS Defender, HMS Dragon and HMS Duncan have been announced as the names of the first six ships.  
 
-- All ships will be equipped with the world-beating Principal Anti-Air Missile System (PAAMS), which is designed to deal with multiple attacks by anti-ship missiles. It will be powered by the WR21 Gas Turbine and will reach speeds of up to 29 knots.  
 
-- The current contract with BAE Systems is for the first six ships of a class of eight.  
 
-- The Type 45 Destroyer IPT is based at the Defence Procurement Agency Headquarters at Abbey Wood in Bristol. (ends)  
 
 
 
 Second Type 45 Destroyer Commences Production on Clyde  
 
 
(Source: BAE Systems; issued Aug. 26, 2004)
 
 
 BAE Systems Naval Ships has celebrated two important milestones today - beginning production on the second Type 45 Destroyer for the Royal Navy and welcoming the latest intake of apprentices into the Clyde-based business.  
 
These two events help confirm the company’s reputation as the leading provider of naval capability and complete warship delivery and reinforce its determination to have a suitability skilled workforce to service current and future contracts.  
 
First Sea Lord, Admiral Sir Alan West, began production of the vessel, to be known as HMS DAUNTLESS when it enters service, at BAE Systems’ Govan facility on the River Clyde, Glasgow on Thursday 26 August 2004. The ceremony was witnessed by senior Ministry of Defence and Royal Navy officials, MPs and MSPs, members of the Type 45 Destroyer team and by the 100 new apprentices who have just joined the business.  
 
Vic Emery, Managing Director of BAE Systems Naval Ships said,  
 
“When we talk about our business we don’t just talk about building the ships, we also talk about delivering to the Navy the capability they need to face the challenges ahead. We take the initial idea, work with the customer to define what they need. We plan it, design it, build it and bring it together. We ensure that not only does every system work but also that it works with every other system. We deliver the finished article.  
 
“In an incredibly advanced ship like the Type 45 Destroyer it takes a huge range of skills to be able to do that. We have those skills and we will ensure that the young people joining us today will also have the opportunity to develop those skills. Today is all about ensuring that our customer has the capability he needs, and that we have the capability and the skills to successfully face the future.  
 
“This is a big day for the Type 45 programme, a big day for these young people and a big day for the business.”  
 
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Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Setembro 24, 2004, 09:57:43 pm
HMS Leeds Castle Bids Farewell to Stanley  
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Sept. 23, 2004)
 
 
 HMS Leeds Castle, the Falklands Islands Patrol Vessel, has said farewell to Port Stanley as she returns home to Portsmouth after three and a half years in the South Atlantic. The patrol task off the Falklands and South Georgia will now be undertaken by regular visits by other Royal Navy ships.  
 
Since being deployed in February 2001, Leeds Castle has been a frequent visitor to the outlying settlements and islands, including Stanley itself and developed a very special rapport with the scattered settlements.  
 
As the ship sailed, Stanley came to a standstill, schools, offices and Government House allowing people to gather along Victory Green to say a fond farewell to an old friend. The bells of Stanley Cathedral rang, the Defence Force fired a gun salute and a Government Air Service Islander aircraft conducted a fly-past.  
 
Her Commanding Officer, Lt Cdr Iain Lower said, "This is a remarkable turn-out and just shows the depth of feeling that has developed between the ship and the Falkland Islanders, not just over the last four years, but ever since the ship first operated in these waters in 1982".  
 
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Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Setembro 29, 2004, 12:12:01 am
MoD Awards BAE Systems Ships Disposals Contract
 
 
(Source: BAE Systems; issued Sept. 27, 2004)
 
 
 The Defence Logistics Organisation (DLO), the logistics unit of the UK’s Ministry of Defence, has signed an ‘enabling’ contract with BAE Systems which formalises the company’s role as lead contractor for the disposal or sale of Royal Navy ships.  
 
The contract is worth up to £7 million over an initial five years with options for the DLO to extend beyond this. BAE Systems’ CS&S Naval business will be responsible for the regeneration and delivery of ships to their new owner and will agreed firm prices with the DLO for each project.  
 
The contract will operate within the terms of the Memorandum of Agreement that the MOD has had in place with UK maritime industry and will cover the disposal of vessels such as frigates, destroyers, patrol vessels and minehunters, but does not include the disposal of surplus nuclear submarines. It has wide-ranging support from the major players within the naval industry, including the Society of Maritime Industries and the British Naval Equipment Manufacturers’ Association.  
 
Major General Malcolm Wood, Director General of Disposals and Sales at the Defence Logistics Organisation said, “This contract builds on a relationship between the MOD and BAE Systems which has existed since December 1998. Our aim all along has been to provide better through-life support and lower costs to navies around the world.”  
 
Rory Fisher, MD of CS&S, Naval added, “Clearly, this is an important step for the company in developing its ship reactivation business and strategy for managing the supplier base. I am confident we can deliver a real return for the MOD - we already have significant experience in this field by managing the regeneration and modernisation of two Type 22 frigates for the Romanian Navy.”  
 
The scope of each project could vary widely - from regenerating and modernising a ship for onward sale – to towing a vessel from one port to another. In fulfilling its role as lead contractor, CS&S Naval will ensure all relevant companies within the naval industry are able to compete for work, and will be encouraging the use of on-line electronic procurement methods.  
 
BAE Systems has major operations across five continents and customers in some 130 countries. The company has more than 90,000 people and generates annual sales of approximately £12 billion through its wholly-owned and joint venture operations.  
 
Customer Solutions & Support employs around 15,000 people at over 40 locations and provides through-life support and services across the air, sea and land sectors. It carries out upgrades, maintenance, repair and overhaul of military systems. CS&S supports customers' military capability in areas such as training; facilities management; spares and repairs; technical information services; manpower services; and supply chain and logistics management.  
 
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Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Outubro 06, 2004, 08:57:14 pm
Commander-In-Chief Fleet Starts VT Production On HMS Dauntless
 
 
(Source: VT Group; issued undated)
 
 
 Admiral Sir Jonathon Band, Commander-in-Chief Fleet, has officially started VT Shipbuilding’s production of the second Royal Navy Type 45 destroyer, HMS Dauntless, at VT’s Portsmouth Shipbuilding Factory.  
 
VT Shipbuilding is building the bow sections, funnels and masts for the first six Type 45 destroyers and also expects to be similarly involved for the two ships subsequently ordered. The sections will be transported by barge to BAE Systems’ facilities on the Clyde where the ships are being assembled.  
 
Admiral Band officially signalled the start of VT production on HMS Dauntless when he commenced steel cutting at the state-of-the-art £50m. facilities in Portsmouth Naval Base.  
 
He commented: “I was honoured to be asked to cut the first steel for HMS Dauntless in Portsmouth. This event marked another key milestone in the modernisation programme of the new Navy. This is great news for the Royal Navy and VT, who together with BAE Systems on the Clyde, will provide us with this superb new capability.”  
 
The 1,200 tons bow section, which extends to about a third length of the ship, is scheduled to leave Portsmouth in May 2006 for consolidation by BAE, who started production on the second ship last month  
 
VT Shipbuilding Managing Director Peter McIntosh explained: “The advanced facilities that we have at Portsmouth have already enabled us to achieve an impressive productivity performance on ship 01 and we expect further improvements on ship 02.  
 
“PSF is now recognised as a centre of excellence in naval shipbuilding and will place VT in a strong position for the Type 45, CVF and other major naval shipbuilding projects that are planned over the next few years.”  
 
VT started work on the blocks for the first-of-class Type 45 last year and the huge bow section is now structurally complete. The next few months will involve detailed outfitting before the bow section is moved north next Spring.  
 
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Título:
Enviado por: Spectral em Novembro 20, 2004, 10:10:04 pm
U.K. Scraps Plans To Build More Than A Dozen Warships   

By ANDREW CHUTER, LONDON


Britain’s Ministry of Defence announced Nov. 19 that it dropped plans to build up to 14 warships to replace the fleet of Type 23 frigates now in service with the Royal Navy. The government had planned to move to the assessment phase of the program to build the Future Surface Combatant (FSC) next year.

Now the MoD is reconsidering its options. The first of the warships had been planned to enter service around 2012. An MoD spokesman said uncertainties regarding future Royal Navy operations, the maturity of emerging technologies and industry/government efforts to pull together a long-term warship building strategy had all affected the decision.

The British may be looking at splitting the FSC requirement in two, an industry source said. The Defence Procurement Agency recently asked industry for design ideas for what it called a “global corvette.” The source said the Royal Navy may go for a combination of the corvette and a variant of the 7,500-metric-ton Type 45 destroyer now under development

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Más notícias para os ingleses. Para além do atraso, em vez de terem 12 navios de guerra a sério vão ter metade, sendo os outros 6 pouco mais que um OPV...
Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Novembro 25, 2004, 10:26:02 pm
The Royal Marines Get Vikings
 
 
(Source: Royal Navy; issued Nov. 24, 2004)
 
 
 The Royal Marine Commandos, an integral part of the Royal Navy, have taken delivery of Viking – one of the MoD's most advanced armored land vehicles and the first armored vehicles to be operated by the Corps for over fifty years.  
 
The amphibious Vikings are armored, all terrain vehicles capable of operating anywhere in the world in temperatures from -46oC to +49oC, and were selected for their ability to be deployed in jungle, desert or arctic conditions quickly.  
 
A fleet of 108 Viking has been bought for the Royal Marines following a grueling two-year trial and development program.  
 
The first prototype Viking vehicles were delivered in June 2001. The vehicles successfully completed a 24-month series of trials in Norway, the UK, Sweden and Oman. In Norway, the vehicle successfully completed a winter deployment inside the Arctic Circle. In September 2001, Vikings were transported to Oman and took part in Exercise Saif Sareea 2, where full operational testing was carried out in the extreme hot and dry desert conditions.  
 
Lord Bach, Minister for Defence Procurement, said: "The Royal Marines are a mobile commando force. They need a vehicle that can cope with a variety of terrain, provide protection from enemy fire and be easily transportable by air. Viking stood out as the right solution, and will give the Royal Marines the protection and mobility they need for years to come."  
 
The Vikings consist of two tracked vehicle units linked by a steering mechanism. They can be lifted by Chinook helicopters, driven into a C130 Hercules aircraft or carried on a landing craft. They can also be split into two sections in just 20 minutes to be carried by the Merlin helicopter.  
 
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Título: Novo sonar 2087
Enviado por: JLRC em Dezembro 01, 2004, 04:27:32 pm
HMS Westminster Gets Sonar 2087
 
 
(Source: UK Defence Procurement Agency; issued Nov. 24, web-posted Nov. 29, 2004)
 
 
 Members of the press were invited to see one of the world's most advanced new sonar systems at a media facility on board the newly upgrade frigate HMS Westminster last week.  
 
The press in Rosyth, Scotland was given extensive briefings on the advanced new capabilities, which HMS Westminster has been given as part of a £25million upgrade. The improvements include the installation of Sonar 2087, the Surface Ship Torpedo Defence system and the WECDIS electronic navigation system.  
 
The most potent ship of her type in the Royal Navy, HMS Westminster is the first vessel to get the advanced Sonar 2087. This is a new-generation low frequency active sonar, a vital defence capability much needed by the Royal Navy in order to detect a new generation of increasingly stealthy submarines which often operate close to shore and are very hard to detect.  
 
The system is being fitted to at least six of the Royal Navy's Type 23 Frigates Ð a general purpose class of ship but with an enhanced capability in anti-submarine warfare (ASW) when fitted with Sonar 2087, and the Merlin helicopter.  
 
During the briefing it was explained how the system works and how the MOD has processes in place to minimise its effect on the marine environment. Some of the points made included:  
 
--Sonar 2087 is an active system that puts noise into the water when in use. The MOD fully recognises that underwater noise has the potential to cause problems to the marine environment and has developed robust operating procedures, utilising the best available scientific advice, to reduce any impact.  
 
--Sonar 2087 has never been associated with any marine mammal strandings or found to have caused physical harm to any marine mammal. Independent mammal observers have monitored the trials and results analysed to date have shown there were no noticeable adverse impacts on marine life. As part of the approved Environmental Action Plan, the sonar will not be used if the marine mammals are within the predetermined safe range.  
 
--The range within which an animal must be close to the Sonar system for it to be possibly caused harm is effected by a range of issues from water conditions, Sea State, temperatures, power settings and transmission interval. For example in recent trials off Scotland a mammal would have had to be within 500 meters of the sonar for 15 minutes to have been caused any permanent damage. All such variables that affect this time and distance are taken into account during the development of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA)  
 
--Sonar 2087 is not more 'powerful' than existing sonar systems, however, unlike other existing systems it operates at a lower frequency (longer wavelength) to enable detection of a hostile submarine at sufficient range from friendly forces that it is prevented from attacking those forces or otherwise interfering with their operations.  
 
The EIA is carried out to ensure any effect on the marine environment is minimised Ð each can cost up to half a million pounds. To date £1.6 M has been spent on S2087 EIAs. The EIA advises the MOD and Royal Navy of the actions that should be taken to reduce the potential risk of an impact on the marine environmental.  
 
Whilst Sonar 2087 does put sound into the water, there are other, natural sounds such as lightning strikes on the sea and the calls of some species of Whales that can be louder than S2087 at source.  
 
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Título: 155 TMF concept sets sights on naval market
Enviado por: JLRC em Dezembro 09, 2004, 03:58:03 pm
155 TMF concept sets sights on naval market


BAE Systems Land Systems has put forward a "low cost, low risk" plan to develop a naval 155 mm gun system, which the company argues would offer a significant enhancement to the range and lethality of the UK Royal Navy's (RN's) naval gunfire support capability.
[Jane's Defence Weekly - first posted to http://jdw.janes.com (http://jdw.janes.com) – 3 December 2004]
Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Dezembro 13, 2004, 11:39:19 pm
VT Group Commences Negotiations for New Offshore Patrol Vessel
 
 
(Source: VT Group; issued Dec. 13, 2004)
 
 
 VT Group plc has commenced negotiations with the Ministry of Defence for the construction of a new 80-metre Offshore Patrol Vessel (Helicopter) for the Royal Navy, following the Ministry’s assessment of competitive bids from a number of companies.  
 
The ship will be built to VT’s account, handed over in September 2006 and chartered to the MoD for an initial period until March 2012. It will be manned and operated by the Royal Navy.  
 
The programme is expected to be worth an initial total of around £30 million, under a Public-Private Partnership arrangement, with the potential for this to increase if the charter is extended.  
 
The 80m ship will replace the RN’s two existing Castle Class offshore patrol vessels and will carry out the role of Falkland Islands Patrol Vessel. VT will also be responsible for providing a full Contractor Logistics Support (CLS) service to maintain the ship so that she is available for sea for more than 300 days a year. By utilising modern automated equipment and commercial maintenance practices, VT will guarantee the availability with a single ship, compared to the two currently needed to provide the same availability.  
 
VT Group Chief Executive Paul Lester commented: “This programme will provide a significant boost to our shipbuilding throughput at Portsmouth, supplementing the work that we are carrying out on the Type 45 destroyer. It also underlines the success of the PPP model that we have introduced on the initial River Class ships.”  
 
The new design will be based on the River Class, which were built by VT and are currently under charter to the MOD. The ‘Batch 2’ River Class will be enhanced with a helicopter deck capable of accepting helicopters up to the size of the new Merlin aircraft, and surveillance radar.  
 
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Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Dezembro 14, 2004, 12:22:36 am
HMS Bulwark Enters Service
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Dec. 10, 2004)
 
 
 The Royal Navy has today accepted into service one of the most technologically advanced warships ever to join the fleet - the 18,500 tonne HMS Bulwark.  
 
Built in Barrow-in-Furness by BAE Systems, HMS Bulwark, now docked in her home port of Devonport, is the second in a new class of amphibious assault ship which combines innovative design with state-of-the-art computing power.  
 
Bulwark joins her sister ship HMS Albion, which was accepted into service last July. Together they represent a huge step forward in modernising amphibious operations and will be a pivotal element of UK expeditionary warfare capability for the next 30 years.  
 
Minister for Defence Procurement, Lord Bach said: "I am extremely happy to see HMS Bulwark enter service with the Royal Navy - she and her sister ship HMS Albion form a key part of a £1 Billion modernisation programme which will mark a new era for the Royal Navy, completely renewing our amphibious shipping capability.  
 
"Built in Britain HMS Bulwark is one of the most advanced vessels of her type anywhere in the world. Not only can she carry hundreds of men and their equipment to wherever they are needed across the globe but she also contains one of the largest and most sophisticated battlefield command systems ever installed in a Royal Navy warship. She is indeed a vessel to be proud of."  
 
 
BACKGROUND NOTES:  
 
HMS Bulwark can carry up to 700 troops and her flight deck can accommodate two Merlin helicopters.  
 
A large floodable dock holds four large landing craft - with another four secured to the sides of the ship.  
 
She was launched on November 15, 2001, displaces 18,500 tonnes, has an overall length of 176 metres and a beam of 25.6 metres.  
 
HMS Bulwark will be based in Devonport, together with HMS Albion and HMS Ocean, from where she will depart on missions all over the world.  
 
The project is being managed by the Landing Ships Dock (Auxiliary) Integrated Project Team, based at the Defence Procurement Agency headquarters at Abbey Wood, Bristol.  
 
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Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Janeiro 20, 2005, 06:58:45 pm
HMS Victorious Arrives in Devonport (edited for content)
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Jan. 19, 2005)
 
 
 The Vanguard class submarine HMS Victorious arrived at HM Naval Base Devonport on Sunday 16 January 2005 for a major refit, which will be undertaken by Devonport Management Limited.  
 
The submarine left her home port of Faslane in Scotland on 13 January to make the four-day transit into Devonport Naval Base. The work to be carried out is a Long Overhaul Period and will include a refuel.  
 
HMS Victorious is the second of the Royal Navy's four Trident nuclear powered submarines to be refitted at Devonport. Her sister submarine HMS Vanguard recently completed her successful three-year refit with DML and returned home to Faslane earlier this month.  
 
As he prepared to sail the submarine to Plymouth with 119 crew and visitors from various affiliations on board, the Commanding Officer of HMS Victorious, Commander John Humphreys, said: "It is with sadness that we leave Faslane today. It has been home for the ten years that HMS Victorious has been contributing to the continuous operational cycle of the UK's national deterrent.  
 
"I have nothing but praise for the Base and its personnel and the support they have provided to us over the years. We look forward to returning and resuming this important role on completion of our successful refit with DML at Devonport."  
 
Commenting on the arrival, DML's Chief Executive Dr Dennis Gilbert, said:  
 
"This second refit in the class represents a fundamental cornerstone of our workload over the next three years. Our project and production teams have completed the planning activities and are now keen to deliver against the challenges that this refit presents."  
 
Shortly after arriving in Devonport, Commander John Humphreys will be leaving HMS Victorious to take up his new appointment on the International Military Staff at the NATO Headquarters in Brussels.  
 
The Royal Navy operates four Vanguard class Strategic missile submarines which provide the UK's national deterrent. Each can carry 16 Trident missiles. They are HMS Vanguard, HMS Victorious, HMS Vigilant and HMS Vengeance.  
 
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Título: Task Force da GB no Mediterrâneo e Médio Oriente
Enviado por: JLRC em Janeiro 26, 2005, 11:39:50 pm
HMS Invincible Leads Royal Navy Strike Force on Major Exercises in Middle East
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Jan. 24, 2005)
 
 
 Aircraft carrier HMS Invincible left Portsmouth on 17 January 2005 to lead a Royal Navy strike force on a series of exercises in the Mediterranean and Middle East spanning three months.  
 
In her strike carrier role, with a mixed force of Fleet Air Arm and RAF Harriers embarked, HMS Invincible (Commanding Officer Captain Neil Morisetti RN) will fly the flag of Rear Admiral Charles Style. Admiral Style’s command will include the Portsmouth-based HMS Grafton, a Type 23 frigate; and the Type 42 destroyer HMS Nottingham, embarking on her first operational mission since the completion of her repair package last year.  
 
The Portsmouth ships will be joined by the Devonport-based Type 23 frigate HMS Montrose. Joining the force will be the Royal Fleet Auxiliary support ship Fort George with four of the Navy’s newest helicopter, the Merlin, on board, from 820 Squadron.  
 
The long-planned series of exercises, entitled MARSTRIKE 05, is designed to demonstrate Britain’s ability to deploy, operate and sustain a maritime strike force and to reinforce the Government’s commitment to the stability and security of the Mediterranean and Gulf regions.  
 
MARSTRIKE’s main objective is to develop the operational capability of the participating units – in particular HMS Invincible’s strike role conducted with her tailored air group. Major focus of the deployment will be Exercise Magic Carpet, a joint and combined exercise based on Oman with participation by the Omani, US and French forces.  
 
HMS Invincible’s aircraft will, at various times include Sea Harrier FA2s from 801 Naval Air Squadron (NAS) joined by a Sea King Mk 6 from 771 Squadron ‘B’ Flight, Harrier GR7 strike aircraft from No. 4 (AC) Squadron RAF, and three Sea King airborne early warning helicopters of B Flight, 849 NAS. The aircraft will join the ship at sea.  
 
France has allocated the frigate FS Guepratte to the deployment, seen as a natural progression of the integration last year of the Portsmouth-based destroyer HMS Gloucester into French carrier task group operations in the Mediterranean.  
 
MARSTRIKE 05 will also provide the opportunity for the British ships to make a series of goodwill visits to countries in the region.  
 
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Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Janeiro 28, 2005, 07:20:42 pm
AMS wins £12M MOD Contract for Harrier Support
 
 
(Source: Alenia Marconi Systems; issued, Jan. 26, 2005)
 
 
 The Ministry of Defence (MOD) recently awarded a £12 million contract to AMS, to develop advanced Precision Approach Radars (PAR) on aircraft carriers, HMS Ark Royal and HMS Illustrious, in support of the Harrier GR Mk 9 aircraft.  
 
The Sea Harrier FA2 and Harrier GR7 are both being replaced by the Harrier GR9, which is considered most appropriate to the nature of operations around the world and will be operated by Joint Force Harrier, which consists of Royal Navy and Royal Air Force squadrons.  
 
As part of improvements being made to the safe operation of the aircraft at sea, the MOD is engaged in fitting additional Ship Approach Recovery Aids to the aircraft carriers, which will significantly improve the safety of operations in poor weather and at night. The MOD selected the SPN-720 PAR radar developed by Galileo Avionica of the Finmeccanica group, as the most appropriate system.  
 
AMS will align the original radar design to meet the MOD requirements including changes to the radar characteristics, adaptation of the ship’s gyro data to match current standards and console modifications. Consoles will now include an upper display providing operators with a surveillance capability to further enhance safe aircraft control. These displays will be common to those already installed by AMS in the ships Operations Room and they will be interfaced with the ship’s Combat Management System (CMS). Each PAR system will also be provided with an on-board training capability to ensure that operator skill levels are maintained at sea.  
 
In addition to the PAR radar systems the MOD has contracted AMS to study the installation of a Pilot Interpreted Approach (PIA) aid, thereby providing pilots with further assistance in poor weather or at night. A unique shipborne guidance system developed by AMS will be used in conjunction with new aircraft systems.  
 
Funded by the MOD’s Defence Logistics Organisation this key programme is managed by the Harrier Integrated Project Team (IPT). Air Commodore Ian Thorne, Harrier IPT Leader, said:  
 
"Both parties worked extremely hard to deliver this important contract. AMS has been particularly responsive and positive throughout this process and we have every reason to expect delivery of an entirely successful programme, to cost and time.”  
 
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PS : Consta que o Invencible vai ser desarmado. Esta notícia parece confirmá-lo.
Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Janeiro 28, 2005, 07:44:54 pm
World's Best Anti-Torpedo Kit Enters Service  
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Jan. 27, 2005)
 
 
 An innovative UK-developed anti-torpedo system, which will protect our ships from underwater torpedo attack, has entered service with the Royal Navy. And with some careful project management, and the use of 'smart' procurement practices, the project is expected to beat its original estimated cost by around £5million.  
 
Called Surface Ship Torpedo Defence (SSTD), the system includes highly sensitive acoustic sensors, which are towed some distance behind a ship and can identify and pin-point the location of an incoming torpedo.  
 
Developed by Middlesex based Ultra Electronics, SSTD will not only warn a ships Commanding Officer of any incoming threat, but will also advise the best course of action, from manoeuvring the ship away from danger to deploying acoustic decoys - also part of the SSTD system - which will lure a torpedo away from its original target.  
 
The £65million SSTD project will see up to 65 Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels are being prepared to receive SSTD. Sixteen sets of the equipment are being procured which can be easily transferred between ships and will be fitted to appropriate vessels when they deploy on operations or exercise.  
 
The first SSTD kit has been fitted to Type 23 frigate HMS Westminster.  
 
Lord Bach, Minister for Defence Procurement said: "This is another wonderful example of UK engineering leading the way. We are now protecting our ships with the very best torpedo defences in the world - and have been able to save around £5 million on the original estimated cost thanks to careful management and employing 'smart' procurement principles.  
 
"Torpedo attack remains a significant threat to our vessels, particularly with the proliferation of quiet submarines around the world. This system is the very best of its kind and establishes UK industry as a world leader in this field of technology."  
 
SSTD is expected to provide the fleet with protection from torpedo attack for the next 25 years  
 
 
BACKGROUND NOTES:  
 
1. Up to Sixty-five RN ships and Royal Fleet Auxiliary support ships, ranging from frigates to Invincible class aircraft carriers and auxiliary oilers are to be fitted to receive SSTD with all equipment delivered over the next two years. The work is expected to take between three and four weeks per vessel and will be conducted at UK yards  
 
2. SSTD will replace the existing Sonar 2070 system.  
 
3. SSTD is managed by the Torpedo Countermeasures Integrate Project Team, based at the Defence Procurement Agency, Abbey Wood, Bristol.  
 
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Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Janeiro 31, 2005, 11:27:26 pm
HMS Westminster Formally Re-Joins the Fleet
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Jan. 28, 2005)
 
 
 HMS Westminster, which has emerged from refit as the Royal Navy's most advanced frigate, formally re-joined the fleet in a ceremony in Portsmouth on Thursday 27 January 2005.  
 
The ship underwent an extensive upgrade during 12 months in Rosyth and is the first warship to get the Sonar 2087 system which will help the Navy to better detect 'stealthy' seaborne threats, including submarines and mini-submarines.  
 
She was also fitted with an advanced new torpedo defence system, a new computerised navigational system and equipment that allows her to operate the potent new Merlin helicopter.  
 
HMS Westminster was rededicated in the Naval Base during a service conducted by The Reverend Monsignor Richard Madders, the Navy's Principal Roman Catholic Chaplain.  
 
Principal guest Lady Sally Livesay, who launched the ship on the Tyne in 1992, arrived in style in a horse-drawn carriage provided by the Household Cavalry Regiment – the ship's affiliate Army unit. She was joined by the Duke of Westminster, who maintains a keen interest in his namesake ship's activities.  
 
During the ceremony Lady Livesay inspected a parade comprising most of the 174 ship's company.  
 
HMS Westminster's Commanding Officer, Commander Andrew Bretton, said:  
 
"The ship is now at the cutting edge of technology and ready to face uncertain challenges ahead with a range of impressive new capabilities and a ship's company ready, willing and able to do their duty.  
 
"HMS Westminster represents a great investment for the future of our nation."  
 
Music during the 45-minute ceremony will be provided by the Royal Marines' Band, Portsmouth.  
 
HMS Westminster will continue her operational sea training for the next few months in UK waters and will then be ready to deploy anywhere in the world.  
 
-ends-
Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Fevereiro 26, 2005, 01:41:26 am
VT Group Secures Contract For New Offshore Patrol Vessel
 
 
(Source: VT Group; issued Feb. 25, 2005)
 
 
 VT Group plc has been awarded a contract by the Ministry of Defence for the construction of a new 80 metre Offshore Patrol Vessel (Helicopter) for the Royal Navy.  
 
The ship will be built to VT’s account, with production starting in June. She will be handed over to the Royal Navy in Autumn 2006, entering service, after the completion of trials, in Spring 2007. The ship will be chartered to the MoD for an initial period until March 2012.  
 
The programme is expected to be worth an initial total of around £30 million, under a Public-Private Partnership arrangement, with the potential for this to increase if the charter is extended. Some 100 new jobs will be created by the programme and up to 400 existing jobs safeguarded.  
 
The ship, based on the VT-built River Class which are currently under charter to the MoD, will replace the RN’s two existing Castle Class offshore patrol vessels and will carry out the role of Falkland Islands Patrol Vessel.  
 
She will be manned and operated by the Royal Navy but VT will be responsible for providing a full Contractor Logistics Support (CLS) service to maintain the vessel so that she is available for sea for more than 300 days a year. By utilising modern automated equipment and commercial maintenance practices, VT will guarantee the availability with a single ship, compared to the two currently needed to provide the same availability.  
 
VT Chief Executive Paul Lester commented: “This contract strengthens VT’s role as a leading provider of PPP/PFI solutions following the success of the River Class programme. The project will utilise excess capacity at our main shipbuilding facility, which already has a healthy order book through the Type 45 programme that stretches over the next four years.”  
 
The ‘Batch 2’ River Class design will be enhanced with a helicopter deck capable of accepting helicopters up to the size of the new Merlin aircraft, increased accommodation to cater for an embarked force, a bigger gun, higher levels of survivability and surveillance radar.  
 
-ends-
Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Março 02, 2005, 12:34:41 am
New £30 Million Royal Navy Warship to be Built in Portsmouth  
 
 
(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Feb. 25, 2005)
 
 
 On 25 February 2005, the Ministry of Defence awarded the contract to build a brand new warship to VT Group, as production began on another vessel, the third Type 45 Destroyer HMS Diamond, at the Portsmouth shipyard.  
 
The £30 million contract for a new Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) will create 100 new jobs and sustain around 400 posts at VT's shipbuilding facility. The new OPV will patrol waters round the Falkland Islands and is being acquired under an innovative charter and logistic support contract.  
 
Scheduled to enter service in 2007, the new OPV will be the first warship to be launched at Portsmouth since the frigate HMS Andromeda in 1967.  
 
Minister for Defence Procurement, Lord Bach, was at Portsmouth Dockyard on 25 February 2005 to announce the OPV contract award and officially launch production of the third Type 45 Anti-Air Warfare Destroyer, HMS Diamond. Lord Bach said:  
 
"Today is a day of double celebration for Portsmouth and the Royal Navy. Through this contract, VT will build a new Offshore Patrol Vessel in Portsmouth that will ensure our Falklands Island patrol service remains strong and effective for years to come.  
 
"The Type-45 programme meanwhile will provide Britain with the most advanced air destroyer fleet in the world, and it is a pleasure to get work officially underway on the third vessel in the programme, HMS Diamond.  
 
"Today, however, is not just about ships, it is about people. 100 new jobs will be created as a result of the OPV contract and a further 400 sustained. Together with the hundreds already working on the Type 45 contract, this is excellent news for Portsmouth."  
 
The new ship will replace the two Castle Class ships currently employed in the Falkland Island role, HMS Dumbarton Castle and HMS Leeds Castle. Unlike the Castle Class ships, which have to return to the UK every three years for major repairs, the new OPV's greater reliability and more modern design means she will be able to remain in the South Atlantic until 2012 and will save the taxpayer £2 million in support costs over a seven year period.  
 
Weighing in at 1,850 tonnes, the new OPV will have a crew of 34 (compared with 51 for the old Castle class ships) and be armed with a single 30mm gun. She will carry out patrol duties around the Falklands and their dependencies, and is able to accommodate a single helicopter up to Merlin size.  
 
BAE Systems Electronics is the prime contractor for the delivery of the first six Type 45 Destroyers. VT at Portsmouth and BAE Systems Naval Ships in Govan will both build and outfit substantial sections of the ships.  
 
The Type 45 Destroyer will replace the capability currently provided by the Type 42. The first of class ship is planned to enter service later in the decade.  
 
The class is to be known as the 'D' Class. HMS Daring, HMS Dauntless, HMS Diamond, HMS Defender, HMS Dragon and HMS Duncan have been announced as the names of the first six ships.  
 
-ends-
Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Março 15, 2005, 12:04:48 am
Keel of Third Astute-Class Submarine Is Laid  
 
 
(Source: UK Defence Procurement Agency; issued March 11, 2005)
 
 
 First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Alan West today performed the traditional 'laying the keel' ceremony for HMS Artful -- one of the biggest and most powerful attack submarines ever procured by the Royal Navy.  
 
The ceremony marks the formal start of construction of HMS Artful, the third Astute-class submarine under construction by BAE Systems at Barrow-in-Furness. She joins HMS Astute and HMS Ambush, currently being assembled at the Barrow shipyard.  
 
With improved communications, a greater capacity for joint operations and the ability to carry more weaponry, the Astute-class submarines will become a cornerstone of UK defence capability.  
 
Defence Procurement Minister Lord Bach said: "This ceremony marks another significant stage in this important project. The Astute class will be the most advanced and powerful attack submarines the Royal Navy has ever operated and these boats will play a key part of our defences for decades to come.  
 
"The Royal Navy has a requirement for nuclear powered submarines well into the future and the Barrow-in-Furness yard remains the UK's centre of excellence for submarine building. Announcements on the procurement of further Astute class boats will be made at the appropriate time.  
 
"Submarines are extremely demanding engineering projects, and the Astute class is no exception."  
 
Around 5,500 people are employed on the project for the first three Astute class submarines, which has an expected cost to MoD of about £3.5Bn.  
 
 
BACKGROUND NOTES:  
 
1. The third of three Astute-class submarines ordered by the MoD, HMS Artful joins HMS Astute and HMS Ambush - already under construction.  
 
2. First of class HMS Astute is expected to enter service in 2009.  
 
3. Astute-class submarines will displace 7,800 tonnes dived and are 97 metres long. They will have six weapons tubes and massively increased firepower compared with earlier attack submarines. They can dive to depths in excess of 300 metres and will have a complement of 98 men. They are to be powered by a Pressurised Water Reactor 2, equipped with Core H, which will fuel the reactor for the submarine's full service life, ending the need for costly reactor refuellings.  
 
4. HMS Astute, HMS Ambush and HMS Artful are being procured by the Defence Procurement Agency Attack Submarines Integrated Project Team based at Abbey Wood, Bristol.  
 
5. Astute class submarines will be based at Faslane on the Clyde and will undergo refits at Devonport.  
 
-ends-
Título: Submarinos da classe Trafalgar
Enviado por: JLRC em Junho 04, 2005, 03:02:53 pm
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Jane's Navy International
17 May 2005
Comms office upgrade begins for Trafalgar submarines
All seven of the UK Royal Navy's (RN's) Trafalgar-class nuclear attack submarines (SSNs) are to receive a new open-architecture communications office reconfigured to promote coherency and more rapid technology insertion in their external communications system.
Título:
Enviado por: Marauder em Agosto 02, 2006, 10:05:53 am
Royal Navy pensa em introduzir UAVs também
http://www.janes.com/regional_news/euro ... _1_n.shtml (http://www.janes.com/regional_news/europe/news/jni/jni060705_1_n.shtml)
Título:
Enviado por: Lancero em Junho 11, 2007, 04:37:41 pm
(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g49/seruriermarshal/009/20070609_faf577251a0904928225uhUqRs.jpg)

(http://i53.photobucket.com/albums/g49/seruriermarshal/009/20070609_eca9ac51f3939752f8529KjIb9.jpg)

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v101/He219/dailypix/militarypix/fresh/more/more/even%20more/more/will%20it%20ever%20end/more/more/AstuteLaunch1.jpg)

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The Royal Navy’s newest super-submarine, Astute, was launched today, 8 June 2007, by HRH The Duchess of Cornwall at the BAE Systems shipyard in Barrow in Furness, Cumbria.



(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v101/He219/dailypix/militarypix/fresh/more/more/even%20more/more/will%20it%20ever%20end/more/more/AstuteCutaway.jpg)



Vídeo (http://http)

Classe (http://http)
Título:
Enviado por: Bravo Two Zero em Junho 11, 2007, 08:38:28 pm
Uma pergunta:
A classe Astute é classificada como SSGN ( Cruise missile submarine ) ou como SSN ( attack submarine ) ?
Título:
Enviado por: Von Einsamkeit em Junho 16, 2007, 02:54:58 am
SSN

SSGN é mais dedicado como o Oscar-II Russo e agora os Ohio SSGN americanos
Título:
Enviado por: SSK em Junho 17, 2007, 04:20:39 pm
http://g1.globo.com/Noticias/Mundo/0,,MUL49012-5602,00.html
Título:
Enviado por: SSK em Junho 17, 2007, 04:35:52 pm
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Royal Navy Launches Latest Attack Submarine - Astute
(http://defenseupdate.typepad.com/newscast/images/2007/06/11/astute_front.jpg)
 The Royal Navy's newest attack submarine, Astute, was launched last week (June 8, 2007) by HRH The Duchess of Cornwall at the BAE Systems shipyard in Barrow in Furness, Cumbria. Astute is the first nuclear attack submarine to be launched in the UK for almost a decade. Far bigger and more potent than the current class submarines, the 7,400 tons, 100 meter long sub weighs about 2,000 more than the current Trafalgar class submarines. Astute is expected to begin sea trials in March 2008, and is expected to enter service with the Royal Navy in 2009. It will be based in Scotland. Astute is the first vessel of four in the Astute class. The other three are AMBUSH, ARTFUL and AUDACIOUS.


http://www.defense-update.com/products/a/astute_submarine.htm
Título:
Enviado por: SSK em Junho 18, 2007, 01:42:50 pm
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17 de junho de 2007 - 16:34
Malvinas abrigam maior base militar do Atlântico Sul

Base inglesa de Mount Pleasant começou a receber investimentos a 25 anos e hoje conta com grande poderio militar, 1.650 soldados e custo semanal de US$ 4 milhões
Roberto Godoy

SÃO PAULO - A guerra contra a Argentina pela posse do arquipélago das Malvinas/Falklands havia terminado em 14 de junho de 1982, com a vitória das forças britânicas, ao custo de 1,4 mil mortos - e já no dia 17, ás 12 horas, a primeira-ministra Margareth Tatcher anunciava ter recebido da rainha Elizabeth “indicação clara para garantir a defesa das ilhas”. A designação recebeu, de cara, uma dotação de £100 milhões.

Passados 25 anos e tendo sido gastos mais US$ 550 milhões, o resultado prático da ação é a mais formidável base militar do Atlântico Sul, a de Mount Pleasant dedicada a sofisticadas ações de vigilância armada. As ilhas tem 2.300 habitantes civis - os kelpers - e, até dezembro do ano passado, 3.180 carneiros contados pelo censo rural.

O grande complexo abriga 1.650 soldados da Marinha, Exército e Aeronáutica. Desde setembro de 2001, está sempre em estado de alerta intermediário por conta da guerra contra o terror. Há ainda navios, radares digitais, mísseis antiaéreos e um atracadouro habilitado a receber submarinos nucleares de grande porte.

Caças supersônicos Tornado F-3, aviões EC-130 de monitoramento eletrônico, helicópteros anti-submarinos, uma fragata lança-mísseis, lanchas torpedeiras e um grande jato VC-10/T, de reabastecimento em vôo, estão empenhados em uma operação permanente de monitoramento do espaço aéreo da região.

As autoridades de defesa do Reino Unido e as de seu maior parceiro, os Estados Unidos, temem a utilização das rotas antárticas como linha de trânsito clandestino do terrorismo internacional.

O elevado padrão de sobreaviso em Mount Pleasant foi estabelecido pelo Estado-Maior da Defesa do Reino Unido, no mesmo dia em que o governo americano revelava que suas agências de inteligência haviam tomado conhecimento de novos atentados em preparo por organizações terroristas alinhadas com a rede Al-Qaeda, de Osama bin Laden. No dia 7 de julho de 2005, o metrô de Londres era atacado por terroristas. O atentado a bomba deixou o saldo de 50 mortos e mais de 700 feridos.


Manutenção custosa
O custo de manutenção de Mount Pleasant é de quase US$ 4 milhões por semana, de acordo com orçamento 2006-2007 do governo britânico. Segundo Derek Wilkinson, um ex-oficial da Royal Air Force (RAF) que atuou recentemente na área e hoje vive no Uruguai, a rotina da base começa às 6 horas da manhã. “Faz frio o ano todo nas 700 ilhas e afloramentos austrais britânicos e nessa época isso pode significar temperatura média de 8 graus”, conta.

Seguindo uma escala variável as tripulações dos quatro caças supersônicos Tornado F-3 do Esquadrão 1435 fazem sucessivas patrulhas em regime de reação rápida. Esses grandes jatos de emprego múltiplo decolam com oito mísseis sob as asas móveis e 750 projéteis de 27 milímetros para o canhão de bordo.

Cada missão de patrulha dura em média duas horas, com raio de ação de 740 quilômetros sem reabastecimento combustível em vôo. Se as condições climáticas estiverem desfavoráveis os Tornado podem recorrer ao avião tanque, um jato VC-10. O esquema de pronta resposta será mantido por tempo indeterminado.

O pessoal da RAF, formado por 16 duplas de piloto e navegador para os Tornados, implica o trabalho em terra de 69 especialistas em manutenção. As tripulações permanecem o tempo todo com seus macacões de vôo, capacetes à mão, em salas anexas aos abrigos de concreto construídos na menor distância possível da pista de 2.590 metros de extensão.

Os Tornados voam a 2.330 km/h e podem transportar até 9 toneladas de mísseis e bombas. A fragata lança-mísseis e as corvetas torpedeiras da Marinha são responsáveis pelo controle da área de exclusão, um círculo de pouco mais de 400 quilômetros ao redor das ilhas principais, onde está a capital, Port Stanley. Um Hércules EC-130H realiza missões de transporte, de acompanhamento da atividade eletrônica e de escuta de comunicações, no ar e na superfície.

O uso das rotas antárticas para vôos irregulares é rotina entre traficantes de drogas. O espaço aéreo é pouco vigiado e a instabilidade magnética típica da região dificulta o controle. Todos os novos jatos executivos de última geração têm autonomia suficiente para realizar vôos intercontinentais transpolares e, com uma ou duas escalas, desembarcar passageiros em pistas clandestinas de qualquer ponto da América do Sul.
Título:
Enviado por: SSK em Julho 04, 2007, 11:41:07 pm
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Royal Navy Tests Enghanced Block IV Tomahawk Cruise Missile  
 
The Royal Navy released today images from firing trials launch of its newest Block IV Tomahawk long-range Land Attack Missile (TLAM) conducted recently off the US coast. The missile was fired from the 5,200 ton attack submarine HMS Trenchant used one of her torpedo tubes to launch the missile, which then flew over the Gulf of Mexico, striking a target hundreds of miles away with pin-point accuracy.
 
During the 60 minute test fight the missile reached heights of 10,000 feet and speeds of 500 miles an hour. The Royal Navy plans to field the new missile with existing Trafalgar class submarines next year. The missile, produced by Raytheon, offers precision strike at targets over 1,000 miles away.

The missile is linked to satellite communication systems throughout its flight, enabling in-flight retargeting and on-course intelligence gathering and battle damage assessment capabilities. It is expected to significantly improve the long-range precision attack capability of the Royal Navy. Britain bought from the USA 64 missiles from under a £70M four years ago. The missiles will be capable of being fired from the current Trafalgar Class submarines and is considered a primary weapon for the four Astute Class nuclear powered attack submarines currently under construction.


http://www.defense-update.com/products/t/tomahawk.htm
Título:
Enviado por: SSK em Agosto 14, 2007, 10:43:40 pm
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HMS Astute, Britain's Latest Nuclear Submarine

Laid down by Vickers at its shipyard in Barrow-in-Furness and finished by BAE Systems, HMS Astute is Britain's latest, and by far, most sophisticated nuclear powered submarine. She was launched on June 8, 2007 and will be commissioned in about a year. While cost over-runs and delays in completion of design specifications have brought criticism to the project, the fact remains that Astute is equal to the best in the American arsenal of attack submarines.

She is the first of three in the Trafalgar series, with HMS Ambush and HMS Artful to follow. If past production of British submarines represents what is to follow, the cost of succeeding submarines will not be much less than the 960 million pounds of Astute. The series was first envisioned in the mid 1990s, but advances in electronics and the changing demands of world politics meant many revisions to original plans. The British Admiralty bombarded Vickers with design modification demands and each revision meant cost over-runs. The dilemma was to produce an obsolescent submarine within cost or to produce one that was state-of-the-art at a much higher cost. The British government chose the latter. When BAE took over the design phase, its engineers consulted with Electric Boat in Groton, Connecticut to gain a better understanding of cost-cutting measures. Recommendations included the design of hull modules vertically oriented to allow easier installation of tight-fitting equipment. The British engineers stuck to their guns in not allowing production to begin until comprehensive computer modeling detailed every step of the process.

The first British nuclear submarine was HMS Dreadnought, launched in 1960. Like the Nautilus, (SSN-571) she was essentially a test platform for its nuclear plant. That boat, being a success, brought on the Valiant, Swiftsure and Trafalgar classes of attack submarines. Each boat constructed within a class represented a more modern version of the boat preceding it. Constructed in series, as is the flow of American submarines, each boat was an improvement in performance. Most of the early Valiant and Swiftsure boats have been retired. One such modernization was the addition of conformal anechoic hull tiles to reduce sonar signature. Rolls-Royce, the producer of nuclear power plants for British submarines, perfected its PWR 1 pressurized water reactor over the years to a standard design that is durable and reliable.

Astute is larger than its predecessors at 323 feet in length and a 37 foot beam. This is similar to American designs and is determined by the volume necessary to give a reasonable freeboard when the weight of vessel is dictated by its heavy equipment. The boat's draft is about 33 feet. Its Rolls-Royce PWR 2 is the same basic design as the PWR 1, but is lighter and has a longer lasting core. With a life expectancy of 25 years, Astute will never have to be refueled. Indeed, the hull construction does not provide for refueling. Its ducted propulsor, similar to that of American Virginia class submarines, drives the boat at about 30 knots. Its passive sonar is at a par with America's best, having ranges up to 3000 miles. It will carry a crew of about 100 with berthing for another 10 special operations type personnel. It has equipment to continually extract oxygen from sea water, thus replenishing interior breathable air.

The boat's only limiting factor is the amount of food able to be stored in the already cramped space. Some things in submarines never change. U-boats hung wurst from overhead piping and stuffed boxes of canned goods outboard of engines. American Guppies and nuclear attack boats stacked crated canned goods in passage ways, bilges and every nook and cranny. Astute will probably do the same.

When commissioned in about a year, Astute will be a significant addition to the British ability to strike an enemy from long range. It will carry both torpedoes and Tomahawk missiles with ranges of over 2500 miles. It will be a submarine of great value in the coming struggle against terrorism.
Título:
Enviado por: Miguel em Janeiro 15, 2008, 08:44:18 pm
Reduçao da Royal Navy

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Selon la presse britannique, la Royal Navy va être contrainte de se séparer de cinq nouvelles frégates, réduisant à seulement 20 le nombre de bâtiments de ce type en service. Les quatre dernières Type 22 devraient être désarmées, de même qu'une Type 23. La flotte anglaise ne devrait donc plus comprendre que 8 destroyers lance-missiles (Type 45 et 42) et 12 frégates de la classe Norfolk (Type 23). Trois de ces unités, construites dans les années 90, avaient déjà été vendues au Chili, alors que deux frégates du type 22 ont été récemment acquises par la Roumanie.
Les raisons de cette nouvelle cure d'amaigrissement de la Royal Navy tient essentiellement dans des questions de restrictions budgétaires. Au-delà des conséquences financières de la guerre en Irak, le ministère britannique de la Défense doit faire face au financement de plusieurs programmes majeurs, comme l'avion de combat F-35. Côté marine, aux coûteux sous-marins nucléaires d'attaque de la classe Astute (dont le nombre final reste plus qu'incertain), se sont ajoutés les destroyers lance-missiles du type 45, eux aussi très onéreux. Leur nombre a déjà été réduit de 12 à 8 unités mais la commande des deux derniers n'est plus assurée. Enfin, il convient d'assurer la construction des porte-avions Queen Elizabeth et Prince of Wales. La facture s'élève à plus de 5 milliards d'euros et un glissement du programme de deux ans est annoncée par la presse anglaise.


8 destroiers e 12 Fragatas :!: quem vai ficar com essas 5 Fragatas?
Título:
Enviado por: P44 em Janeiro 16, 2008, 08:38:24 am
Brasil? Chile? Algum país de Leste?

Portugal não é de certeza
Título:
Enviado por: zocuni em Janeiro 17, 2008, 02:34:20 am
Citação de: "P44"
Brasil? Chile? Algum país de Leste?

Portugal não é de certeza


De repente se duplicarmos a exportação de vinho do porto,quem sabe?


Abraços,
Título:
Enviado por: ShadIntel em Janeiro 17, 2008, 09:42:31 am
Citação de: "zocuni"
Citação de: "P44"
Brasil? Chile? Algum país de Leste?

Portugal não é de certeza

De repente se duplicarmos a exportação de vinho do porto,quem sabe?


Abraços,

 :lol: Mesmo se o preço do Vinho do Porto subisse tanto como o do petróleo sem abrandamento da procura, haveria melhores utilizações para tanto dinheiro.
Para quê mais uma classe de fragatas multirole ?
Título:
Enviado por: zocuni em Janeiro 17, 2008, 10:56:24 am
Citação de: "ShadIntel"
:lol: Mesmo se o preço do Vinho do Porto subisse tanto como o do petróleo sem abrandamento da procura, haveria melhores utilizações para tanto dinheiro.
Para quê mais uma classe de fragatas multirole ?


É verdade.
Título:
Enviado por: P44 em Janeiro 17, 2008, 11:44:11 am
não me admirava nada que a T-23 excedente fosse para o Chile :twisted:
Título:
Enviado por: JLRC em Janeiro 17, 2008, 04:19:38 pm
Citação de: "P44"
não me admirava nada que a T-23 excedente fosse para o Chile :twisted:


E também a minha crença.
Título:
Enviado por: P44 em Fevereiro 14, 2008, 02:16:18 pm
Defense Secretary Des Browne underlines his commitment to Scottish shipyards

London February 11, 2008 - The Defense Secretary Des Browne today visited Babcock Marine in Rosyth to witness the start of a £50 million investment project to the dockyard in preparation for the two Royal Navy super carriers.

Des Browne witnessed the signing of a £35m contract by Babcock Engineering Services with Glasgow-based subcontractors Edmund Nuttall Limited to modify the docks in anticipation of the future carrier work.

In addition to modifying the dock to accommodate the building of the carriers, key equipment will be purchased, such as the 'Goliath' crane, the largest in the UK. The total investment in Rosyth will amount to £50 million.

Defense Secretary, Des Browne said:

"This is a significant investment for shipbuilding in Rosyth and a symbol of our commitment to the two new aircraft carriers which will be the largest ships ever sailed by the Royal Navy.

"I am delighted to see this boost for the maritime industry in Scotland and jobs for Scottish workers."
The CEO of Babcock International Group plc, Peter Rogers and the Babcock Marine CEO, Archie Bethel OBE were also on hand to witness the start of this important project.

Peter Rogers said:

"The award of this contract is the culmination of a great deal of hard work by the Babcock Marine team and Edmund Nuttall Limited together with our colleagues in the Aircraft Carrier Alliance including the Ministry of Defense to ensure that the Rosyth site is ready to play its part in what is the most exciting and physically largest defense project for many years."

Martin Rogers, Chief Executive of Edmund Nuttall Limited, said:

"We are understandably delighted to have secured this major package of work, extending a long standing and successful relationship between Nuttall Limited and Babcock at Rosyth. We are looking forward now to starting work on site."


  www.seawaves.com (http://www.seawaves.com)
................................................................

£35m Contract Allows Assembly of Navy Super Carriers

London February 11, 2008 -The start of an investment project to modify the dockyard at Rosyth, in preparation for the assembly of the two Royal Navy super carriers was witnessed today, 11 February 2008, by Defense Secretary Des Browne.


The two 65,000 tonne aircraft carriers, HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales, are to be constructed in sections in shipyards at Portsmouth and Barrow-in-Furness, Glasgow, with final assembly at Babcock's Rosyth in Scotland.

Des Browne witnessed the signing of a £35m contract today by Babcock Engineering Services with Glasgow-based subcontractors Edmund Nuttall Limited to modify the docks in order to accommodate the building of the carriers and widen its direct entrance.

The total investment in Rosyth will amount to £50m which will also provide for the necessary equipment to be purchased, such as the 'Goliath' crane, the largest in the UK, and hauling gear.

Defense Secretary, Des Browne said:

"This is a significant investment in shipbuilding in Rosyth and a symbol of our commitment to the two new aircraft carriers, which will which will be the largest ships ever sailed by the Royal Navy."

The CEO of Babcock International Group plc, Peter Rogers and the Babcock Marine CEO, Archie Bethel OBE were also on hand to witness the start of this important project. Peter Rogers said:

"The award of this contract is the culmination of a great deal of hard work by the Babcock Marine team and Edmund Nuttall together with our colleagues in the Aircraft Carrier Alliance including the Ministry of Defense, to ensure that the Rosyth site is ready to play its part in what is the most exciting and largest defense project for many years."

(http://img443.imageshack.us/img443/9003/cvfuk2008qx7.th.jpg) (http://http)

(http://img441.imageshack.us/img441/9771/cvfcca2rq3.th.jpg) (http://http)

(http://img504.imageshack.us/img504/2460/ukcarrier1hc3.jpg)
Título:
Enviado por: AMRAAM em Junho 26, 2008, 01:27:21 pm
Pensaba,que esta noticia ya habia sido tratada aqui,pero me he dado cuenta de que no,o al menos en este topic.Pues nada ahi va(Es de algunos dias atras):
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Government cancels two warships
Royal Navy's new Type 45 Destroyer HMS Daring
The Royal Navy does not have "unlimited resources"

The government has cancelled plans to build an extra two Type 45 Destroyers for the Royal Navy.

Armed Forces Minister Bob Ainsworth told the Commons it would not be taking up the option to build the seventh and eighth warships.

Already, six high-tech £600m Type 45s have been ordered and will be based in Portsmouth, Hampshire.

Mr Ainsworth said there were not "unlimited resources" for the Navy but the fleet had "sufficient capability".

A spokesman for Portsmouth-based VT Group, which builds the bows, funnels and masts for the ships, said it was not surprised and had not budgeted for the order - therefore the decision would have no impact on jobs.

Mr Ainsworth, opening a Commons debate on defence, said: "The reality is we do not have unlimited resources.
   
The six destroyers already on contract will provide a formidable capability
Armed Forces Minister
Bob Ainsworth MP

"We have to prioritise between a range of competing requirements, focusing on the balance between current operations and future capability.

"That is why I can confirm that we have taken a decision not to take the option to order the seventh and eighth Type 45 destroyers.

"The six destroyers already on contract will provide a formidable capability."

The ships are assembled at BAE Systems shipyard on the Clyde in Scotland.

The first of the Type 45s, HMS Daring, is due to go into service next year.

Mr Ainsworth added that work on new vessels to replace the Type 22 and 23 frigates would, also be accelerated.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/hampshire/7464085.stm


Bueno,como todo no han de ser malas noticias os dejo un bello regalito :wink:
(http://img337.imageshack.us/img337/2241/shipddgtype45cutawaylgxv3.jpg)
Título:
Enviado por: nelson38899 em Agosto 15, 2008, 03:08:58 pm
boas

Depois de ter lido a noticia que vou por a seguir fiquei com a ideia, que ja não falta muito para termos navios de guerra com peças de artilharias iguais aos da 2ª grande guerra.

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BAE to Build 155mm Naval Gun for U.K

LONDON - The possibility of British warships firing 155mm artillery is a step closer to reality after an announcement from BAE Systems that it has signed a deal with the Ministry of Defence to build a gun to undertake land-based firing trials next year.

CORDA, BAE's consulting arm, together with the company's Land Systems business in Britain and defense research company QinetiQ, hope to start live-firing trials in fall 2009 with a 155mm naval gun based on the British Army's AS90 self-propelled howitzer system.

BAE said it is also exploiting the capabilities of other company business units such as Armament Systems in the U.S. and Bofors in Sweden.

The Armament Systems division is already in the latter stages of developing a similar system for the U.S. Navy - the 155mm Advanced Gun System destined for the force's DDG 1000 destroyer program.

No more than two DDG 1000s are likely to be built rather than the seven planned, but the AGS could find its way onto up-rated Arleigh Burke DDG-51 destroyers likely to be built in their place.

If the 4 million pound ($7.55 million) British contract goes according to plan, BAE hopes to move to a full technology demonstrator program ahead of possible retrofitting of the gun to existing Type 23 frigates and Type 45 destroyers, as well as an upcoming generation of warships known as the Future Surface Combatant.

This latest contract is the third phase of work that kicked off in 2006 as part of a three-year MoD research program known as Maritime Surface Effects. Eight different study programs are looking at issues such as coastal suppression, naval fire support, offensive and defensive surface warfare, and the role of unmanned surface vehicles.

BAE said in a statement that replacing the current 4.5-inch gun with a 155mm system would increase the range and effect on targets while also reducing costs by using the same gun and ammunition as the British Army.

Previous study phases examined the feasibility of fitting the 155mm gun into the existing Mk8 Mod 1 turret and considered some of the technology risks of the proposed solution.

"In addition to providing the Royal Navy with a potential low-cost route to a significant enhancement in capability, this program will help to sustain the U.K. industrial capacity to design, upgrade and manufacture artillery and gunnery systems," BAE Land System executive John Kelly said.

(http://www.defensenews.com/pgf/stories84/081408dfn_bae_navalgun_800.JPG)
http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i= ... =EUR&s=SEA (http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=3675384&c=EUR&s=SEA)
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Enviado por: Nuno Bento em Agosto 15, 2008, 06:14:25 pm
Não vejo grande utilidade numa peça de elevado calibre hoje em dia, são os misseis são mais eficazes contra navios, e as peças de calibres mais pequenas permitem cadencias de tiro superiores, para alem de serem mais baratas.

A unica vantagem que vislumbro é para bombardeamento de terra.
Título:
Enviado por: jmg em Agosto 15, 2008, 06:50:58 pm
As peças para mim fazem sentido para missões de interdição em que podem ser usadas para dissuadir embarcações civis de penetrarem num determinado espaço marítimo ou como foi dito para apoio à operações terrestres, bombardeando a costa.
Para mim não deve ser descurada bem pelo contrário.
Título:
Enviado por: nelson38899 em Novembro 20, 2008, 09:29:21 pm
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BOTADO EL CUARTO DESTRUCTOR TYPE 45
El Lunes 17 de Noviembre era botado el destructor Dragon, cuarto del Tipo 45 para la Royal Navy. La ceremonia tuvo lugar en los astilleros de BVT del río Clyde. El Dragon estuvo decorado con un gran dragón de Gales en su proa.
De los otros tres destructores botados, el Daring ha finalizado las pruebas del constructor, el Dauntless las acaba de iniciar hace unos días y el Diamond se encuentra finalizando su construcción en los astilleros y empezará sus pruebas de mar dentro de un año. El quinto está aún en construcción en grada y del sexto se inició el corte de metal en Febrero de este año.
Una de las características de estos destructores es la posibilidad de transportar 60 Marines completamente equipados y operar un helicóptero Chinook desde su plataforma de vuelo.
http://eltiradorsolitario.blogspot.com/ (http://eltiradorsolitario.blogspot.com/)


(http://www.mod.uk/NR/rdonlyres/34806106-8DC9-475B-840C-5F00867D489A/0/NE080358006.jpg)
Título:
Enviado por: P44 em Dezembro 09, 2008, 11:10:28 am
novos CVF britânicos possivelmente adiados 2 anos:

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Navy faces aircraft carriers delay
By Sylvia Pfeifer and Alex Barker

Published: December 4 2008 23:32 | Last updated: December 4 2008 23:32

The Royal Navy will have to wait up to two years longer for its £4bn aircraft carriers under cost-cutting plans being finalised by John Hutton, defence secretary.

The decision to push back one of the government’s sacrosanct defence equipment programmes represents a sharp reversal. Ministers have always insisted the two ships would be in service by 2014 and 2016.


According to industry insiders, the Ministry of Defence is considering two options: delaying the in-service date of the first carrier by 12 months or delaying the second ship by up to two years.
Mr Hutton’s willingness to delay such an important programme underlines the severity of the cash crisis facing the MoD. He has expressed determination to make the department “live within its means” while prioritising support for frontline troops in Iraq and Afghanistan.

He is expected to stress that investment will not stop and there will be no impact on jobs. The delay, intended to spread costs, will also help synchronise the project with the expected delivery in 2017 of the F-35 Lightning II or Joint Strike Fighter, the aircraft being built to fly from the ships.

Industry executives think the earlier in-service dates unrealistic given the contract for the programme was signed this year.

The results of a review of the equipment programme are expected early next week. No major programmes will be cancelled but most will face some delay. The moves will not be enough to allow the MoD to balance its budget for 2009.

Future Lynx, the £1bn helicopters programme, is safe although the final number ordered will be cut marginally. AgustaWestland, the defence contractor, will be awarded an additional contract to upgrade existing Lynx helicopters for use in Afghanistan.

A £16bn programme to build armoured vehicles for the army will be revamped. The MoD is expected to prioritise investment in the Scout reconnaissance vehicle rather than the Fres utility vehicle, in a blow to General Dynamics, the US contractor that this year won a provisional contract for the design.

The Society of British Aerospace Companies wrote to Alistair Darling, chancellor, and Peter Mandelson, business secretary, before last month’s pre-Budget report urging them to consider the contribution the sector could make to an economic stimulus package.

On Thursday night the MoD said it hoped to make an announcement “in due course”.

Additional reporting by James Blitz


http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/bb1b9392-c252 ... ck_check=1 (http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/bb1b9392-c252-11dd-a350-000077b07658.html?nclick_check=1)
Título:
Enviado por: Vicente de Lisboa em Dezembro 09, 2008, 04:14:33 pm
As imagens da Daring deviam vir com um aviso prévio, de tão feia que a coisa é.
Título:
Enviado por: P44 em Dezembro 10, 2008, 08:46:18 am
mais um corte....

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Falkland Islands to be left without warship

The Falkland Islands are to be left without the protection of a British warship for the first time since the war with Argentina because the Royal Navy no longer has enough ships to meet all its commitments.




Sean Rayment, Defence Correspondent
Last Updated: 1:32PM GMT 07 Dec 2008

(http://www.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01154/hms-northumberland_1154765c.jpg)
HMS Northumberland has been pulled off Falkland duties because of Navy outstretch


The frigate HMS Northumberland, which is armed with guided missiles, torpedoes and a Lynx helicopter, was due to be sent on patrol to the islands this month. But it will now be replaced by a Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) vessel not equipped for offensive combat operations.
The controversial decision was forced on senior naval commanders by the increasing problem of overstretch facing the Royal Navy.
Cuts to the size of the fleet over the last 10-years – the Royal Navy has just 22 frigates and destroyers compared to 65 in 1982 – has left the service with too few ships to meet its responsibilities.
The Telegraph also understands that the Royal Navy is likely to face more cuts in the near future while major projects such as the £3.9bn new carrier programme could be delayed. Ageing vessels such as Type 23 frigates, which were commissioned in the late 1980s, will have their service life extended by up to 20-years.
The last time the British government reduced its naval presence in the South Atlantic was in 1982 when the ice patrol vessel HMS Endurance was withdrawn from patrolling the area around the Falkland Islands. The move prompted an invasion by the Argentine military and led to the Falklands War.
HMS Northumberland was due to begin a six-month voyage in the South Atlantic but has been diverted to take part in the European Union counter-piracy mission off the coast of east Africa.
In its place, RFA Largs Bay, a landing ship which is crewed by civilian sailors, will arrive in the South Atlantic this week to begin its mission of protecting the islands from the potential threat posed by Argentina, which still claims sovereignty of the islands.
The vessel will be equipped with a Lynx Mark 8 helicopter and Sea Skua anti ship missiles for self-defence. The landing ship has a small number of Royal Navy sailors who are responsible for manning a helicopter flight deck as well as a boarding party made up of lightly-armed Royal Marines but Royal Navy sources have said that the ship would be able to do little more than protect itself in the event of an emergency.
The size of the military force on the Falklands has been dramatically reduced since the end of the war in 1982. The islands are garrisoned by just 50 soldiers, composed of infantry, engineers and signallers. The RAF has four Tornado F3 air defence aircraft and crews to maintain them while the naval component consists of just one ship.
The Royal Navy has some 22 frigates and destroyers in the fleet, however only a third are available for operations at any one time and the seven currently available for operational service are already taking part in deployments.
One senior naval source said that successive cuts by the government had left the Royal Navy vulnerable and unable to properly defend its interests overseas.
He said: "The Royal Navy has been pared to the bone. The fleet is now so small that the Royal Navy can't even send a proper warship to guard the Falklands. By the time the Royal Navy has met all of its operational obligations there is nothing left and that is why a civilian-crewed Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship has been sent to the Falklands.
"In any shooting war with a serious enemy the Royal Navy would cease to exist within a few weeks. Rock bottom is an appropriate description of where the Royal Navy now is."
A Ministry of Defence document leaked to The Telegraph last year revealed that the Royal Navy would struggle to fight a war against a "technologically capable adversary". The report also stated that the Royal Navy was an "under-resourced" fleet composed of "ageing and operationally defective ships".
Admiral Sir Alan West, a former Chief of the Naval Staff, and who is a security minister in the Lords, has previously warned that the reduction in the fighting capability of the Royal navy could cost lives and gave warning that Britain would end up with a "tinpot" Navy if more money were not spent on defence.
Liam Fox, the shadow Tory defence spokesman, said: "The Government needs to explain how this won’t impact on the security of the Falklands. What on earth are we doing putting EU flag waving ahead of our own security priorities?
"It is outrageous that the British Government would ever diminish the protection of our strategic interests in order to pay homage to the politics of the EU."
A spokesman for the MoD, said: "The government is fully committed to the defence of the Falkland Islands. There is a whole package of assets – air, sea and land assigned to the region, not simply one ship. The Royal Navy maintains the flexibility to redeploy its ships to where they will have maximum effect."
Título:
Enviado por: P44 em Dezembro 11, 2008, 01:27:10 pm
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Carriers to enter service late  
 
(http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/45235000/jpg/_45235699_carrier.jpg)
The two new carriers would be the biggest in Royal Navy history

Defence Secretary John Hutton has said that the Royal Navy's two new aircraft carriers are likely to enter service a year or two later than planned.

In a statement to MPs, he added there would be no delay in construction - but work would continue at a slower pace, sustaining jobs for longer.

The £4bn shipbuilding project is due to begin next spring.

The announcement affects shipyards in Appledore, in north Devon, Portsmouth, Barrow-in-Furness, Glasgow and Rosyth.

'Workforce stability'

Mr Hutton said: "We have concluded that there is scope for bringing more closely into line the introduction of the Joint Combat Aircraft and the aircraft carrier. This is likely to mean delaying the in-service date of the new carriers by one to two years.

"We are in close consultation with the Aircraft Carrier Alliance on how this might best be done. Construction is already under way and will continue.

"The programme will still provide stability for the core shipyard workforce, including 10,000 UK jobs."

Des Browne gave the green light for the construction of HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales in May, when he was defence secretary. Contracts worth about £3.2bn were signed in July.

'Financial chaos'

BBC defence correspondent Caroline Wyatt said the government did not view cancelling major defence projects as an option, but considered delays as a way of controlling the Ministry of Defence's (MoD) spiralling budget.

Liberal Democrat MP Mike Hancock, a member of the Commons Defence Committee, said the MoD was in financial "chaos".

Meanwhile, hundreds of jobs in Somerset are to be secured due to a new government order for 62 Future Lynx helicopters from Agusta Westland, BBC West has learned.

An immediate contract will also be awarded to upgrade existing Lynx helicopters to prepare them for battlefield sites such as Afghanistan.

The order, worth £1bn, has been delayed for more than two years.






http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7776695.stm (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7776695.stm)
Título:
Enviado por: nelson38899 em Janeiro 30, 2009, 09:34:30 am
HMS Daring

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7856247.stm (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/7856247.stm)
Título:
Enviado por: Lancero em Janeiro 30, 2009, 04:03:31 pm
Enquanto isso, um dos heróis das Malvinas vai ser vendido aos bocados no e-bay

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... -eBay.html (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1126951/Farewell-warrior-Falklands-veteran-broken-claim-piece-eBay.html)
Título:
Enviado por: Menacho em Janeiro 30, 2009, 04:49:35 pm
(http://www.mod.uk/NR/rdonlyres/A94E152A-8831-40CD-85D0-5D69E1AFDC9C/0/daringtyphoon.jpg)
Título:
Enviado por: Vicente de Lisboa em Fevereiro 11, 2009, 03:55:24 pm
Hepa parem lá de postar essa coisa feia. Isso dá a volta ao estomago.  :?
Título:
Enviado por: Jorge Pereira em Fevereiro 11, 2009, 03:59:50 pm
Citação de: "Vicente de Lisboa"
Hepa parem lá de postar essa coisa feia. Isso dá a volta ao estomago.  c34x  :wink:
Título:
Enviado por: HSMW em Fevereiro 11, 2009, 04:00:54 pm
Só pedia duas dessas "coisas feias".
Um "jeitinho" tendo em conta a nossa ancestral aliança militar  c34x
Título:
Enviado por: HSMW em Fevereiro 11, 2009, 04:21:35 pm
Parece que no numero de fragatas estamos de acordo   :lol:
Título:
Enviado por: Vicente de Lisboa em Fevereiro 12, 2009, 02:03:51 am
Oh meus senhores. Essas coisas feias nas cores da Marinha Portuguesa... eu acho que a fealdade era tanta que o proprio Neptuno se recusava a aceita-las no mar.
Título:
Enviado por: P44 em Março 21, 2009, 11:41:56 am
The United Kingdom's Future Nuclear Deterrent Capability
   
   
(Source: House of Commons Public Accounts Committee; issued March 19, 2009)
 
 
   
   Edward Leigh MP, Chairman of the Committee of Public Accounts, today said: "The Ministry of Defence's ability to maintain continuous at sea nuclear deterrence from 2024, when two of the current Vanguard class submarines will have gone out of service, is open to doubt.

"The Department's timetable for completing the design and build process for the replacement submarines is extremely tight. It has 17 years to do it, even though the Department itself accepts that such a process usually cannot be completed in under 18. The MOD's track record in delivering major defence projects on time is not exemplary.

"The MOD must make absolutely fundamental decisions about the design of the new submarines by September of this year. These include the main design features; whether to develop a new type of nuclear reactor requiring substantial research and development; and, crucially, the design and size of the missile compartment.

"The problem is that a decision on the size of the missile compartment in the new submarines will have to be taken in advance of the development by the United States of a missile to succeed the current Trident D5. In other words, our programme to have a renewed nuclear deterrent will depend on yet to be taken decisions by the US on the dimensions of the successor missile. The MOD is taking steps to reduce the risk of a new missile not fitting in our submarines, but there is no guarantee it will."

Mr Leigh was speaking as the Committee published its 11th Report of this Session which, on the basis of evidence from the Ministry of Defence (the Department), examined making important decisions, managing dependence on the United States and managing the programme effectively.

The United Kingdom first deployed a submarine-launched nuclear deterrent in 1968. Since then, successive governments have been committed to a policy of continuous at sea deterrence, meaning that at least one nuclear-armed submarine is on patrol at any one time. In its 2006 White Paper, the Government announced its intention to maintain the United Kingdom's nuclear deterrent capability and set out its plans to build a new class of submarines to replace the current Vanguard fleet and to participate in the United States' Trident D5 ballistic missile life extension programme.

The Department's ability to sustain its nuclear deterrent capability in the future is dependent on collaboration with the United States. The new class of submarine is likely to remain in service beyond the extended life of the existing Trident D5 missile, which will be renewed in 2042, and must therefore be compatible with any successor missile developed by the United States. The Department has received a series of assurances from the United States that any new missile will be compatible with the United Kingdom's new submarine class. Nevertheless, the concern remains that the Department has no direct control over the development of the new missile.

The future deterrent programme is still at the concept phase. The Department has yet to make many decisions about the principal parameters of the submarine design, the type of nuclear reactor, and the design and size of the missile compartment. The Department expects to make these decisions by September 2009. To respond to an already challenging timeline, the Department plans to overlap the submarine's design and construction phases.

The Strategic Deterrent Programme Board is chaired by the Senior Responsible Owner, who is responsible for coordinating the delivery of the future deterrent. In order to succeed, the Senior Responsible Owner must maintain strong relationships across other departments to ensure that he delivers the capability that the government as a whole requires. He must draw on performance management information that is still evolving and operate in the context of a challenging commercial environment, characterised by monopoly suppliers.


Click here for the full report (35 pages in PDF format) on the UK Parliament website.
http://www.publications.parliament.uk/p ... 50/250.pdf (http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200809/cmselect/cmpubacc/250/250.pdf)

(ends)

   
   
   Warnings of Future Trident Issues
   
   
(Source UK Ministry of Defence; issued March 19, 2009)
 
 
   
   Some media outlets have reported that the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) has said that Britain's ability to maintain its Trident nuclear deterrent is 'open to doubt' with an 'extremely tight' timetable to design, build and replace the missile-carrying submarines.

It has also been reported that the American-built missiles that will arm the British submarines may be the wrong size.

Quentin Davies, Minister for Defence Equipment and Support, said: "Our ability to maintain the Trident nuclear deterrent is not in doubt. Although I recognise that the timelines are challenging, I remain very confident that we will deliver a new submarine on time and maintain our continuous at-sea deterrence.

"The Committee has misunderstood the situation regarding missiles and missile compartments (Emphasis added--Ed.) in the new US and British submarines. These are certain to be compatible because the missile compartments in both boats will share the same basic design. A significant amount of work has already been completed on both of the potential propulsion options and a decision is currently on course for September 09.

“I will publish a full response to the PAC report following more detailed consideration of its findings."

-ends-
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HaDeS em Março 17, 2010, 02:11:41 am
Royal Navy: depois de seis anos, um novo ‘Triunfo’
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A Marinha Real  (Royal Navy) informou que o submarino nuclear de ataque HMS Triumph voltou ao mar para provas, (que deverão durar três meses) após um período de manutenção e reabastecimento que durou seis anos, realizado em parceria com a Babcock.

Segundo a Marinha Real, entre as melhorias implementadas incluem-se a instalação do mais recente sistema de sonar e de um novo sistema de comando e controle, além da modernização no sistema de mísseis de cruzeiro Tomahawk. Uma nova rede de computador em figra óptica foi instalada, assim como um sistema melhorado de comunicações via satélite. Instalou-se também uma bomba adicional para esvaziamento mais rápido dos tanques de lastro, assim como realizou-se diversas outras melhorias nas capacidades de segurança e combate a incêndios.

O custo dos trabalhos foi de aproximadamente 300 milhões de libras (por volta de 800 milhões de reais), envolvendo 1.000 pessoas e totalizando 2,75 milhões de horas-homem.  Segundo o informe, trata-se do último período de manutenção e reabastecimento realizado por um submarino da classe Trafalgar, da qual o Triunph é o último dos sete construídos (comissionamento em outubro de 1991).

Características da classe Trafalgar:

    * Deslocamento submerso: 5.200 toneladas
    * Comprimento: 85,4 m
    * Boca: 9,8 m
    * Tripulação: 130
    * Armamento: 5 tubos capazes de disparar torpedos Spearfish e mísseis Tomahawk.

http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/ (http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: sergio21699 em Março 18, 2010, 07:45:35 pm
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Submarino nas Malvinas «Just in case»
Britânicos não correm riscos idênticos aos de 1982
18.03.2010


As autoridades militares britânicas confirmaram o envio para as águas das ilhas Malvinas de um dos seus submarinos de ataque da classe Swiftsure.

Trata-se do submarino Sceptre, é um dos últimos dois navios da classe Swiftsure que ainda está ao serviço. Os navios da classe Swiftsure substituíram os submarinos da classe Churchill, um dos quais, o HMS Conqueror, afundou o cruzador ligeiro General Belgrano em 1982.
Ainda que tenha sido dado relevo ao envio de um submarino nuclear, a Grã Bretanha não possui submarino que não sejam movidos a energia nuclear.
O submarino enviado tem um reactor nuclear como motor mas não está armado com mísseis nucleares.

O submarino britânico, encontra-se na região na companhia de outros dois navios da Royal Navy, o navio logístico de reabastecimento HMS Scott e o contra-torpedeiro HMS York. Além disso, as ilhas contam com a protecção de aeronaves de combate Typhoon-II.

A Argentina reafirmou recentemente a sua intenção de continuar a exigir a devolução das ilhas Malvinas, a que os britânicos chamam de Falkland, e criticou duramente o envio de uma plataforma de prospecção de petróleo para tentar verificar a viabilidade económica da exploração daquela matéria prima.

Evitar os erros de 1982

Embora não haja nenhum indicio de que a Argentina possa de alguma forma pensar em efectuar alguma operação de retaliação contra a plataforma de prospecção de petróleo que se encontra na região, ou contra as ilhas, os receios britânicos têm razões históricas.

Em 1981, perante o reacender dos protestos argentinos relativamente às ilhas Malvinas, a Grã Bretanha praticamente não reagiu nem emitiu qualquer protesto ou aviso aos argentinos.

Segundo várias publicações e estudos feitos após o conflito, os generais argentinos terão considerado que a Grã Bretanha não estava interessada nas ilhas e que não reagiria a uma operação de invasão.

Ao colocar forças militares na região, aparentemente a Grã Bretanha está apenas a frisar junto das autoridades argentinas que devem evitar a confusão que terá levado os generais argentinos a invadir as ilhas em 1982.

Ainda que as suas forças armadas tenham capacidade para enviar uma força militar para as ilhas Malvinas, em termos gerais a capacidade militar dos argentinos é apenas uma sombra do que era em 1982.

http://www.areamilitar.net/noticias/noticias.aspx?NrNot=903
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: teXou em Agosto 30, 2010, 06:54:55 pm
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HMS Astute commissioned into navy
Friday, August 27, 2010

The UK's most powerful attack submarine, HMS Astute, has been commissioned into the Royal Navy.
In a ceremony overseen by the boat's patron, the Duchess of Cornwall, Astute officially became 'Her Majesty's Ship'.

First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Mark Stanhope said: "The Astute Class is truly next generation - a highly versatile platform, she is capable of contributing across a broad spectrum of maritime operations around the globe, and will play an important role in delivering the fighting power of the Royal Navy for decades to come. A highly complex feat of naval engineering, she is at the very cutting edge of technology, with a suite of sensors and weapons required to pack a powerful punch.

"Today is an important milestone along the road to full operational capability which will follow after a further series of demanding seagoing trials testing the full range of the submarine's capabilities."

Rear Admiral Simon Lister, Director of Submarines, who oversees the build programme of the class for the MoD, said: "To my mind Astute is a 7,000 tonne Swiss watch. There is an extraordinary amount of expertise that goes into putting one of these submarines together. There are stages when it's like blacksmithing and there are stages when it's like brain surgery.

"So to see Astute commissioned is momentous not only for the Royal Navy, who have been eagerly anticipating this quantum leap forward in capability, but for the thousands of people around the country who have been involved in the most challenging of engineering projects."

HMS Astute is fifty per cent bigger than any attack submarine in the Royal Navy's current fleet but is also quieter than any of her predecessors. Astute will never need to be refuelled and can theoretically circumnavigate the world submerged, creating the crew's oxygen and drinking water from seawater.

The submarine has the capacity to carry a mix of up to 38 Spearfish heavyweight torpedoes and Tomahawk Land Attack Cruise missiles – and can target submarines, surface ships and land targets. The boat's sonar system has a range of 3,000 nautical miles.

Astute is the first Royal Navy submarine not to have a traditional periscope, instead using electro-optics to capture a 360-degree image of the surface for subsequent analysis by the commanding officer.
http://www.defencemanagement.com/news_s ... p?id=13978 (http://www.defencemanagement.com/news_story.asp?id=13978)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Agosto 31, 2010, 07:13:26 pm
Citar
LONDON | Tue Aug 31, 2010 12:49am BST

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain and France are getting ready to unveil plans to share aircraft carriers amid pressure on the British military to cut costs, the Times reported on Tuesday.

Prime Minister David Cameron and French President Nicholas Sarkozy were expected to announce the proposal at a November summit, the Times said, quoting an unidentified British naval source for its information.

No immediate comment was available from British officials on the report.

Earlier this month, a Defence Ministry source told Reuters that Britain might cancel one or both of its planned new aircraft carriers to cut costs, though there were no plans to scale back the country's nuclear deterrent.

The proposal involving France would make it easier for Britain to scrap or downgrade one of the two replacement carriers under construction, the Times said.

The newspaper said the proposal would ensure that one of three ships -- one French and two British -- would always patrol the seas.

"Using each other's carriers would require decisions to be made at the strategic level so that national aims on any given operation would be the same," the naval source was quoted as saying.

The Defence Ministry is conducting a sweeping review of Britain's future military needs and ways to provide capability more cheaply.

(Reporting by Karolina Tagaris; editing by Ralph Gowling)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: teXou em Setembro 01, 2010, 01:07:10 pm
Citar
Jump jets to fall victim to spending cuts
New jump jets for the next generation of Royal Navy aircraft carriers will be cancelled to save money.
 
By James Kirkup, Political Correspondent
Published: 9:00AM BST 30 Aug 2010


In a move that could put hundreds of British manufacturing jobs at risk, defence chiefs are ready to abandon plans to buy a vertical-landing fighter jet for the Royal Navy.

Instead, a cheaper conventional-landing warplane will replace the Navy’s Harriers when they retire.
 
The Navy is buying two new aircraft carriers at a cost of more than £5 billion. Army and RAF chiefs have questioned that plan and suggested that one carrier should be scrapped or shared with the French navy.

Attempting to defend the carriers, Royal Navy chiefs are seeking cuts elsewhere in their planned spending.

Aircraft carriers now in service carry Harrier jets, which are can take off from a short runway and land vertically by directing the blast of their engines downwards.

The next generation of carriers are expected to carry US-made Joint Strike Fighters.

Originally, the Navy was planning to buy a specially-adapted short take-off vertical-landing (STOVL) variant of the JSF, which would take off and land on the carriers much as Harriers do now.

However, developing and building the special STOVL version of the JSF would cost more than buying the conventional version, and insiders say that cost cannot be justified.

The military value of vertical landing has also been questioned by senior officers, who say conventional fighters are more useful because they can fly further and faster and carry more weapons.

Using conventional jets would also make it easier to conduct joint operations with allies including the US and France, whose carriers

As a result of those calculations, the STOVL aircraft is set to be scrapped in favour of the cheaper conventional JSF, which would be launched from the new carriers using catapults.

In recent weeks, the MoD has quietly commissioned design work on catapults to launch jets from the new carriers, due to enter service in 2014 and 2016.

Because construction work on the ships is still at an early stage, adapting their designs to accommodate conventional aircraft is said to be relatively easy.

In addition, a team of 12 Royal Navy pilots has been sent to the US to train with conventional take-off aircraft on carriers.

Much of the specialised engine system for the STOVL jet is being made by Rolls Royce in Bristol, and the switch would jeopardise hundreds of jobs there.

The decision to abandon the STOVL jet could be rubber-stamped at a meeting of the National Security Council next week, although ministers are aware that the move could be controversial.

Giving up on the STOVL aircraft could lead to accusations of waste, since the Ministry of Defence has already spent more than £500 million on the programme.

But insiders say the overall saving of buying standard fighters instead will more than justify writing off that spending.

Pulling out of the STOVL project could also strain British relations with the US. The STOVL jet is being jointly developed with the US Marine Corps, and without British involvement, US costs are likely to increase.

Government sources said ministers will blame the previous administration for the need to change plans on the carriers and their aircraft.

A source said: “Labour chose the wrong type of aircraft and the wrong configuration of carrier, and they wasted a lot of money doing it. What’s going on now is about trying to fix that mess.”

An MoD spokesman said: “The Defence Secretary has made clear that tough decisions will need to be made but the complex process of a Strategic Defence and Security Review will be concluded in the Autumn and speculation at this stage about its outcome is entirely unfounded.”
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/news ... -cuts.html (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/industry/defence/7970372/Jump-jets-to-fall-victim-to-spending-cuts.html)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Setembro 02, 2010, 11:03:12 am
a França aluga uns Rafales em Leasing  c34x
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: teXou em Setembro 02, 2010, 11:36:35 am
Citação de: "P44"
a França aluga uns Rafales em Leasing  :mrgreen:
Sobretudo se puserem em conjunto os seus porte-aviões ou se construírem os seguintes conjuntos como o anúncia a imprensa francesa e inglesa.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Setembro 25, 2010, 05:37:50 pm
do THE SUN, tabloide sensasionalista, portanto vale o que vale....


Citar
(http://img839.imageshack.us/img839/5694/sunhk.jpg)

By TOM NEWTON DUNN

Published: 24 Sep 2010

DEFENCE bosses have drawn up shock plans to shrink the Royal Navy's battleship fleet by HALF, The Sun can reveal.

In a cuts blueprint seen by us, the fleet will be slashed to just 12 frigates and destroyers.

It will make our surface armada, once feared the world over, smaller than that of every other major European nation except Portugal.

And 7,500 sailors will be laid off, more than a fifth of the Senior Service's manpower of 35,760.

The plan would leave the service which won Trafalgar, Jutland and the Falklands unrecognisable.


Last night the closest living relative of the Navy's greatest hero, Admiral Lord Nelson, said the plan would have left him "horrified".

And a naval source said: "It won't just be a disaster - we are heading for a national humiliation."

The drastic cuts are being considered because the Treasury has ordered the MoD budget to be slashed by 19 per cent.

Losing 12 frigates and destroyers is the price the Navy will have to pay to keep two new 60,000-ton aircraft carriers. The troop landing ships Albion and Bulwark, which came into service only seven years ago, will also be sold off.

The Navy currently has 24 battleships - four Type 22 and 13 Type 23 frigates, five Type 42 and two Type 45 destroyers.

At the time of the Falklands War in 1982 we boasted 53 frigates and 13 destroyers.

Cutting the fleet in half again would make ours smaller than those of historical foes France, Germany, Spain and Italy. Even skint Greece boasts more ships and only Portugal - with a population a sixth of Britain's - has the same number.

Advertisement

Admirals have been put under massive new pressure by Army boss General Sir David Richards winning the PM round to not sacking 20,000 troops.

In a move that left Defence Secretary Liam Fox fuming, David Cameron was persuaded that the Army cuts would risk victory in Afghanistan. There are also growing concerns that the difficult defence review is being badly rushed to meet artificial Treasury deadlines.

A source said: "The money men have forgotten we're an island nation with 90 per cent of our trade going by sea. And we have the additional tasks now of chasing pirates and counter-terrorism. The Navy has never been busier."

And 80-year-old Anna Tribe, the great-great-great-granddaughter of Admiral Horatio Nelson, said: "I think he would be horrified.

"As a country we are terribly in debt and savings have to be made, but not all the money was spent on sensible things. It is very sad."

The RAF also faces bitter cuts with Tornado and Harrier jets, Chinook and Puma choppers and the jobs of 6,500 airmen under threat.

Our revelation comes as the row with Argentina over a hunt for oil in the Falklands is expected to be raised by the Argies in the UN in New York today.

Deputy PM Nick Clegg will also signal to the UN that the age of big Cold War-style fleets and armies is over as we face "more fluid, less visible" threats.

Last night a Downing Street spokesman said no final decisions had been taken on defence cuts.

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/ne ... R=Our+Boys (http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/campaigns/our_boys/3151008/Youve-shrunk-brour-battleships.html?OTC-RSS&ATTR=Our+Boys)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 25, 2010, 05:45:40 pm
Epá ser ultrupassado por todos excepto por Portugal é brutalmente humilhante para o RU, não interessa se são ou não capazes de manter a Marinha, mas Portugal?! Chiça só faltava ser ultrupassado por esse país terceiro-mundista...

Aliados, hein?! :roll:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lightning em Setembro 25, 2010, 07:44:01 pm
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
Epá ser ultrupassado por todos excepto por Portugal é brutalmente humilhante para o RU, não interessa se são ou não capazes de manter a Marinha, mas Portugal?! Chiça só faltava ser ultrupassado por esse país terceiro-mundista...

Aliados, hein?! :roll:

Pois, porque é que não falam na Bélgica? Ainda tem menos Fragatas que nós...
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Crixus em Setembro 25, 2010, 10:41:57 pm
Citação de: "Lightning"
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
Epá ser ultrupassado por todos excepto por Portugal é brutalmente humilhante para o RU, não interessa se são ou não capazes de manter a Marinha, mas Portugal?! Chiça só faltava ser ultrupassado por esse país terceiro-mundista...

Aliados, hein?! :roll:

Pois, porque é que não falam na Bélgica? Ainda tem menos Fragatas que nós...

Atencao que nao e assim tao mau afinal eles referen-se a " major European nation"......
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lightning em Setembro 25, 2010, 11:47:47 pm
Citação de: "Crixus"
Citação de: "Lightning"
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
Epá ser ultrupassado por todos excepto por Portugal é brutalmente humilhante para o RU, não interessa se são ou não capazes de manter a Marinha, mas Portugal?! Chiça só faltava ser ultrupassado por esse país terceiro-mundista...

Aliados, hein?! :mrgreen: , afinal somos grandes.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: typhonman em Setembro 26, 2010, 12:22:24 am
12 navios de superfície na RN....

Muito antigo almirante estará as voltas no caixão.... :shock:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Outubro 19, 2010, 01:54:06 pm
(http://www.defense-aerospace.com/base/util/119205_2.jpg)
Not likely: British media claim that the Royal Navy will not operate fast jets from its new carriers until 2019 due to spending cuts due to be announced today. (MoD image)

National Security Strategy Published
   
   
(Source: British Government; issued Oct. 18, 2010)

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articl ... tegy.html# (http://www.defense-aerospace.com/article-view/release/119205/british-govt.-publishes-national-security-strategy.html#)

-------------------x--------------------------



Navy aircraft carrier will be sold after three years - and never carry jets

One of the Navy’s new £3 billion aircraft carriers will never carry aircraft and will sail for only three years before being mothballed and possibly sold, ministers will announce on Tuesday.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstop ... -jets.html (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/defence/8072041/Navy-aircraft-carrier-will-be-sold-after-three-years-and-never-carry-jets.html)


----------------------x------------------------------

9 October 2010 Last updated at 11:08 GMT


Defence review: HMS Ark Royal to be scrapped



Defence Secretary Liam Fox: "Our decision will be based on the correct balance over the next 30-40 years"

The Royal Navy's flagship, the aircraft carrier Ark Royal, is to be scrapped early as part of the government's defence review.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-11570593 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-11570593)

-------------------------------x------------------------


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David Cameron defends defence cuts leading to decade of aircraft carriers with no jets

Prime minister says UK will still remain a front-rank military power



David Cameron and Liam Fox at the Permanent Joint Headquarters in London on 19 October 2010. David Cameron and Liam Fox at the Permanent Joint Headquarters in London today. Photograph: Toby Melville/AFP/Getty Images

David Cameron today pledged that Britain would remain a "front-rank" military power as he sought to reassure service personnel over cuts to the defence budget that mean the UK will be without a carrier capable of flying jets for around a decade.

The prime minister is set to announce that the Royal Navy's flagship HMS Ark Royal and her fleet of Harrier jets are to be scrapped immediately when he unveils the strategic defence and security review later today.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010 ... CMP=twt_gu (http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2010/oct/19/david-cameron-defence-cuts-decade-aircraft-carriers-no-jets?CMP=twt_gu)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: typhonman em Outubro 19, 2010, 05:58:21 pm
Até arrepiam estes cortes no UK...... :?
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: FoxTroop em Outubro 19, 2010, 08:37:54 pm
Goldman Sachs.... É só seguir a Goldman Sachs  :D   :D
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Outubro 19, 2010, 08:47:50 pm
Citação de: "FoxTroop"
Goldman Sachs.... É só seguir a Goldman Sachs  :D   c34x  :lol:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Vicente de Lisboa em Outubro 20, 2010, 12:23:06 pm
Major European nation indeed. Somos os maiores!

Temos de começar a pensar na prespectiva de termos a 2ª Marinha a seguir ao UK.
Um gajo até "os" sente a crescerem  :mrgreen:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Outubro 20, 2010, 02:31:30 pm
Citação de: "Vicente de Lisboa"
Major European nation indeed. Somos os maiores!

Temos de começar a pensar na prespectiva de termos a 2ª Marinha a seguir ao UK.
Um gajo até "os" sente a crescerem  :twisted:

França, Itália, Espanha, Alemanha, Holanda, Grécia, estão todos á frente
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Vicente de Lisboa em Outubro 20, 2010, 02:55:29 pm
À frente a nivel Europeu. Eu estou a falar do campeonato "atrás da Royal Navy".

"Ah e tal a seguir à RN está logo a MP. Somos bons não somos?"  :P
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: luis filipe silva em Outubro 20, 2010, 03:23:02 pm
P 44 escreveu:
Citar
França, Itália, Espanha, Alemanha, Holanda, Grécia, estão todos á frente
E a Turquia, e a Noruega?
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Outubro 21, 2010, 09:22:47 am
Citação de: "luis filipe silva"
P 44 escreveu:
Citar
França, Itália, Espanha, Alemanha, Holanda, Grécia, estão todos á frente
E a Turquia, e a Noruega?


Esqueci-me, é da idade  :oops:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: JLRC em Outubro 22, 2010, 04:59:32 pm
Citação de: "luis filipe silva"
P 44 escreveu:
Citar
França, Itália, Espanha, Alemanha, Holanda, Grécia, estão todos á frente
E a Turquia, e a Noruega?

A Turquia não é Europa e a Noruega não pertence à UE.
 :mrgreen:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: luis filipe silva em Outubro 22, 2010, 05:52:23 pm
JLRC escreveu:
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A Turquia não é Europa e a Noruega não pertence à UE.
Pronto!... Tira lá a Turquia. Com respeito à Noruega, onde está escrito que são marinhas da UE?

Citar
It will make our surface armada, once feared the world over, smaller than that of every other major European nation except Portugal.

P.S. não te esqueças de tomar as gotas :mrgreen:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HaDeS em Outubro 22, 2010, 09:04:51 pm
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Submarino nuclear britânico encalha perto de ilha escocesa
HMS Astute é o submarino de ataque mais poderoso da Marinha Britânica.
O acidente não deixou feridos ou causou danos ambientais.

Um submarino nuclear britânico encalhou nesta sexta-feira (22) perto da ilha escocesa de Skye, sem registro de feridos ou danos aparentes ao meio ambiente, anunciou o ministério da Defesa.
(http://s.glbimg.com/jo/g1/f/original/2010/10/22/000.jpg)
A fonte informou ainda que nenhuma parte do sitema de propulsão nuclear do "HMS Astute", que entrou em serviço em agosto passado, foi deanificado ou representa algum tipo de perigo, e que nenhum membro da tripulação ficou ferido.

O serviço de guarda-costeira indicou, por sua parte, que enviou preventivamente um rebocado, mas que os trabalhos de resgate estavam a cargo do ministério da Defesa.

Considerado o submarino de ataque mais poderoso da Marinha Britânica, cujo preço ronda os 5,5 bilhões de dólares, o "HMS Astute", tem 7.800 toneladas e está armado com torpedos Spearfish e mísseis de cruzeiro Tomahawk.
(http://s.glbimg.com/jo/g1/f/original/2010/10/22/000_.jpg)

http://g1.globo.com/mundo/noticia/2010/ ... ocesa.html (http://g1.globo.com/mundo/noticia/2010/10/submarino-nuclear-britanico-encalha-perto-de-ilha-escocesa.html)


Bom, pelo visto não é tão "astusto" assim :lol: .
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Miguel em Outubro 22, 2010, 09:35:16 pm
Incrível a Royal Navy sem Porta Avioes!! pelo menos até 2020  :mrgreen:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lightning em Outubro 23, 2010, 12:14:23 am
Citação de: "Miguel"
Incrível a Royal Navy sem Porta Avioes!! pelo menos até 2020  :mrgreen:

Não é impossivel haver uma 2ª guerra das Falkland, o que não falta na história é 2ªs guerras... :wink:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Crypter em Outubro 23, 2010, 12:44:53 am
Se isso acontecess, e eles perdessem as ilhas, decapitavam o Prime Minister!!!  :lol:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Outubro 23, 2010, 10:05:06 am
how the mighty have fallen!!!!!  :twisted:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Outubro 23, 2010, 10:13:21 am
A sorte deles é a Argentina estar como está e tem o governo que tem. As Forças Armadas Argentinas estão um caco.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: FoxTroop em Outubro 23, 2010, 01:59:42 pm
Citação de: "Cabeça de Martelo"
Citação de: "FoxTroop"
Goldman Sachs.... É só seguir a Goldman Sachs :D c34x :lol:

Quando estalou a crise grega, li uma reportagem sobre a mesma e, num dos entrevistados, perguntaram quais seriam os paises que poderiam cair em risco igual (pensando em Portugal, Espanha, etc) e a resposta foi: "Basta seguir o pessoal da Goldman Sachs"

Não é que o gajo tinha razão?!!!!! Vejam os numeros da economia inglesa e os ratings atribuidos por quem realmente pode comprar divida. Este corte na despesa militar é apenas o inicio, e por mais que os "inflexiveis" venham dizer o contrario, os numeros (tanto dos USA como do RU) não mentem, por mais que se "martelem"
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Outubro 23, 2010, 02:12:24 pm
Se eu roubar uma galinha sou preso, se roubar o governo nos impostos sou penhorado, se os bancos roubam biliões e mentem para continuar a roubar os governos, eles continuam a dar-lhes dinheiro.

Vá-la se perceber isto... :roll:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Upham em Outubro 25, 2010, 05:13:18 pm
Citação de: "HaDeS"
Citar
Submarino nuclear britânico encalha perto de ilha escocesa
HMS Astute é o submarino de ataque mais poderoso da Marinha Britânica.
O acidente não deixou feridos ou causou danos ambientais.

Um submarino nuclear britânico encalhou nesta sexta-feira (22) perto da ilha escocesa de Skye, sem registro de feridos ou danos aparentes ao meio ambiente, anunciou o ministério da Defesa.
(http://s.glbimg.com/jo/g1/f/original/2010/10/22/000.jpg)
A fonte informou ainda que nenhuma parte do sitema de propulsão nuclear do "HMS Astute", que entrou em serviço em agosto passado, foi deanificado ou representa algum tipo de perigo, e que nenhum membro da tripulação ficou ferido.

O serviço de guarda-costeira indicou, por sua parte, que enviou preventivamente um rebocado, mas que os trabalhos de resgate estavam a cargo do ministério da Defesa.

Considerado o submarino de ataque mais poderoso da Marinha Britânica, cujo preço ronda os 5,5 bilhões de dólares, o "HMS Astute", tem 7.800 toneladas e está armado com torpedos Spearfish e mísseis de cruzeiro Tomahawk.
(http://s.glbimg.com/jo/g1/f/original/2010/10/22/000_.jpg)

http://g1.globo.com/mundo/noticia/2010/ ... ocesa.html (http://g1.globo.com/mundo/noticia/2010/10/submarino-nuclear-britanico-encalha-perto-de-ilha-escocesa.html)


Bom, pelo visto não é tão "astusto" assim :lol: .

Boa tarde!

Como sou um curioso, aquele penacho branco será fumo será vapor de água????? Suponho que mesmo um submarino de propulsão nuclear disponha de geradores diesel para emergências mas assim tão branquela.........????? Será de algum sistema de arrefecimento do reactor?

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: luis filipe silva em Outubro 25, 2010, 08:22:27 pm
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Como sou um curioso, aquele penacho branco será fumo será vapor de água????? Suponho que mesmo um submarino de propulsão nuclear disponha de geradores diesel para emergências mas assim tão branquela.........????? Será de algum sistema de arrefecimento do reactor?
Não tendo conhecimentos suficientes acerca da matéria, arrisco a pensar que será vapor, para evitar o sobreaquecimento do reactor. Por outro lado, pergunto-me... E quando estão assentes no fundo do mar, por horas ou dias? E o Astute tem passado muito tempo assente no fundo, a avaliar pela quantidade de "verdura" nas obras vivas do casco.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: papatango em Outubro 25, 2010, 10:54:26 pm
O HMS Astute tem um reactor nuclear de água pesada, que aquece a água para accionar turbinas a vapor.
Além disso tem dois geradores a Diesel.
É portanto normal ver fumo num navio que é movido a vapor e que tem motores a diesel.
Debaixo de água, as coisas processam-se de outra forma, naturalmente.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: borisdedante em Outubro 30, 2010, 02:20:28 pm
A tradução em francês dum artigo do "Financial Times" (http://http)sobre a facto da França e da Grã-Bretanha partilharem os seus porte-aeronaves.
Citar
Britain and France are considering a deal under which they would each have only one active aircraft carrier, the Queen Elizabeth and the Charles de Gaulle, but would offer the use of each other’s vessel should a crisis occur while one is in refit.

It is early evening when the phone rings in the private apartments of the Elysée Palace.


http://www.corlobe.tk/article21683.html (http://www.corlobe.tk/article21683.html)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Novembro 02, 2010, 01:45:22 pm
Citar
Britain's Cameron, France's Sarkozy sign defence treaties

British Prime Minister David Cameron and French President Nicolas Sarkozy signed two landmark defence treaties at a summit in London on Tuesday.

"Today we open a new chapter," Cameron told a joint press conference with the French leader at a Foreign Office mansion in central London, adding: "Britain and France are natural partners."

Under the deal, the two countries will create a joint military force and share aircraft carriers and nuclear test facilities.


© 2010 AFP

http://www.expatica.com/fr/news/french- ... 07512.html (http://www.expatica.com/fr/news/french-news/britain-s-cameron-france-s-sarkozy-sign-defence-treaties_107512.html)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Edu em Novembro 02, 2010, 02:43:33 pm
Quero depois ver para quem ficam os porta-aviões partilhados quando houver discordâncias ou diferentes politicas entre os dois países. Como resolveriam uma situação como a da invasão do Iraque em que os países partilharam diferentes perspectivas?
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: papatango em Novembro 04, 2010, 12:23:55 am
É conforme a situação se apresente.

Se o porta-aviões disponível for francês e a Argentina atacar as Malvinas, os franceses podem decidir não disponibilizar o porta-aviões.
Em alternativa, podem permitir a utilização do porta-aviões em situações específicas, por exemplo apenas como navio de apoio.

Curiosamente o presidente da França disse algo curioso sobre o que faria a França se a Grã Bretanha estivesse tão aflita que precisasse de um porta-aviões.
Porém creio que aquilo é uma declaração de circunstância.
Dificilmente os franceses enviariam o Charle de Gaulle para o Atlântico Sul, cheio de caças F-35C.

Como na maior parte do tempo as marinhas só treinam, os dois países vão utilizar apenas um porta-aviões.

Ficamos por saber o que vai acontecer no futuro com o primeiro porta-aviões britânico (que vai ser retirado de serviço, apenas três anos depois de ser entregue).
Também não sabemos qual será o futuro do PA-2, o meio-irmão gémeo dos dois porta-aviões britânicos que agora virou irmão siamês.

A outra coisa que não sabemos, é onde fica o famoso eixo franco-alemão, que foi uma das traves mestras da União Europeia.

Será que vamos ver o aparecer de outras alianças do tipo ?
Mas a Alemanha junta-se com quem ?

As coisas estão a ficar muito esquisitas.  :shock:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Edu em Novembro 04, 2010, 12:40:29 am
Mas o porta-aviões a ser partilhado não será o Charles de Gaule, será um a ser construido,não?

Que PA-2 é esse que se refere?

Sinceramente aquilo que antevejo a ir-se para a frente com esta politica é a Grã Bretanha ficar sem porta-aviões.
Já a França, do meu ponto de vista, devia avançar para um segundo porta-aviões individualmente e os britanicos que resolvam os seus próprios problemas.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Edu em Novembro 04, 2010, 12:45:08 am
Outra realidade engraçada destes tempos é vermos uma espanha com praticamente dois porta-aviões (embora sem aviões para os dois) e uma Grã Bretanha futuramente a ter apenas meio porta-avião...
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Novembro 04, 2010, 08:46:54 am
Citação de: "Edu"
Mas o porta-aviões a ser partilhado não será o Charles de Gaule, será um a ser construido,não?

Que PA-2 é esse que se refere?

Sinceramente aquilo que antevejo a ir-se para a frente com esta politica é a Grã Bretanha ficar sem porta-aviões.
Já a França, do meu ponto de vista, devia avançar para um segundo porta-aviões individualmente e os britanicos que resolvam os seus próprios problemas.


o PA-2 é a versão francesa do CVF

Foi adiado pelo Sarkozy até 2012

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Future_Fre ... ft_carrier (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Future_French_aircraft_carrier)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/ff/PA2.svg/800px-PA2.svg.png)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: teXou em Novembro 04, 2010, 10:16:04 am
Citar
Revealed: Rescue tug crashed into stranded submarine HMS Astute causing millions of pounds of damage Nov 4 2010 Exclusive by Craig McDonald

THE tug sent to rescue the Navy's grounded showpiece submarine crashed into her and tore off one of her fins, the Record can reveal.
And insiders fear the damage from the collision will cost millions to fix.
We have learned that HMS Astute got away with relatively minor dents when she got stuck on a shingle bank off Skye two weeks ago.
But when Coastguard tug Anglian Prince tried to pull the £1billion nuclear-powered sub free, the two vessels collided.
The impact ripped off Astute's starboard foreplane, one of her navigation fins.
A source said last night: "The damage from the grounding was minor. Astute just had some denting to her casing, which is nothing massively serious for a ship of her size.
"But the damage done by the tug could result in a multi-million pound repair bill. It's ironic."
It's understood the Anglian Prince ran into Astute after her crew attached a tow rope to the sub.
We have been told the rope got snagged in the tug's propellers and the two vessels were pulled together.
The repairs to Astute, described as the world's most modern submarine, are expected to take weeks. Sources say she's not likely to be able to resume her sea trials before March next year.
Astute got stuck near the Skye Bridge on the morning of October 22 as her crew practised transferring personnel from shore to the sub during the trials.
The 100-metre long vessel was stranded for 10 hours as bemused locals gathered on the shore to take photos.
The Anglian Prince was sent from her base in Stornoway to rescue her and the Astute was dragged free at about 6pm.
Divers checked her hull for damage before she headed back to her base at Faslane on the Clyde under her own power.
She was hauled from the water last Thursday so experts could examine her hull and rudder.
A Navy spokesman confirmed last night: "There was a collision between Astute and a tug, which resulted in damage to the submarine's starboard foreplane.
"This will be repaired at Faslane and trials will resume in due course.
"The inquiry into the damage sustained by Astute is now complete, although the findings have still to be released to naval officers."
The Navy has also launched an inquiry into why the sub ran aground.
Reports at the time said she was outside a safe sea lane, clearly marked on Admiralty charts, at the time. A Navy spokesman said last month: "One of the things being looked at is if the charts were up to date with recent seabed changes in the area. The seabed can change quickly."
The probe will look at possible negligence by the crew. The Navy have refused to speculate on whether the Astute's commander, Andy Coles, could face a court martial.
Astute, the first in a class of six new submarines, was launched in 2007 and formally commissioned into the Navy this August.
She weighs 7800 tons - as much as nearly 1000 double-decker buses.
Her nuclear reactor means she will never have to be refuelled and she makes her own air and water supplies. She can sail around the world without having to surface.
She doesn't carry nuclear weapons but is armed with Spearfish torpedoes and Tomahawk cruise missiles which can hit targets 1200 miles away.
The sub has 39,000 acoustic panels on her surface which mask her sonar signature and allow her to sneak up on enemy ships.
The Coastguard tug fleet was set up in 1994 after the Braer oil spill off Shetland. It is on standby 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and is kept at 30 minutes "readiness to sail".
But days before the Anglian Prince rescued Astute, the Con-Dems announced that the tugs were being axed to save money.
The SNP MP for the Western Isles, Angus MacNeil, said: "The most expensive and advanced submarine in the world has had to be pulled to safety by the tugboat which the Westminster government wants to scrap.
"The Anglian Prince is a vital service. It is regrettable that it is to be removed."

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/2010/11/04/revealed-rescue-tug-crashed-into-stranded-submarine-hms-astute-causing-millions-of-pounds-of-damage-86908-22691209/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: papatango em Novembro 04, 2010, 09:35:24 pm
Citação de: "Edu"
Mas o porta-aviões a ser partilhado não será o Charles de Gaule, será um a ser construido,não?
Que PA-2 é esse que se refere?
Sinceramente aquilo que antevejo a ir-se para a frente com esta politica é a Grã Bretanha ficar sem porta-aviões.
Já a França, do meu ponto de vista, devia avançar para um segundo porta-aviões individualmente e os britanicos que resolvam os seus próprios problemas.
A França e a Grã Bretanha vão partilhar os porta-aviões de cada um dos países. A França tem o Charles de Gaulle e a Grã Bretanha terá futuramente o Prince of Wales, que será o segundo navio do projecto CVF (que previa dois navios para aviões STOL e que despunha de uma rampa).

A França adiou a construção do seu segungo porta-aviões por razões financeiras, mas esra um porta-aviões convencional com uma catapulta.

Agora os britânicos, decidiram utilizar o primeiro dos seus navios porta-aviões (que não tem catapultas) apenas durante poucos anos, ao mesmo tempo que vão converter o seu segundo porta-aviões num gémeo do porta-aviões francês PA-2 (que está presentemente suspenso).

As diferenças operacionais entre a Royal Navy e a Marine Nationale desapareceram, porque o porta-aviões britânico, vai ser praticamente um gémeo do projecto francês.
O porta-aviões Prince of Wales, que estará operacional em 2020, será um porta-aviões convencional e tanto poderá utilizar os Rafale-Naval quanto o F-35C.

O Charles de Gaulle, vai operar com um esquadrão de caças Rafale-Naval e outro de F-35-C, a mesma coisa acontecerá com o Prince of Wales, quando for esse navio a estar ao serviço.

Citação de: "Edu"
Outra realidade engraçada destes tempos é vermos uma espanha com praticamente dois porta-aviões (embora sem aviões para os dois) e uma Grã Bretanha futuramente a ter apenas meio porta-avião...
Nem de perto nem de longe, um navio como o Principe de Asturias se pode sequer comparar com um porta-aviões como o Charles de Gaulle. Aliás, os britânicos também concluiram o mesmo, pois os seus porta-aviões, ou «cruzadores de coberta corrida» (Invincible, Illustious e Ark Royal) também não estariam à altura de competir com o Charles de Gaulle. E quando foi lançado o Principe de Asturias era tecnicamente superior aos porta-aviões britânicos, principalmente porque aproveitava melhor o espaço na coberta. Só quando os britânicos modificaram os seus três porta-aviões é que eles passaram a ter um navio equivalente ao espanhol (falo dos navios, não falo do tipo de caças Harrier embarcados, que isso é outra história).

A inferioridade do conceito do avião de descolagem vertical, utilizando uma rampa, quando comparado com o avião de descolagem convencional com catapulta foi um dos argumentos que levou o primeiro ministro David Cameron a optar por esta reviravolta que aliás já estava em discussão há dois anos.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lightning em Novembro 04, 2010, 09:50:24 pm
Citação de: "papatango"
Agora os britânicos, decidiram utilizar o primeiro dos seus navios porta-aviões (que não tem catapultas) apenas durante poucos anos, ao mesmo tempo que vão converter o seu segundo porta-aviões num gémeo do porta-aviões francês PA-2 (que está presentemente suspenso).

O primeiro porta-aviões britânico já está num estado de construção tão avançado assim que não tem hipotese de operar com catapultas?

Citar
Citação de: "Edu"
Outra realidade engraçada destes tempos é vermos uma espanha com praticamente dois porta-aviões (embora sem aviões para os dois) e uma Grã Bretanha futuramente a ter apenas meio porta-avião...
Nem de perto nem de longe, um navio como o Principe de Asturias se pode sequer comparar com um porta-aviões como o Charles de Gaulle. Aliás, os britânicos também concluiram o mesmo, pois os seus porta-aviões, ou «cruzadores de coberta corrida» (Invincible, Illustious e Ark Royal) também não estariam à altura de competir com o Charles de Gaulle. E quando foi lançado o Principe de Asturias era tecnicamente superior aos porta-aviões britânicos, principalmente porque aproveitava melhor o espaço na coberta. Só quando os britânicos modificaram os seus três porta-aviões é que eles passaram a ter um navio equivalente ao espanhol (falo dos navios, não falo do tipo de caças Harrier embarcados, que isso é outra história).

A inferioridade do conceito do avião de descolagem vertical, utilizando uma rampa, quando comparado com o avião de descolagem convencional com catapulta foi um dos argumentos que levou o primeiro ministro David Cameron a optar por esta reviravolta que aliás já estava em discussão há dois anos.

Então também podemos comentar a Marinha Italiana que tem dois porta-aviões STOVL operacionais, o Garibaldi e o Cavor  :D .

(http://www.military-today.com/navy/giuseppe_garibaldi.jpg)
(http://www.britishskytours.com/images/CAVOUR.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: papatango em Novembro 04, 2010, 10:18:46 pm
Citar
O primeiro porta-aviões britânico já está num estado de construção tão avançado assim que não tem hipotese de operar com catapultas?
Correcto.
O projecto já começou há muito tempo e os projectos de detalhe estão em grande medida concluidos.

A colocação de um sistema de catapultas, implica modificações muito grandes, mas acima de tudo a utilização de aeronaves de descolagem convencional, com duas pistas (uma delas em ângulo) altera muito no interior do navio.
Está relacionado com o fluxo de descolagens e aterragens.

A principal vantagem dos porta-aviões com catapulta é a rapidez com que conseguem colocar os seus aviões no ar e a rapidez com que os conseguem recolher. É como uma dança coordenada, que dá a um navio uma vantagem táctica tremenda. Tudo tem que ser pensado, para garantir que os aviões que são presos pelos cabos de retenção saem da pista imediatamente para o hangar para eventual manutenção, e isto tendo que garantir que em caso de necessidade pode haver aeronaves a descolar ao mesmo tempo.
Um bom porta-aviões também se mede pela rapidez com que ele consegue transportar as aeronaves do hangar para a pista e coloca-los no ar.

Citar
Então também podemos comentar a Marinha Italiana que tem dois porta-aviões STOVL operacionais, o Garibaldi e o Cavor
Sim. O Cavour, embora maior, é um porta-aviões pensado para aeronaves de descolagem vertical e é por isso um navio para operações secundárias.
Ainda que seja uma unidade militar de um extraordinário valor.
A verdade é que não tem nem de perto nem de longe a capacidade que terá um Charles de Gaulle, já para não falar do futuro Prince of Wales.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Edu em Novembro 04, 2010, 10:19:40 pm
Então e qual será o destino do primeiro porta-aviões a ser construido pelos inglêses? Fica como reserva? É desmantelado?
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: papatango em Novembro 04, 2010, 10:26:55 pm
Citação de: "Edu"
Então e qual será o destino do primeiro porta-aviões a ser construido pelos inglêses? Fica como reserva? É desmantelado?
O navio vai aparentemente operar como porta-helicóipteros e depois será colocado numa situação de reserva.
Os americanos chamam a isso «mothballed» ou seja, o navio fica nas bolas de naftalina.

Não se sabe porém, se será possível uma reconversão do Queen Elizabeth para porta-aviões convencional, conforme sugeriu o Lightning.
O que sabemos é que neste momento eles não o poderiam fazer, sem atrasar a entrada do navio ao serviço por muito mais tempo.
Se o Queen Elizabeth pudesse ser convertido (um processo lento e caro), ele poderia até virar o PA-2 francês, como já se cogitou.
Nesse caso o Charles de Gaulle passaria a um estagio de reserva em 2030 e França e Grã Bretanha ficariam com dois navios praticamente irmãos gémeos.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lightning em Novembro 04, 2010, 10:31:21 pm
Citação de: "papatango"
Correcto.
O projecto já começou há muito tempo e os projectos de detalhe estão em grande medida concluidos.

A colocação de um sistema de catapultas, implica modificações muito grandes, mas acima de tudo a utilização de aeronaves de descolagem convencional, com duas pistas (uma delas em ângulo) altera muito no interior do navio.

Muito bem, eu não tenho duvidas sobre como opera um porta-aviões com sistema de catapultas e aeronaves de descolagem convencional, eu pensava é que os britânicos ainda poderiam adaptar o primeiro a esse sistema.

Eu até tinha a ideia, (errada percebo agora) que os futuros porta-aviões britãnicos apesar de pensados originalmente para operar aeronaves de descolagem e aterragem vertical, tinham capacidade para com alguma facilidade se tornarem porta-aviões convencionais caso tal fosse decidido durante a vida dos porta-aviões.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: papatango em Novembro 04, 2010, 11:01:03 pm
Eu também já li vários comentários sobre isso mas aparentemente não é assim tão fácil.

Parece que a situação é tal que os ingleses disseram que neste momento, considerando todos os custos envolvidos, parar a construção do navio, ficaria mais caro que desmantela-lo.

As modificações devem ser consideráveis, levando a cálculos complexos para garantir a estabilidade do navio.
Por isso para os ingleses, para ser mais rápido, o mais simples é agarrar nos estudos do PA-2 e construir o Prince of Wales a partir dele.
Afinal os franceses estão muito mais avançados e também têm, muito mais experiência, quer na construção, quer na operação dos navios.

Outra coisa que também não foi falada ainda, são os aviões AEW&C que os franceses têm, mas que os britânicos não tinham.
Essa falha era outro dos calcanhares de Aquiles do Queen Elizabeth, que desloca mais de 60.000t mas tem que utilizar um helicóptero para ter apoio de um radar de aviso antecipado.

Agora com o Prince of Wales igual ao navio dos franceses, eles vão poder adquirir aeronaves AEW&C, ou então, melhor ainda, utilizar as dos franceses. :mrgreen:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Get_It em Novembro 05, 2010, 03:57:03 am
Citação de: "papatango"
A principal vantagem dos porta-aviões com catapulta é a rapidez com que conseguem colocar os seus aviões no ar e a rapidez com que os conseguem recolher. É como uma dança coordenada, que dá a um navio uma vantagem táctica tremenda. Tudo tem que ser pensado, para garantir que os aviões que são presos pelos cabos de retenção saem da pista imediatamente para o hangar para eventual manutenção, e isto tendo que garantir que em caso de necessidade pode haver aeronaves a descolar ao mesmo tempo.
Um bom porta-aviões também se mede pela rapidez com que ele consegue transportar as aeronaves do hangar para a pista e coloca-los no ar.
Citação de: "papatango"
Outra coisa que também não foi falada ainda, são os aviões AEW&C que os franceses têm, mas que os britânicos não tinham.
Essa falha era outro dos calcanhares de Aquiles do Queen Elizabeth, que desloca mais de 60.000t mas tem que utilizar um helicóptero para ter apoio de um radar de aviso antecipado.

Agora com o Prince of Wales igual ao navio dos franceses, eles vão poder adquirir aeronaves AEW&C, ou então, melhor ainda, utilizar as dos franceses. :mrgreen:
O facto dos porta-aviões do tipo CATOBAR dar a possibilidade de se operar um maior número ainda de aeronaves é realmente uma outra grande vantagem -- pessoalmente eu até diria que está é que é a principal. Não só a catapulta e a pista modificada permite operar aeronaves AEW&C, como o E-2 Hawkeye (que é o único actualmente operado a partir de porta-aviões, senão estou em erro), mas como também UCAVs, uma área na qual os britânicos e franceses também querem andar de mãos-dadas. Esta maior escolha de aeronaves também se abrange aos caças, pois pelos vistos o F-35B vai tornar-se no futuro o único caça naval VSTOL enquanto em relação a caças navais com capacidade CATOBAR existem actualmente o F-18, Rafale e F-35C. Isto claro as opções mais óbvias para um país europeu e membro da NATO como a Grã-Bretanha.

Citação de: "papatango"
Se o Queen Elizabeth pudesse ser convertido (um processo lento e caro), ele poderia até virar o PA-2 francês, como já se cogitou.
Seria interessante pois possivelmente poderia sair mais barato à França, mas seria completamente inimaginável os franceses estarem a tirar trabalho aos seus estaleiros nacionais, especialmente num projecto desta magnitude.

Cumprimentos,
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: papatango em Novembro 06, 2010, 01:13:52 am
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Seria interessante pois possivelmente poderia sair mais barato à França, mas seria completamente inimaginável os franceses estarem a tirar trabalho aos seus estaleiros nacionais, especialmente num projecto desta magnitude.
Se partirmos do principio de que a reconversão de um navio no outro, implica enormes alterações em muitas áreas, e se partirmos do principio de que os franceses têm capacidade para fazer as modificações não vejo porquê.

Afinal, se os projectos tivessem avançado como inicialmente previsto, parte do navio francês seria feito na Grã Bretanha de qualquer maneira.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Novembro 08, 2010, 05:59:28 pm
Revealed: Stranded nuclear submarine crashed into rescue tug during botched bid to free it


The Royal Navy faced further embarrassment today after it was revealed the nuclear-powered submarine which ran aground on a shingle bank last month was badly damaged in a collision with a tug which tried to free it.
The £1billion HMS Astute was on sea trials when it became stuck on a shingle bank on the west coast of Scotland on October 22.

The vessel, the most advanced submarine ever built, ran aground off the coast of the Isle of Skye but it was freed by the evening of October 22 when the tide began to rise.

But it is understood HMS Astute was damaged after a collision with the Coastguard tug the Anglian Prince, which was sent to free it.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... e-tug.html (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1326443/Navy-submarine-HMS-Astute-ran-aground-damaged-rescue-tug.html)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: chaimites em Novembro 08, 2010, 07:19:56 pm
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As modificações devem ser consideráveis, levando a cálculos complexos para garantir a estabilidade do navio.
Por isso para os ingleses, para ser mais rápido, o mais simples é agarrar nos estudos do PA-2 e construir o Prince of Wales a partir dele.

as modificaçoes podem mesmo ser inviaveis!

A estabilidade de um navio esta dependente de duas forças o cemtro de gravidade (peso)  e centro de empuxo (agua)


 Depende também do ponto de aplicação dessas forças. A força peso é aplicada no centro de gravidade (CG), que é fixo e o empuxo é aplicado no centro de empuxo (CE), que é variável.

O centro de gravidade do corpo localiza-se no centro de aplicação do seu peso. Quando a distribuição de massa de um objeto é homogênea, o seu centro de gravidade coincide com o seu centro de massa. Se o corpo não é homogêneo ou tem forma irregular, seu centro de gravidade não coincide com o seu centro de massa. É possível localizar o CG do corpo pendurando-o livremente. O CG do corpo fica no ponto de cruzamento das verticais que passam pelo ponto de sustentação.

Já o centro de empuxo CE está localizado no centro de gravidade do líquido deslocado pelo corpo.

A posição do centro de gravidade CG, então não se altera em relação ao corpo. Já o centro de empuxo do navio CE muda de acordo com a forma do volume do líquido deslocado, já que está localizado no centro de gravidade do líquido deslocado.

  O navio é projetado para em caso de oscilações laterais, retornar a posição inicial. Para isso, seu centro de gravidade CG fica abaixo do centro de empuxo CE, , de modo que temos uma situação de equilíbrio estável. O momento das forças  e  é que faz com que o navio volte à posição inicial.
 

O CG no caso de uma embarcação, não pode coincidir com o CE, pois quando o CG coincide com o CE, o corpo imerso fica em equilíbrio indiferente, ou seja, se qualquer perturbação fizer o corpo se mover lateralmente, ele não retorna a posição de equilíbrio.

o CE muda de posição quando o barco se movimenta, o que altera a situação de equilíbrio. Essa mudança depende da forma do casco, já que o CE está localizado no centro de gravidade do líquido deslocado.

Para obter-se maior estabilidade possível, a distribuição de cargas no interior do navio é feita de tal modo que o centro de gravidade se situa o mais próximo possível do fundo do navio.

quando se adiciona um peso vamos alterar o centro de gravidade

De maneira geral, pesos adicionados em posição superior ao centro de gravidade terão efeitos de diminuir a estabilidade, e quando dispostos abaixo terão efeito contrário. A exceção a esses casos recai naqueles em que há grande variação das propriedades hidrostáticas do casco devido a mudança de deslocamento. Naturalmente, se o centro de gravidade deixa de estar no plano de centro o sistema flutuante operará com banda e a curva de estabilidade estática será não simétrica.

Quando uma carga é embarcada, o que se quer é conhecer as novas condições de flutuação e estabilidade da embarcação. Os parâmetros a serem determinados são: deslocamento, banda e calados.

O peso adicionado significa uma nova força no sistema. Levará ao aparecimento de uma nova parcela de empuxo para manter o equilíbrio. A nova parcela de empuxo surgirá no centro do volume da fatia do navio que sofrer afundamento. Como se quer afundamento paralelo essa fatia terá espessura constante. Se o peso for adicionado numa vertical que passa por esse ponto, o novo par de forças terá momento nulo e o navio não tomará nem trim nem banda.
É necessária então a determinação desse centro de volume.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: luis filipe silva em Novembro 08, 2010, 08:22:06 pm
Pois na minha modesta opinião podem ser viáveis, senão vejam as alterações que foram feitas nos porta aviões da classe Midway. Senão vejam as três grandes alterações que foram feitas durante a vida do navio.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midway_cla ... ft_carrier (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midway_class_aircraft_carrier)

Os seus dois irmãos foram também modernisados, mas o convés de vôo ficou diferente entre os três.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: chaimites em Novembro 08, 2010, 08:50:40 pm
Claro que podem ser alterados!

Se nao se alterarem os centros de gravidade e de empuxo da plataforma


Sendo estes alterados Há que recalcular as curvas Hidrostáticas do navio,  tendo em conta o novo deslocamento   banda e calados! aqui é que tudo pode complicar-se pois as alteraçoes podem ser mais dispendiosas que construir novo!
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: JLRC em Novembro 16, 2010, 02:00:07 pm
Citação de: "luis filipe silva"
Pois na minha modesta opinião podem ser viáveis ...

Claro que podem ser alterados. Eles foram projectados de início para a possibilidade de serem equipados com catapultas e cabos de travagem. O problema com o Queen Elizabeth é que se fosse equipado de início com as catapultas, ficaria mais caro e durante vários (muitos anos) ficaria a operar sem aviões (um porta-aviões sem aviões  :shock: ) pois o F-35C só está previsto chegar ao RU depois de 2020, a tempo de equipar o Prince of Wales. Se a actual situação financeira alterar-se, para melhor, é provável que o Queen Elizabeth, após a entrada em serviço do Prince of Wales, venha a ser equipado com as catapultas e os cabos de travagem. A pista obliqua já lá está, é uma questão de pintura ou pouco mais. Quanto ao PA2 francês, a DCNS tem um projecto novo mais ao gosto da Marine Nationale, só com uma ilha.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Novembro 25, 2010, 04:00:59 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: typhonman em Novembro 30, 2010, 11:27:32 pm
What a shame!!!
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: teXou em Dezembro 06, 2010, 12:07:38 pm
Citar
Diving belles! Wrens set to serve on Navy submarines... and they'll get their own bunks to avoid 'hot-bedding' with the men

It is one of the last great all- Below: Hot-bedding male bastions in Britain’s Armed Forces with a proud tradition stretching back more than 100 years.

But now the Royal Navy’s submarine fleet is preparing to open its doors to women for the very first time.

Wrens have served on surface ships since the Navy lifted its ban on women crew 20 years ago, but they have remained outlawed from the ‘silent service’ because of fears that their reproductive organs and unborn children might be affected by the reactors on board modern nuclear-powered subs.
(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/12/04/article-0-0C599DC8000005DC-604_468x586.jpg)
There were also concerns that the presence of women on submarines -  four of which carry the Trident nuclear missile - could create dis ruptive relationships
on vessels that often spend months underwater.

A study by the Institute of Naval Medicine, however, has concluded that there is no risk to female or foetal health from submarine radiation under normal operating conditions.

Navy sources have indicated that female submariners could be on board by next year.

Concerns had previously been expressed by the wives and girlfriends of submariners over whether females would be allowed to sleep in the bunks vacated by their male counterparts when they swapped shifts - a practice commonly known as ‘hot-bedding’.

But senior naval officers made it clear last night that if Wrens are allowed to join the submarine fleet, they will be provided with separate sleeping and showering facilities

One officer said many in the Navy felt women were just as tough as men when it came to withstanding the psychological pressures of the loneliness of underwater life.

Submariners are allowed to receive messages of up to 40 words from friends and family, but cannot reply
Kim Richardson, chair of the Naval Families Federation, who took part in the review, said: ‘There was a 50/50 split about whether females should serve in submarines.

‘Some family members did express concerns about where the females were going to sleep, and a number of these physical aspects were raised.

‘We were reassured by the Navy that all this is being taken into account, but we are still keen to hear from anyone who has a view.’

In Plymouth, Devon, home of the nuclear submarine fleet, a senior petty officer said: ‘A
female is a distraction. It is as old as Adam and Eve.

‘When you are in a tense situation working hard, you form relationships. With a bloke, it is a mate for life. With a woman, it is often lustful. Just watch and see what happens when they join our boats.’
The U.S. Navy announced two years ago that it is to deploy women on board its nuclear submarines.

The U.S. military carried out numerous reviews and medical assessments, which
concluded that there was no reason to ban women from serving on the submarines.

Now, 340 women have been selected to serve on the U.S. Navy’s Virginia class submarines. The first will go on board later this month.

Allowing Wrens to serve on submarines would give women almost full equality in the Navy. Only mine-clearance diving teams and the Royal Marines would remain all-male.

An MoD spokeswoman said: ‘The Royal Navy is conducting a review of its policy of excluding females from serving in submarines and is considering the operational, health, legal, social, technical and financial implications.

No decisions have been taken but all options will be considered.’
 
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1335741/Wrens-serve-Navy-submarines-bunks-avoid-hot-bedding.html
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: AtInf em Dezembro 17, 2010, 10:06:13 am
Para a memória futura: último voo dos Harrier da RN


 :(
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lightning em Dezembro 17, 2010, 06:30:56 pm
Citação de: "AtInf"
Para a memória futura: último voo dos Harrier da RN

Estes Harriers já não eram da RN (que se chamavam Sea Harriers), esses deixaram de voar em 2006.

Como em 2006 o F-35 ainda não estava operacional, decidiu-se colocar os Harriers da RAF a operar a partir dos porta-aviões britânicos e criou-se a Joint Force Harrier com aviões da RAF e pilotos da RAF e RN, foram esses da RAF que voaram agora pela ultima vez.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: typhonman em Dezembro 19, 2010, 03:26:03 pm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=voeo0Oiox-c (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=voeo0Oiox-c)

Em jeito de Homenagem.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: AtInf em Dezembro 21, 2010, 09:56:18 am
Citação de: "Lightning"
Estes Harriers já não eram da RN (que se chamavam Sea Harriers), esses deixaram de voar em 2006.

Como em 2006 o F-35 ainda não estava operacional, decidiu-se colocar os Harriers da RAF a operar a partir dos porta-aviões britânicos e criou-se a Joint Force Harrier com aviões da RAF e pilotos da RAF e RN, foram esses da RAF que voaram agora pela ultima vez.

Ok. Obrigado pela correcção. Eu sabia que era uma força conjunta, mas julgava que estes ainda pertenciam à RN.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Janeiro 06, 2011, 05:17:50 pm
:lol:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: teXou em Fevereiro 11, 2011, 06:24:47 pm
Carrier programme accommodates changes

(http://www.theengineer.co.uk/Pictures/web/h/x/g/Artists_impression_of_the_CV_design_1_.jpg)
...


A great deal has happened since my last blog, not least the announcement of the Strategic Defence and Security Review that work on the build of both the new aircraft carriers will continue.  This is very good news for the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, the Royal Navy and the approximately 10,000 jobs in the UK which depend on the Carrier programme. The SDSR also announced that the UK will be procuring the more capable Carrier Variant (CV) of the F 35 aircraft instead of the Short Take-off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) version.  This is, in my personal opinion, good news, but does result in alteration of the aircraft carrier design, which contains adaptability to accommodate the new aircraft launch system equipment, including catapults, jet blast deflectors and arrestor wires together with the associated below deck equipment and changes to the mission system.



While engineering the fitting of this equipment to the ships, the first of which is well into production, is no small challenge, our engineers and designers are already working hard to ensure that when we deliver the ships we will ultimately have the best and most capable solution.

Meanwhile the six shipyards working on production of the ships are continuing to press on with construction of Queen Elizabeth. The Lower Blocks are the massive sections that make up the hull of the ships and both Lower Blocks 03 at Govan and 02 in Portsmouth are now structurally complete up to four deck, the hangar deck, and three deck in the outboard areas. I can tell you it is a very long way down to the floor of the build hall from up there!  When walking on the hangar deck being almost up amongst the crane rails gives a novel and different perspective to the build halls.  At A&P Tyne the upper units of Centre Block 03 are structurally complete from the flight deck down to three deck, so virtually all the structure is built around the centre sections of the ship.  On Valentine’s Day this year, the after ring of Lower Block 03 (LB03) will be moved around to align with the remainder of LB03 and combining together will commence, which is all proceeding towards shipping LB03 from Govan which will be the first block to enter the build dock in Rosyth later this year.


Combination of the two lower blocks making up the lower part of the bow of the ship is well advanced on the dock side at Rosyth and with the prominent bulbous bow this structure now resembles something like an enormous boot!  The one remaining Lower Block, LB05, right at the aft end, and comprising the steering gear compartment and rudders, has commenced construction at Portsmouth recently, with the Commander of the Naval Base, Commodore Rob Thompson doing the honours and officially starting production.  This lower block will be constructed and shipped to Rosyth in four units so that each is of a weight that will allow them to be lifted and lowered into the build dock by the Goliath Crane.  The rudders themselves and the rudder horns and hull inserts have been constructed in Rosyth and are also now nearing completion.


The Goliath Crane for the build dock has been constructed in China and is currently on board a ship en route to Rosyth. As I write this the ship is in the Atlantic, heading north and is expected to arrive at Rosyth in late February.  On arrival the ship will berth across the entrance to the build dock and then a very interesting transition will occur.  The main beam of the crane will be jacked up, while it remains on the ship, the legs will be installed at each end and then the complete structure wheeled from the ship onto the crane rails by the dock.  Installation of the Goliath Crane will be a highly visible indication of progress with the build of Queen Elizabeth and will make a significant difference to the Fife skyline.  The crane will be commissioned during the spring and early summer months and will be used to install the first of the upper blocks onto the lowers before the end of the year.

2011 looks like being a very interesting year for the Aircraft Carrier Alliance and its suppliers, so to keep up to date with what is happening you may also wish to visit our website – http://www.aircraftcarrieralliance.co.uk


http://www.theengineer.co.uk/blog/carrier-programme-accommodates-changes/1007239.article
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: nelson38899 em Abril 08, 2011, 07:46:13 pm
Citar
Uma pessoa foi morta e outra gravemente ferida durante um tiroteio a bordo de um submarino nuclear britânico fundeado em Southampton, sul de Inglaterra, informou a polícia, que excluiu a hipótese de um acto terrorista.

Um homem foi detido após o incidente, que não representou "qualquer risco para o público", e "não está relacionado com um acto terrorista", asseguraram responsáveis policiais citados pela agência France Presse. O ministro da Defesa britânico recusou-se a qualquer comentário e remeteu todas as informações para as autoridades policiais.

O Astute, o mais recente submarino britânico a propulsão nuclear, tinha já sido notícia em finais de Outubro, quando se afundou nas costas escocesas antes de conseguir reemergir após algumas horas de expectativa.

Este episódio implicou a substituição deste submarino, equipado com mísseis convencionais Spearfish e Tomahawk preparados para atingir alvos a uma distância de dois mil quilómetros.

dn.pt
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: typhonman em Abril 19, 2011, 03:30:52 pm
Estes ingleses andam malucos, deve ser por causa do casamento real.... :shock:

http://sol.sapo.pt/inicio/Internacional ... t_id=17159 (http://sol.sapo.pt/inicio/Internacional/Interior.aspx?content_id=17159)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: ShadIntel em Abril 19, 2011, 03:44:32 pm
São erros "comuns" no Reino Unido. Já esqueceram pastas com documentos classificados em táxis, comboios, ou mesas de cafés, agora passaram à negligência versão 2.0 .
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Desertas em Abril 19, 2011, 08:12:38 pm
Citação de: "ShadIntel"
São erros "comuns" no Reino Unido. Já esqueceram pastas com documentos classificados em táxis, comboios, ou mesas de cafés, agora passaram à negligência versão 2.0 .

Podem ser erros "comuns", mas nunca deveriam acontecer. Tenho  curiosidade em saber , quantos milhões de libras e dólares serão gastos pela  Royal Navy , e  U.S.Navy ,para limitar este "Erro Comum".

Um Abraço
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Maio 04, 2011, 03:46:00 pm
Citar
Politicians hide their plans to put French jets on Royal Navy carriers

The Royal Navy won't be flying Anglo-US Joint Strike Fighters, but providing a platform for French Rafales as part of an EU force, writes Christopher Booker.

The magnificent military pageantry of the royal wedding coincided, sadly, with yet another humiliating instance of the precipitate decline in Britain’s military power. There has long been something very odd about the two giant aircraft carriers which are to be the centrepiece of Britain’s defence capability over the next 50 years – one to be instantly mothballed, the other not due in service for another decade. Now, it seems, the bill for this project is to rise yet again, by further billions of pounds, because, according to the Ministry of Defence, one carrier needs extensive modification to accommodate the Joint Strike Fighters we are allegedly building with the US.

When are the MoD and our politicians going to tell us the truth about these ships – which has been hidden in plain view for years? The purpose of these latest changes is not to accommodate Anglo-US JSFs, which may never be built, but – as I first reported as long ago as 2006 – to equip the carriers to fly French-built Rafales.

Ever since 1996, under the last Tory government, these carriers have been planned as a joint Anglo-French project. Their only purpose has been to serve as the main Anglo-French contribution to the European Rapid Reaction Force, as agreed by Tony Blair at Helsinki in 1999, and confirmed between the lines in several treaties since, including the latest, signed by David Cameron and President Sarkozy last November.

This is where the 600-year history of the Royal Navy is to end – sailing partly French-built ships, crewed by British sailors, as a platform for inadequate French aircraft with French pilots (and with escorts provided by other EU nations such as Spain). But why are our politicians so reluctant to admit what they are up to, and trying to pretend that we shall somehow still have an independent Royal Navy, equipped with aircraft at least partly British? That is not what they are spending vast sums of our money to achieve, and it is time they came clean about it.

 :shock:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Junho 15, 2011, 03:13:45 pm
:lol:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tyr em Junho 15, 2011, 09:42:51 pm
:rir:  :rir:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Novembro 05, 2011, 12:00:03 pm
No Warships Protecting UK Shores
   
   
(Source: British Forces Broadcasting Service; posted Nov. 2, 2011)
 
 
   
   Cutbacks have left the UK without a single warship specifically tasked with protecting the country's shores for the past month, the Ministry of Defence confirmed today.

The Royal Navy normally provides a minimum coverage of a frigate or destroyer fulfilling the role of Fleet Ready Escort (FRE). This task is for the ship to be at high readiness for an emergency, including a terrorist attack, in UK waters or abroad.

However pressures on the navy caused by cuts to its fleet in last year's strategic defence and strategy review (SDSR) as well as its commitments to the Nato mission to Libya, has left it unable to fill the role.

In the SDSR, the Government cut the number of frigates or destroyers in the navy's surface fleet from 24 to 19.

The last ship to undertake the FRE role was the Type 23 frigate HMS Portland which left the position on October 3 to take part in the NATO Joint Warrior exercise off Scotland.

A Royal Navy spokesman said: "Due to the successful deployment of Royal Navy units to the Libya campaign, it has been necessary to reprofile the commitments of some ships. Should a FRE activation be required, a Royal Navy ship would be allocated."

The spokesman explained that although there had not been a ship specifically tasked as an FRE, one of the vessels taking part in the Joint Warrior exercise could have been allocated within 24 hours' notice.

He added that the FRE would not necessarily be on patrol during its tasking but could be alongside in port at high readiness to sail.

The spokesman said that as well as the FRE, the navy normally has a frigate escorting the continuous at sea deterrent (nuclear submarine) as well as fishery protection vessels.

He added the next FRE would be formally notified on November 7 but if one was required prior to that they would be nominated immediately.

Former First Sea Lord, Admiral Lord Alan West told the Portsmouth News: "If there was a terrorism incident in UK waters, this would historically be the ship sent in to deal with it.

"It's a big problem. If we haven't got a ship ready to do this role then it's worrying. It's a very unsatisfactory position to be in."

-ends-

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articl ... hores.html (http://www.defense-aerospace.com/article-view/release/130074/uk-had-no-warships-to-protect-its-shores.html)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: chaimites em Novembro 08, 2011, 12:01:54 am
BAE iniciou os testes de mar do 5º T45  para a Royal Navy
D36 HMS Defender

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: borisdedante em Dezembro 15, 2011, 01:53:38 am
UK Without Surveillance Aircraft As Russians Call (excerpt)


The appearance of a Russian navy battlegroup off the coast of Scotland last night raised fresh concerns over the UK government’s decision not to have any surveillance aircraft.
http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articl ... ships.html (http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articles-view/release/3/131224/uk-lacks-aircraft-to-track-russian-ships.html)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: FoxTroop em Dezembro 15, 2011, 01:53:32 pm
Está boa  :lol:  Os russos fundeiam uma esquadra a 30nm. da costa britânica e só depois é que os "bifes" dão por isso...... E eu a pensar que nós estávamos mal  :lol:  :lol:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: typhonman em Dezembro 15, 2011, 09:34:50 pm
Citação de: "FoxTroop"
Está boa  :lol:  Os russos fundeiam uma esquadra a 30nm. da costa britânica e só depois é que os "bifes" dão por isso...... E eu a pensar que nós estávamos mal  :lol:  :lol:


Que risada... :o
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: chaimites em Dezembro 22, 2011, 06:25:45 pm
Alguma coisa muito estranha se passa em terras de Sua Magestade!  :mrgreen:


Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lightning em Janeiro 10, 2012, 06:00:53 pm
O ingleses também já começam a mexer as suas peças de xadrez.

Citar
Londres responde a ameaças do Irão com envio de contratorpedeiro ‘Daring’ para o Estreito de Ormuz.

http://www.cmjornal.xl.pt/detalhe/notic ... o-no-golfo (http://www.cmjornal.xl.pt/detalhe/noticias/internacional/mundo/navio-britanico-no-golfo)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: nelson38899 em Janeiro 10, 2012, 08:48:29 pm
lá vai 25% da defesa inglesa!

Acho piada aos Ingleses, para proteger as suas costas não há navios, para meter-se numa guerra são sempre os primeiros.

Se eles mantiverem os níveis de cortes actuais, quero ver quem é que vai patrulhar as suas costas. Já estou a ver Portugal a enviar o npo, como faz com os f16 para os países do báltico.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lightning em Janeiro 10, 2012, 09:32:18 pm
Citação de: "nelson38899"
lá vai 25% da defesa inglesa!

Acho piada aos Ingleses, para proteger as suas costas não há navios, para meter-se numa guerra são sempre os primeiros.

Se eles mantiverem os níveis de cortes actuais, quero ver quem é que vai patrulhar as suas costas. Já estou a ver Portugal a enviar o npo, como faz com os f16 para os países do báltico.

Eu acho piada é nós enviarmos o NPO para o Reino Unido para substituir um Contra-Torpedeiro :mrgreen: .
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Março 13, 2012, 09:15:33 pm
Cost of Refitting Royal Navy Aircraft Carrier Trebles (excerpt)
   
   
(Source: Daily Telegraph; issued March 12, 2012)
 
 
   
   The costs of refitting a Royal Navy aircraft carrier so it can be used by a new generation of fighter jets have more than trebled, defence sources have told The Daily Telegraph.

Estimates for adapting HMS Prince of Wales so that it can be used by the [F-35C version of the] Joint Strike Fighter are understood have risen from £500?million to £1.8?billion.

Millions have already been spent on studies to look at how to convert the ship after ministers decided to scrap the jump-jet variant of the plane in favour of a conventional take-off and landing model. But so great is the rise in total costs, ministers are considering abandoning the plan and reverting to the Ministry of Defence’s original proposals.

Philip Hammond, the Defence Secretary, believes there is not enough money in the budget to afford the £300?million a year to carry out the work over six years.

“We are certainly looking at what’s affordable and what can be done in terms of risk and cost,” said an MoD official. “If you have an unaffordable programme you cannot ignore it.”

The move is likely to be embarrassing for the Government as the changes were at the heart of the Strategic Defence and Security Review in 2010. It will also heighten criticism of the Government for disbanding the fleet of Harrier jets and selling them to US Marine Corps for “peanuts”.

Under the new plans, the Government is expected to choose the |F-35B] jump-jet version of the JSF, even though the [F-35C conventional] take-off and landing model can fly further and carry more bombs. (end of excerpt)


Click here for the full story, on the Daily Telegraph website.

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articl ... .8-bn.html (http://www.defense-aerospace.com/article-view/release/133498/cost-of-adapting-uk-carrier-trebles-to-%C2%A31.8-bn.html)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Março 28, 2012, 02:32:48 pm
Citar
O retorno dos blimps

A Royal Navy anunciou o interesse no uso de Blimps (ou Airship) para vigilância e reabastecimento dos seus novos porta-aviões. O modelo de vigilância estudado é o Long Endurance Multi-Intelligence Vehicle (LEMV) da Northrop-Grummam. O US Army comprou três LEMV em 2010 por US$ 315 milhões para realizar missões de vigilância no Afeganistão. O LEMV tem autonomia de 3 semanas, gasta 4,5 galões de combustível por hora, tem 90 metros de comprimento, capacidade de carga de 1,1 toneladas e pode ser controlado por uma estação em terra, operar de forma autônoma ou ser pilotado.

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/HAV_01-580x434.jpg)

Os modelos Hybrid Air Vehicles (HAV) da Northrop-Grummam estão sendo estudados para as missões de carga. A versão HAV-366 (imagem abaixo) tem capacidade de carga de 50 toneladas sendo mais que o dobro do C-130. Tem autonomia de vários dias a uma velocidade de 80 nós. Pode ser usado para apoiar missões antipirataria levando 150 tropas e suas embarcações em incursões contra alvos em terra.

Estudos americanos

Os blimp são considerados bem mais baratos de operar que as aeronaves de asa fixa ou rotativa o que renovou o interesse neste tipo de plataforma. Já foram extensivamente usados no passado em operações militares, mas caíram em desuso. A US Navy operou 168 blimps durante a Segunda Guerra Mundial para patrulha costeira anti-submarina. Na década de 1950 foram usado para vigilância radar contra ataque de mísseis balísticos operando até 1962.

Na década de 1980 o blimp Airship 500 foi testado pela Guarda Costeira Americana, França e Reino Unido para patrulha marítima. O estudo PACE (Patrol Airship Concept Evaluation) realizado em 1983 pela Guarda Costeira Americana mostrou a vantagem dos Blimp comparados com as aeronaves. Queriam uma aeronave para seis tripulantes com autonomia de 48 horas. O programa foi cancelado em favor de um projeto de blimp de vigilância da US Navy. A imagem abaixo é dos testes da marinha francesa com o Airship 500 lançando um bote no mar.

Em 1982 o Reino Unido pensou em usar os blimps para alerta aéreo antecipado depois dos combates contra os argentinos nas Malvinas. A Royal Navy acabou usando os helicópteros Sea King na missão.

A US Navy reiniciou os estudos sobre o uso de blimps para uso militar a partir de 1974. Após estudos de 1985, a NASP (US Navy Airship Program) concluiu que os blimps eram a forma mais barata para manter a capacidade de alerta aéreo antecipado contínuo. Passaram a estudar o uso dos Blimps como plataforma de vigilância contra ataques de mísseis anti-navio contra Grupos Tarefas sem porta-aviões. Em 1986 foi lançado uma concorrência para desenvolver a aeronave. Foram enviados propostas da Goodyear/Loral com o WPG-3W e da Airship/Westinhouse com o Sentinel 5000. O Sentinel 5000 foi escolhido em um contrato de US$ 170 milhões em 1987. A imagem abaixo é um conceito de um blimp de alerta aéreo antecipado baseado no Sentinel 5000.

A Westinghouse desenvolveria o radar e a Airship a aeronave baseada no modelo Sentinel 1000 porém bem maior. O Sentinel 5000 levaria 15 tripulantes com autonomia de 30 dias. Seria reabastecido de três em três dias pelo Grupo Tarefa que acompanharia. Operaria em uma altitude de 1.500 metros, mas podendo chegar a 3.000 metros. Usaria dois motores para cruzeiro e um para velocidade. O projeto foi cancelado no meio de 1990 por falta de fundos. Esperavam comprar até 40 Sentinel 5000 por US$ 2 bilhões para um futuro requerimento de uma plataforma de alerta antecipado independente para apoiar grupos tarefas.

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/airship-5000.jpg)

Depois do inicio do projeto do Sentinel 5000 foi logo pensado em outras variantes. Na fase de conceito foi estudado armar o Sentinel 5000 com um “airborne Patriot” ou uma bateria de 16 mísseis AMRAAM. A USAF estudou seu uso para complementar as aeronaves AWACS na missão de detectar mísseis cruise em picket radar na costa dos EUA. Uma versão anti-minas foi considerada para substituir os helicópteros na missão a a principal vantagem sendo o tempo de deslocamento até a aérea de operação sendo bem menor. Uma versão anti-submarina levaria um sonar fazendo a missão que fazia durante a Segunda Guerra Mundial, e com um sonar bem maior e mais capaz que os levados pelos helicópteros.

Blimps na MB

Os blimps poderiam ser interessantes para a MB para realizar uma grande variedade de missões. Como plataforma de alerta aéreo antecipada poderia ser um complemento aos S-2 Traker que estão sendo modificados para a missão. Poderiam apoiar Grupos Tarefas sem a necessidade de um porta-aviões. Idealmente seria uma versão não tripulada voando a grande altitude.

Um blimp de carga poderia fazer o papel dos C-1 Trader de carga apoiando as operações da esquadra. Poderia levar cargas urgentes, pessoal ou fazer evacuação médica. Um modelo de grande capacidade como o HAV366 poderia apoiar as operações dos fuzileiros, principalmente as missões de paz com um tempo de reação bem menor que os navios.

Uma das missões mais atualmente é a proteção do pré sal. Um blimp poderia atuar como plataforma de sensores e armas protegendo o local, incluindo missões anti-submarina.

Fonte: http://www.naval.com.br/blog/#ixzz1qEGZzzu2 (http://www.naval.com.br/blog/#ixzz1qEGZzzu2)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: brunopinto90 em Abril 02, 2012, 12:47:29 pm
também vão ter a missão de destruir aviões, os mesmos vão contra eles!

Estes americanos e ingleses têm cás umas ideias. Também não é novo, isto foi usado durante a 2GM.

Quanto custará uma dessas aeronaves.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: RicardoL em Novembro 16, 2012, 11:10:13 pm
Gigante com pés de barro


O bilionário submarino HMS Astute da Royal Navy tem sido assolado por problemas de projeto e de construção que levantaram dúvidas sobre o seu desempenho e sua segurança, informou o jornal The Guardian em seu site. Segundo a matéria, o submarino não pode atingir a sua velocidade máxima de projeto.

Até o momento o navio, o mais sofisticado já produzido para a marinha do Reino Unido, não pode realizar fugas em alta velocidade para escapar dos seus perseguidores – um requisito essencial para um navio da sua classe.

Ele também seria incapaz de acompanhar o mais recente navio-aeródromo da Royal Navy, que poderá navegar a mais de 30 nós. Uma fonte do Guardian disse que o navio possui “um motor V8 com uma caixa de transmissão tipo Morris Minor”.

O ministério da Defesa do Reino Unido confirmou que o Astute apresentou alguns problemas durante os testes de mar. “É normal que a primeira unidade de uma classe apresente áreas onde modificações são necessárias e estas são então incorporadas pelos navios seguintes,” informou um porta-voz.

Embora o Ministério da Defesa informe que não pode discutir a velocidade dos submarinos, o porta-voz disse que o Astute “proporcionará uma capacidade notável para as próximas décadas”.

No entanto, se os problemas de propulsão persistirem, eles representarão um dos maiores desastres que o Ministério da Defesa já teve de lidar, e, potencialmente, deixará o desempenho da frota muito aquém das tarefas para as quais ela foi projetada.

John Large, um engenheiro e analista de segurança nuclear independente, disse: “Estes problemas são muito mais significativos do aqueles que se esperam durante a construção de uma nova classe de submarino nuclear. O que mais preocupa é o aparente descompasso entre a planta do reator nuclear e o sistema de turbina a vapor, colocando a velocidade do submarino abaixo das expectativas e ao alcance de armas anti-submarinas.”

O secretário substituto do Defesa, Jim Murphy, disse que os ministros “devem ser claros sobre o impacto de quaisquer problema com este programa essencial tanto em tempo como em custo”.

Mesmo que o navio ainda tenha que dar início ao seu serviço ativo, o Astute - quatro anos atrasado e R$ 2 bilhões acima do orçamento – sua entrada em operação foi cercada de polêmica desde que foi encomendado há 15 anos. Em 2010, encalhou perto de Skye, uma calamidade que levou o seu comandante a ser removido do posto. No ano passado, um oficial superior foi morto a tiros por um membro da tripulação.

O Guardian soube que durante exercícios realizados ao longo da costa leste dos Estados Unidos, um tampão de um dos dutos que leva água salgada para o reator apresentou um vazamento. Um compartimento foi inundado, forçando o comandante a emergir imediatamente. Embora não tenha causado vítimas, a investigação mostrou que o tampão foi produzido com uma liga metálica errada, mesmo que os registros da construção demonstrem que o metal correto tenha sido usado.

“O fato do tampão ter falhado já é uma notícia ruim, mas o mais preocupante é que não há como saber se o submarino possui outras peças como estas a bordo,” informou uma fonte. “O teste de qualidade existe para garantir que este tipo de coisa não ocorra, mas aconteceu. Então, o que mais pode estar instalado a bordo que nós não temos conhecimento? É impossível de saber. Eles instalaram o tampão errado e passou.”

O Ministério confirmou o problema. “Durante testes no ano passado, o HMS Astute apresentou um vazamento que foi imediatamente isolado e o submarino retornou em segurança para a superfície,” disse um porta-voz na época.”A investigação demonstrou que uma peça não construída com a liga apropriada apresentou corrosão. Uma peças substituta foi empregada e o submarino seguiu com o seu programa.”

Alguns dos instrumentos que indicam o estado do reator nuclear também estariam comprometidos, informou o Guardian. O chumbo empregado deve ser um “metal virgem”, proveniente de grandes profundidades, de forma que não carregam cargas elétricas que possam gerar uma leitura falsa.

No entanto, o chumbo empregado no Astute não era dessa qualidade, o que significa que os instrumentos apresentam leituras incorretas. Usar um metal impuro pode ter também um efeito em cadeia durante a manutenção – o metal com carga elétrica cria uma radioatividade crescente e persistente dentro do compartimento do reator.

Uma fonte disse que este descuido é “imperdoável”. Inicialmente o Ministério da Defesa negou que havia um problema com os instrumentos do reator. No entanto, em seguida foi confirmado que um metal errado havia sido usado – mas os testes mostraram que a precisão das leituras não foram afetadas, insistiram. Além disso, alguns dos quadros de distribuição de pequenos computadores do Astute deveriam ter sido colocados seis polegadas de distância um do outro, mas apresentaram apenas uma polegada de distância.

Eles não eram compatíveis com normas de segurança da marinha ou civis e agora estão tendo de ser movidos ou substituídos. O Ministério da Defesa diz que este trabalho já foi concluído.

De todos os problemas, aqueles relacionados com propulsão, que são os mais sensíveis. O Ministério da Defesa afirmou que o Astute seria capaz de fazer 29 nós, mas ao Guardian foi dito que isso não é possível.

Ao invés de construir uma nova planta nuclear para Astute, o Ministério da Defesa optou por usar o reator de água pressurizada 2 (PWR2) dos submarinos da classe Vanguard, muito maiores. O reator foi conectado com um sistema de turbina a vapor baseado no modelo utilizado pelos antigos submarinos da classe Trafalgar.

“Este sempre apareceu como um problema possível, e foi o que aconteceu”, disse uma fonte. “O PWR2 foi feito para um navio muito maior, e o Astute teve que ser projetado em torno dele. Isso pode ter gerado corte de custos, mas tem causado problemas. A potência do reator não se traduz em movimento para a frente.”

Large acrescentou: “Muito se esperava da classe Astute, mas essas falhas que ocorreram durante a sua entrada no serviço ativo, particularmente no sistema de propulsão, e o seu desempenho abaixo do projetado, sugerem que tudo partiu de um grande improviso feito a partir de algumas peças mal ajustadas – A verdadeira preocupação aqui é se essas incompatibilidades ou similares irão comprometer a segurança nuclear pondo em risco a tripulação e do público em geral”.

FONTE: The Guardian (tradução e adaptação do original em inglês pelo Poder Naval)


Se a poderosa Royal Navy está assim, nem quero pensar no resto das marinhas da europa ocidental.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Novembro 17, 2012, 11:38:50 am
(http://www.defense-aerospace.com/base/util/140254_1.jpg)
HMS Astute, the Royal Navy’s latest nuclear-powered attack submarine, is beset by design and construction flaws, notably to its propulsion system, and cannot reach its top speed. (RN photo)

Slow, Leaky, Rusty: Britain's £10bn Submarine Beset By Design Flaws (excerpt)
   
   
(Source: The Guardian; published Nov. 16, 2012)

The Royal Navy's new multibillion pound hunter-killer submarine, HMS Astute, has been beset by design and construction flaws that have raised doubts about its performance and potential safety.

The Guardian can reveal that Astute, the first of seven new submarines costing £9.75bn, has been unable to reach its intended top speed.

At the moment, the boat, heralded as the most sophisticated submarine ever built for the navy, cannot sprint to emergencies or away from an attack – an essential requirement for a hunter-killer boat.

It would also be incapable of keeping pace with the Royal Navy's new aircraft carriers, which will be able to travel at more than 30 knots and need the submarines to protect them. One source told the Guardian the boat had a "V8 engine with a Morris Minor gearbox".

Other problems that have affected the boat in recent months include:

• Flooding during a routine dive that led to Astute performing an emergency surfacing.

• Corrosion even though the boat is essentially new.

• The replacement or moving of computer circuit boards because they did not meet safety standards.

• Concern over the instruments monitoring the nuclear reactor because the wrong type of lead was used.

• Questions being raised about the quality and installation of other pieces of equipment.

• Concern reported among some crew members about the Astute's pioneering periscope, that does not allow officers to look at the surface "live".

The MoD confirmed Astute had suffered some "teething problems" during sea trials. "It is normal for first of class trials to identify areas where modifications are required and these are then incorporated into later vessels of the class," a spokesman said.

Though the MoD said it cannot discuss the speed of submarines, the spokesman said Astute would "provide an outstanding capability for decades to come".

However, if the propulsion problems persist, they would represent one of the biggest procurement disasters the MoD has ever had to deal with, and potentially leave the Astute fleet struggling to perform all the duties it was built for. (end of excerpt)


Click here for the full story, on the Guardian website.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/nov/1 ... eaky-rusty (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2012/nov/15/hms-astute-submarine-slow-leaky-rusty)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Novembro 18, 2012, 11:04:53 pm
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/HMS-Astute-corte.jpg)
(Como em todas as imagens é só clicar para aumentar.)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Sertorio em Janeiro 08, 2013, 07:17:46 am
Citar
These new computer-generated images put into context the huge scale of the largest warships ever built for the Royal Navy.

The Aircraft Carrier Alliance (ACA) has released a series of powerful posters illustrating the sheer size of the warships.

The computer-generated images show the warships dwarfing some of the country's most recognisable landmarks.


Scroll down for video

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2258574/New-aircraft-carriers-HMS-Queen-Elizabeth-HMS-Prince-Wales-largest-warships-built-Royal-Navy.html#ixzz2HMkwUZap
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Março 29, 2013, 10:29:20 pm
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8248/8577500571_7daa1276d1_b.jpg)
Citar
HMS Edinburgh sails past the Statue of Liberty, en-route to her berth. New York is the final foreign port visit for Edinburgh, who decommissions on return to Portsmouth. Edinburgh is the last of the iconic Type 42 Destroyers.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Abril 16, 2013, 05:00:50 pm
HMS Ambush 'Issue' Halts Sea Trials
   
   
(Source: British Forces News; published April 15, 2013)
 
 
   
   The Royal Navy’s newest nuclear submarine has been forced to abandon her sea trials after a fault was discovered.

The billion pound HMS Ambush has been towed back to port on the Clyde just weeks after being handed over to the Navy by BAE.

The vessel came to an unexpected halt in Gare Loch in ­Dunbartonshire - and so far the MOD has only confirmed that "an issue has arisen," meaning the sub has to return to base.

-ends-

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articl ... rials.html (http://www.defense-aerospace.com/articles-view/release/3/144290/%E2%80%98issue%E2%80%99-cuts-short-royal-navy-ssn-sea-trials.html)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Maio 27, 2013, 09:14:26 pm
27 de maio de 1982 foi um mau dia para a Royal Navy, embora pudesse ter sido pior...

http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2013/05/27/o-ataque-a-fragata-hms-broadsword-nas-malvinas/#axzz2UWbo3IR7

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/A-4-atacam-a-HMS-Broadsword-no-dia-25-de-maio-de-1982.jpg)

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Ataque-%C3%A0-HMS-Broadsword-Carlos-A-Garcia.jpg)

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/broadsward-flight.jpg)

http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2013/05/27/31-anos-do-afundamento-do-destroier-hms-coventry-na-guerra-das-malvinas/#axzz2UWbo3IR7

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/06.jpg)

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/HMS-Coventry-2.jpg)

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/HMS-Coventry-31.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Julho 31, 2013, 08:10:55 pm
Aterrou...é o que interessa... :mrgreen:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Setembro 13, 2013, 09:03:49 pm

Futuras fragatas da RN, Type 26.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Setembro 27, 2013, 12:14:30 pm
http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2013/09/25/royal-navy-comissiona-sexto-contratorpedeiro-tipo-45/#axzz2g5ZYKV00

(http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-kqhiDLUPFfA/UKaOWPzjctI/AAAAAAAAbY8/nL1LcFet1kE/s1600/hms+duncan+2nd+sea+trials+001+16-11-2012+12-44-45.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Setembro 28, 2013, 09:17:40 pm
Ui. Se os cortes orçamentais e os f-35B não derem "bandeira" vai ser um espectáculo... :mrgreen:
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/UK-Carrier-4.jpg)
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/UK-Carrier-1.jpg)
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/UK-Carrier-2.jpg)
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/UK-Carrier-3.jpg)

http://navaltoday.com/2013/09/27/gallery-a-taste-of-operations-aboard-hms-queen-elizabeth/

P.S. Haverá AEW???
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: pchunter em Outubro 14, 2013, 04:58:57 pm
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Empresa portuguesa vai equipar a Royal Navy

14/10/2013 | 00:00 | Dinheiro Vivo

Os navios da Royal Navy (marinha britânica) vão ter sistema de comunicação made in Portugal. A Empresa de Investigação e Desenvolvimento de Eletrónica (EID), única empresa portuguesa de software militar, ganhou o concurso internacional para equipar os futuros navios da segunda maior marinha do mundo, designados por Type 26 Global Combat Ships.

O valor do contrato pode chegar aos 30 milhões de euros, dependendo da quantidade de navios a equipar. Para já estão previstos 13. “A escolha da EID para integrar a equipa que irá levar a cabo o desenho detalhado do sistema de comunicações dos Global Combat Ships foi para nós motivo de grande orgulho, já que se trata do reconhecimento, pela segunda maior marinha do mundo, das competências da empresa no domínio das comunicações de navios de guerra, fruto de trinta anos de experiência e de mais de cem sistemas fornecidos para marinhas dos cinco continentes”, afirmou o administrador Marcos Lopes ao DN.

Nesta fase do projeto, e nos próximos seis meses, estarão envolvidos mais de dez engenheiros especialistas da EID, em cooperação com elementos da British Aerospace (empresa mandatada pelo Ministério da Defesa/Marinha Inglesa) e a Rohde & Schwarz (empresa alemã, especialista em comunicações rádio).

“Contamos que, finda esta fase, se concretize o contrato de fornecimento para um número de navios ainda não totalmente determinado, mas que pode chegar aos 13. Assim sendo, a divisão de Comunicações Navais da EID terá trabalho garantido, só através deste importante programa, ao longo das próximas duas décadas”, revelou o administrador. Nesta altura a empresa emprega 150 pessoas, das quais mais de 50 por cento são engenheiros e técnicos altamente qualificados e portugueses. E “não poderá deixar de aumentar”, revelou ao DN Marcos Lopes.

Fonte: http://www.dinheirovivo.pt/Empresas/Artigo/CIECO283210.html
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Outubro 20, 2013, 01:41:18 pm
http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2013/10/19 ... azer-mais/ (http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2013/10/19/as-coisas-que-os-militares-britanicos-nao-podem-fazer-mais/)

E eu a pensar que a nossa marinha estava mal...
 :shock:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Outubro 20, 2013, 04:31:46 pm
Citação de: "HSMW"
http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2013/10/19/as-coisas-que-os-militares-britanicos-nao-podem-fazer-mais/

E eu a pensar que a nossa marinha estava mal...
 :shock:

Se fosse só isso...  :mrgreen:
(http://www.suricatafx.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/deck_comparison.jpg)
(http://i2.dailyrecord.co.uk/incoming/article2056540.ece/ALTERNATES/s615/HMS-Queen-Elizabeth-2056540.jpg)
(http://www.vostokstation.com.au/aircraft/images/F-35_JSF_variants.jpg)

http://blogs.ottawacitizen.com/2013/09/05/british-face-procurement-management-problems-on-new-aircraft-carrier-project-basic-errors-made-says-report/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Elizabeth-class_aircraft_carrier

http://www.naval-technology.com/features/featurecarriers-queen-elizabeth-gerald-ford-varyag/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2409511/Royal-Navys-new-aircraft-carriers-set-sail-radar-cover-reveals-damning-report.html

 :G-beer2:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: jurista em Novembro 19, 2013, 02:22:59 pm
Desde há alguns dias  que os Estaleiros Navais de Portsmouth deixaram de construir navios. A partir de agora, só efectuarão reparações:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-24836582 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-24836582)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Sertorio em Dezembro 12, 2013, 03:18:11 am
Plymouth F126, decommissioned

(http://pravda-team.ru/eng/image/photo/2/3/6/72236.jpeg)
(http://pravda-team.ru/eng/image/photo/2/3/2/72232.jpeg)
(http://pravda-team.ru/eng/image/photo/2/3/3/72233.jpeg)
(http://pravda-team.ru/eng/image/photo/2/3/4/72234.jpeg)
(http://pravda-team.ru/eng/image/photo/2/3/5/72235.jpeg)
(http://pravda-team.ru/eng/image/photo/2/3/7/72237.jpeg)
(http://pravda-team.ru/eng/image/photo/2/3/8/72238.jpeg)
(http://pravda-team.ru/eng/image/photo/2/3/9/72239.jpeg)
(http://pravda-team.ru/eng/image/photo/2/4/0/72240.jpeg)
(http://pravda-team.ru/eng/image/photo/2/4/1/72241.jpeg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Dezembro 19, 2013, 09:55:47 pm
(http://i.imgur.com/PJ74bw0.jpg)
Citar
The forward end of the fifth Astute-class submarine, Anson, lines up with her sisters in giant hall.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Dezembro 21, 2013, 11:11:30 pm
(http://i.imgur.com/vz1Cp7Z.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Junho 02, 2014, 11:00:15 am
http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2014/06/01/preparativos-finais-para-o-hms-ocean-voltar-a-atividade/
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_-uUkf_pHt-Y/THOSrUnQ8VI/AAAAAAAAFoo/tgtX3cG_BRg/s1600/HMS+Ocean+(L12).jpg)
(http://www.naval-technology.com/projects/ocean/images/ocean6.jpg)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Junho 04, 2014, 09:36:43 am
O Enterprise Britânico.
http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2014/06/03/essas-sao-as-viagens-do-hms-enterprise/
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/RIMG0257.JPG)
(http://img696.imageshack.us/img696/7194/hmsenterprise050611008.jpg)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Enterprise_(H88)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Junho 15, 2014, 02:57:48 pm
HMS Artful colocado na agua.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Julho 04, 2014, 02:23:54 pm

Como será utilizado o Queen Helizabeth.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Julho 04, 2014, 05:00:32 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Julho 05, 2014, 03:16:25 pm
Queen Launches Royal Navy’s Newest Carrier

Queen Elizabeth II christened the U.K.’s newest aircraft carrier, the H.M.S. Queen Elizabeth, on Friday. The ship is due to start sailing with combat jets in 2020.

 :arrow: http://on.wsj.com/1q2DG45 (http://on.wsj.com/1q2DG45)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Julho 11, 2014, 02:38:16 pm

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Alvalade em Agosto 25, 2014, 07:22:01 pm
O Diário de Bordo do HMS Conqueror durante a guerra das malvinas (Ainda tem algumas partes classificadas) : https://www.gov.uk/government/publicati ... roceedings (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hms-conqueror-op-corporate-report-of-proceedings).

O dia do afundamento do ARA G.Belgrano está na parte 2
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 11, 2014, 11:21:02 am
http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2014/11/10/type-26-para-a-rn-custos-levam-a-especulacoes-sobre-compra-de-fremm/
Citar
PORÉM, ESPECULAÇÕES SOBRE A MARINHA REAL BRITÂNICA CONSIDERAR A COMPRA DE FREMM SÃO DESMENTIDAS POR AUTORIDADES DO MINISTÉRIO DA DEFESA, QUE REFORÇA COMPROMISSO COM A NOVA FRAGATA TYPE 26 EM DESENVOLVIMENTO PELA BAE SYSTEMS
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Type-26-imagem-2-BAE-Systems.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Menacho em Dezembro 09, 2014, 09:29:21 pm
44 fogos en submarinos británicos en 4 años!!!

http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/544937/Royal-Navy-s-nuclear-submarines-catastrophe-fires
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Dezembro 19, 2014, 06:53:46 pm
:G-beer2:
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In June 2014, the Royal Navy’s new Merlin Mk2 helicopters took part in Exercise Deep Blue, off the south coast of England. The anti-submarine warfare exercise was designed to test the helicopters which were recently upgraded by Lockheed Martin UK through the Merlin Capability Sustainment Programme. Nine Merlin Mk2s were involved in Deep Blue, the largest concentration of Merlins at sea. More than 250 Royal Navy personnel deployed on HMS Illustrious and HMS Westminster for the exercise which lasted several weeks.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Fevereiro 09, 2015, 07:34:58 pm
(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-v0tTxtgTpzA/VNNczsKTNLI/AAAAAAAACw4/phGno8WImJU/s1600/Royal%2BNavy.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Fevereiro 19, 2015, 10:38:41 am
http://www.helis.com/database/news/aw159_cage/
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Bae Systems, February 16, 2015 - A £3.2m contract has been awarded by the UK’s Ministry of Defence to BAE Systems to equip the AW159 Wildcat helicopter fleet with a bespoke mission planning system.

The system will be used by Royal Navy and Army Air Corps pilots who fly the Wildcat.

Combined Arms Gateway Environment (CAGE) is a unique system developed by BAE Systems that can be used on multiple platforms to plan, brief, rehearse, execute and debrief a mission using the latest situational awareness and planning support information.
(http://www.helis.com/database/pics/news/2015/aw159_cage.jpg)
(http://www.helis.com/database/pics/news/2015/aw159_cage_2.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Menacho em Fevereiro 24, 2015, 09:06:16 pm
Reino Unido contrata la siguiente fase del programa naval Type 26 GCS, que prevé la entrega de 11 buques a la Royal Navy a partir de 2020

(http://www.defensa.com/images/stories/noticias/2015/2/rs21592_.jpg)

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(defensa.com) La empresa Defence Equipment & Support (DE&S), del Ministerio de Defensa británico, contrató el astillero local BAE Systems Marítime la implementación de la fase de demostración del programa de desarrollo de la fragata Tipo 26 GCS (Global Combat Ship o Buque de Combate Global). El contrato, de 859 millones de libras, contempla la financiación de la adquisición de equipos para la construcción de los buques y la ejecución de las instalaciones de ensayo.

El contrato asociado a la fase de demostración, que se iniciará el próximo 1 de abril, se produce  tras suscribir el de la fase de desarrollo técnico inicial y se presenta como el paso más importante en el programa, ya que servirá para apoyar el relativo a la fase de construcción, que comenzará en 2016. Los planes contemplan que sean construidos y entregados a la Royal Navy un total de 11 buques a partir de 2020, los cuales permanecerán en servicio activo hasta el año 2060, sustituyendo progresivamente a las fragatas Tipo 23 Clase de la clase Duke en la Royal Navy.

La fragata fue diseñada para realizar, entre otras misiones, operaciones conjuntas y multinacionales de combate, combate de la piratería marítima, misiones de apoyo humanitario y atención en emergencias. La versatilidad de la nave permite la operación de helicópteros, lanchas de asalto, aeronaves y submarinos operados remotamente y le permite llevar cargas en apoyo de situaciones de desastre.

El navío recibirá una pieza de artillería Mk 45 127 mm; sistemas de defensa próxima Raytheon Phalanx Block 1B; estaciones de armas controladas remotamente de MSI Defense Systems armados con piezas automáticas de 30mm; misiles MBDA UK Sea Ceptor lanzados desde células de lanzamiento verticales; tubos lanzadores de torpedos que potencialmente podrían albergar el torpedo Sting Ray Mod 1 de BAE Systems; afuestes de ametralladoras; radar de búsqueda BAE Systems Artisan 3D; sonar remolcado Thales Underwater Systems Sonar 2087; y sistemas de navegación, comunicaciones, control, electro-ópticos y de guerra electrónica. Tendrán un desplazamiento de alrededor de 6.000 toneladas, una eslora de 148,5 metros, manga de 20 metros, una velocidad superior a 26 nudos, autonomía de 60 días, autonomía máxima de 7.000 millas náuticas y será operado por una tripulación compuesta de 118 elementos.

Para implementar el programa, BAE Systems Maritime se basa en acuerdos de desarrollo de diseño con numerosos fabricantes internacionales,  como Babcock, DCNS, GE Energy Power Conversion, Imtech Marine, Raytheon, Tyco Fire & Integrated Solutions, Rolls Royce, MTU, David Brown Gear Systems o Rohde & Schwarz. (Victor M. S. Barreira)

http://www.defensa.com/index.php?option ... Itemid=186 (http://www.defensa.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=14772:reino-unido-contrata-la-siguiente-fase-del-programa-naval-type-26-gcs-que-preve-la-entrega-de-11-buques-a-la-royal-navy-a-partir-de-2020&catid=57:otan&Itemid=186)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Março 01, 2015, 03:44:39 pm
Britain's new aircraft carrier HMS Queen  Elizabeth sighted  in River Forth

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/02/27/262619FF00000578-2972278-image-a-34_1425051696053.jpg)

Aerial footage of HMS Queen Elizabeth afloat in the tidal  basin at Rosyth - video taken by HMS Gannet SAR flight.


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The ship is Britain's largest ever maritime vessel weighing 65,000 tonnes and measuring 918 feet from bow to stern. At almost 230 feet she stands as tall as Niagara Falls from the keel to  the masthead. Once completed she will have enough room to transport 36 F-35 Lightning fighter jets, though only three of the 48 ordered from the U.S. manufacturers have been so far delivered.

The ship is beginning  to take form today with some of its nine decks becoming visible. The cost of fitting out the ship has spiralled drastically since plans for its construction were revealed. In 2008 an initial contract for its completion was priced at £3,2 billion. Two years later the bill was put at £5,2 billion, with the most recent figures indicating it will cost more than £6 billion to complete.

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/02/27/26281D6E00000578-2972278-image-a-2_1425067238818.jpg),

HMS Queen Elizabeth in all her glory

Daily Mail (http://http)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Abril 05, 2015, 01:21:39 pm
RN nuclear submarine suffers £500,000 damage after 'hitting floating ice' while tracking Russian vessels

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CB0K6o-XIAEz6wi.jpg:large)

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The 5,300-ton HMS Talent limped back with a hugue dent and will be out of action for several months. Royal Navy top brass are investigating the incident. (...) The collision, which ripped a 6ft hole at the top of the conning tower , comes at a time of heightened tension between Britain and Russia in the airspace over the North Sea and beneath the waves.(...)

The Royal Navy's explanation that HMS struck ice was also used to explain damage to British submarines during the Cold War which was later found to have been caused by enemy vessels. In 1981 the crew of HMS Sceptre were ordered to say they had hit an iceberg after their collision with the Russian submarine K-211.

Source:  Mail on Sunday, 5/4/2015 (http://http)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Abril 06, 2015, 06:43:35 pm
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(http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/03179/MoDHMSWalney_3179406k.jpg)
Price: Open to bids - HMS Walney is a Sandown Class minesweeper, used to locate and identify the underwater explosive devices. The 450-tonne vessel with a crew of 34 entered service in 1993 and was decommissioned in 2010. The 170ft vessel is currently in Portsmouth docks, and isn't going anywhere fast, having had her engines and most of her fittings removed. Built with a glass-reinforced plastic hull so as not to set off magnetic mines, her scrap value is lower than a conventionally constructed ship. Buyers should contact the MoD's Disposal Services Authority at http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/news ... me=3179406 (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/industry/11374426/From-second-hand-boots-to-armoured-tanks-Britains-military-surplus-for-sale.html?frame=3179406)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Abril 07, 2015, 10:53:21 am
Citação de: "P44"
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(http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/03179/MoDHMSWalney_3179406k.jpg)
Price: Open to bids - HMS Walney is a Sandown Class minesweeper, used to locate and identify the underwater explosive devices. The 450-tonne vessel with a crew of 34 entered service in 1993 and was decommissioned in 2010. The 170ft vessel is currently in Portsmouth docks, and isn't going anywhere fast, having had her engines and most of her fittings removed. Built with a glass-reinforced plastic hull so as not to set off magnetic mines, her scrap value is lower than a conventionally constructed ship. Buyers should contact the MoD's Disposal Services Authority at http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/news ... me=3179406 (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/industry/11374426/From-second-hand-boots-to-armoured-tanks-Britains-military-surplus-for-sale.html?frame=3179406)
Se o MDN sabe...  :twisted:

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Abril 27, 2015, 10:13:32 am
A Classe Tiger : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiger-class_cruiser
(http://i401.photobucket.com/albums/pp98/D-Mitch_photos/1591522.jpg)
(http://www.godfreydykes.info/tiger%20as%20was.jpg?0230AE0E)
(http://www.hazegray.org/navhist/rn/cruisers/tiger/tiger4.jpg)
(http://www.candoo.com/ulsternorrie/norries_pages/norriesships/blakeps.jpg)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Maio 11, 2015, 07:52:35 pm
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Don’t tell Moscow: Five of Britain's six nuclear subs held up in the repair shed

BRITAIN has just one nuclear-powered submarine on active patrol, after defects and routine repairs left the remainder of the fleet in port.

By Marco Giannangeli
PUBLISHED: 00:01, Sun, May 3, 2015

(http://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/1/590x/submarine-574556.jpg)
The Talent returns to port on board a damaged sub

Of the Royal Navy’s six hunter-killer and attack boats in service, four are in dock while a fifth has been beset by a series of problems.

The capability gap is revealed just days after Finland had to fire depth charges after reports a Russian submarine had entered its waters. Only the Astute is on active operation.

The first of the new Astute-class submarines, she has been sent back to sea after a short break following her maiden voyage last year.

Her sister ship, the Ambush, has yet to deploy on its first mission following the discovery of 57 “operational defects”. She is being used as a training vessel while these are being resolved.

The Navy should have six new Astute-class attack boats in service.

Costing £1billion each, they will set new standards for weapons load and stealth, carrying Spearfish and Tomahawk missiles and able to detect a boat leaving New York from Devonport, 3,000 nautical miles away.
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/574556 ... ence-fleet (http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/574556/Britain-only-one-nuclear-submarine-active-patrol-defects-defence-fleet)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Maio 22, 2015, 09:07:09 pm
Uma excelente noticia para a Royal Navy.  :wink:
http://www.helis.com/database/news/merlin_aew
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UK Ministry of Defence, May 22, 2015 - The MOD and Lockheed Martin UK, as the prime contractor for Crowsnest, have selected Thales as the chosen bidder to provide the radar and mission system at the heart of the Crowsnest capability.

The Crowsnest project will act as the Royal Navy’s eyes and ears for its next generation carriers, giving long range air, maritime and land detection, as well as the capability to track potential threats. Crowsnest will also be able to support wider fleet and land operations, replacing the Sea King helicopter’s Airborne Surveillance and Control capability that has been deployed on regular operations since 1982.

Lockheed Martin UK will now conclude the project’s £27 million assessment phase, expected in 2016, supported by Thales and AgustaWestland, the manufacturer of the Merlin helicopter onto which the system will be able to be fitted.

Once a decision has been taken to proceed into the manufacture phase, it is expected that around 300 jobs will be sustained across these companies in Crawley, Havant and Yeovil.

The upgraded Merlin Mk2 helicopters are the world’s most advanced maritime helicopter, which already provide various functions including Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) and humanitarian duties.

Crowsnest is part of the UK’s future aircraft carrier capability, which will deliver two Queen Elizabeth Class Aircraft Carriers and fifth generation Lightning II fast jets to operate from them across the world.

Air Vice-Marshal Julian Young, Director Helicopters at the MOD’s Defence Equipment and Support organisation, said:

- Crowsnest will form an integral part of future carrier operations and act as the Royal Navy’s eyes and ears, providing protection through early warning and surveillance.
(http://www.flightglobal.com/assets/getasset.aspx?itemid=57424)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: FRONTEIRO em Maio 24, 2015, 03:34:49 pm
A Não Perder!
http://sicnoticias.sapo.pt/programas/so ... -Britanica (http://sicnoticias.sapo.pt/programas/sociedadedasnacoes/2015-05-22-O-futuro-da-Marinha-Real-Britanica)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Junho 19, 2015, 04:57:02 pm
Babcock Started HMS Albion LPD Refit and Upgrade at Devonport Royal Dockyard

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The two year maintenance period will include a number of key upgrades which will greatly enhance the ship’s capability to perform as a key asset to the Royal Navy in future challenging and demanding operational situations. Over 100 alterations and additions will be completed as part of the upkeep.

Additionally a major maintenance programme will include the overhaul of all engines and a complete strip-down and extensive maintenance work on all systems. The upkeep period will see more than 20,000m2 (equivalent to three football pitches) of tank blasting and preservation undertaken, over 40km of new electrical cables installed, and in excess of 1.5km of new pipework.

The programme is being delivered under the Surface Ship Support Alliance (between the MoD, Babcock and BAE Systems) Class Output Management (COM) approach, under which Babcock leads the support of all amphibious vessels.

HMS Albion docked down at Devonport in October 2014, prior to the start of the upkeep period, as part of a different approach to regeneration, to refine and de-risk the refit in advance and ensure that the work is incorporated into the specification from the start, thereby limiting growth in the package. Planning for this upkeep period has drawn substantially on experience from previous amphibious ship upkeeps, notably the recent major upkeep period on HMS Ocean .

Babcock Amphibious COM Team Leader Dai Dumbleton commented: “There is no doubt that the Albion upkeep period is a unique project which will present some significant issues, with equipment and sub-systems that will be in an unknown condition as well as challenges around obsolescence and replacement spares. Babcock is ready and fully dedicated to delivering this project successfully at optimum value to the customer.”

HMS Albion is scheduled to leave Babcock’s Devonport Royal Dockyard to start sea trials in early 2017. When she returns to the fleet, following sea trials, HMS Albion will replace sister ship HMS Bulwark as one of the Royal Navy’s key capital ships.

http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2804

(http://www.navyrecognition.com/images/stories/news/2015/june/Babcock_HMS_Albion_Refit_Upgrade.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Junho 21, 2015, 07:13:04 pm
HMS Illustrious awaits her fate in Portsmouth naval base (June 2015). Photo by Clive G. Herbert.

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CH9zHpBVEAAqUvT.jpg:large)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Julho 08, 2015, 12:36:05 pm
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CJYnYDDWEAA2aQS.jpg:large)
This graphic helps show the true scale of the Queen Elizabeth class supercarrier.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Julho 11, 2015, 10:03:20 am
http://www.janes.com/article/52862/uk-completes-transition-of-merlin-from-raf-to-rn
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The United Kingdom officially completed the transfer of the AgustaWestland AW101 Merlin HC.3/3A troop transport helicopter from the Royal Air Force (RAF) to the Royal Navy (RN) during a ceremony held on 9 July.

The ceremony, which took place at the type's former home station of RAF Benson, saw the last of the 25 helicopters transition from the RAF's Merlin Force over to the RN's Commando Helicopter Force (CHF).

During the event, 28 (Army Cooperation) Squadron, which operated the platform for the air force, was re-rolled as the new Boeing Chinook and Westland Puma operational conversion unit at RAF Benson under the designation 28 (Reserve) Squadron, while the RN stood up 845 Naval Air Squadron (NAS) as the service's second Merlin unit, to be located at Royal Naval Air Station (RNAS) Yeovilton alongside the already constituted 846 NAS.

The decision to transfer the Merlins from RAF to RN control was one of the initiatives announced during the Strategic Defence & Security Review (SDSR) in 2010. The transition features a GBP445 million (USD685 million) Merlin Life Sustainment Programme (MLSP) that includes converting the current HC.3/3As into the HC.4/4A configuration. Major features of this programme comprise the fitting of folding main-rotor blades and tail boom for shipborne operations, as well as a new 'glass' cockpit for commonality with the RN's Merlin HMA.2 and AW159 Lynx Wildcat.

While the Merlin will replace the Westland Commando (Sea King) HC.4 platforms that are being retired from RN service in March 2016, they themselves will be replaced in RAF service by 14 new Chinook HC.6 helicopters.
(http://www.janes.com/images/assets/862/52862/1457231_-_main.jpg)

Saaudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Agosto 22, 2015, 08:12:26 pm

Mais um Astute para a RN.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Agosto 31, 2015, 02:30:05 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Setembro 08, 2015, 12:39:11 pm

Footage released by BAE Systems showing with accelerated rythm the construction of the "Prince of Wales" aircraft carrier.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 11, 2015, 08:26:52 pm
Citação de: "olisipo"

Footage released by BAE Systems showing with accelerated rythm the construction of the "Prince of Wales" aircraft carrier.

Simplesmente espectacular, vai ser mesmo um enorme Navio !!!
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 11, 2015, 08:30:42 pm
Citação de: "Lusitano89"

Muito bom, será um excelente substituto das nossas Fragatas,  :lol:  :lol:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Setembro 15, 2015, 11:50:11 am
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Setembro 30, 2015, 02:51:38 pm
(https://scontent-mad1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xal1/v/t1.0-9/12065577_1675664959311666_2806642344302606918_n.jpg?oh=0615adf697b72c098f83da51a7f1a1ea&oe=56955FB8)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Outubro 10, 2015, 11:05:41 am
Navio da RN construído na Coreia do Sul.

Not a valid youtube URL
(http://www.kjclub.com/UploadFile/exc_board_67/2015/10/09/20151008134529.jpg)
(http://www.kjclub.com/UploadFile/exc_board_67/2015/10/09/20151008134618.jpg)
(http://www.kjclub.com/UploadFile/exc_board_67/2015/10/09/20151008134618_2.jpg)
(http://www.kjclub.com/UploadFile/exc_board_67/2015/10/09/20151008134525_1.jpg)
(http://www.kjclub.com/UploadFile/exc_board_67/2015/10/09/20151008134525_3.jpg)
(http://www.kjclub.com/UploadFile/exc_board_67/2015/10/09/20151008134525_4.jpg)


comprimento: 200.9m

Largura: 28.6m

altura: 10m

deslocamento: 37.000t

tripulação : 63 militares 46 passageiros

armamento : 2 x Mk.15 Phalanx CIWS
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: ICE 1A+ em Outubro 10, 2015, 06:33:18 pm
Sao navios tanque certo? Podimos construir em Portugal!! que falta fazia um a nossa marinha.  tide class tankers a noruega tambem vai comprar um! mas com 26 mil tons custam cerca de 120 milhoes.......             Royal Navy MARS tankers
Designers have completed plan for the British Royal Fleet Auxiliary's (RFA) new fleet of Tide-class military afloat reach and sustainability (MARS) tankers, which will serve at least 25 years.

The four Tide-class MARS tankers, comprising Tidespring, Tiderace, Tidesurge and Tideforce, will enter service with the Royal Navy to boost its capabilities by delivering fuel, water, spare parts and other supplies.

In cooperation with the Royal Navy and RFA, BMT Defence Services has completed design for the four next-generation tankers with hundreds of design drawings and plans.

The company has also developed and tested scale models in the gigantic water tank at Haslar in Gosport, where Tidespring vessel also successfully refuelled HMS Queen Elizabeth in various sea conditions.

"A Range Rover's fuel tank connected to all four 7in hoses on the starboard size of a Tide tanker would be full in 0.12 seconds."
The future tanker project naval architect Mark Lewis said: "A Range Rover's fuel tank connected to all four 7in hoses on the starboard size of a Tide tanker would be full in 0.12 seconds."

Following completion of a £450m quartet design of the 37,000t ships, Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) will draw up detailed plans to begin construction on the ships next year at Okpo-dong in south-east South Korea.

The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) awarded a contract to DSME in 2012 for the construction of four MARS tankers to replace the existing RFA's single hulled tankers, with the first ship of the class due to be delivered in October 2015, with the final vessel due in April 2017.

The new double-hulled tankers will be designed to meet International Maritime Organization pollution (MARPOL) regulations, an International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships 1973 and the protocol of 1978, as well as European Commission environmental regulations.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Outubro 11, 2015, 05:07:16 pm
Os bifes que tanto gostam de estourar dinheiro para manter uma aparência de industria militar devem ter achado a proposta de construção na Coreia extremamente vantajosa, caso contrário os navios seriam, certamente, construídos no Reino Unido. Certamente, que custariam muito mais de 150 milhões de euros a unidade. Só como referência, o Cantábria, construído há sete anos, custou cerca de 240 milhões de euros e o Bonn, construído há quatro anos, custou cerca de 330 milhões de euros.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: ICE 1A+ em Outubro 11, 2015, 11:24:38 pm
Citação de: "NVF"
Os bifes que tanto gostam de estourar dinheiro para manter uma aparência de industria militar devem ter achado a proposta de construção na Coreia extremamente vantajosa, caso contrário os navios seriam, certamente, construídos no Reino Unido. Certamente, que custariam muito mais de 150 milhões de euros a unidade. Só como referência, o Cantábria, construído há sete anos, custou cerca de 240 milhões de euros e o Bonn, construído há quatro anos, custou cerca de 330 milhões de euros.
E impossivel os estaleiros europeus concorrerem com  os asiaticos, que constroem duas a 3 vezes mais barato. A Noruega tambem vai comprar um navio desses ao mesmo estaleiro mas na versao de  27 mil tons.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Outubro 12, 2015, 10:26:48 am
: (http://www.janes.com/images/assets/140/55140/1531421_-_main.jpg)

Construction begins on last of three River-class Bath 2 OPVs for the Royal Navy

http://www.janes.com/article/55140/cons ... royal-navy (http://www.janes.com/article/55140/construction-begins-on-last-of-three-river-class-bath-2-opvs-for-the-royal-navy)

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(...) The first steel for what will become HMS Trent was cut at BAE Systems Govan Shipyard on 7 October, according to the UK Ministry of Defence. The first and second vessels, Forth and Medway are scheduled to be delivered in 2017, followed by  Trent in 2018.
 
 The vessels are being purchased, at a cost of £348 million, in order to maintain UK shipbuilding activity - and are expected to lead to the early decommissioning of the three original River-class vessels.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 12, 2015, 01:56:20 pm
Citação de: "olisipo"
: (http://www.janes.com/images/assets/140/55140/1531421_-_main.jpg)

Construction begins on last of three River-class Bath 2 OPVs for the Royal Navy

http://www.janes.com/article/55140/cons ... royal-navy (http://www.janes.com/article/55140/construction-begins-on-last-of-three-river-class-bath-2-opvs-for-the-royal-navy)

Citar
(...) The first steel for what will become HMS Trent was cut at BAE Systems Govan Shipyard on 7 October, according to the UK Ministry of Defence. The first and second vessels, Forth and Medway are scheduled to be delivered in 2017, followed by  Trent in 2018.
 
 The vessels are being purchased, at a cost of £348 million, in order to maintain UK shipbuilding activity - and are expected to lead to the early decommissioning of the three original River-class vessels.

Pegando nas últimas palavras, neste fórum, do Camarada NVF, então temos três NPO's por £ 348 milhões o equivalente a € 487 milhões, quantia suficiente para nós adquirirmos NOVE ou DEZ Navios da classe Viana do castelo, e já com o acréscimo dos 23% de IVA !!
Mas mais grave os três navios Britânicos da classe River batch 2, nem hangar tem, e também só estão armados com uma peça de 30mm !!!! :lol:  :lol:  :wink:
Só queria que por cá os dois próximos NPO's possuíssem Hangar o que seria uma vantagem operacional muito grande para esta classe de Navios e os poderia catapultar para o mercado internacional, pois penso que o custo por unidade ficaria pelos cerca de € 60 milhões, já com iva, bem abaixo dos £ 116 milhões por unidade de River Class Batch 2 !
Pensem só no que nós ganharíamos se tivéssemos proposto o Modelo Viana do Castelo Serie II, com Hangar, a concurso à RN, pois o Navio possui dimensões para que o hangar telescópico seja uma realidade, e tivéssemos ganho, e nos milhões que o Governo Britânico pouparia ???

Estarei correcto quando vejo estas oportunidades perdidas ou estarei errado ??

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Outubro 12, 2015, 08:40:31 pm
Oh camarada Tenente, acho que aqui a questão a colocar seria: quanto custariam os nossos NPO se fossem construídos na Coreia?  :twisted:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 12, 2015, 08:46:06 pm
Citação de: "NVF"
Oh camarada Tenente, acho que aqui a questão a colocar seria: quanto custariam os nossos NPO se fossem construídos na Coreia?  :twisted:

Mas eu já nem vou por aí, deixa-me sonhar, o sonho ainda não paga impostos, ainda........seriam com certeza bem mais baratos que os feitos em VdC mas a diferença de um River class batch 2 para um NPO Viana do Castelo, mesmo já alterado e com Hangar, construído nos West Sea, seria abismal e de certeza que a concorrermos com a BAE em pé de igualdade, com um produto final semelhante, deslocamento/guarnição/velocidade/Armamento idênticos, de certeza que em função do preço final, ganharíamos !!

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 17, 2015, 04:15:00 pm
Nuclear Sub Project Poses UK's Biggest Financial Challenge


(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/DFN-UK-successor-sub_zpsyh5phxaw.jpg) (http://http)

(Photo: BAE Systems Concept)

LONDON — Britain’s nuclear submarine effort is a monster-sized undertaking that keeps the Ministry of Defence’s top civil servant awake at night, the official admitted to the Parliamentary Public Accounts Committee Wednesday.

Jon Thompson, the permanent undersecretary at the MoD and the man responsible for keeping defense spending in check, told lawmakers that renewing Britain’s nuclear deterrent was the biggest project the ministry was ever going to tackle.

“The project I worry about the most in relation to future financial risk is the nuclear enterprise. It’s a significant element of the overall equipment plan ... it most keeps me awake at night,” he told the committee during a session examining the MoD’s progress in improving financial management.

The defense nuclear enterprise covers the equipment, infrastructure and people required to deliver the UK deterrent and nuclear powered submarines, including the new Astute-class hunter killer boats and Trident missile boats.

The third of an expected seven Astute-class nuclear submarine fleet recently left the BAE Systems' yard at Barrow-In-Furness for sea trials.

Thompson, one of the principle architects behind the MoD’s improved control of its budgets in the last few years, said if the government goes ahead with plans to build a new generation of nuclear missile submarines, annual costs of nuclear-related work will exceed £5 billion (US $7.7 billion) a year compared with today’s figure of more than £3.5 billion.

Britain’s defense procurement and support spending this year is set at nearly £13 billion. Peak spending on the Successor nuclear deterrent program is expected to get underway next year and run until the late 2020s, consuming a major part of the equipment budget.

“It’s the single biggest future financial risk we face. The project is a monster. It’s an incredibly complicated area to estimate future costs but we will make them,” he said.

The Conservative government has not given an up-to-date estimate of the program costs. Previously, it has said the submarines would cost between £11 billion and £14 billion at 2006 prices and estimated an overall cost of up to £20 billion when infrastructure and other costs are wrapped in.

In its 10-year defense equipment plan of 2014-2024, the MoD said it planned to spend around £40 billion on submarine procurement and support.

Thompson said an updated equipment spending plan covering the decade up to 2025 is likely to be published in the next couple of weeks.

The Conservative government is expected to seek parliamentary approval next year to start building four Trident missile-carrying Successor submarines to replace the same number of Vanguard-class boats tasked with providing Britain’s nuclear deterrence.

The Labour Party, the main opposition party, has previously been committed to a credible nuclear deterrent, but the recent election of the left-winger Jeremy Corbyn as the party leader has thrown that policy into confusion.

Even so, the Conservatives would expect to secure approval for the program as a number of Labour Party members of Parliament would likely vote with the government or abstain.

BAE Systems and its industrial partners, Babcock International and Rolls-Royce, have been working on a five-year, £3.3 billion assessment phase ahead of an expectation of starting to cut metal on the first boat next year.

Functional engineering on the Successor is more or less complete and BAE is now into the spatial engineering phase ahead of the expected development and production go ahead in 2016.

The first of the new class of submarines is expected to enter service in 2028. Some long lead items are already being funded and infrastructure projects undertaken to allow construction and operation of the boats.

Aside from the Trident missile, Britain is collaborating with the US on a common missile compartment and associated navigation, fire control and launch systems.

General Dynamics Electric Boat already has a contract for the first 12 missile tubes destined for the Successor program.

http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?19-Ro ... ers/page71 (http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?19-Royal-Navy-matters/page71)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 17, 2015, 04:23:40 pm
Work Begins On Third Royal Navy Patrol Vessel

(Source: UK Ministry of Defence; issued Oct 07, 2015)

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/RN%20Offshore%20patrol%20vessel_1_zpscdmzr9u2.jpg) (http://http)

 Construction of the final Royal Navy Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) took an important step forward today, as the Minister of State for Defence Procurement started a computer-guided laser to cut the first piece of hull.

 During a visit to BAE Systems’ Govan yard in Glasgow, Defence Minister Philip Dunne saw progress on the build of the first and second OPVs and met members of the workforce on a programme that has protected more than 800 Scottish jobs.

 HMS Trent is the third of three Offshore Patrol Vessels which will begin joining the fleet in 2017. Alongside HMS Forth and HMS Medway, HMS Trent will go on to take part in counter terrorism, combating piracy, halting smuggling and defending UK waters.

 The vessels are being built at BAE Systems’ shipyards on the Clyde as part of a £348 million contract.

 Defence Minister, Philip Dunne, said:

 "These new ships will provide an important capability to the Royal Navy and our Armed Forces‎. They will perform vital tasks in defending the nation's interests around the world.

“This investment forms part of over £160 billion in our 10 year Equipment Plan which is funded out of the newly protected Defence budget.

“Manufacture of these ships sustains over 800 quality engineering jobs here in Scotland, ensuring that the shipyards on the Clyde continue to sit at the heart of a thriving naval shipbuilding capability. They are paving the way for work to begin on our new T26 frigates next year.”

This third generation of River-class patrol ship is expected to displace approximately 1,800 tonnes, be about 90m long and 13m wide and have a range of over 5,000 nautical miles.

 Director Ships Support at the MOD’s Defence, Equipment and Support organisation, Neal Lawson, said:

“HMS Trent, along with HMS Forth and HMS Medway, will provide the Royal Navy with the flexibility to operate in a wide variety of roles in UK waters and overseas. More capable than the existing River class, they will have a flight deck to take the latest Merlin helicopters, fire-fighting equipment, and increased storage capacity and accommodation.

“But the importance of this programme is not only that the OPVs will have the latest technology in new ships, but also that the build programme acts as a stepping stone to work on our future multi-mission warship, the Type 26 Global Combat Ship.”

Construction of the first two ships, HMS Forth and HMS Medway, is already well underway.

http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?638-RAN-News/page122 (http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?638-RAN-News/page122)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 20, 2015, 08:41:51 am
Royal Navy receives first updated Merlin HC3

19 October, 2015 BY: Craig Hoyle London

The Royal Navy has taken delivery of its first AgustaWestland AW101 Merlin HC3 helicopter with an initial package of upgrades to support maritime operations.

Modified under the Ministry of Defence’s 25-aircraft Merlin Life-Sustainment Programme, the rotorcraft is one of seven being adapted during a first-phase activity. This will cover for the retirement of the Commando Helicopter Force’s last Westland Sea King HC4s in March 2016 and the updated aircraft are due to reach initial operating capability status “in spring 2016”, AgustaWestland says.

Updates include a folding main rotor head and a revised main undercarriage, which, along with new deck lashing rings, will allow for operations from naval vessels, plus communication system updates.


(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/RN%20Modernised%20EH101%20Merlin_zpsiobdf34e.jpg) (http://http)

AgustaWestland

The lead aircraft entered modification in October 2014 and was flown in updated guise for the first time on 8 April. Flight trials concluded in August, says AgustaWestland, which is conducting the update programme at its Yeovil site in Somerset.

Flightglobal’s Fleets Analyzer database shows Merlin ZJ126 as having been built in 2001 for the UK Royal Air Force.

“The interim-standard of the life-sustainment programme sees fast-time conversion of the aircraft to operate in its new littoral manoeuvre role,” says Air Vice-Marshal Julian Young, director helicopters at the MoD’s Defence Equipment and Support organisation.

A second programme phase will update all 25 aircraft to the enhanced HC4/4+ standard, for reintroduction between 2017 and 2020. This activity will include updating the rotorcraft’s cockpit to a similar standard as that installed in the RN’s Merlin HM2 multimission helicopter fleet, and fitting an automatic main rotor blade folding and tail fold systems. The first aircraft to enter this process arrived in Yeovil in August 2015.

http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?19-Ro ... ers/page71 (http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?19-Royal-Navy-matters/page71)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 26, 2015, 05:37:45 pm
ora aqui vai a união de duas partes do HMS Prince of Wales:

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Novembro 23, 2015, 01:44:27 pm
(http://www.military-today.com/navy/astute_class_l1.jpg)

£1.3 billion contract awarded for fifth Astute-class nuclear attack submarine

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/13bn-contract-awarded-for-latest-attack-submarine
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Novembro 26, 2015, 07:25:40 pm
Maritime Security 
SDSR gives Royal Navy OPV boost
23rd November 2015 - 17:02 by Richard Thomas in London

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/56392892_zpstvoovala.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/56392892_zpstvoovala.jpg.html)

The UK will purchase a further two offshore patrol vessels for the Royal Navy (RN), it has been announced as part of the Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) on 23 November.
Three Batch 2 River-class OPVs (pictured above) are currently under construction for the Royal Navy by BAE Systems, while three Batch 1 vessels are in service, in addition to the Batch 1 South Atlantic patrol vessel HMS Clyde. The first of the Batch 2 vessels will enter service with the RN in 2017, and feature a redesigned flight deck to operate Merlin helicopters, and increased storage and accommodation facilities.
The Batch 2 design is simillar to the Amazonas-class purchased by Brazil.
According to the report, up to six patrol vessels will be accommodated in a Joint Force 2025. Although initially it was unknown whether they would replace their older counterparts the UK Ministry of Defence has subsequently stated they would do so. The first Batch 2 vessel entered service with the RN in 2003.
The new patrol vessels will ‘increase the RN's ability to defend UK interest at home and abroad’, according to the SDSR report, leading to the potential for further overseas OPV deployments in future. The Batch 1 River-class OPV HMS Severn deployed to the Caribbean on 2014.
Steel on the first UK Batch 2 ship was cut in October 2014 and the first of class is expected to enter service in 2017. The Batch 2 variants are longer at 90.5m and faster than most River-class ships at 24kt.
BAE Systems is also promoting the Batch 2 River-class to the Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency.
Meanwhile the UK will design and build a new class of lighter, flexible general-purpose frigates in a bid to increase the total number of frigates and destroyers in Royal Navy. The new frigate will be designed with a view to ‘increased export potential’ according to the report.
Three new logistics vessels will also be purchased for fleet support and likely to be operated by the RFA along the Wave-class tankers under construction.
The SDSR report goes on to say that the UK government will publish a national shipbuilding strategy in 2016, of which the acquisition of the Type 26 Global Combat Ship will ‘form a central part of the strategy’.
As part of the plan, the two additional OPV’s would provide ‘continuity of shipbuilding work and additional capability for the Royal Navy in the short term’.

https://www.shephardmedia.com/news/imps-news/two-new-opvs-royal-navy/

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Novembro 28, 2015, 07:33:17 pm


Royal Navy's Helicopter Assault Carrier "Ocean" To Be Decommissioned

http://www.defensenews.com/story/defense-news/2015/11/27/royal-navys-helicopter-assault-carrier-ocean-decommissioned/76443520
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Novembro 29, 2015, 12:11:17 pm
No, five frigates have not been cancelled

POSTED BY: GEORGE ALLISONNOVEMBER 23, 2015


(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/type26baevid21-777x437_zpszg0fcw0q.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/type26baevid21-777x437_zpszg0fcw0q.jpg.html)

Despite alarming headlines, five frigates have not been cancelled. Postponing the order of five lighter frigates until the next SDSR frees up money for other projects.
The initial Type 26 frigate order has been cut back from 13 to 8 in order to fund more of the immediate spending outlined in todays SDSR, a move that has been widely expected since 2013. Prime Minister David Cameron has announced that we will be buying 8 ASW frigates, 5 general purpose frigates and 2 more patrol vessels.
The original plan for Type 26 was 8 anti-submarine warfare variants and 5 general purpose variants. This is still the case.
Many media outlets such as the Daily Record are claiming that only the 8 ship ASW variant of the vessel will be built, this does not appear to be the case, it is understood that the 5 General Purpose variants will still be going ahead.
Minister of State for Defence Procurement Philip Dunne said in December 2013:
“In the less than half a minute remaining to me, I will unfortunately not be able to address many of the questions that have been asked, but I would like to deal with numbers and commissioning. My hon. Friend the Member for New Forest East (Dr Lewis) gave me due notice of his questions. We intend to place an order towards the end of next year, once the design is mature, which we expect to be for eight vessels initially.”
Work on the first of the frigates doesn’t start until the end of the decade, putting money towards an order this far in advance for ships not due to be complete until well after 2025 despite needing the money to fund other commitments made today would be an unwise decision.
The Type 26 frigate represents the future backbone of the Royal Navy and a massive leap forward in terms of flexibility of surface vessels enjoyed by the service. It will replace the 13 Type 23 frigates of the Royal Navy and export orders are being sought after by BAE. The programme has been underway since 1998, initially under the name “Future Surface Combatant”. The programme was brought forward in the 2008 budget at the expense of Type 45 destroyers 7 and 8.
The design has now passed Main Gate approval and a detailed design is under way and it is expected that the Type 26 will “enter service as soon as possible after 2020″, each vessel is expected to cost between £250-£350m.

The original working model for the ship put the length at 141 metres long and gave a displacement close to 7,000 tonnes. In late 2010 it was reported that the specifications had been reduced in order to bring down the cost from £500m to £250-350m per ship. By 2011 new specification details began to emerge of a 5,400 tonne ship emphasising flexibility and modularity. The new design is believed to be 149m long, a top speed of more than 26 knots and accommodation for up to 200 people. It is expected to have 60 days endurance and have a range of 7,000 miles at 15 knots.
The Type 26 will be an adaptable, powerful and flexible frigate with a wide array of cutting edge sensors and weapons designed to help it effectively and efficiently meet the evolving mission requirements inherent to modern warfare.


Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Dezembro 22, 2015, 12:31:06 am


Since December 31, the Royal Navy and Maritime Search and Rescue Service (SAR) will be substituted by a civilian company. Thus, 70 years of military SAR come to an end.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/cars/comment/goodbye-raf-search-and-rescue/

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-21934077
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Fevereiro 02, 2016, 05:17:07 pm


                                      Type 45 destroyers: UK's £1 billion face engine refit

The Royal Navy most modern warships are to be fitted with new engines because they keep breaking down

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-35432341
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Fevereiro 08, 2016, 12:01:05 pm

Putting the Type 45 propulsion problems in perspective

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/putting-the-type-45-propulsion-problems-in-perspective
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Fevereiro 10, 2016, 06:56:17 pm
(http://www.shipspotting.com/photos/middle/8/9/5/178598.jpg) 

HMS "Iron Duke" Type-23 frigate, one of the five British ships to be deployed in the Baltic

UK to send five ships to Baltic as part of NATO buildup against Russia

Britain will also contribute troops to a new  6,000-strong force intended as a deterrent

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/feb/10/uk-to-contribute-five-extra-ships-to-baltic-as-nato-boosts-presence
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Fevereiro 25, 2016, 04:54:24 pm


HMS Albion, the assault ship mothballed during five years, will return to duty in 2017

http://forces.tv/77492859
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Março 04, 2016, 12:12:08 pm
(http://www.janes.com/images/assets/501/58501/1645560_-_main.jpg)

UK Royal Marines unit ditches the SA80 for Colt C8

http://www.janes.com/article/58501/uk-royal-marines-unit-ditches-the-sa80-for-colt-c8

A high profile UK Royal Marine unit has been equipped with the Colt Canada C8 carbine to enhance its ability to protect the Royal Navy's nuclear deterrent submarine base and nuclear weapons convoys.

 The move makes the unit the first British non-special unit to completely drop the bullpup L85A2 (SA80) rifle used by the rest of the regular forces. (...)

Details of the re-equipment effort were revealed by the commander of 43 Commando Fleet Protection Group Royal Marines  (...) which have the task of protecting UK nuclear weapons at HM Naval Base Clyde at Faslane in Scotland or when they are moved around the UK (...)

The logic behind the move was because the L119 has "reduced ricochet, limited collateral damage features" (...)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Março 08, 2016, 02:16:18 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Março 10, 2016, 03:57:10 pm


UK announces  £642m investment for Successor submarine programme

http://www.naval-technology.com/news/newsuk-government-announces-642m-investment-for-successor-submarine-programme-4829128
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Março 21, 2016, 02:37:24 pm
Afinal sucata com ele...  >:(
http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/politics/7012282/HMS-Illustrious-to-be-sold-for-scrap.html (http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/politics/7012282/HMS-Illustrious-to-be-sold-for-scrap.html)
Citar
THE Navy’s former flagship HMS Illustrious is set to be sold for scrap.

The legendary aircraft carrier, dubbed Lusty, will be turned into pots, pans and razors.

The MoD had promised the last Invincible class carrier would be preserved.

But no workable charity or commercial offer came in and scrapping her is now inevitable, defence sources admitted.

The news will upset thousands of people who hoped Lusty could be saved as a heritage site.

She is currently rusting in Portsmouth harbour.
(http://img.thesun.co.uk/aidemitlum/archive/02750/02_18215035_6e742f_2750033a.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Abril 04, 2016, 06:26:24 pm
(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Why-the-Royal-Navy-has-just-been-cut-by-another-2-ships-1014x487.jpg)

HMS Dauntless

(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/HMS-Lancaster-1.jpg)

HMS Lancaster

Why the Royal Navy has just been cut by another 2 ships

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/why-the-royal-navy-has-just-been-cut-by-another-2-ships/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Maio 20, 2016, 05:20:12 pm
Os tais helicópteros que não serviram para o Exército Português... E continua a moda do outsourcing nas ilhas britânicas.

UK Royal Navy pilots to train on H135 and H145 helos from 2018

http://www.janes.com/article/60510/uk-royal-navy-pilots-to-train-on-h135-and-h145-helos-from-2018 (http://www.janes.com/article/60510/uk-royal-navy-pilots-to-train-on-h135-and-h145-helos-from-2018)

Citar
UK Royal Navy (RN) rotary-winged pilots are to be trained on Airbus Helicopters H135 and H145 twin-engined platforms from 2018, under a new GBP1.1 billion (USD1.5 billion) contract announced by the Ministry of Defence (MoD) on 20 May.

Under the contract awarded to Ascent Flight Training, which provides pilot training on behalf of the MoD under the UK Military Flight Training System (UKMFTS) programme, Airbus Helicopters will provide 29 H135 and three H145 platforms out to 2033. Airbus Helicopters' share of the new UKMFTS Rotary-Wing (RW) contract is given as GBP500 million.

UKMFTS RW covers rotary-winged training across all three of the UK's armed services, and will involve the manufacture and delivery of aircraft, the provision of instructors, the building of infrastructure, and the training of initial RN, Royal Air Force (RAF), and British Army crews and maintenance personnel.

The RN's Fleet Air Arm (FAA) currently has about 500 pilots (including about 50 from the Royal Marines), and now fields only rotorcraft with the retirement of the BAE Systems Harrier combat aircraft in 2010. The Lockheed Martin F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) is not due to enter operational service until 2018 (and will not see carrier service until 2021).

Naval helicopter crews are presently trained alongside those from both the RAF and Army Air Corps (AAC) aboard single-engined Airbus Helicopters H125 (formerly AS/EC350) Squirrel and twin-engined Bell 412EP platforms at RAF Shawbury in Shropshire, AAC Middle Wallop in Hampshire, and RAF Valley on the Isle of Anglesey. After training, RN crews are then streamed onto their operational type of either the AgustaWestland Lynx/Lynx Wildcat, Westland Sea King, or AgustaWestland AW101 Merlin. By the time that the new UKMFTS RW students begin graduating, the older Lynx HMA8 will be retired and the phasing out of the Sea King Airborne Surveillance and Control (ASaC) 7 platform will be well under way, if not already complete.

(http://www.janes.com/images/assets/510/60510/1679521_-_main.jpg)
A computer-generated impression of the Airbus Helicopters H145 in its UK military training livery. UK Royal Navy pilots will join those from the Royal Air Force and British Army in being trained on both the H135 and H145 from 2018 through to 2033, under a new GBP1.1 billion contract awarded on 20 May. Source: Airbus Helicopters
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Maio 20, 2016, 07:39:42 pm
Os tais helicópteros que não serviram para o Exército Português... E continua a moda do outsourcing nas ilhas britânicas.

UK Royal Navy pilots to train on H135 and H145 helos from 2018

http://www.janes.com/article/60510/uk-royal-navy-pilots-to-train-on-h135-and-h145-helos-from-2018 (http://www.janes.com/article/60510/uk-royal-navy-pilots-to-train-on-h135-and-h145-helos-from-2018)

Citar
UK Royal Navy (RN) rotary-winged pilots are to be trained on Airbus Helicopters H135 and H145 twin-engined platforms from 2018, under a new GBP1.1 billion (USD1.5 billion) contract announced by the Ministry of Defence (MoD) on 20 May.

Under the contract awarded to Ascent Flight Training, which provides pilot training on behalf of the MoD under the UK Military Flight Training System (UKMFTS) programme, Airbus Helicopters will provide 29 H135 and three H145 platforms out to 2033. Airbus Helicopters' share of the new UKMFTS Rotary-Wing (RW) contract is given as GBP500 million.

UKMFTS RW covers rotary-winged training across all three of the UK's armed services, and will involve the manufacture and delivery of aircraft, the provision of instructors, the building of infrastructure, and the training of initial RN, Royal Air Force (RAF), and British Army crews and maintenance personnel.

The RN's Fleet Air Arm (FAA) currently has about 500 pilots (including about 50 from the Royal Marines), and now fields only rotorcraft with the retirement of the BAE Systems Harrier combat aircraft in 2010. The Lockheed Martin F-35B Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) is not due to enter operational service until 2018 (and will not see carrier service until 2021).

Naval helicopter crews are presently trained alongside those from both the RAF and Army Air Corps (AAC) aboard single-engined Airbus Helicopters H125 (formerly AS/EC350) Squirrel and twin-engined Bell 412EP platforms at RAF Shawbury in Shropshire, AAC Middle Wallop in Hampshire, and RAF Valley on the Isle of Anglesey. After training, RN crews are then streamed onto their operational type of either the AgustaWestland Lynx/Lynx Wildcat, Westland Sea King, or AgustaWestland AW101 Merlin. By the time that the new UKMFTS RW students begin graduating, the older Lynx HMA8 will be retired and the phasing out of the Sea King Airborne Surveillance and Control (ASaC) 7 platform will be well under way, if not already complete.

(http://www.janes.com/images/assets/510/60510/1679521_-_main.jpg)
A computer-generated impression of the Airbus Helicopters H145 in its UK military training livery. UK Royal Navy pilots will join those from the Royal Air Force and British Army in being trained on both the H135 and H145 from 2018 through to 2033, under a new GBP1.1 billion contract awarded on 20 May. Source: Airbus Helicopters

Lá está, somos uma Nação de ricos e abastados como tal não compramos artigos em quais intermediários apenas ganhem/roubem algumas dezenas de milhar de euros temos que adquirir Helis cujo preço seja mais elevado para poderem amealhar/roubar mais !!!!!

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Maio 20, 2016, 09:20:06 pm
Só mesmo essa 'política' permite explicar a quantidade de vezes que adquirimos equipamento não testado. Porque razão o nosso exército pagou pela 'militarização' de um helicóptero novo havendo outros aparelhos certificados no mercado? Porque razão optámos pelo Pandur II quando os standard do mercado eram o Piranha e o AMV? Porque razão andamos a adquirir (aos bochechos) HK G4 e G5 quando praticamente todos os exércitos aliados utilizam FN Minimi e FN MAG?

É certo que de vez em quando acertamos — por exemplo, no caso dos submarinos e dos Merlin —, mas os negócios acabam sempre por ser polémicos, quer devido a simples corrupção, ou então a amadorismos como o leasing dos subs ou a não inclusão de contrato de manutenção no caso dos helis; tudo com o objectivo aparente de poupar uns cobres, mas que no futuro conduzem a gastos desnecessários e à inoperacionalidade dos equipamentos.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Maio 20, 2016, 11:47:39 pm
(http://img.thesun.co.uk/aidemitlum/archive/02877/SHIP_2877086a.jpg)

Inside the new £3.1bn aircraft Carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth, almost ready for action

http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/7162714/Inside-the-new-pride-of-the-Royal-Navy-State-of-the-art-31bn-aircraft-carrier-HMS-Queen-Elizabeth-almost-ready-for-action.html
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Maio 21, 2016, 11:12:03 am
Só mesmo essa 'política' permite explicar a quantidade de vezes que adquirimos equipamento não testado. Porque razão o nosso exército pagou pela 'militarização' de um helicóptero novo havendo outros aparelhos certificados no mercado? Porque razão optámos pelo Pandur II quando os standard do mercado eram o Piranha e o AMV? Porque razão andamos a adquirir (aos bochechos) HK G4 e G5 quando praticamente todos os exércitos aliados utilizam FN Minimi e FN MAG?

No caso dos Pandur o próprio Exército não tinha escolhido essa viatura mas sim o AMV. Em relação às ML... eu aposto que as MG-4/5 são superiores às Minimi tanto na versão em 5.56 como na de 7.62mm, pelo menos no aspecto da fiabilidade.

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Maio 21, 2016, 03:19:14 pm
Nunca foi dito que a 'política' era definida pelo Exército, ou qualquer outro ramo das FFAA, mas que são coniventes é quase garantido.

Quanto à fiabilidade das metralhadoras alemãs, não tenho dados suficientes para me pronunciar e fazer apostas, mas a experiência das G36 no exército alemão e das HK416 no exército norueguês é capaz de dar algumas pistas. Se quisesse ser mauzinho podia sempre dizer as metralhadoras alemãs são mais fiáveis porque raramente são utilizadas em combate, em comparação com as belgas. Certamente, não é à toa que os principais exércitos ocidentais utilizam continuamente as metralhadoras belgas há décadas e continuam a adquiri-las.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Maio 21, 2016, 03:49:32 pm
Nunca foi dito que a 'política' era definida pelo Exército, ou qualquer outro ramo das FFAA, mas que são coniventes é quase garantido.

Não são os militares que tomam a decisão final, quem toma é sempre o governo.

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Quanto à fiabilidade das metralhadoras alemãs, não tenho dados suficientes para me pronunciar e fazer apostas, mas a experiência das G36 no exército alemão e das HK416 no exército norueguês é capaz de dar algumas pistas. Se quisesse ser mauzinho podia sempre dizer as metralhadoras alemãs são mais fiáveis porque raramente são utilizadas em combate, em comparação com as belgas. Certamente, não é à toa que os principais exércitos ocidentais utilizam continuamente as metralhadoras belgas há décadas e continuam a adquiri-las.

Pois, é por isso que o USMC trocou as suas Minimi por HK416... e em relação às G-36, já leste muitas queixas de militares Portugueses ou Espanhóis que as usam todos os dias...certo?

Ah, antes que esqueça, podes perguntar a um colega do fórum (Foxtroop) o que ele achou da MG4, é que essa menina ainda passou-lhe pelas mãos. Ou então ao pessoal da FOEsp, ou ao pessoal do DAE, ou ao pessoal da UPF, ou ao pessoal do Batalhão de Comandos, ou ao pessoal do...

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Maio 21, 2016, 09:15:10 pm
Não são os militares que tomam a decisão final, quem toma é sempre o governo.

Por mais que me esforce, não consigo encontrar diferenças significativas entre o que disse anteriormente e o que acabaste de dizer. Enfim, dou-te um ponto pela redundância.

Citar
Pois, é por isso que o USMC trocou as suas Minimi por HK416... e em relação às G-36, já leste muitas queixas de militares Portugueses ou Espanhóis que as usam todos os dias...certo?

As informações que tenho indicam a substituição que referes foi parcial (somente cerca de 40% do inventário de M249 substituído por M27). Se tens informações mais precisas, pf, bota link. Relativamente a queixas da G36, de facto, só conheço as dos alemães — curiosamente o país fabricante de espingarda. Quanto aos outros dois países, os meus comentários são os seguintes:

a) Portugal tem umas duas ou três centenas de exemplares de tal arma o que, comparado com as dezenas de milhares de exemplares ao serviço da Alemanha, é estatisticamente irrelevante; mais os militares portugueses não são muito conhecidos por partilharem experiências — quer positivas, quer negativas.

b) Todos os equipamentos ao serviço das FFAA espanholas são os melhores do mundo e estão, obviamente, isentos de falhas. Da mesma forma, nunca vais ouvir um brasileiro, um indiano, ou um paquistanês a criticarem as suas FFAA e respectivos equipamentos, pois estes quatro países acima mencionados são as maiores super-potências militares do planeta.

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Ah, antes que esqueça, podes perguntar a um colega do fórum (Foxtroop) o que ele achou da MG4, é que essa menina ainda passou-lhe pelas mãos. Ou então ao pessoal da FOEsp, ou ao pessoal do DAE, ou ao pessoal da UPF, ou ao pessoal do Batalhão de Comandos, ou ao pessoal do...

Com devido respeito ao colega Foxtroop, aos militares das unidades mencionadas e a ti próprio, só posso dizer que as opiniões de umas poucas dezenas de operacionais não são comparáveis às de dezenas de milhares de operacionais que utilizam as referidas metralhadoras belgas em, praticamente, todos os exércitos aliados (só para aí 4 ou 5 exércitos utilizam as congéneres alemãs).

Aliás, se queres que te diga, acho a relação entre a H&K (ou o seu representante em Pt) e as FFAA/FS algo duvidosa, como também achei duvidoso que o leasing de 2 submarinos (que acabaram sendo pagos a pronto) tenha ficado mais caro que a aquisição de 3 submarinos. Mas isso sou eu que gosto de teorias da conspiração.  :G-beer2:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: overlord em Maio 23, 2016, 01:52:11 am
Não são os militares que tomam a decisão final, quem toma é sempre o governo.

Por mais que me esforce, não consigo encontrar diferenças significativas entre o que disse anteriormente e o que acabaste de dizer. Enfim, dou-te um ponto pela redundância.

Citar
Pois, é por isso que o USMC trocou as suas Minimi por HK416... e em relação às G-36, já leste muitas queixas de militares Portugueses ou Espanhóis que as usam todos os dias...certo?

As informações que tenho indicam a substituição que referes foi parcial (somente cerca de 40% do inventário de M249 substituído por M27). Se tens informações mais precisas, pf, bota link. Relativamente a queixas da G36, de facto, só conheço as dos alemães — curiosamente o país fabricante de espingarda. Quanto aos outros dois países, os meus comentários são os seguintes:

a) Portugal tem umas duas ou três centenas de exemplares de tal arma o que, comparado com as dezenas de milhares de exemplares ao serviço da Alemanha, é estatisticamente irrelevante; mais os militares portugueses não são muito conhecidos por partilharem experiências — quer positivas, quer negativas.

b) Todos os equipamentos ao serviço das FFAA espanholas são os melhores do mundo e estão, obviamente, isentos de falhas. Da mesma forma, nunca vais ouvir um brasileiro, um indiano, ou um paquistanês a criticarem as suas FFAA e respectivos equipamentos, pois estes quatro países acima mencionados são as maiores super-potências militares do planeta.

Citar
Ah, antes que esqueça, podes perguntar a um colega do fórum (Foxtroop) o que ele achou da MG4, é que essa menina ainda passou-lhe pelas mãos. Ou então ao pessoal da FOEsp, ou ao pessoal do DAE, ou ao pessoal da UPF, ou ao pessoal do Batalhão de Comandos, ou ao pessoal do...

Com devido respeito ao colega Foxtroop, aos militares das unidades mencionadas e a ti próprio, só posso dizer que as opiniões de umas poucas dezenas de operacionais não são comparáveis às de dezenas de milhares de operacionais que utilizam as referidas metralhadoras belgas em, praticamente, todos os exércitos aliados (só para aí 4 ou 5 exércitos utilizam as congéneres alemãs).

Aliás, se queres que te diga, acho a relação entre a H&K (ou o seu representante em Pt) e as FFAA/FS algo duvidosa, como também achei duvidoso que o leasing de 2 submarinos (que acabaram sendo pagos a pronto) tenha ficado mais caro que a aquisição de 3 submarinos. Mas isso sou eu que gosto de teorias da conspiração.  :G-beer2:

Em relação a parte de menbros e ex-menbros das Forças Armadas Portuguesas não falarem mal do nosso armamento é verdade.
Conheci que dizia que os m60 tavam bons e era bastantes capazes não precisavamos dos leopard 2, mas depois ja diziam que era o melhor tanque do mundo( e até são capazes de ter razão). Como militar da GNR que são uso muito a G3 e acho-a antiquada, pesada e uma arma desajustada para o serviço policial mas porra so ouço dizer que é a melhor arma do mundo. Tal como era a P38 antes de virem as Glocks. Enfim não podermos ter coisas melhores ja sabemos que não podemos agora o tipico portugues é incapaz de reconhecer que há coisas melhores
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Maio 23, 2016, 12:26:41 pm
Não são os militares que tomam a decisão final, quem toma é sempre o governo.

Por mais que me esforce, não consigo encontrar diferenças significativas entre o que disse anteriormente e o que acabaste de dizer. Enfim, dou-te um ponto pela redundância.

Citar
Pois, é por isso que o USMC trocou as suas Minimi por HK416... e em relação às G-36, já leste muitas queixas de militares Portugueses ou Espanhóis que as usam todos os dias...certo?

As informações que tenho indicam a substituição que referes foi parcial (somente cerca de 40% do inventário de M249 substituído por M27). Se tens informações mais precisas, pf, bota link. Relativamente a queixas da G36, de facto, só conheço as dos alemães — curiosamente o país fabricante de espingarda. Quanto aos outros dois países, os meus comentários são os seguintes:

a) Portugal tem umas duas ou três centenas de exemplares de tal arma o que, comparado com as dezenas de milhares de exemplares ao serviço da Alemanha, é estatisticamente irrelevante; mais os militares portugueses não são muito conhecidos por partilharem experiências — quer positivas, quer negativas.

b) Todos os equipamentos ao serviço das FFAA espanholas são os melhores do mundo e estão, obviamente, isentos de falhas. Da mesma forma, nunca vais ouvir um brasileiro, um indiano, ou um paquistanês a criticarem as suas FFAA e respectivos equipamentos, pois estes quatro países acima mencionados são as maiores super-potências militares do planeta.

Citar
Ah, antes que esqueça, podes perguntar a um colega do fórum (Foxtroop) o que ele achou da MG4, é que essa menina ainda passou-lhe pelas mãos. Ou então ao pessoal da FOEsp, ou ao pessoal do DAE, ou ao pessoal da UPF, ou ao pessoal do Batalhão de Comandos, ou ao pessoal do...

Com devido respeito ao colega Foxtroop, aos militares das unidades mencionadas e a ti próprio, só posso dizer que as opiniões de umas poucas dezenas de operacionais não são comparáveis às de dezenas de milhares de operacionais que utilizam as referidas metralhadoras belgas em, praticamente, todos os exércitos aliados (só para aí 4 ou 5 exércitos utilizam as congéneres alemãs).

Aliás, se queres que te diga, acho a relação entre a H&K (ou o seu representante em Pt) e as FFAA/FS algo duvidosa, como também achei duvidoso que o leasing de 2 submarinos (que acabaram sendo pagos a pronto) tenha ficado mais caro que a aquisição de 3 submarinos. Mas isso sou eu que gosto de teorias da conspiração.  :G-beer2:

Em relação a parte de menbros e ex-menbros das Forças Armadas Portuguesas não falarem mal do nosso armamento é verdade.
Conheci que dizia que os m60 tavam bons e era bastantes capazes não precisavamos dos leopard 2, mas depois ja diziam que era o melhor tanque do mundo( e até são capazes de ter razão). Como militar da GNR que são uso muito a G3 e acho-a antiquada, pesada e uma arma desajustada para o serviço policial mas porra so ouço dizer que é a melhor arma do mundo. Tal como era a P38 antes de virem as Glocks. Enfim não podermos ter coisas melhores ja sabemos que não podemos agora o tipico portugues é incapaz de reconhecer que há coisas melhores
Se é assim na sua realidade na minha não. Ainda agora sobre a classe Tejo as críticas quanto ao fraco equipamento, sensores e armamento foi bastante acentuada, inclusive de militares no activo, comparando com o que o navio fazia anteriormente e mesmo tendo em conta o que vai fazer na Marinha Portuguesa. Além de que, se existisse uma arma e sensores fracos mas por exemplo os Módulos de desminagem e combate à poluição tivessem vindo em quantidade razoável menos mal. Mas não vieram. não virão e nem com uma LUPA GIGANTE vejo (e outros verão, desde civis a militares e ex militares) onde foram gastos 6 milhões por navio. ::)
(https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-ZO6cFFg5moo/VyyUtxgdEoI/AAAAAAAAU7U/lVieUExfNasQQq-LPiHmC--1eXSBo8IQQCLcB/s1600/NRP_Tejo2.jpg)
Sempre ouvi críticas ao M60. Desde alguma antiquação ao facto de segundo alguns militares virem em pior estado que os M48 que cá tínhamos. Que o Leopard 2 é muito bom, sem dúvida. Agora alguém antes dos adquirir teve em conta a manutenção, os veículos lança-pontes e de recuperação? Ouve quem avisasse para a questão e não foram adquiridos à mesma? Se calhar a questão não eram os M60 serem os maiores mas sim apesar das limitações estarem adequados à realidade portuguesa e ao material e manutenção que tínhamos. Se calhar por isso era melhor um Upgrade ao M60 que adquirir Leopard2 sem contratos de manutenção, sem veículos de recuperação, lança pontes, etc e portanto limitados em uso. E isso não é deixar de reconhecer que o Leopard 2 é muito melhor em todos os aspectos mas sim ter em conta limitações devido a termos adquirido um sofisticado MBT com "serviços mínimos" como quem compra um "fusca" na oficina do Bairro. E não foi caso único já que os Merlin passaram pela mesma coisa... ::)
(http://www.operacional.pt/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/3-amarques.jpg)   
Meu caro, a G3 é antiquada, o NRP Bérrio é velhinho, o Al III está ultrapassado. A questão que porem alguns foristas, militares e ex militares não percebem é algo muito simples: É preferivel ter mesmo velhote, ultrapassado mas funcional nem que seja em missões de segunda linha ou não ter? Já aqui dei o exemplo do Al III da Marinha Francesa e belga. Estão tão velhos e ultrapassados cá como lá, no caso Frances até têm uma carrada de modelos substitutos em uso, agora respondia um Sargento Francês um dia: Se num abastecedor precisamos de um helicóptero para movimentar carga ou umas mangueiras, porque usar um Lynx ou um Dauphin se o Al III cumpre essa missão? Se estamos numa missão anti-pirataria no Golfo de Aden para que usar outra aeronave se um Al III armado faz essa missão, mas barato e de uma forma de facto menos eficaz mas sem colocar em causa a missão?  Os belgas ainda usam Al III da sua Força Aérea nas Fragatas Karel Dorman, apesar de terem o NH90, mas como são em pequena quantidade, preferem  usa-los em SAR até virem mais. Por cá, mesmo com 5 Lynx, fazer o mesmo? Não se pode. Estão velhos e falta "estrutura". Apenas se usam Al III para "instrução". Esperem pelo resultado em 2018, sobretudo com a classe política actual ( e não só, já que a responsabilidade dos falhanços na aquisição de equipamento não é apenas política) . Ou acabou-se os helis ligeiros na Fap ou levam uma caranguejola de dois lugares que nem um terços das missões do velhote al III fazem...  ;)
(http://avia-dejavu.net/SP-SSI.JPG)
 Não podemos ter coisas melhores? A sério? Existe melhor que o U209PN? Desde a operação à manutenção correu e corre tudo sobre rodas, com alto índice de uso e pouquíssimas falhas. Existiram luvas na aquisição? Entre 100 a 150 milhões. É mau? É, mas já viu o caso dos Nh90 que você e eu já pagamos 111 milhões de um helicóptero que não vamos ter nunca? E os média falam nisso? Raramente. Vão buscar até a antena de 400 mil euros do Trident, mas usar o exemplo dos Nh90 ou dos custos que a falta de contrato para os Merlim custou ao contribuinte português, passando inclusive pela reactivação dos Puma, isso já dá muito trabalho. Caramba, apetece dizer: As vezes mais valem umas "luvas" para termos material de jeito e em pleno uso, do que compras com tudo a "correr bem" e depois descobrir-se que não existem, desde contratos de manutenção a peças.  É que pagar por pagar, já nos basta as Pandur, A400, Ec635, Nh90, NPO,etc. E o custo é muito superior aos 150 milhões de luvas nos submarinos.  ::)
(https://poadu.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/r10_1036-001.jpg)
Entretanto e voltando à RN temos o HMS illustrious à venda, com 32 anos de serviço e 2 milhões de Libras de Reserva  ;D ;D

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All parties interested in acquiring the vessel should note that a Bank Guarantee of £2 Million will be required by the DSA and will not be released until the recycling of the vessel is nearing completion.

All interested parties must e-mail: desdsa-mst2a@mod.uk, desdsa-mst2a1@mod.uk and deslcsls-DSA-Commercial@mod.uk no later than 17.00hrs (GMT) Monday 23 May 2016.

http://www.warhistoryonline.com/featured/hms-illustrious-sale.html (http://www.warhistoryonline.com/featured/hms-illustrious-sale.html)
(http://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/HMS_Illustrious-1-640x427.jpg)
(http://www.warhistoryonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/USMC_Harriers_line_the_deck_of_HMS_Illustrious_MOD_45147594-445x640.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Junho 08, 2016, 11:08:44 am
http://defence-blog.com/news/royal-navy-in-hot-water-as-engines-of-britains-flagship-1bn-destroyers-break-down-in-middle-of-sea.html (http://defence-blog.com/news/royal-navy-in-hot-water-as-engines-of-britains-flagship-1bn-destroyers-break-down-in-middle-of-sea.html)
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The Royal Navy’s fleet of Type 45 destroyers are breaking down because their engines cannot cope with the Persian Gulf’s warm waters.

Rolls-Royce are blaming extremes of temperature in the Middle East for the repeated power outages that have left Britain’s best fighting ships without propulsion or weapons systems.

Six Clyde-built Type 45 destroyers need work expected to cost tens of millions of pounds after a string of power failures.

If it is not done, the vessels could be left as sitting ducks in battle if the UK is in a major conflict at sea again.

A Whitehall source said: “We can’t have warships that cannot operate if the water is warmer than it is in Portsmouth harbour.

(http://defence-blog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/5625649110_7b9987a703_b-696x511.jpg)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Junho 09, 2016, 07:46:44 pm
Inquiry reveals UK's Type 45 destroyers are even less reliable in warm water

Jeremy Binnie, London - IHS Jane's Defence Weekly
09 June 2016

(http://www.janes.com/images/assets/089/61089/1169069_-_main.jpg)

Senior defence industry officials revealed during testimony to a parliamentary inquiry on 7 June that the problems with the integrated electric propulsion (IEP) system on the Royal Navy's new Type 45 destroyers are more acute in warm environments such as the Gulf.

Rolls-Royce's Tomas Leahy claimed the Ministry of Defence (MoD) failed to specify that the Type 45s would have to operate in warm environments. "There was a specification for Type 45, the engine met that specification," he told the inquiry. "Are the conditions in the Gulf in line with that specification? No they are not, so the equipment is having to operate in far more arduous conditions than initially required by that specification."
"The operating profile considered at the time [the Type 45 was specified] was that there would not be repeated and continuous operations in the Gulf," BAE Sysyems Maritime Managing Director John Hudson said. "It was not designed explicitly or uniquely for operations in the Gulf."
He said that BAE had nevertheless attempted to design the ship so it would experience a "graceful degradation" of its performance at high temperatures, but then added that the exact opposite was happening.
"What we have found in the Gulf is that it takes the gas turbine generator bit into an area which is sub-optimal for the generator, and also we found that with the drive units that the cooling system created condensation within the drive units which caused faults and that caused electrical failures as well," he said. These electrical failures leave the Type 45s unable to operate their propulsion, sensor, or weapons systems.
Leahy suggested the problems would be experienced by all gas turbines, not just the Rolls-Royce WR-21 engines fitted to the Type 45. "It's not a fault of the WR-21. Even if it was a simple-cycle gas turbine it will still suffer the same fate in those circumstances, it's a law of physics."

http://www.janes.com/article/61089/inquiry-reveals-uk-s-type-45-destroyers-are-even-less-reliable-in-warm-water
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Junho 23, 2016, 12:54:00 pm
Royal Navy Flagship HMS Ocean – Amphibious Assault Operations


Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Junho 24, 2016, 03:15:06 pm
Excelente vídeo! Um navio lindíssimo.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Junho 25, 2016, 03:46:56 pm
(https://i2.wp.com/news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/USS_Ohio_SSBN-726_hatches.jpg?w=2860&ssl=1)

US Admiral Terry Benedict, responsible for the nuclear weapons of ballistic missile submarines:  UK Exit From European Union Won't Hinder Nuclear Sub Collaboration

https://news.usni.org/2016/06/24/benedict-uk-exit-european-union-wont-hinder-nuclear-sub-collaboration
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Junho 25, 2016, 06:28:05 pm
(https://i2.wp.com/news.usni.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/USS_Ohio_SSBN-726_hatches.jpg?w=2860&ssl=1)

US Admiral Terry Benedict, responsible for the nuclear weapons of ballistic missile submarines:  UK Exit From European Union Won't Hinder Nuclear Sub Collaboration

https://news.usni.org/2016/06/24/benedict-uk-exit-european-union-wont-hinder-nuclear-sub-collaboration
Mas se a Escócia "bater com a porta"do RU exactamente devido à saída da UE resta saber onde a RN vai colocar os submarinos...  ;D
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HMNB CLYDE
HER MAJESTY'S NAVAL BASE

HM Naval Base Clyde – commonly known throughout the Navy as Faslane – is the Royal Navy’s main presence in Scotland. It is home to the core of the Submarine Service, including the nation’s nuclear deterrent, and the new generation of hunter-killer submarines. The Royal Naval Armaments Depot at Coulport, 8 miles from Faslane, is responsible for the storage, processing, maintenance and issue of key elements of the UK's Trident Deterrent Missile System and the ammunitioning of all submarine embarked weapons.

http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/our-organisation/where-we-are/naval-base/clyde (http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/our-organisation/where-we-are/naval-base/clyde)
(http://dev.virtualearth.net/REST/v1/Imagery/Map/AerialWithLabels/56.058838,-4.808812/10?key=AkGceV_Znn-cUvu3CzDW37KjrwE1ilfwDPdQEH-abk3h3DYY4wXpnsKaRiadYJUq&mapSize=490,262)
(http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/~/media/royal%20navy%20responsive/images/where%20we%20are/bases/naval%20bases/clyde/clydebackground1_1500x1090.jpg?mh=447&mw=980&thn=0)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Junho 25, 2016, 07:04:06 pm
Sim, o tema da base de Faslane é importante no caso dum novo referendum na Escócia. Más as declarações de Benedict julgo que representam uma reafirmação  (não dum político como Kerry, mas dum alto militar, o que não é o mais ortodoxo) da tradicional "special relationship" entre Estados Unidos e o Reino Unido. Um facto que o resto da Europa não pode ignorar.

Cumprimentos.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Junho 25, 2016, 07:12:50 pm
Já para não falar da distribuição de meios militares, tal como se viu na divisão da Checoslováquia.
Quem é que fica com o quê.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Junho 26, 2016, 10:44:48 am
Sim, o tema da base de Faslane é importante no caso dum novo referendum na Escócia. Más as declarações de Benedict julgo que representam uma reafirmação  (não dum político como Kerry, mas dum alto militar, o que não é o mais ortodoxo) da tradicional "special relationship" entre Estados Unidos e o Reino Unido. Um facto que o resto da Europa não pode ignorar.

Cumprimentos.
Estava a ser irónico em relação às declarações, pois é demais evidente que ao nível não apenas da frota nuclear mas de toda a cooperação militar não existirão quaisquer alterações.  Mas isso nada tem a ver com a UE e sim com a NATO e uma proximidade grande entre as duas nações. Aliás, a França sempre fez parte da CEE/UE e não foi por isso que deixou de desenvolver misseis e submarinos nucleares próprios (pois não fazia parte do estatuto operacional da NATO). Percebo que face às declarações anteriores de Obama (que agora já deu a volta ao prego), alguém com responsabilidade viesse colocar "agua na fervura", agora pessoalmente considero que a existir algum tipo de preocupações com a frota nuclear, seria caso a Escócia num novo referendo votasse pela saída do RU. Mas mesmo aí é pouco credível que o RU não trouxesse os seus submarinos nucleares e que a Escócia não se quisesse ver livre deles. O mais certo era por via de um acordo manterem-se na Escócia como foi o caso da frota russa do mar negro .

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Junho 26, 2016, 11:55:25 am
Nicola Sturgeon, primeira ministra da Escócia, insiste em reclamar um segundo referendo de independência depois do Brexit, onde os escoceses votaram a favor da UE. Nâo sei como acabará esto. A maioria dos escoceses não desejam a permanência de Faslane, e não acredito que seja fácil um acordo como o de Sevastopol  (antes da invasâo russa da Crimeia). É evidente que a NATO e a UE são entidades diferentes (como vc recorda França saiu durante anos da estrutura integrada da NATO e continuou na UE), mas o terramoto provocado por o Brexit é uma situaçâo infinitamente mais grave. A postura de Washington é difícil. Em tudo caso, "wait and see", prudência e sangue frio.

Cumprimentos

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Junho 28, 2016, 02:53:41 pm
Já para não falar da distribuição de meios militares, tal como se viu na divisão da Checoslováquia.
Quem é que fica com o quê.

http://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2013/11/scottish-independence-white-paper-defence-issues/

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Defence capabilities at the point of independence

Maritime forces

One naval squadron to secure Scotland’s maritime interests and Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and contribute to joint capability with partners in Scotland’s geographical neighbourhood, consisting of:
•two frigates from the Royal Navy’s current fleet
•a command platform for naval operations and development of specialist marine capabilities (from the Royal Navy’s current fleet, following adaptation)
•four mine counter measure vessels from the Royal Navy’s current fleet
•two offshore patrol vessels (OPVs) to provide security for the 200 nautical mile Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). However, as the Royal Navy only has four OPVs currently[263], a longer lead time for procurement might be necessary
•four to six patrol boats from the Royal Navy’s current fleet, capable of operating in coastal waters, providing fleet protection and also contributing to securing borders
•auxiliary support ships (providing support to vessels on operations), which could be secured on a shared basis initially with the rest of the UK

These arrangements will require around 2,000 regular and at least 200 reserve personnel.

Land forces

An army HQ function and an all-arms brigade, with three infantry/marine units, equipped initially from a negotiated share of current UK assets, and supported by:
•a deployable Brigade HQ
•two light armoured reconnaissance units
•two light artillery units
•one engineer unit deploying a range of equipment for bridging, mine clearance and engineering functions
•one aviation unit operating six helicopters for reconnaissance and liaison
•two communication units
•one transport unit
•one logistics unit
•one medical unit

Special forces, explosives and ordnance disposal teams will bring the total to around 3,500 regular and at least 1,200 reserve personnel.

Air forces

Key elements of air forces in place at independence, equipped initially from a negotiated share of current UK assets, will secure core tasks, principally the ability to police Scotland’s airspace, within NATO.
•an Air Force HQ function (with staff embedded within NATO structures)
•Scotland will remain part of NATO‘s integrated Air Command and Control (AC2) system, initially through agreement with allies to maintain the current arrangements while Scotland establishes and develops our own AC2 personnel and facility within Scotland within five years of independence
•a Quick Reaction Alert (QRA) squadron incorporating a minimum of 12 Typhoon jets based at Lossiemouth
•a tactical air transport squadron, including around six Hercules C130J aircraft, and a helicopter squadron
•flight training through joint arrangements with allies

In total this would require around 2,000 regular personnel and around 300 reserve personnel.

Civilian support

In addition to military capability following a vote for independence, the Scottish Government will establish core government capacity for defence functions, such as strategic planning, oversight and policy functions for defence and security. Given the importance of ongoing shared security interests between Scotland and the rest of the UK, we will ensure a partnership approach during the period of transition to independence.

Following a vote for independence, priorities for the Scottish Government capacity dealing with defence will be planning for the strategic security review to be carried out by the first Scottish Parliament following independence, based on the most recent UK National Risk Assessment and input from Scottish experts and academic institutions.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 14, 2016, 10:49:33 am
BAE unveils General Purpose Frigate concepts

Richard Scott, London - IHS Jane's Navy International  13 July 2016

 Key Points

• Avenger builds on the pedigree of the existing Amazonas-class/River-class Batch 2 offshore patrol vessel
• Cutlass is a stretched and enhanced derivative of the RNO Al Shamikh-class corvette design

 BAE Systems Naval Ships has lifted the lid on its initial thinking regarding the UK's projected General Purpose Frigate (GPFF) programme, revealing two export-derived concept designs positioned to address different points on the cost/capability curve.

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/p1630751_zpsir3zgs06.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/p1630751_zpsir3zgs06.jpg.html)

The Avenger design builds on the Amazonas-class/River-class Batch 2 offshore patrol vessel, and plots onto the lower end of the solution space. (BAE Systems)

 Plans to acquire a new class of more affordable and potentially exportable light frigate were announced in November last year as part of the 2015 Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR15). While the new Type 26 Global Combat Ship - eight of which are now planned - will primarily support carrier task group operations and provide protection for the UK's strategic nuclear deterrent, the GPFF is to be rolled for a range of less high-tempo tasks.

http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?19-Royal-Navy-matters/page80
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Julho 14, 2016, 11:26:47 am
BAE unveils General Purpose Frigate concepts


http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?19-Royal-Navy-matters/page80

http://www.youtube.com/user/BMTDefence

http://www.bmtdsl.co.uk/media/6102250/BMT%20Warships%20Venator%20110%20General%20Purpose%20Light%20Frigate%20Technical%20Brief.pdf
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 14, 2016, 12:03:54 pm
BAE unveils General Purpose Frigate concepts


http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?19-Royal-Navy-matters/page80

http://www.youtube.com/user/BMTDefence

http://www.bmtdsl.co.uk/media/6102250/BMT%20Warships%20Venator%20110%20General%20Purpose%20Light%20Frigate%20Technical%20Brief.pdf

No tópico da substituição das fragatas VdG, há uns meses atrás,  já tinha referenciado as Venator como possibilidade de serem as substitutas das nossas três fragatas. 

http://www.forumdefesa.com/forum/index.php?topic=12409.0
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Julho 14, 2016, 12:23:36 pm
Outra solução "low cost" seriam as ALPHA 4000 espanholas.

http://www.navantia.es/ckfinder/userfiles/files/lineas_act/productos%20diciembre%202015/LF-4000%20(antiguna%20F-538).pdf
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 14, 2016, 12:43:10 pm
Outra solução "low cost" seriam as ALPHA 4000 espanholas.

http://www.navantia.es/ckfinder/userfiles/files/lineas_act/productos%20diciembre%202015/LF-4000%20(antiguna%20F-538).pdf

Muito bom navio e com um equipamento/armamento suficiente para as nossas necessidades, se fosse eu a decidir era este modelo que escolheria alteraria os exocet para os Harpoons e colocaria as OM 30mm Marlim em vez dos 35mm. :G-beer2: :G-beer2: :G-beer2:

At NAVDEX 2015 Navantia unveiled its F-538 Frigate Design for the Peruvian Navy
 
At NAVDEX 2015 naval defense exhibition which was taking place in Abu Dhabi, UAE, last week, Navantia unveiled the F-538 frigate design it is proposing for the Peruvian Navy. Navantia representatives at NAVDEX 2015 told Navy Recognition that this new Frigate design is based on the proven AVANTE 3000/2400 design. This new design incorporates lessons learned in building the Spanish F-100, Norwegian F-310 and Australian AWS destroyers.

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/Navantia_F-538_Frigate_Peru_Avante_NAVDEX_2015_1_zps9zgbjkpm.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/Navantia_F-538_Frigate_Peru_Avante_NAVDEX_2015_1_zps9zgbjkpm.jpg.html)
        
At IDEX 2015, Navy Recognition learned that Nexter Systems and DCNS teams are currently working together in order to interface the Narwhal 20B with the DCNS made FREMM Frigates. Following this work the Narwhal guns will be able to exchange data with the Combat Management System (CMS). More specifically, it will be connected to the fire control system and surveillance radar (Thales Herakles) of the frigates which will allow greater flexibility and shorter reaction time when dealing with threats.The new F-538 Frigate design unveiled by Navantia at NAVDEX 2015

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/Navantia_F-538_Frigate_Peru_Avante_NAVDEX_2015_2_zpss4dlzpeo.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/Navantia_F-538_Frigate_Peru_Avante_NAVDEX_2015_2_zpss4dlzpeo.jpg.html)
        
The F-538 incorporates the Spanish Navy Combat Management System (CMS) foundand proven on board Spanish Navy LHD, replennishment vessel and Meteoro class OPVs. The new Frigate is fitted with the COMPLEX Integrated Platform Management System developed entirely by Navantia.

With a moderate displacement of about 3,800 tons, the F-538 is Navantia's answer to navies looking for mid-size frigates to conduct a wide range of missions.
        
At IDEX 2015, Navy Recognition learned that Nexter Systems and DCNS teams are currently working together in order to interface the Narwhal 20B with the DCNS made FREMM Frigates. Following this work the Narwhal guns will be able to exchange data with the Combat Management System (CMS). More specifically, it will be connected to the fire control system and surveillance radar (Thales Herakles) of the frigates which will allow greater flexibility and shorter reaction time when dealing with threats.Maximum close-in and anti-missile protection on the rear aspect of the frigate: The F-538 is quite uniquely fitted with 2x Millenium guns and 1x RAM launcher
        
The scale model on display at NAVDEX 2015 showed the F-538 fitted according to the Peruvian Navy requirements. The informed observer will immediatly notice a quite unique weapons fit on top of the helicopter hangar: No less than three Close In Weapon System (CIWS) are present:
- 2x Rheinmetall Millenium 35mm gun systems
- 1x Raytheon RAM launcher (21x RAM block A1 missiles) between the two guns

Navantia representative explained that this quite unique configuration were part of the Peruvian Navy requirements. Final specifications and weapons fit may evolve however. Quite unusual also is the fact that two triple torpedo launchers are fitted on top of the main structure instead of being housed inside the structure.

The F-538 model at NAVDEX also featured:
- A 76mm main gun by Oto Melara
- 16x Mk 41 VLS for Raytheon ESSM surface to air missiles located forward, behind the main gun
- 2x Hitrole 12.7 mm remote weapon system by Oto Melara fitted on top of the bridge
- 8x MBDA Exocet Blk III anti-ship missiles
- 2x RF/IR/acoustic decoy launchers
- A Smart-S Mk2 radar by Thales
- A Thales Sting 2.0 fire control radar
- A Thales Kingklip hull sonar

The helicopter deck and hangar can accomodate SH-3D or NH-90 helicopters. The F-538 was designed with great attention focused on low radiated noise, reduced radar cross section, low infra red signature, low magnetic signature and low electric signature. The propulsion system is CODAD type (Combined diesel and diesel). The requirement of the Peruvian Navy is for 5 frigates.

F-538 main characteristics:
Length overall: 113.2m
Maximum beam: 15.6m
Draught: 4.7m
Full load displacement: 3800 t
Max. Speed: 30 kn
Range: 4000 nm

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/Navantia_F-538_Frigate_Peru_Avante_NAVDEX_2015_3_zps6jzes6f2.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/Navantia_F-538_Frigate_Peru_Avante_NAVDEX_2015_3_zps6jzes6f2.jpg.html)
        
At IDEX 2015, Navy Recognition learned that Nexter Systems and DCNS teams are currently working together in order to interface the Narwhal 20B with the DCNS made FREMM Frigates. Following this work the Narwhal guns will be able to exchange data with the Combat Management System (CMS). More specifically, it will be connected to the fire control system and surveillance radar (Thales Herakles) of the frigates which will allow greater flexibility and shorter reaction time when dealing with threats.The F-538 Frigate design showcased by Navantia at NAVDEX 2015 show the Peruvian Navy configuration

http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php/news/naval-exhibitions/navdex-2015-show-daily-news/2454-at-navdex-2015-navantia-unveiled-its-f-538-frigate-design-for-the-peruvian-navy.html

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Julho 20, 2016, 09:55:25 am


Reino Unido aposta na renovação da frota de submarinos nucleares
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Julho 20, 2016, 05:05:30 pm
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Cnque2sWYAAVUSN.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Menacho em Julho 21, 2016, 08:14:48 am
Accidente del SSN Ambush de la Royal Navy, al chocar con un tanker en Gibraltar.

Unos irresponsables estos british, hay que tener en cuenta de que a pocos km de Gibraltar hay cientos de miles de personas en julio en las playas.

A ver si aprenden a conducir por la dereita!!.. >:( >:( >:(

(http://i1.wp.com/chronicle.gi/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Screen-Shot-2016-07-20-at-9_Fotor.jpg?zoom=2&resize=690%2C450)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Alvalade em Julho 21, 2016, 08:20:33 am
Porque eles fizeram isso de propósito.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Menacho em Julho 21, 2016, 10:20:38 am
(https://scontent.fmad3-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/13700101_1079304912135586_1374163015412811579_n.jpg?oh=2656de9f7741c0e3653045986c176f23&oe=5830D252)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Julho 21, 2016, 11:25:48 am
Accidente del SSN Ambush de la Royal Navy, al chocar con un tanker en Gibraltar.

Unos irresponsables estos british, hay que tener en cuenta de que a pocos km de Gibraltar hay cientos de miles de personas en julio en las playas.

A ver si aprenden a conducir por la dereita!!.. >:( >:( >:(

(http://i1.wp.com/chronicle.gi/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Screen-Shot-2016-07-20-at-9_Fotor.jpg?zoom=2&resize=690%2C450)

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/jun/17/trident-whistleblower-william-mcneilly-discharged-from-royal-navy

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 21, 2016, 12:04:55 pm
Accidente del SSN Ambush de la Royal Navy, al chocar con un tanker en Gibraltar.

Unos irresponsables estos british, hay que tener en cuenta de que a pocos km de Gibraltar hay cientos de miles de personas en julio en las playas.

A ver si aprenden a conducir por la dereita!!.. >:( >:( >:(

(http://i1.wp.com/chronicle.gi/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Screen-Shot-2016-07-20-at-9_Fotor.jpg?zoom=2&resize=690%2C450)

É o que se chama levar mesmo a letra o Nome do Navio  HMS " Ambush " .
Devia estar a treinar para efectuar ambuscadas mas á queima roupa, para abordar a embarcação com que colidiu....... só pode !!! :N-icon-Axe:

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Julho 21, 2016, 02:55:18 pm
(http://cdn.images.dailystar.co.uk/dynamic/1/photos/957000/HMS-Ambush-with-damage-showing-after-a-collision-587957.jpg)
(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2016/07/21/11/36768CFA00000578-3700175-image-a-36_1469095500312.jpg)

In the dock: HMS Ambush sits forlornly at Gibraltar today with its damaged turret covered in tarpaulin
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Julho 28, 2016, 01:28:07 pm
(http://ep01.epimg.net/elpais/imagenes/2016/07/27/album/1469641235_460249_1469692229_album_normal_recorte1.jpg)
(http://ep01.epimg.net/elpais/imagenes/2016/07/27/album/1469641235_460249_1469690736_album_normal.jpg)
(http://ep01.epimg.net/elpais/imagenes/2016/07/27/album/1469641235_460249_1469690685_album_normal.jpg)
(http://ep01.epimg.net/elpais/imagenes/2016/07/27/album/1469641235_460249_1469690738_album_normal.jpg)

Desarmando al submarino británico "Ambush" en Gibraltar
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Julho 29, 2016, 07:27:05 pm


HMS Ambush heads to UK from Gibraltar for repairs after collision

http://home.bt.com/news/uk-news/royal-navy-submarine-heads-to-uk-from-gibraltar-for-repairs-after-collision-11364076296067
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Agosto 17, 2016, 07:59:34 am
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/five-ships-to-be-permanently-based-in-bahrain/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/five-ships-to-be-permanently-based-in-bahrain/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social)
Citar
How many ships will be based at Mina Salman following the construction of the new facility, what type of ships will they be and what type of operations will they be expected to conduct?”

The answer was:

“Today there are around half a dozen Royal Navy ships and units deployed in the region and well over 1,200 men and women.

This includes the Mine Counter Measures Force that have been located at the Bahrain facilities since 2003. This force of four Mine Counter Measures vessels, supported by one Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship will continue to be permanently located and supported from the new UK Mina Salman Support Facility (UK MSSF).

The UK MSSF will support all Royal Navy ships that deploy to the region that pass through Bahrain, but it is too early to say what the future scale of the Royal Navy’s deployment to the region will be and whether any further Royal Navy vessels will be permanently located at UK MSSF.”
(https://ukdjstatic-b4d.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/bahrain-1-2048x1152-20141206-135013-681-1021x580.png)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Agosto 24, 2016, 04:41:01 pm

MoD sells aircraft carrier HMS Illustrious for scrap to a Turkish company

http://navaltoday.com/2016/08/23/british-mod-sells-light-aircraft-carrier-hms-illustrious-for-scrap/
Título: Re: Royal Navy os novos OPV
Enviado por: tenente em Agosto 31, 2016, 05:54:31 pm
Clyde moving to River drumbeat

31st August 2016 - 17:02  by Richard Thomas in Scotstoun

The fitting out of HMS Forth, the first of the new batch of River-class OPVs for the Royal Navy, is expected to be completed by December this year, ahead of sea trials in March 2017.

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/3d6483d3_zpssvkb6xjx.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/3d6483d3_zpssvkb6xjx.jpg.html)

The OPV is the first new vessel to be launched, or floated up as is now the case, at the BAE Systems Scotstoun facility since 2013 and represents what the 1,000 or so workers at the site hope will be a regular occurrence over the coming years.
Discussions remain ongoing, according to BAE Systems officials, on options for a further two OPVs, adding to the three already under construction, disclosing that some preparatory work for Boat 4 had begun.

The two options in the River-class build, Boats 4 and 5, have slight variants in their design compared to the first three vessels, primarily due to the emissions requirements having to be brought into line with the latest SOLAS rules.
Construction of Forth began in October 2014 while Medway, the second of class, began in June 2015. Work on the future HMS Trent began in October 2015.

Iain Stevenson, managing director at BAE Systems Naval Ships, said: ‘HMS Forth will continue with fit out until Christmas and then the ship we head for sea trials around March [2017]. Medway is consolidating in Govan and Trent is just behind that.'
Sea trials for Medway are lined up for Q4 in 2017, ahead of a handover later in the quarter. For Trent it will be the middle of 2018 when sea trials will take place, with a handover scheduled for Q3 of that year.

Forth entered the water for the first time on 13 August in what is the first application of a new method in ship design and construction for BAE Systems.
Using 3D design software the company says it is able to produce a much more complete vessel by the time it hits the water and is aiming for around 80% of future vessels completed inside and out before their launch.
Indeed, the dramatic concept and site of a ship launch is being replaced by more thorough, effective, but less visually spectacular float ups.
The design for the Batch 2 River-class OPVs are variants of the design already in service in Brazil and Thailand with some modifications in terms of size and general outfitting, with the largest changes to the ships combat management systems.

BAE Systems says that the vessels will be globally deployable and capable of patrol in environments as diverse as the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.
The vessels have caused some controversy over their potential uses for a navy already shorn of its past capability. The number of T26 Global Combat Ships will drop to eight, down from 13 originally planned, with five light frigates due to bulk up numbers at a future date.
With the T45 air defence destroyers all having to undergo extensive and invasive engineering work to try and deal with power outages and difficulties operating in the warm seas of the Gulf, it may well be that any boats are better than no boats for the senior service.

https://www.shephardmedia.com/news/imps-news/cylde-reverberates-river-drumbeat/


Uns updates nas páginas da WestSea, referentes á construção dos NRP SINES e NRP SETUBAL idênticos a este da BAE Systems, eram muito bem vindos.......e descansavam um pouco, os intervenientes neste fórum que se preocupam com a situação a nível de navios da nossa Marinha
Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Setembro 02, 2016, 09:59:56 am
http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2016/09/01/lancamento-do-hms-forth-primeiro-opv-classe-river-batch-ii/ (http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2016/09/01/lancamento-do-hms-forth-primeiro-opv-classe-river-batch-ii/)
Citar
O futuro HMS Forth, o primeiro da nova classe “River” Batch II de navios-patrulha oceânicos (OPV – Offshore Patrol Vessel) da Royal Navy, foi lançado em 13 de agosto e depois movido para Scotstoun, para os acabamentos finais e testes de mar. A classe será composta por quatro navios. Esta classe é semelhante à “Amazonas” da Marinha do Brasil.

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Setembro 02, 2016, 03:06:54 pm
(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/HMS_Severn.jpg)

Four modern River class OPVs to be decommissioned

HMS Severn on patrol on UK territorial waters

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/post-sdsr-optimism-disappears-over-the-horizon/

Citar
5. The SDSR 2015 made it clear that the 'Batch 1' River class HMS Tyne, Severn and Mersey would be decommissioned to be replaced by very similar new Batch 2 River class OPVS currently being built in Glasgow.  The Batch 1 were all commissioned in 2003 and will have only served in the RN for around 15 years. It is a dismal waste to decommission these relatively modern vessels when they have plenty of life in them and we are so short of hulls. With a crew of just 30 and an annual running cost of around £20M, it is pitiful that we cannot afford to retain them in some role. (More detailed discussion here  (http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/hms-severn-deploys-to-the-caribbean/#OPV2)). Furthermore it is now clear Falklands patrol vessel HMS Clyde, only commissioned in 2007, will also be retired and replaced by a new vessel.   (..)

Of course these ships will make very attractive second-hand purchases for overseas navies and the temptation to flog them off will probably be too much for the Treasury.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Setembro 02, 2016, 04:15:38 pm
(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/HMS_Severn.jpg)

Four modern River class OPVs to be decommissioned

HMS Severn on patrol on UK territorial waters

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/post-sdsr-optimism-disappears-over-the-horizon/

Citar
5. The SDSR 2015 made it clear that the 'Batch 1' River class HMS Tyne, Severn and Mersey would be decommissioned to be replaced by very similar new Batch 2 River class OPVS currently being built in Glasgow.  The Batch 1 were all commissioned in 2003 and will have only served in the RN for around 15 years. It is a dismal waste to decommission these relatively modern vessels when they have plenty of life in them and we are so short of hulls. With a crew of just 30 and an annual running cost of around £20M, it is pitiful that we cannot afford to retain them in some role. (More detailed discussion here  (http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/hms-severn-deploys-to-the-caribbean/#OPV2)). Furthermore it is now clear Falklands patrol vessel HMS Clyde, only commissioned in 2007, will also be retired and replaced by a new vessel.   (..)

Of course these ships will make very attractive second-hand purchases for overseas navies and the temptation to flog them off will probably be too much for the Treasury.
Lá vai Portugal e encerra-se a questão do NPO 2000 (por 77 milhões devem trazer os 4 e ainda mais qualquer coisa)...  8) :o

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy os novos OPV
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 02, 2016, 05:51:22 pm
(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/HMS_Severn.jpg)

Four modern River class OPVs to be decommissioned

HMS Severn on patrol on UK territorial waters

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/post-sdsr-optimism-disappears-over-the-horizon/

Citar
5. The SDSR 2015 made it clear that the 'Batch 1' River class HMS Tyne, Severn and Mersey would be decommissioned to be replaced by very similar new Batch 2 River class OPVS currently being built in Glasgow.  The Batch 1 were all commissioned in 2003 and will have only served in the RN for around 15 years. It is a dismal waste to decommission these relatively modern vessels when they have plenty of life in them and we are so short of hulls. With a crew of just 30 and an annual running cost of around £20M, it is pitiful that we cannot afford to retain them in some role. (More detailed discussion here  (http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/hms-severn-deploys-to-the-caribbean/#OPV2)). Furthermore it is now clear Falklands patrol vessel HMS Clyde, only commissioned in 2007, will also be retired and replaced by a new vessel.   (..)

Of course these ships will make very attractive second-hand purchases for overseas navies and the temptation to flog them off will probably be too much for the Treasury.
Lá vai Portugal e encerra-se a questão do NPO 2000 (por 77 milhões devem trazer os 4 e ainda mais qualquer coisa)...  8) :o

Saudações

Se os adquirir-mos lá temos mais do mesmo como os Viana do Castelo ou seja, mas vá-se lá saber o que vai naquelas cabecinhas pensadoras:

.................Lack of hangar – a critical weakness

If we remain optimistic and assume that the new OPVs will be additions to the fleet rather than just replacements, then the design of these ships represents a major missed opportunity. If these ships were designed with a hangar their potential for overseas service would be transformed. Although the new ships will have a flight deck, it is not practical to embark a helicopter for an extended period without the protection and facilities for maintenance that a hanger provides. A helicopter gives a warship a quantum leap in the speed at which it can respond to events as well as its offensive capability. In a more serious conflict a helicopter can help mitigate for the OPVs light armament. (Virtually unarmed patrol ship HMS Endurance was able to by send her helicopters into action in the Falklands/South Georgia operation of 1982). The Amazonas design provides space for 2 standard (20ft) TEU shipping containers to be lashed to the deck and one these could perhaps be used as a shelter for a small UAV.

Even with the best radar and sensor fit, a surface ship can only survey a fraction of the area that airborne assets can cover. There are plenty of OPV designs that include a hangar and are comparable to the BAE design, potentially offering the RN a far more powerful and flexible ship. If we had used one of these designs as a starting point instead of the ‘bare bones’ Amazonas, it would not have cost much to make minor changes to suit RN needs.........

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/Diagram_zpscfrpw5sj.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/Diagram_zpscfrpw5sj.jpg.html)

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/hms-severn-deploys-to-the-caribbean/#OPV2

Olha que estás enganado, :nice: :nice: :nice: pois seguindo os critérios de orçamentos para aquisições de equipamentos para as FFAA, o actual MDN só deverá atribuir 20 milhões para aquisição dos ditos, :G-clever: :G-clever: :G-clever: :G-clever: :G-clever: :G-clever:
Aposto que quem fica com eles é o BRASIL, e faz muito bem fica com seis unidades idênticas!

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy os novos OPV
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 02, 2016, 06:47:54 pm
Já agora......

http://ukarmedforcescommentary.blogspot.pt/2014/10/opvs-that-come-with-lots-of-questions.html
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Setembro 02, 2016, 07:41:59 pm
Resumindo: os bifes vão fazendo encomendas (por motivos contratuais), de forma a manter os estaleiros activos, mas como a RN não tem pessoal para guarnecer os novos navios, desfazem-se de navios relativamente novos e assim já há guarnições  suficientes.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Setembro 02, 2016, 07:45:02 pm
(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/HMS_Severn.jpg)

Four modern River class OPVs to be decommissioned

HMS Severn on patrol on UK territorial waters

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/post-sdsr-optimism-disappears-over-the-horizon/

Citar
5. The SDSR 2015 made it clear that the 'Batch 1' River class HMS Tyne, Severn and Mersey would be decommissioned to be replaced by very similar new Batch 2 River class OPVS currently being built in Glasgow.  The Batch 1 were all commissioned in 2003 and will have only served in the RN for around 15 years. It is a dismal waste to decommission these relatively modern vessels when they have plenty of life in them and we are so short of hulls. With a crew of just 30 and an annual running cost of around £20M, it is pitiful that we cannot afford to retain them in some role. (More detailed discussion here  (http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/hms-severn-deploys-to-the-caribbean/#OPV2)). Furthermore it is now clear Falklands patrol vessel HMS Clyde, only commissioned in 2007, will also be retired and replaced by a new vessel.   (..)

Of course these ships will make very attractive second-hand purchases for overseas navies and the temptation to flog them off will probably be too much for the Treasury.
Lá vai Portugal e encerra-se a questão do NPO 2000 (por 77 milhões devem trazer os 4 e ainda mais qualquer coisa)...  8) :o

Saudações

Mais depressa vão parar ao Brasil
Título: Re: Royal Navy os novos OPV
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 02, 2016, 08:28:20 pm
Resumindo: os bifes vão fazendo encomendas (por motivos contratuais), de forma a manter os estaleiros activos, mas como a RN não tem pessoal para guarnecer os novos navios, desfazem-se de navios relativamente novos e assim já há guarnições  suficientes.

E pergunto eu, com negócios deste género quem fica a ganhar ???
E quem paga estes negócios ruinosos para o estado Britânico ???

O que tenho lido com os custos dos novos OPV da RN, é aflitivo, derrapagens atrás de derrapagens em Navios muitíssimo caros, pelo menos o dobro de um Classe Viana do Castelo, o mesmo armamento principal, sensivelmente o mesmo deslocamento e autonomia e guarnição e a  mesma limitação no que concerne a operar com Heli orgânico, sem hangar . Traineira por traineira a nossa é bem mais barata !!!!

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/Diagram_zpscfrpw5sj.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/Diagram_zpscfrpw5sj.jpg.html)

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/NPO-NRP-Figueira-da-Foz-1024x475_zpsuaymrbpb.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/NPO-NRP-Figueira-da-Foz-1024x475_zpsuaymrbpb.jpg.html)

Se tivéssemos oferecido à RN o nosso projecto que é bem mais barato, também não deveria ter ganho.......quanto mais caro o Navio é mais se pode roubar, não é SÓ cá no burgo que isso acontece !!!

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Setembro 03, 2016, 01:17:09 pm
(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/HMS-Forth-1014x487.jpg)

HMS Forth

Exclusive interview: Junior Defence Procurement Minister opens up about his shipbuilding heartbreak

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/exclusive-interview-junior-defence-procurement-minister-opens-up-about-his-shipbuilding-heartbreak/

Citar
Question (...) so how much will building HMS Forth cost?

Answer:  HMS Forth will cost £116 Million, Britain can be proud that the Royal Navy will own the most expensive OPV in the world
Título: Re: Royal Navy os novos OPV
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 03, 2016, 01:24:30 pm
(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/HMS-Forth-1014x487.jpg)

HMS Forth

Exclusive interview: Junior Defence Procurement Minister opens up about his shipbuilding heartbreak

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/exclusive-interview-junior-defence-procurement-minister-opens-up-about-his-shipbuilding-heartbreak/

Citar
Question (...) so how much will building HMS Forth cost?

Answer:  HMS Forth will cost £116 Million, Britain can be proud that the Royal Navy will own the most expensive OPV in the world

Muito bom, com estes £ 116M que correspondem a cerca de € 140 M tínhamos verba para comprar três Viana do Castelo e ainda sobrava para comprar três OM 76mm para as Vasco da Gama !
Título: Re: Royal Navy os novos OPV
Enviado por: mafets em Setembro 03, 2016, 06:35:45 pm
(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/HMS-Forth-1014x487.jpg)

HMS Forth

Exclusive interview: Junior Defence Procurement Minister opens up about his shipbuilding heartbreak

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/exclusive-interview-junior-defence-procurement-minister-opens-up-about-his-shipbuilding-heartbreak/

Citar
Question (...) so how much will building HMS Forth cost?

Answer:  HMS Forth will cost £116 Million, Britain can be proud that the Royal Navy will own the most expensive OPV in the world

Muito bom, com estes £ 116M que correspondem a cerca de € 130 M tínhamos verba para comprar três Viana do Castelo e ainda sobrava para comprar três OM 76mm para as Vasco da Gama !
Fonix. 130 milhões por este OPV. Só pode ter os cagatórios em ouro maçiço.   ;)  Os "desvios" do NPO2000 ao pé deste é uma brincadeira de crianças, mas depois a culpa é dos migrantes para justificar o brexit. Serve que nem uma luva por exemplo para senhores como estes continuarem a "financiar-se" sem restrições da UE, ou seja a roubarem à vontade...  ::) :P :o ;D

Cumprimentos 
Título: Re: Royal Navy Type 31 Frigate
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 27, 2016, 05:05:57 pm
BMT Defence Services offering to the Type 31 Frigate programme, the Venator-110, is emerging as the most serious contender, let’s take a look.

As announced in the Strategic Defence & Security Review, the government intends to launch a concept study and then design and build a new class of future light frigates to complement eight Type 26 Frigates.

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/Venator-110-GPLF-seascape-stbd-turn-c-BMT-Defence-Services-2016-1021x580_zps4yhbjolp.png) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/Venator-110-GPLF-seascape-stbd-turn-c-BMT-Defence-Services-2016-1021x580_zps4yhbjolp.png.html)

 
While it was previously expected that the “five lighter frigates” mentioned in November would be heavily stripped down general purpose variants of the Type 26 Frigate, other contenders seem to be emerging.

The Joint Requirements Oversight Committee is expected to determine the top-level capability for the new General Purpose Frigate soon and there is an expectation that the requirement will be met by an off-the-shelf design.

One of the most obvious contenders for the programme is an offering from BMT, the Venator-110.

There are three variants of the Venator-110, each designed to suit specific roles and levels of affordability. The three variants are the ‘General Purpose Light Frigate’, the ‘Patrol Frigate’ and the much lighter ‘Patrol Ship’.

The General Purpose Light Frigate variant is, clearly, designed to meet the expected requirements of the Type 31 Frigate programme.

The design is billed by BMT as the “optimum balance between capability, survivability and cost“.

With an estimated displacement of 4,000 tonnes, a top speed in excess of 25 knots and accommodation for over 115 personnel in addition to a crew size of 85 personnel the craft is “designed to cover a multitude of general purpose and specialist roles”.

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/ven110_zpsevkkdahw.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/ven110_zpsevkkdahw.jpg.html)
IMAGE: BMT Defence Services

BMT also describe the vessel as being intended to counter the recent problems the Royal Navy have had with regards to ships becoming ever more expensive and complicated, resulting in fewer of them ever being built:

“The overriding design intent behind Venator-110 is to blend a lean manned and adaptable capability with an affordable procurement cost, within the dimensions of a Light Frigate.

This intent, facilitated by a ‘Middle Out’ design philosophy, is essential to avoid the spiral of escalating platform requirements that can result in ever larger and more expensive warships.”

With a range in excess of 7,000nm augmented by replenishment at sea, the ship can reach and maintain a presence in an area of operations anywhere around the globe.

In April this year, BMT’s Venator-110 hullform started hydrodynamic testing at QinetiQ’s Haslar facility.

Weapons

The Vertical Launch Silos on the vessel will cater for a range of missiles and decoys, including the quad-packed Sea Ceptor missile that will arm the Type 26 frigates.

In addition, the vessel can also be fitted with automated 30mm cannons, heavy machine guns, soft-kill systems, anti surface and anti-submarine weaponry.

The design of the vessel presents a tailorable choice of Vertical Launch Silo (VLS) configurations, ranging from 24 missiles in two 3-cell silos to 48 missiles in four 3-cell silos or even 24 missiles in two 3-cell silos in addition to an 8 cell strike length silo.

Images below via BMT show a few examples of how the vessel could be configured.



(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/venconf3BMT-120x120_zpshdhylc5m.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/venconf3BMT-120x120_zpshdhylc5m.jpg.html)

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/venconf2BMT-120x120_zpspoqsxgw4.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/venconf2BMT-120x120_zpspoqsxgw4.jpg.html)

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/venconf1BMT-120x120_zps213zicmz.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/venconf1BMT-120x120_zps213zicmz.jpg.html)

With regards to the gun system, the design can support a medium calibre gun system including 57mm, 76mm, 114mm and 127mm calibres in addition to various general purpose machine guns and soft-kill defences.

There is currently little information on the sensors the vessel may carry.

Manning & Survivability

With the perceived manpower shortage in the fleet, the manning levels of any solution to the Type 31 requirement will be a key factor.

In what BMT describe as its ‘lean manned’ form the vessel is capable of maintaining a routine operational capability found on most warships.

Figures suggest that even in the full combat configuration, the core crew would consist of 85 personnel, capable of maintaining 24 hour operations.

BMT has conducted a series of simulations with this core crew. This reportedly included warfighting scenarios such as Naval Gunfire Support operations in addition to simultaneous internal firefighting, the simulations validated the figure.

Interestingly, the option to forward position the ship, allowing the crew to rotate while the ship stays deployed (much like what’s currently done with the MCM fleet) is made more practical by the lean nature of the core crew.

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/14107637_1168381986541848_8267424969434627296_o_zps6bguvzad.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/14107637_1168381986541848_8267424969434627296_o_zps6bguvzad.jpg.html)
BMT’s Venator-110 future frigate offering breaking away from a Tide class tanker and Queen Elizabeth class carrier.

Forward basing in this manner may be considered for the class.

The information regarding plans for the Type 31 being based abroad came to light in a speech by Admiral Sir Philip Jones, First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff, delivered the Lord Mayor of London’s annual Defence and Security lecture in Mansion House.

“Given our long standing defence relationships in the Middle East, it is certain that a Royal Navy task group – centred on a Queen Elizabeth-class carrier – will regularly deploy East of Suez.

And it will be perfectly possible, should we wish, for Type 31 frigates to permanently operate from the Gulf region or from Asia-Pacific in the decades ahead.

These are examples of what we COULD do and not yet policy, and I am never complacent about the challenges we continue to face in recruiting and retaining the very best men and women in a competitive employment market.”

Survivability is a key factor throughout the design of the vessel, especially when it comes to propulsion.

Separated main engine spaces each containing two independent prime movers and two independent shafts feature in order to increase the chance the vessel can maintain propulsion even following major damage from hostile action.

The Venator-110 design adopts a Combined Diesel And Diesel (CODAD) configuration and features two shafts combined with four prime movers.

The design uses off the shelf equipment, which BMT say ensures simple maintenance procedures and leaves room for future capability growth while requiring minimum levels of personnel to operate.

Where would the vessels be built?

The Prime Minister at the time at the Strategic Defence & Security Review, David Cameron, confirmed that the five future light frigates mentioned in the defence review will be built in Scotland.

This is in addition to the eight anti-submarine warfare frigates and two extra patrol vessels on top of the three already being constructed at the Glasgow yards.

David Cameron told the House of Commons:

“There will be eight of the Type 26’s and at least another five of the new type of frigate, probably more, and they can be built in Scotland if the conditions are right. The only way these ships wouldn’t be built in Scotland is if Scotland was independent and didn’t have the national resources of the Royal Navy.”

Mr Cameron also told the Commons that the new class of frigates would be “more affordable than the Type 26 which will allow us to buy more of them for the Royal Navy so that by the 2030’s we can further increase the total number of Royal Navy frigates and destroyers.”

Summary

The Venator-110 design by BMT represents perhaps the most practical solution to the future light frigate needs of the Royal Navy, the product emphasises a few of the most used buzzwords on frigate design, namely affordability, modularity and survivability while still seemingly being able to fulfil a war-fighting role.

The robust and flexible baseline design of the vessel would appear to allow a range of roles and capabilities to be developed over the service life of the vessel, what’s called ‘future proofing’. This capability allows the ship to be adapted to a role with much less effort than some other designs.

We can only hope for “at least” five of them.

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/venator-110-britains-future-light-frigate/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Outubro 01, 2016, 07:32:49 pm
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CtrgEgTWcAAEFcq.jpg)

Impression of how the UK's new nuclear submarines may look

Building to start on new nuclear submarines as government announces  £1.3 billion investment

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/building-to-start-on-new-nuclear-submarines-as-government-announces-13-billion-investment

(..) As part of our £178 billion equipment plan, the programme will be supported by a defence budget that will rises every year until the end of the decade, meeting the NATO commitment to spend two per cent of GDP on defence .

Defence Secretary Michael Fallon said:

• "Britain's ballistic missile submarines are the ultimate guarantee of our nation's safety - we use them every day to deter the most extreme threats.

• We cannot know what new dangers we might face in the 2030s, 2040s and 2050s so we are acting now to replace them.

• Along with increasing the defence budget to buy new ships, planes and armoured vehicles, this shows that this government will never gamberro with our national security."

The investment will support delivery of the manifesto commitment on which this Government was elected, to retain the Trident-based continuous at sea deterrent -the ultimate guarantee of our safety- and build the new fleet of four Successor Ballistic Missile submarines (...)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 04, 2016, 09:42:26 pm
HMS Westminster first Type 23 frigate to complete life extension upgrade

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/hms-westminster-first-type-23-frigate-to-complete-life-extension-upgrade_zpsftq8xf51.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/hms-westminster-first-type-23-frigate-to-complete-life-extension-upgrade_zpsftq8xf51.jpg.html)
Photo: BAE Systems

Work on upgrades to the Royal Navy’s Portsmouth-based Type 23 frigate, HMS Westminster, have been completed at Portsmouth Naval Base, UK.

The multi-million pound refit on the 24-year-old Duke Class frigate has followed several busy years of deployments across the globe and includes upgrades to weapons and marine systems that will enhance her warfighting capabilities for years ahead.

The improvements to HMS Westminster include the installation of BAE Systems’ Artisan 3D radar, which can monitor more than 800 objects simultaneously from 200 to 200,000 meters away and the Sea-Ceptor air defense weapon system, which will protect against aerial threats.

She has also been installed with a refurbished 4.5 inch MK8 naval gun, which can fire up to two dozen high explosive shells per minute to combat surface, aircraft and shore targets. Additionally, HMS Westminster’s hull has received a coat of anti-fouling paint, providing protection from algae and marine organism growth on operations.

Structural improvements include replacing the bridge, upgrading the galley and refurbishing mess decks and communal areas for the ship’s company, who recently moved back on board.

HMS Westminster will now undergo a series of harbor-based and sea trials ahead of an anticipated return to service in spring 2017.

Richard Dingley, BAE Systems Maritime Services, said: “HMS Westminster’s upkeep program confirms the company’s ship support capabilities and sustains the Royal Navy’s desire for the long term availability of their ships. We are continuing to deliver support to more than half of the Royal Navy’s surface fleet. This includes technical services, training solutions and modernization programs, as well as maintenance, repair and upgrades to ships and equipment. Our attention will now focus on returning to the fleet as an operational warship next year.”

The image below, provided by BAE Systems, illustrates the upgrades HMS Westminster received during her refit.

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/hms-westminster-first-type-23-frigate-to-complete-life-extension-upgrade-1_zpscz3gbinl.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/hms-westminster-first-type-23-frigate-to-complete-life-extension-upgrade-1_zpscz3gbinl.jpg.html)
hms-westminster-first-type-23-frigate-to-complete-life-extension-upgrade-1

https://navaltoday.com/2016/10/04/hms-westminster-first-type-23-frigate-to-complete-life-extension-upgrade/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Outubro 09, 2016, 03:53:08 pm
 Royal Navy ship that has had £29million worth of refits now axed four years early

    21:27, 6 Oct 2016

RFA Diligence is the only vessel dedicated to repairing stricken Navy boats and submarines at sea

(http://i1.mirror.co.uk/incoming/article8993562.ece/ALTERNATES/s615/B35XXE.jpg)
 Naval chiefs planned to use RFA Diligence until 2020 but she will go on sale soon

A Royal Navy support ship that underwent almost £29m worth of refits in the last three years is being axed four years early.

RFA Diligence, the only vessel dedicated to repairing stricken Navy boats and submarines at sea, is being sold in the latest cost-cutting Tory move.

Major revamps were carried out from June 2012 to February 2013 and from September 2014 to February 2015, costing £17.6m and £11m respectively.

Naval chiefs planned to keep her in service until 2020.

But the 10,595-tonne vessel will be withdrawn before the end of this year.

Defence Minster Earl Howe admitted in a parliamentary answer: “Taking into account Diligence's age and increasing obsolescence, it was concluded that retaining her in service would no longer represent good value for money to the taxpayer and the decision was taken to retire her early.”

Former Head of the Navy, Admiral Lord West, branded it ‘a debacle’.

He said: “It’s a waste.

“The first refit was done to extend her life to 2020, that was the whole point.

“The next refit was done because there were certain regulations that had to be complied with.

“When you add the two together, that’s quite a lot of money.

“There is insufficient money in the defence programme, and particularly the Navy programme, to run the things that should be being run.

“That’s why things are being squeezed.”

The former Security Minister feared RFA Argus, the hospital ship sent to West Africa in 2014 to help ebola relief, could also be sold or scrapped.

He said: “I think it’s quite likely we will find that will go too.”

The peer raised wider concerns about the Navy, with the six £1bn Type 45 destroyers needing vital engine replacements and ongoing delays to the Type 26 frigate projects.

Just eight vessels will replace the existing Type 23 frigates, with vague plans for five ‘lighter frigates’.

Lord West said: “There are real problems for the Naval programme and ensuring it is being properly funded and developed – and Diligence is part of that.

“I don’t think they intend to run down the Navy, but because of lack of funding that is effectively what’s happening.”

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/royal-navy-ship-29million-worth-8994164
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: nelson38899 em Novembro 15, 2016, 07:17:42 pm
Citar
The Telegraph reported that UK Royal Navy warships will be left without anti-ship missiles  and be forced to rely on naval guns because of cost-cutting.

The Navy’s Harpoon missiles will retire from the fleet’s frigates and destroyers in 2018 without a replacement, while there will also be a two year gap without helicopter-launched anti-shipping missiles.

Naval sources said the decision was “like Nelson deciding to get rid of his cannons and go back to muskets” and one senior former officer said warships would “no longer be able to go toe-to-toe with the Chinese or Russians”.

Harpoon missiles are unlikely to be replaced for up to a decade, naval sources said, leaving warships armed only with their 4.5in Mk 8 guns for anti-ship warfare.

The Harpoon is an all-weather, over-the-horizon, anti-ship missile system, developed and manufactured by McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing Defense, Space & Security). In 2004, Boeing delivered the 7,000th Harpoon unit since the weapon’s introduction in 1977. The missile system has also been further developed into a land-strike weapon, the Standoff Land Attack Missile (SLAM).

A spokesman for the Navy said: “All Royal Navy ships carry a range of offensive and defensive weapons systems.  Backed by a rising defence budget and a £178 billion equipment plan, upgrade options to all our weapons are kept under constant review.”
http://defence-blog.com/news/the-telegraph-uk-royal-navy-warships-will-be-left-without-anti-ship-missiles.html (http://defence-blog.com/news/the-telegraph-uk-royal-navy-warships-will-be-left-without-anti-ship-missiles.html)

Os ingleses tem um olho para a sua defesa, que até me assusta.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Novembro 15, 2016, 08:26:01 pm
São mísseis antigos, alguns com mais de 30 anos. Mas não deixa de ser fantástico que a RN se desfaça da sua principal arma ofensiva de superfície sem um substituto à vista.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 16, 2016, 12:29:12 pm
São mísseis antigos, alguns com mais de 30 anos. Mas não deixa de ser fantástico que a RN se desfaça da sua principal arma ofensiva de superfície sem um substituto à vista.
É a RN a inovar. Não foram os primeiros a ter uma classe de Contra-Torpedeiros sem torpedos Anti-Submarinos?  ;D ;)

Citar
Armament:   
Anti-air missiles:
Sea Viper air defence system, with a 48-cell Sylver A50 VLS, for mix of up to 48:
Aster 15 missiles (range 1.7–30 km)
Aster 30 missiles (range 3–120 km)
Anti-ship missiles:
2 × quad Harpoon launchers[N 1]
Guns:
1 × BAE 4.5 inch Mk 8 naval gun
2 × Oerlikon 30 mm guns
2 × Phalanx CIWS
2 × Miniguns
6 × General purpose machine guns

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Daring_(D32) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Daring_(D32))

(https://defencyclopedia.files.wordpress.com/2015/05/120416-n-pk218-028_royal_navy_destroyer_hms_daring_d_32.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Novembro 18, 2016, 04:21:32 pm
E pelos vistos não têm só falta de material, mas também de pessoal especializado!

http://www.lopinion.fr/blog/secret-defense/faute-personnel-royal-navy-demande-marins-a-france-114378
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: perdadetempo em Novembro 19, 2016, 08:18:49 pm
E pelos vistos não têm só falta de material, mas também de pessoal especializado!

http://www.lopinion.fr/blog/secret-defense/faute-personnel-royal-navy-demande-marins-a-france-114378

E já acontece/ia às uns tempos:

http://coastguard.dodlive.mil/2014/07/a-royal-relationship/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: olisipo em Novembro 21, 2016, 03:18:21 pm
Citar
(http://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/660/cpsprodpb/C357/production//_92570005_hms_richmond.jpg)

HMS Richmond  is one of the Navy's fleet of Type 23 frigates

Royal Navy 'woefully low' on warships

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-38044967

Britain's defences are at risk amid uncertainty over plans to replace the 'woefully low" numbers of Royal Navy warships, MPs have been warned.

The Royal Navy has 19 frigates and destroyers, but a Defence Select Committees report says that number could fall unless there is a clear timetable set out for replacing older vessels.

It says the UK could "lack the maritime strength" to meet potential threats.

But the Ministry of Defence says it is investing billions in the Navy's fleet.

The  Committee's report  (http://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/defence-committee/) examines the MoD's plans to modernise the Royal Navy's escorts fleet -including the introduction of two new classes of frigate and the enforced refit of engines  on certain destroyers.

MPs said they had "serious concerns" about the funding and timetable of the new fleet, and the country's ability to handle threats from areas like Russia.

Cutting steel on new frigates in 2017

Sounding out the Senior Service

They also attacked the MoD for the "extraordinary mistakes" in the design of Type 45 destroyers after it emerged they had faulty engines unable to operate continuously in warm waters.

"The UK's enduring presence in the Gulf should have made it a key requirement for the engines. The fact that it was not was an inexcusable failing and one which must be not repeated", the MP's report said.

And it aided: "Failure to guarantee this would put this email personnel and ships of the Royal Navy in danger, with potentially dangerous consequences"

Modernising the Royal Navy

(http://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/033B/production/_92272800_globalcombatship624cj.png)

*  Ageing Type 23 frigates to be replaced by eight Type 26 frigates (pictured above) plus five General Purpose frigates.

*  First Type 23 ship due to retire from service in 2023.

*  Defence Select Committee says it not convinced MoD can deliver to this schedule.

*  MPs also want detailed costs and timetable for refit of faulty engines on Type 45 destroyers.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Defence committee chairman Julian Lewis said MPS were "putting the MoD on notice to deliver the modernisation programme on time.

He said: "For decades, the numbers of Royal Navy escort vessels have been severely in decline.

"The fleet is now way below the critical mass required for the many tasks which could confront it, if the international scene continues to deteriorate".

The MoD says it is investing billions of pounds in two new aircraft carriers as well as new warships and submarines with the goal of increasing the size of the Royal Navy.

"This major programme of investment will ensure that the Royal Navy remains one of the world's most modern and powerful navies with a genuine global reach", it said in a statement.

It added that the Type 45 destroyer was "hugely capable ship, but it was "committed to improving" the vessel's "power and propulsion system".

Título: Re: Royal Navy OPV classe RIVER
Enviado por: tenente em Dezembro 08, 2016, 03:51:10 pm
UK starts construction of two more Royal Navy offshore patrol vessels

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/uk-starts-construction-of-two-more-royal-navy-offshore-patrol-vessels_zpsjgxdkfsm.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/uk-starts-construction-of-two-more-royal-navy-offshore-patrol-vessels_zpsjgxdkfsm.jpg.html)

The UK Ministry of Defence announced Thursday that work on two new offshore patrol vessels for the Royal Navy will get underway with a £278M contract with shipbuilder BAE Systems.
The two new vessels were named HMS Tamar and HMS Spey.
Preparation works were already underway and Minister for Defence Procurement, Harriett Baldwin, will mark the official start of production by attending the steel cutting ceremony for HMS Tamar at the Govan shipyard in Scotland.
The contract with BAE Systems will bring the Royal Navy’s fleet of next generation River-class OPVs from three to five ships.
These five ships will begin to enter service in 2018, in support of the Royal Navy’s mission to protect national interests at home and around the world.
According to the MoD, the £287 million contract includes the building of HMS Tamar and HMS Spey as well as support for all five of the new ships.
“This contract will deliver two more modern Offshore Patrol Vessels, HMS Tamar and HMS Spey, for the Royal Navy and safeguard vital shipbuilding skills and hundreds of jobs in Scotland,” Baldwin said.
“Protected by a rising Defence budget, the OPV programme is an important part of the Government’s £178 billion plan to ensure our armed forces have the equipment they need.”
HMS Tamar and HMS Spey will be manufactured at the Govan shipyard before being floated to Scotstoun to be fitted out. They are expected to be delivered in 2019.
Like the other vessels of its class, HMS Tamar and HMS Spey will carry out counter-terrorism, anti-piracy, anti-smuggling and maritime defence operations, and are expected to be equipped with a 30mm cannon and a flight deck capable of receiving a Merlin helicopter.
Displacing around 2,000 tonnes, they will have a maximum speed of 24 knots and will be able to sail 5,500 nautical miles before having to resupply.
BAE Systems is currently exploring a number of export opportunities with international customers for OPV. The Brazilian Navy operates three Amazonas-class corvettes which are based on the design of the River Class OPV and were built at BAE Systems’ facilities in the UK.

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/BAEvidscreen_zpsl1wedd31.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/BAEvidscreen_zpsl1wedd31.jpg.html)

https://navaltoday.com/2016/12/08/uk-starts-construction-of-two-more-royal-navy-offshore-patrol-vessels/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Janeiro 20, 2017, 09:44:15 am
Confirma-se o novo Merlin AEW: http://www.janes.com/article/67041/uk-orders-crowsnest-helicopter-radar-systems (http://www.janes.com/article/67041/uk-orders-crowsnest-helicopter-radar-systems)

Citar
The United Kingdom has awarded a GBP269 million (USD327 million) contract to Lockheed Martin to build Crowsnest airborne surveillance and control (ASaC) systems for the Royal Navy.

Crowsnest is the replacement for the service's Sea King ASaC.7 (SKASaC) helicopters, due to retire in September 2018. In total 10 Crowsnest systems are being bought, which all 30 of the Royal Navy's Leonardo AW101 Merlin HM.2 helicopters will be modified to carry, as required.

The UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) selected Lockheed Martin UK as prime contractor for the programme in May 2015, with Thales to work as a subcontractor. The MoD opted for Crowsnest to be based around updating the Thales Searchwater mechanically scanned array radar and Cerberus sensor suite systems used on the current SKASaC helicopters. According to the MoD the contract also includes GBP9 million of spares.

In a statement announcing the awarding of the contract on 16 January Harriett Baldwin, Minister for Defence Procurement, said, "Crowsnest will provide a vital intelligence, surveillance, and tracking system for our new Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers, capable of detecting any potential threats at sea."

Speaking to IHS Jane's on 17 January, a Lockheed Martin spokesperson said that the first 'production role' Crowsnest kit is due to be delivered to the MoD in October 2018, with a first production aircraft available in June 2019. The system is then expected to enter service with an initial operating capability on the Merlin HM.2 in 2020.

The Crowsnest radome is mounted to the side of a Merlin helicopter, and can be lowered for operation and raised for landing.
(http://www.janes.com/images/assets/041/67041/1631239_-_main.jpg)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Janeiro 24, 2017, 03:49:32 pm
The British Accidentally Fired A Ballistic Missile At The U.S. And It's Fine, Everything's Fine

The British Royal Navy was conducting a test of one of its submarine-launched ballistic missiles last summer, when the damn thing ended up heading straight for the United States. Not the Russians. Not the Chinese. Not ISIS. But the tea and crumpet Brits almost hit us with a missile.

It’s unclear exactly what went wrong with the test that took place on June 20th of last year, as the British government is keeping the details of the failed launch a secret. The Sunday Times, however, is reporting that a top naval source said the missile, which was unarmed at the time of the launch, veered off in the wrong direction towards America:

The Sunday Times can reveal that a Trident II D5 missile — which can kill millions when armed with nuclear warheads — experienced an alarming failure after being launched from a British submarine off the coast of Florida in June last year.

It was the only firing test of a British nuclear missile in four years and raises serious questions about the reliability and safety of the weapons system. The failure prompted a news blackout by Downing Street that has remained in place until this weekend.

Failure to disclose the error was described as “bizarre and stupid” by Admiral Lord West, former first sea lord and chief of the naval staff.
With each missile armed with up to five nuclear warheads, a Trident can kill millions of people. It has a range of more than 4,600 miles.

 
After whatever it is went wrong actually went wrong, the missile automatically entered into a self-destruct sequence, a U.S. military source told CNN.

There is good reason why the British would want to keep the failed launch secret. First of all, the Trident missile is really the only nuclear deterrent they have, with no air-dropped bombs and no land-based nuclear weapons. Unlike the United States, the United Kingdom has no nuclear triad.

But perhaps more important to those in charge of the British government, less than a month after the failed launch the British parliament voted to renew the Trident program on schedule, instead of abandoning its nuclear deterrent altogether.

It’s fucked up to laugh at, but, of all the people you think would have almost hit Americans in 2016, you’d never think it was the Brits, right? Thing is, the Trident—and Britain’s nuclear submarine force as a whole—are largely considered to be pretty reliable. As the BBC notes, the U.K. has conducted at least six Trident tests since 2000, and we haven’t heard of a single other mishap involving those.

But, you know, given that they could’ve smashed into a nice piece of America, you’d think Prime Minister Teresa May could’ve said, “Our bad. We ain’t tryin’ to kill y’all. We just fucked up. We still good, right?”

I mean, we did sell the Trident to the Brits. Least they could have done was say we ain’t trying to hit you with them.

http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/the-british-accidentally-fired-a-ballistic-missile-at-t-1791511108
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Janeiro 25, 2017, 11:16:25 am
Só por curiosidade o "mano" do nosso Bério anda por terras da América do Sul...  ;) http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/01/24/rfa-gold-rover-271-em-escala-no-rio-de-janeiro/ (http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/01/24/rfa-gold-rover-271-em-escala-no-rio-de-janeiro/)
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Está atracado na Base Naval de Mocanguê, Niterói/RJ, desde o dia 23/01/2017, o navio tanque RFA ‘Gold Rover’ – A 271, da Royal Fleet Auxiliary (Frota Real Auxiliar). O navio fará escala de descanso para tripulação e pequena manutenção, por causa da estação de patrulha pelo Atlântico Sul, através da Atlantic Patrol Task (South).

O Gold Rover foi encomendado em novembro de 1971 e construído pelo estaleiro Swan Hunter, sendo lançado ao mar em 1973. Sua entrada em atividade ocorreu em março de 1974. Dos cinco navios da classe “Rover” originalmente construídos, somente dois permanecem em atividade com a Royal Navy, sendo a segunda unidade o RFA ‘Black Rover’ – A 273. O ‘Green Rover’ foi vendido para a Indonésia em 1992 , renomeado KNI ‘Arun’ – 903 e o ‘Blue Rover’, veterano da Guerra das Falklands/Malvinas, vendido para Portugal em 1993, sendo renomeado N.R.P. ‘Bérrio’ – A 5210.

O NT ‘Gastão Motta’ – G 23, da Marinha do Brasil, possui muitas semelhanças técnicas com a classe “Rover”.
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/gold-rover-A271-GRET-RRJ-srs-13-01-08-c%C3%B3pia-1024x682.jpg)
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/gold-rover-lf-240207-c%C3%B3pia.jpg)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lightning em Fevereiro 10, 2017, 10:02:17 am
Parece que afinal o melhor destroyer do mundo... é um patinho.

http://www.dn.pt/mundo/interior/ruido-dos-navios-de-guerra-britanicos-e-ouvido-a-160-km-pelos-submarinos-russos-5649667.html
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Fevereiro 10, 2017, 10:16:26 am
Parece que afinal o melhor destroyer do mundo... é um patinho.

http://www.dn.pt/mundo/interior/ruido-dos-navios-de-guerra-britanicos-e-ouvido-a-160-km-pelos-submarinos-russos-5649667.html
Faz todo o sentido não o terem dotado de Torpedos ASW : ;D ;)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Fevereiro 10, 2017, 11:29:54 am
E as más noticias continuam....

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/02/10/britains-entire-fleet-attack-submarines-action/

 :o
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: typhonman em Fevereiro 11, 2017, 02:39:12 pm
Depois ouvem-se os lideres europeus a falar mal do Trump, quando nem uma defesa credível temos...

Basta compararar a RN no ano 2000 ( já não digo em 1982), com 2017...
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: RicardoL em Fevereiro 13, 2017, 12:02:11 am
Get Ready, Russia: Britain Is Sending Warships to the Black Sea
Is Britain girding for a fight in Russia’s backyard? For the first time since the Cold War, Britain is sending a warship to the Black Sea on a military mission.

This time, the goal is to send a message to Russia: don’t invade Ukraine. The question is whether Russia will—or even should—bother to take the warning seriously.

Last time Britain invaded the Crimea was in 1854, when an Anglo-French expeditionary force of several hundred ships and six hundred thousand men captured Sevastopol. This time, it’s just the single Type 45 destroyer HMS Diamond, which will carry sixty Special Boat Service and Royal Marine commandos, according to the Daily Mail.

“HMS Diamond will lead a NATO task force and help protect 650 British troops who are involved in secret exercises in Ukraine—a country invaded by Russian-backed rebels in 2014,” the newspaper reported.

Type 45 Destroyers—among Britain’s newest and most advanced warships—are armed with Sea Viper antiaircraft missiles, Harpoon antiship missiles and Phalanx point defense cannon. The Diamond, launched in 2007, will also carry Lynx helicopters to transport the commandos.

However, the Type 45 has also suffered from engines that break down when the destroyers sail into warm waters such as the Persian Gulf. Fortunately for the Royal Navy, the Black Sea is not in the tropics.

Britain’s Defense Secretary Michael Fallon told the Daily Mail that “the UK is sending a clear message that we are committed to defending democracy across the world and support Ukraine’s sovereignty, independence and territorial integrity.”

Retired Royal Navy admiral Alan West also told the newspaper that Britain has “undertaken many naval exercises in the Black Sea in the past but these were much more benign circumstances and with benign intentions. This is an operation with a very serious purpose. HMS Diamond can really look after herself and President Putin is a man who respects hard military power. NATO has to show it won’t be threatened and that the UK takes the lead.”

However, it seems unlikely that Putin and his government will feel particularly threatened by the British move. Militarily, a single warship with sixty commandos is merely symbolic. If deterrence escalates into war, then a single Type 45 destroyer, even as part of a NATO task force, wouldn’t survive long off Russia’s coast, which bristles with land-based aircraft, coastal defense missiles and the warships of the Black Sea Fleet. Nor would it help Ukraine much against a Russian land invasion.

Even as a symbol, a lone destroyer doesn’t exactly send a strong signal that Britain will go to war with Russia to save Ukraine. But what’s particularly interesting is that the Black Sea deployment is part of what seems to be a more muscular British foreign policy. Royal Air Force jets are attacking ISIS in Iraq and Syria, British troops are training Ukrainian soldiers, a thousand troops will be deployed this summer in Estonia and Poland, and Typhoon fighters are headed to Romania.

Meanwhile, other RAF Typhoons are headed to Japan for joint exercises, while Britain has announced that its Queen Elizabeth–class aircraft carriers will be deployed in the South China Sea once the ships are completed in the 2020s. All of which is quite a feat, considering that the Royal Navy has now shrunk to just nineteen destroyers and frigates, the RAF has also downsized, and the British Army has receded to fewer than eighty thousand regular soldiers.

Michael Peck is a contributing writer for the National Interest. He can be found on Twitter and Facebook.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Fevereiro 13, 2017, 11:26:12 am
Esperemos que o Lynx ou o Merlim esteja sempre operacional para pelo menos chatear os submarinos russos do mar negro...  ;D ;)

(http://theduran.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/d0b0d180d0bcd0b8d18f-110.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/rsk3sJO.jpg)

Saudações

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Fevereiro 19, 2017, 02:08:52 pm
Se fossemos lá buscar uns 3 ficava feliz...  :D ;)

Citar
http://www.cavok.com.br/blog/marinha-real-prepara-se-para-dar-adeus-ao-lynx/ (http://www.cavok.com.br/blog/marinha-real-prepara-se-para-dar-adeus-ao-lynx/)

(http://www.eliteukforces.info/images/gallery/helicopters/royal-navy-lynx-helicopter.jpg)
(http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/-/media/royal-navy-responsive/images/news/fleet-air-arm/815/140612-daring-lynx/sc_mq130020089.jpg?mh=447&mw=980&thn=0&hash=FF39E9985F449C5B893464D7F0ACAE0D7A7DF137)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Fevereiro 22, 2017, 12:44:48 pm
RFA Gold Rover, irmao do Bérrio, entra em Portsmouth após a sua última viagem:
https://twitter.com/HMSWarrior1860/status/834347970384506881

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C5QqCQ_WMAAGi2a.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Abril 01, 2017, 11:02:08 am
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/type-26-frigate-asw-platform/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/type-26-frigate-asw-platform/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social)
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The Type 26 will undoubtedly be the most capable ASW afloat, arriving early next decade. But it’s so much more than an ASW platform, with the ability to take Tomahawk strike missiles, a 5-inch gun and a considerable local area defence capability; and the mission bay, which can take a whole range of mission support packages.”

Despite recent sensationalism in the press, the Type 26 Frigate fleet will be armed with Sea Ceptor missiles with additional types to be carried decided at a later date.
(https://ukdjstatic-b4d.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/type26baevid.webp)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Abril 01, 2017, 11:45:08 am
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C8OloEnUIAEFqR-.jpg:large)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Abril 01, 2017, 11:57:46 am
E sai uma redução dos Royal Marine Commandos...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/03/31/royal-marines-could-jeopardy-defence-secretary-sir-michael-fallon/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Abril 03, 2017, 12:31:31 pm
Nem tudo vai mal na RN pois em contrapartida......

https://navaltoday.com/2017/04/03/first-tide-class-tanker-reaches-uk-waters/

First Tide-class tanker reaches UK waters

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/first-tide-class-tanker-reaches-uk-waters_zps6eg9qz70.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/first-tide-class-tanker-reaches-uk-waters_zps6eg9qz70.jpg.html)
RFA Tidespring is now docked in Falmouth ahead of her customization work. Photo: UK Ministry of Defence

RFA Tidespring, the lead ship of the new Tide-class tankers built for Great Britain by the South Korean shipbuilder Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering, arrived in the UK on April 2.

Tidespring started her journey from South Korea in February after being officially accepted by the UK Ministry of Defence on January 12, 2017.

Tidespring was laid down in December 2014 and launched in April 2015. The tanker was expected to reach UK waters in 2016 for further outfitting but was delayed by electrical design changes and wiring issues.

RFA Tiderace, the second tanker in line, was unveiled in South Korea in December 2016. Despite the delays on the first vessel, the UK still expects to have all four tankers delivered by 2018.

BMT Defence Services-designed RFA Tidespring, RFA Tiderace, RFA Tidesurge and RFA Tideforce are 201 meters long, with a beam of nearly 29 meters and a displacement of more than 37,000 tonnes.

The tankers will maintain the Royal Navy’s ability to refuel at sea and will provide fuel to warships and task groups. They will support deployed amphibious, land and air forces close to the shore and will have the ability to operate helicopters.

“It’s fantastic to see that RFA TIDESPRING has arrived in the UK. As her designer, this is an extremely proud moment for everyone that has been involved in this project,” said Muir Macdonald, managing director of BMT Defence Services

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Abril 30, 2017, 03:19:21 pm
Os bifes e os "problemas existenciais". Projectos à pressão e o F35B, agora chucham no dedo...  :P ;)
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Options to augment the capabilities of the Queen Elizabeth carriers in future, including shipborne air-to-air refuelling, are currently being explored by the MoD.
Asked by James Heappey, MP for the Wells:

“To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will examine options in SDSR 2020 to enable HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales to extend the effective combat radius of the F-35B through the introduction of a shipborne air-to-air refuelling capability.”

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/shipborne-air-air-refuelling-capability-explored-queen-elizabeth-carriers/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/shipborne-air-air-refuelling-capability-explored-queen-elizabeth-carriers/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social)


(https://ukdjstatic-b4d.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/BMT_QEC_CV_SternIsland-c-ACA-www_adsadvance_co_uk-1021x580.webp)


Cumprimentos
 
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Abril 30, 2017, 04:15:15 pm
Latest Royal Navy SSN, Audacious, Readied for Tomorrow’s Launch  (Source: compiled by Defense-Aerospace.com; posted April 28, 2017)

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/183258_1_zpsxakvyr7e.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/183258_1_zpsxakvyr7e.jpg.html)
HMS Audacious, an Astute-class nuclear attack submarine, has left the covered hall in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, where she was built and is preparing for her floating out ceremony, scheduled for tomorrow, April 28. (BAE Systems photo)

 HMS Audacious, an Astute-class nuclear attack submarine, has left the covered hall in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, where it was built.

 The 7,400 tonne submarine, which costs over £1 billion, is pictured edging out of her dry dock at Barrow-in-Furness, earlier today as preparations began to prepare her for her floating-out ceremony, on Saturday April 29, during which she will finally enter the water.

 The future HMS Audacious is the fourth Astute-class boat commissioned by the British Government. Although the same design as her three sisters, Audacious will benefit from improvements identified during their build and trial to improve performance.

 The Astute Class is being built by BAE Systems, which employs around 8,000 people in its Submarines business, including those that work on the Astute programme, with thousands more working in the UK submarine supply chain.

 Featuring the latest nuclear-powered technology, the Astute class can circumnavigate the world submerged, manufacturing the crew’s oxygen from seawater as they go.

 They also have the ability to operate covertly and remain undetected in almost all circumstances despite being 50 per cent bigger than the Royal Navy’s current Trafalgar Class submarines, which are to be replaced by the Dreadnought class.

http://www.w54.biz/showthread.php?19-Royal-Navy-matters/page100

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Maio 01, 2017, 10:08:39 pm
(http://i.imgur.com/yYZpOy0.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy vai abater alguns NPO's Classe River
Enviado por: tenente em Maio 02, 2017, 02:29:31 pm
Se estes três NPO's custarem 20 Milhões, ou menos ainda vamos ás compras :G-beer2:
Deve ser a compra ideal para a nossa MdG, armamento principal uma 20mm, não possuem flight deck, nem hangar para o Heli, mas podem transportar equipamento mais pesado pois tem uma grua de 25 tons........ :G-beer2:

No entanto se apontarmos as batarias para o HMS Clyde, bem esse seria um possível mini LPD, podendo transportar 110 militares + crew e o flight deck pode operar um EH101, portanto fica mais baratinho. :banana: :banana: :banana:

Os quatro primeiros River's entraram ao serviço entre 2003 e 2007 !

(http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q745/jolumeme/9682716_orig_zps4sf0i241.jpg) (http://s1357.photobucket.com/user/jolumeme/media/9682716_orig_zps4sf0i241.jpg.html)


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River-class_patrol_vessel#Disposal

River class OPV Batch 1

Tyne, Severn and Mersey[edit]

In early 2001, the Ministry of Defence placed an order with Vosper Thornycroft (VT) for three River-class offshore patrol vessels to replace the Island class.[2] It was understood that the higher availability rates of the River class (up to 300 days per year), would enable the three new ships to perform the duties of the five ships they replaced. The Royal Navy initially chartered (or leased) the ships under a five-year, £60 million contract from the builder VT.[2] As part of the contract, VT would be responsible for all maintenance and support during the charter period. This contract was renewed in January 2007 for another five years at £52 million.[2] However, in September 2012, instead of renewing the contract again, it was announced by the Defence Secretary Philip Hammond that the Ministry of Defence had purchased the vessels for £39 million.[2][10]

The River class are significantly larger than the Island-class vessels and have a large open deck aft allowing them to be fitted with equipment for a specific role, which can include fire-fighting, disaster relief and anti-pollution work. For this purpose, a 25 tonne capacity crane is fitted. In addition, the deck is strong enough for the transport of various tracked and wheeled light vehicles, or an LCVP. The class are primarily used with the Fishery Protection Squadron and EEZ patrol.[2]

In 2009, the running costs for the River class was estimated at £20 million: "The average running cost... of [the] River class is £20 million... These figures, based on the expenditure incurred by the Ministry of Defence in 2009–10, include maintenance, safety certification, military upgrades, manpower, inventory, satellite communication, fuel costs and depreciation."[11]

Clyde

In February 2005, the Ministry of Defence placed an order with VT for the charter of a fourth modified River-class offshore patrol vessel.[2] This fourth ship, Clyde, was constructed at Portsmouth Dockyard and replaced the two Castle-class patrol vessels for duties around the South Atlantic and the Falkland Islands. To fulfill this role, Clyde incorporates several modifications, including an extended length 81.5 m (267 ft 5 in) hull, a top speed of 21 kn (39 km/h), a 30 mm cannon, two miniguns and mountings for five general purpose machine guns.[2] Clyde's elongated hull permits a 20-metre strengthened flight deck able to accommodate a Merlin-sized helicopter. The ship has a full load displacement between 1,850[2] and 2,000 tonnes.[12][13]

Clyde is capable of temporarily embarking up to 110 troops and their equipment and inserting them anywhere on the Falkland Islands.[2] Clyde has a complement of 36.[2]

Disposal

On 24 April 2017, in a written answer to a question raised by Sir Nicholas Soames, Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Defence Harriet Baldwin stated Severn would be decommissioned in 2017, with Mersey and Clyde following in 2019.[14] As of April 2017, no date has been given Tyne's decommissioning.



Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy abate alguns Navios nos próximos anos
Enviado por: tenente em Maio 02, 2017, 03:57:17 pm
Aqui vai a noticia :

http://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2017-04-18/71203

Ministry of DefenceWarships and Submarines: Decommissioning

To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what Royal Navy ships and submarines have been decommissioned in each of the last five years; which are to be decommissioned over the next five years; and if he will make a statement.

A Answered by: Harriett Baldwin Answered on: 24 April 2017

I have interpreted “decommissioned” to mean withdrawn from service.
In relation to the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels that have been withdrawn from service in the last five years, I refer my right hon. Friend to the answer given by my hon. Friend the Minister for Defence Personnel, Reserves and Veterans (Mark Lancaster) on 20 March 2017, to Question number 68186 to the hon. Member for Westmorland and Lonsdale (Tim Farron).

The ships that are programmed to be withdrawn from service over the next five years are listed in the table below. It should be noted that the dates may move depending on operational needs at that time.

Year     Ship
2017    RFA GOLD ROVER, HMS SEVERN
2018    HMS OCEAN
2019    HMS CLYDE, HMS MERSEY
2020
2021
-
In respect of submarines, I am withholding information on their programmed withdrawal from service dates as disclosure would, or would be likely to, prejudice the capability, effectiveness or security of the Armed Forces.

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Maio 15, 2017, 11:13:47 am
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/no-trident-doesnt-run-windows-xp/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/no-trident-doesnt-run-windows-xp/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social)
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No, Trident doesn’t run on Windows XP

Some have claimed that the Vanguard class submarines which carry Trident are vulnerable to cyber-attacks in the same way the recently hit NHS is, that is not the case.

Critics point to the Royal Navy’s decision to install a heavily adapted operating system, based off the same framework as Windows XP, as the operating system on its missile-carrying Vanguard class submarines. While some versions of Windows have long been criticised for unreliability, the variant installed on the submarine fleet is about as robust and reliable as they come, having no real practical similarity with Windows XP.

So reliable is the system that the operating system and its variants are widely used in commercial operations including manufacturing plants, labs and commercial ships. The Royal Navy has already installed similar systems in other ships and submarines.

Some have taken to using the recent attacks on the NHS as part of a campaign against Trident, albeit they’ve used the wrong information. While we have no position on renewing Trident, we do have a very strong position on facts being important.

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C_snfZJXoAAMzFC.jpg)
(https://ukdjstatic-b4d.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/trident2-1021x580.jpg)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Maio 26, 2017, 09:53:15 am
Sei onde ficava bem...  :P ::) ;D ;)
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HMS Severn, a River class offshore patrol vessel, will be be decommissioned by the end of this year, being replaced by HMS Forth.

In a written answer to a question raised by Sir Nicholas Soames, Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Defence Harriet Baldwin stated HMS Severn would be decommissioned in 2017, with Mersey and Clyde following in 2019. As of April 2017, no date has been given Tyne’s decommissioning.

Five Batch 2 Vessels will replace the earlier four Batch 1 vessels and HMS Clyde, a heavily modified Batch 1 vessel currently patrolling the waters around the Falkland Islands.

The Batch 2 vessels are more capable however have been criticised in Parliament for lacking a helicopter hangar, something that will limit utility of the helicopter deck by preventing embarkation of a helicopter for anything other than very short periods; lacking a medium calibre gun and poor value for money.

The vessels were earlier described at a Defence Select Committee meeting as ships “the Royal Navy does not want or need”. It is understood that the Ministry of Defence paid an extra £100 million for new Offshore Patrol vessels in order to satisfy a requirement to pay BAE a minimum of £230 million per year and despite this, the vessels will be much less capable than vessels of similar price.

A house of Commons Briefing Paper explains the agreement:

“In 2009 the Government signed a 15 year Terms of Business Agreement (TOBA) with BAE Systems and Babcock. The TOBA guaranteed BAE Systems a minimum level of surface ship build and support activity of £230 million a year.

This was judged as the minimum level of work possible to sustain a credible warship-building industry in the UK and thus avoid the delays encountered during the Astute class submarine build caused in part by the loss of skilled staff following the gap between Astute and the Vanguard class submarine build. If cancelled the MoD would be liable for industry closure costs and compensation to BAE Systems.”

The government say that the work to build HMS Forth and her sister ships is sustaining around 800 Scottish jobs.

The five new Offshore Patrol Vessels have been ordered to fill a gap in orders after the second carrier and before the Type 26 frigates begin construction. The first of the five new vessels, HMS Forth, is expected to be handed over to the Royal Navy this year.

Minister for Defence Procurement, Harriett Baldwin, said regarding work starting on the final of the five vessels:

“The start of work on HMS Spey, the fifth Offshore Patrol Vessel, is another milestone in a significant programme of work which is sustaining hundreds of jobs in Scotland and the vital shipbuilding skills needed to build the Royal Navy’s new Type 26 Frigates.”

DE&S CEO Tony Douglas said:

“The team at Defence Equipment and Support has driven the successful delivery of the OPV programme; today’s steel cut is a proud moment not only for us, but for the Royal Navy and our industry partners too.

I am looking forward to continuing this long-standing and close relationship when we begin manufacturing for the Type 26 fleet later in the summer.”

The Batch 2 ships for the Royal Navy include some 29 modifications and enhancements over the Amazonas class corvette built by BAE Systems for the Brazilian Navy. The Royal Navy ships are built to more stringent naval standards, with features such as magazine protection, improved hull integrity and fire safety modifications, as well as greater redundancy.

HMS Forth was christened at a ceremony at the BAE Systems Scotstoun shipyard in Glasgow in March this year and will be handed over later this year.

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https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hms-severn-decommissioned-year/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hms-severn-decommissioned-year/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social)
(https://ukdjstatic-b4d.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/1280px-Korvette_Severn_P282_7946-1021x580.webp)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Maio 30, 2017, 07:17:23 pm
Regarding not only the Type31 frigates but other ship classes as well :

http://www.stellersystems.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2017/02/Project-Spartan-Brochure.pdf

custo/fragata cerca de £ 500 milhões !!!


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2017/05/28/could-selling-warships-abroad-break-baes-dominance-building/


Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Junho 27, 2017, 09:10:55 am
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-40402153 (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-40402153)
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The Royal Navy's new aircraft carrier has left its home port for the first time.
HMS Queen Elizabeth - one of two new carriers being built at Rosyth dockyard in Fife at a cost of more than £6bn - is to begin sea trials.
The ship passed under the Forth Bridge just before midnight.
It is the largest warship ever built for the Royal Navy. The flight deck alone is the size of three football pitches.
Once in service the ship can operate with a crew of 1,000 and 40 aircraft.
The 65,000 tonne warship is the Royal Navy's first aircraft carrier since HMS Ark Royal was scrapped in 2010.
(https://ichef-1.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/32DA/production/_96681031_c3c9da43-cb1f-41dd-8588-70987bfd022f.jpg)
(https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/06B7/production/_96691710_hi040284537.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Junho 28, 2017, 09:52:03 pm
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4640214/HMS-Queen-Elizabeth-maiden-voyage.html

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: perdadetempo em Junho 29, 2017, 04:38:45 pm
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ussian Military Hits Back Over Fallon's Jibe (excerpt)
(Source: Reuters; published June 29, 2017)
By Dmitry Solovyov
Russia's defense ministry snapped back on Thursday over comments by British Secretary of Defense Michael Fallon who mocked Moscow's aircraft-carrying cruiser and said the Russians would look with envy on Britain's new warship.

Fallon's comment exposed his "utter ignorance of naval science," ministry spokesman Igor Konashenkov said, and dismissed Britain's HMS Queen Elizabeth carrier as "a convenient oversized target at sea".

"When you saw that old, dilapidated Kuznetsov sailing through the Channel a few months ago, I think the Russians will have looked at this ship with a little bit of envy," British media quoted Fallon as saying this week.

Fallon was referring to Russia's Soviet-era Admiral Kuznetsov and comparing it to HMS Queen Elizabeth, Britain's most advanced and biggest warship which set out on its maiden voyage from its dock in Scotland on Monday.

"These ecstatic statements ... about the supremacy of the beautiful exterior of the new aircraft carrier over the Russian aircraft-carrying cruiser Admiral Kuznetsov expose Fallon's utter ignorance of naval science," Konashenkov said in a statement.

Fallon unnerved Russia's military in January by dubbing the mammoth Russian cruiser "a ship of shame" as it passed through waters close to the English coast on its way back from bombing raids in Syria. (end of excerpt)


Click here for the full story, on the Reuters website.


(EDITOR’S NOTE: Given that the UK doesn’t have any fixed-wing aircraft to put on the HMS Queen Elisabeth, and that none will be available before 2023 unless the US Marine Corps decides to ship aboard, Russia’s response to Fallon’s jibe was remarkably civil, given that many have derided Britain having spent £6 billion on what are, for now, the world’s biggest helicopter carriers.)

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/article-view/release/184902/f_35-reliability-getting-worse%2C-risking-increase-to-operating-costs.html (http://www.defense-aerospace.com/article-view/release/184902/f_35-reliability-getting-worse%2C-risking-increase-to-operating-costs.html)

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-russia-britain-aircraft-idUSKBN19K0XT (http://www.reuters.com/article/us-russia-britain-aircraft-idUSKBN19K0XT)

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: perdadetempo em Junho 30, 2017, 02:04:44 pm
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Cyber Security at Sea – Microsoft XP on Carriers, Hacking Tridents & Spoofing GPS
(http://3kbo302xo3lg2i1rj8450xje.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/DDQ9yZoXsAAISj0.jpg-large-800x533.jpeg)
June 29, 2017 by Rick Spilman
The 65,000-tonne HMS Queen Elizabeth, the Royal Navy’s largest ever warship, puts to sea for the first time, June 26, 2017. Photo: Royal Navy

When reporters were recently being given tours of the Royal Navy’s new “supercarrier,” HMS Queen Elizabeth, some were surprized to see a distinctive logo on several computer screens on the bridge and in control rooms. The logo was for Windows XP, the Microsoft computer operating system introduced in 2001. The ship itself was under construction for over eight years and the many of the procurement lead times were even longer. The reporters were told that the software was ordered in 2004, when XP was the latest and greatest version of the operating system.

Other than being slightly embarrassing that the brand new £3.5 billion aircraft carrier is running outdated software, why is this a problem? The problem is that the older operating systems are much more vulnerable to security breeches.  In May, a worldwide ransomware attack was launched, which created havoc in networks in 99 counties around the world.  (A new wave of ransomware cyber-attacks has hit within the last day. This time, port operations were also impacted, including Moller-Maersk and others.)

During the May attacks, the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) was hit very hard. Across Great Britain computer networks at at least 48 hospitals were shut down by the malware. How did the malware break into the networks? Most suspect it gained access through a flaw in Windows XP, which roughly 90% of British hospitals still use, to one extent or another.

Microsoft stopped supporting Windows XP in 2014 and they are clear about the risks of using the outdated system. On their page, “Windows XP support has ended,” they state: “If you continue to use Windows XP now that support has ended, your computer will still work but it might become more vulnerable to security risks and viruses.”

So, having an aircraft carrier whose networks have known cyber-security risks is a real concern, notwithstanding assurances from the Ministry of Defense that everything is under control.

On the other hand, there may be more to worry about than a hacked aircraft carrier.  The British American Security Information Council (BASIC), a think-tank, recently released a paper titled, “Hacking UK Trident, a Growing Threat.”  They discuss what they consider to be the increasing risk of a cyber-attack on the UK’s Vanguard-class submarines
armed with nuclear-tipped Trident II D-5 ballistic missiles.”  The report’s Executive Summary begins:

A successful attack could neutralise operations, lead to loss of life, defeat or perhaps even trigger the catastrophic exchange of nuclear warheads (directly or indirectly). But the very possibility of cyber-attack and the growing capability to launch them against SSBNs, could have a severe impact upon the confidence of maintaining an assured second-strike capability and therefore on strategic stability between states. Recent suggestions that the fleet is vulnerable have sometimes been met with complacency and claims that the isolated ‘air-gapped’ systems cannot be penetrated. Whilst we recognize that it is important not to be alarmist, these claims are false. 

The reference to the threat of “catastrophic exchange of nuclear warheads” is sufficiently alarming that one might overlook the statement that subs, while isolated and not often connected to networks, can indeed by hacked, at least according to the authors of the report. The Ministry of Defense has denied that such a vulnerability exists.

While not as scary as nukes or a hacked carrier, as merchant ships become more integrated into global networks, there is an increasing risk of cyber-attacks on ships at sea. In 2013, a group of researchers from the University of Texas demonstrated how a ship might be taken over remotely when they “spoofed” the GPS navigation system on the $80 million yacht, White Rose of the Drachs.  The yacht captain had no idea that the boat’s GPS system was sending false information to the autopilot.

While spoofing GPS is scary, there could be far worse to come. Hackers on land have given us a hint of what could be possible. In 2015, two hackers took control of a standard Jeep Cherokee through its communications system. From roughly ten miles away, they remotely turned the windshield wipers on and off, blasted the air conditioning and took over control of the radio. Finally, they disabled the accelerator and shut the car down. Chrysler had to recall 1.4 million vehicles to fix the vulnerability.

Something similar could happen to a modern merchant ship. Imagine pirates taking control without having to climb boarding ladders. Just as the hackers carried off a remote-controlled car-jacking with the Jeep, it may be possible to take over a ship through “spoofed” navigation and hijacked bridge and engine controls. This seems unlikely, yet may not be completely far-fetched.

Networking and automation solve many problems but can also create new risks. As some ship owners work toward remote-controlled or even autonomous ships, these risks could increase dramatically. One day, guarding against cyber-attacks may be thought of as just as much a part of ship operations as avoiding collisions and keeping off the rocks.

http://gcaptain.com/cyber-security-sea-microsoft-xp-carriers-hacking-tridents-spoofing-gps/ (http://gcaptain.com/cyber-security-sea-microsoft-xp-carriers-hacking-tridents-spoofing-gps/)

nota: Não deixa de ser irónico que após justificarem as  suas decisões sobre aquisição de equipamento militar com as suas preocupações com a segurança e a soberania nacional, se tome a decisão de usar um sistema operativo proprietário já obsoleto e em que dificilmente se terá acesso ao código fonte. Talvez fosse altura dos governos preocuparem-se menos com os brinquedos e preocuparem-se mais com o que os faz funcionar.

Cumprimentos,
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Julho 01, 2017, 08:18:22 pm
Algo semelhante se passa com o F-35, com o sistema operativo e outros sistemas a necessitarem de actualização, apesar de o aparelho ainda não se encontrar 100 % operacional. E atenção que não estou a falar de meras 'tapes', mas de actualizações profundas. É um problema que advém de o desenvolvimento destes projectos demorar muito tempo, mas a determinada altura os requisitos e as características têm que ser 'trancadas' sob pena de os projectos nunca andarem para a frente — já para não mencionar os aspectos financeiros inerentes.

No caso do QE, o sistema informático começou a ser desenvolvido em 2004 e o SO escolhido para alguns sistemas foi o XP. Se há uns 4 ou 5 anos tivessem decidido reescrever todo o código (certamente com vários milhões de linhas), seria mais que garantido que o navio ainda não estaria a navegar. E quando o novo código estivesse pronto também já estaria desactualizado. Pode-se, com certeza, criticar a escolha original, mas este tipo de inconveniências é de esperar em projectos desta escala. Desde que se tratem de sistemas desconectados da rede não há risco de maior. De qualquer modo, parece que está previsto substituir o XP na próxima década, durante uma manutenção prolongada.
Título: Re: Royal Navy Type 26 Frigates
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 03, 2017, 01:20:37 pm
Multi-billion deal: Royal Navy orders three new Type 26 frigates

Photo: Royal Navy

The first of the Royal Navy’s next-generation frigates will be laid down before the month is out after a £3.7 billion order was placed for three Type 26s.

Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon yesterday announced the contract with BAE Systems to deliver the first batch of global combat ships.

They will be the first three of eight vessels to replace the equivalent number of specialist submarine-hunting Type 23 frigates currently in service.

Shipbuilding yards on the Clyde will be responsible for building and fitting out the trio, with the first of the as-yet-unnamed class entering service in the mid-2020s.

The work will support and sustain 3,400 jobs – half in the shipyards, half in the supply chain providing parts.

First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Philip Jones said: “For an island nation, dependent on maritime trade, a strong Royal Navy is essential for our national security and economic prosperity.

“Today there are over 500 submarines in the world operated by 40 navies. As one of the quietest and most potent submarine-hunters of any Navy, the Type 26 will have a crucial role to play to protect the nuclear deterrent and our two new aircraft carriers.

 “Although designed to fight and win in the most demanding scenarios, they will also work alongside our international partners to protect and promote the United Kingdom’s interests around the world.”

These world-class warships will protect the nation’s nuclear deterrent and the Royal Navy’s new aircraft carriers, the first of which, HMS Queen Elizabeth, has recently taken to sea for the first time.

The ships specialise in anti-submarine warfare, protecting the UK’s overseas territories and interests across the globe. The flexible design will allow the capabilities to be adapted throughout its lifespan to counter future threats.

The Type 26 frigates are 60ft longer and 2,000 tonnes heavier than their predecessors, equipped with bow and towed array sonar, Sea Ceptor air defence missiles and a 5ins main gun.

The ships are also equipped with a mission bay for plug-in containers carrying equipment for specific tasks, such as disaster relief, and a flight deck big enough to take a Chinook – though the Fleet Air Arm’s Merlin and Wildcat helicopters will be more common.

In due course, the Type 26’s firepower will be bolstered by the future offensive surface weapon – the missile currently being developed to replace the Harpoon.

Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon said: “The Type 26 Frigate is a cutting-edge warship, combining the expertise of the British shipbuilding industry with the excellence of the Royal Navy. We will cut steel on the first ship later this month – a hugely significant milestone that delivers on our commitment to maintain our global naval power. These ships will be a force to be reckoned with, there to protect our powerful new carriers and helping keep British interests safe across the world.

“Backed by a rising defence budget and a £178 billion equipment plan, the Type 26 programme will bring vast economic benefits to Scotland and the wider UK. The contract is structured to ensure value for taxpayers’ money and, importantly, now designed to protect them from extra bills from project overrun. The investment will secure hundreds of skilled jobs at BAE Systems on the Clyde for the next twenty years, and thousands of jobs in the supply chain across Britain. “

Typically just 157 men and women – 30-40 fewer than a Type 23 – will run these ships, but there will be space aboard for up to 208 souls.

Today’s deal also reaffirms the commitment made by the Government in the 2015 Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR15) to build eight Type 26 ships.

The contract for the second batch of five ships is expected to be negotiated in the early 2020s, paving the way to sustain further jobs in Scotland and across the wider supply chain for many years to come.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/07/03/multi-billion-deal-royal-navy-orders-three-new-type-26-frigates/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Julho 10, 2017, 11:53:55 am
lol  ::)  https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hms-daring-removed-active-service-become-harbour-training-ship-due-manning-issues/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hms-daring-removed-active-service-become-harbour-training-ship-due-manning-issues/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social)
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HMS Daring removed from active service to become harbour training ship due to manning issues

Earlier fears that HMS Dauntless would spend the rest of her career tied up alongside have now been calmed, but only because HMS Daring has taken her place as harbour training ship.

It should be noted that the vessel has returned home from a lengthy deployment and likely would not go to sea again for sometime regardless of her usage in this role.

It is understood that HMS Daring, the first Type 45 Destroyer constructed, is currently in number 3 Basin in Portsmouth where she’s expected to remain for two years as a harbour training ship.

The vessel she replaced, HMS Dauntless, will enter refit and subsequently rejoin the active fleet. Information regarding the refit of HMS Dauntless came to light via a response to a question asked by Lord West of Spithead in the House of Lords:

“To ask Her Majesty’s Government when the refits of HMS Dauntless and HMS Lancaster will commence.”

The answer came from Earl Howe:

“On current plans, the refit for HMS LANCASTER will commence in mid 2017 and the refit for HMS DAUNTLESS is scheduled for the end of 2017.”

A very detailed fleet status diagram from SaveTheRoyalNavy.org showing the status of every Royal Navy escort vessel can be found in this in-depth article at the site.

HMS Daring has had a busy couple of years, In 2016 Daring deployed to the Persian Gulf to assist in Operation Inherent Resolve, the campaign against Islamic State. In 2017, after being relieved East of Suez by HMS Monmouth, Daring transited The Bosphorus for exercises in the Black Sea with the Romanian Navy. She is now in Portsmouth for routine maintenance before taking on the harbour training ship role.
(https://ukdjstatic-b4d.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/type45-10-1021x580.webp)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Julho 16, 2017, 02:37:40 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Julho 17, 2017, 10:58:42 am
https://www.facebook.com/royalnavy/?hc_ref=ARS4uHcMuifyA1mm3qB5fcFfG7M4jvuuL-Bfjf4mgaYjYFqQ-Pn8jow7YdMnaa_Wb2M&pnref=story (https://www.facebook.com/royalnavy/?hc_ref=ARS4uHcMuifyA1mm3qB5fcFfG7M4jvuuL-Bfjf4mgaYjYFqQ-Pn8jow7YdMnaa_Wb2M&pnref=story)
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Little meet Large. Very Large!

Two of the smallest vessels in the Royal Navy were positively dwarfed by the largest, brand-new carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth when they paid a fleeting visit to her in the Moray Firth.

Patrol boats HMS Dasher and Pursuer are 1,200 times smaller - by displacement - than the future flagship, which is on her third week of sea trials in the North Sea.
(https://scontent-lhr3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-0/p235x350/19990237_10155518074218205_2067336267092824184_n.jpg?oh=c78c4d8e64a3dee6cbf3808d1c98a05c&oe=59F376DD)
(https://scontent-lhr3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/20031994_10155518074223205_126749890164607223_n.jpg?oh=f7c7abfcc9655020e85a7f668ca00e0a&oe=5A0264C8)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Julho 21, 2017, 08:03:21 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Agosto 10, 2017, 03:27:05 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Agosto 17, 2017, 01:29:39 pm
Lol  ;D :P http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/08/13/seguranca-do-porta-avioes-queen-elizabeth-sob-revisao-apos-pouso-de-drone-bordo/ (http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/08/13/seguranca-do-porta-avioes-queen-elizabeth-sob-revisao-apos-pouso-de-drone-bordo/)
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A segurança do porta-aviões HMS Queen Elizabeth será revisada depois que um entusiasta de fotografias pousou um pequeno drone a bordo do maior navio da Royal Navy e permaneceu não detectado, disse o Ministério da Defesa do Reino Unido (MoD).
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/HMS-Queen-Elizabeth-15-300x194.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Agosto 28, 2017, 04:10:40 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: perdadetempo em Setembro 07, 2017, 01:43:21 am
Aparentemente o Reino Unido pensa conseguir adquirir 5 fragatas type 31 pelo valor de 250M Libras (+/-273M €) por unidade :o

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/type-31-frigate-plans-unveiled-government/ (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/type-31-frigate-plans-unveiled-government/)

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The Type 31 Frigate is expected to be cheaper than Type 26 with a fixed price of £250m to encourage exports.

The first ship is expected to be delivered in 2023 and designed to be replaced at the end of their life instead of frequent refits and upgrades.

As part of the new approach, it was announced that the five Type 31 frigates could be built across different shipyards, before being assembled at a central site believed to be either the Clyde or Rosyth with the former being the favourite if capacity allows...(continua)

Por este preço deve ser aquilo a que se chama  uma fragata ligeira, ou seja um eufemismo para algo armado e aparelhado como uma corveta. Será que em Portugal a Marinha vai de repente descobrir que afinal estas embarcações também servem para o Atlântico Norte? ;D

Cumprimentos,
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: LM em Setembro 08, 2017, 10:01:53 am
E as nossas actuais não serão Fragatas ligeiras...?

Estas vão ter uma autonomia de 28 dias / 6500nm... vai depender do deslocamento/ medidas, mas não parece ser uma corveta.

LM
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: perdadetempo em Setembro 08, 2017, 03:34:03 pm
E as nossas actuais não serão Fragatas ligeiras...?

Estas vão ter uma autonomia de 28 dias / 6500nm... vai depender do deslocamento/ medidas, mas não parece ser uma corveta.

LM

Na minha opinião as nossas unidades actuais são obsoletas, mas quando foram construídas não eram consideradas fragatas ligeiras.  A redundância dos sistemas, a compartimentação, a protecção/volume dos paióis, os sistemas ESM e a tripulação necessária para os operar é que fará a diferença para uma corveta que aparentemente até poderá ter um armamento semelhante e  potencialmente construída mais "gorda".
Neste caso os 110/120m da fragata provavelmente vão servir para o aumentar a capacidade de combustível,  para a tripulação ter mais espaço e pouco mais. Só o tamanho não conta, o que se põe lá dentro e em que condições também é importante :D

A BAE apresentou para este projecto o AVENGER que não passa dum OPV aumentado e o Cutlass que é baseado nas corvetas que foram construidas para OMAN. Provavelmente também se devem considerar os vencedores antecipados.
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/bae-unveils-potential-designs-type-31-frigate/ (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/bae-unveils-potential-designs-type-31-frigate/)

http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php/162-royal-navy-of-oman-ships-equipment/royal-navy-of-oman-opv-corvettes/1342-khareef-class-corvette-opv-al-shamikh-al-rahmani-al-rasikh-ocean-patrol-vessel-royal-navy-of-oman-bae-systems-99-metre-datasheet-pictures-photos-video-specifications.html (http://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php/162-royal-navy-of-oman-ships-equipment/royal-navy-of-oman-opv-corvettes/1342-khareef-class-corvette-opv-al-shamikh-al-rahmani-al-rasikh-ocean-patrol-vessel-royal-navy-of-oman-bae-systems-99-metre-datasheet-pictures-photos-video-specifications.html)

http://www.baesystems.com/en-uk/product/offshore-patrol-vessels (http://www.baesystems.com/en-uk/product/offshore-patrol-vessels)

A Babcock apresentou o projecto Arrowhead:
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/babcock-unveil-arrowhead-120-contender-type-31-frigate/ (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/babcock-unveil-arrowhead-120-contender-type-31-frigate/)

e a Stellar Systems o projecto SPARTAN:
http://www.stellersystems.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2017/07/Project-Spartan-Brochure.pdf (http://www.stellersystems.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2017/07/Project-Spartan-Brochure.pdf)

Tendo em conta o histórico recente dos projectos militares do R. Unido, por 250M de libras por unidade, se fôr a BAE a ganhar o resultado obtido deverá servir para mostrar a bandeira em zonas de conflito de baixa intensidade. No fim de contas é a mesma empresa que cobra 635M £(+/-700M €) por 5 OPV  com armamento e sensores equivalentes aos NPO.

Cumprimentos,

PS. Eu não tenho nada contra as fragatas ligeiras. Se por exemplo o dinheiro disponível para novas unidades fosse 1000-1200M €, entre comprar uma fragata XPTO por esse valor ou três unidades com uma capacidade anti-submarina decente e capacidade de autodefesa AA eu escolhia a segunda opção. A quantidade tem um qualidade muito própria.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Setembro 21, 2017, 04:09:05 pm
http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/09/18/dsei-2017-reino-unido-adia-aposentadoria-do-missil-harpoon/ (http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/09/18/dsei-2017-reino-unido-adia-aposentadoria-do-missil-harpoon/)
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A RN adiou a decisão de retirar de serviço seus mísseis antinavio Harpoon e o movimento aliviará parcialmente uma lacuna de capacidade de mísseis antinavio na Marinha Real Britânica.

Os mísseis pesados antinavio Boeing Harpoon permanecerão em serviço nas fragatas Type 23 da Royal Navy (RN) depois que o Ministério da Defesa do Reino Unido adiou a decisão de retirar a arma em 2018 sem substituição.

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/M%C3%ADssil-Harpoon.jpg)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Setembro 24, 2017, 02:55:56 pm
http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/09/23/hms-clyde-sera-substituido-pelo-hms-forth-nas-falklandsmalvinas/ (http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/09/23/hms-clyde-sera-substituido-pelo-hms-forth-nas-falklandsmalvinas/)
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O navio de patrulha das Falklands HMS Clyde comemora seu décimo aniversário no Atlântico Sul esta semana. O navio de patrulha das Malvinas foi incorporado em 5 de julho de 2007 e chegou em 21 de setembro.

Ele só saiu da área de operação do Atlântico Sul duas vezes nos últimos dez anos, para realizar paradas de manutenção em doca seca em Simon’s Town, África do Sul, a cada 5 anos de operação,
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/HMS-Clyde-2.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Outubro 04, 2017, 11:06:42 am
Não propriamente RN mas relacionado com a sua história.  ;) http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/860997/HMS-Hermes-Falklands-War-flagship-mission-launched-save (http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/860997/HMS-Hermes-Falklands-War-flagship-mission-launched-save)
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In 1987 Hermes was sold to the Indian Navy and was renamed INS Viraat before being decommissioned in March this year.

Mr Trish, who served on the crew of Hermes and saw action during the Falklands war, has secured the provisional support of several major private investors and would love to talk to more to ensure a successful outcome.

The private donors have promised millions to invest in Hermes, getting her back from the Indian government and restoring her for posterity as a museum, training facility and conference venue in Britain at a location on the Thames in London.

However, Mr Trish has been told he needs to demonstrate widespread public demand for the ship to be saved by getting 20,000 people to invest £5 each in the project.
(http://cdn.images.express.co.uk/img/dynamic/1/590x/HMS-Hermes-860997.jpg)


Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Outubro 07, 2017, 11:52:31 am
Royal Navy pode ter que desativar navios anfíbios e helicópteros Wildcat

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/HMS-ALBION-PLUS-HMS-BULWARK.jpg)

Os Royal Marines podem perder a capacidade de desembarcar em praias a partir do mar, enquanto a Royal Navy pode ter que desativar uma frota de helicópteros sob propostas de economia de custos.

Os chefes da Royal Navy apresentaram dois navios de assalto anfíbio, HMS Albion e HMS Bulwark, como opções para serem cortados em uma mini revisão de defesa que está buscando capacidades de segurança, mas também deve reduzir um buraco de £ 20 bilhões a £ 30 bilhões no orçamento ao longo da próxima década.

O The Times soube que outra opção é desativar 28 helicópteros Wildcat HMA2. Isso deixaria o Fleet Air Arm com apenas seus helicópteros Merlin, reduzindo os custos de suporte, mas fontes disseram que isso vai prejudicar sua capacidade de apoiar a frota.

“Nós precisamos de mais dinheiro ou então temos que cortar capacidade”, disse uma fonte. Seus comentários contrastaram com o Chefe das Forças Armadas, Sir Stuart Peach, Air Chief Marshal, que disse na semana passada que a revisão, liderada pelo Cabinet Office, resultaria em “ajustes em vez de cortes”.

Abandonar a habilidade dos Royal Marines de conduzir assaltos à terra a partir do mar, um dos seus propósitos centrais, economizaria centenas de milhões de libras e liberaria marinheiros para o resto da frota.

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Wildcats.jpg)

No entanto, seria devastador para a corporação, disse James Glancy, um ex-oficial de Marinha, que ganhou a Conspicuous Gallantry Cross no Afeganistão. “Cerca de 72% da população mundial é acessível através do mar, por isso é absolutamente essencial. Se você quiser afetar um resultado, se você quiser auxiliar em caso de desastres naturais, você precisa de capacidade anfíbia”, disse ele. “Não há nenhum sentido em ter porta-aviões preparados para o combate armados com jatos F-35, se você não conseguir colocar alguém em terra”.

A proposta de cortar dois navios, relatada pela BBC na noite passada, acompanha uma opção para diminuir em 1.000 o tamanho dos fuzileiros navais de mais de 6.640 pessoas, retirar dois navios caça-minas mais cedo do serviço e vender um navio de pesquisa oceânica. Os fuzileiros navais já sacrificaram o treinamento na Noruega e nos Estados Unidos este ano. Além disso, o outro navio anfíbio principal da Marinha, o HMS Ocean, o porta-helicópteros que lidera os esforços de alívio de furacões da Grã-Bretanha no Caribe, está sendo aposentado no próximo ano.

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/HMS-Ocean-to-Replace-HMS-Bulwark-as-Fleet-Flagship-1024x683.jpg)

Um oficial sênior de Royal Marines culpou a introdução do HMS Queen Elizabeth e do HMS Prince of Wales, os novos porta-aviões de £ 6,2 bilhões, pelo agravamento do financiamento e pelos problemas de pessoal. “Esta é a pior decisão de aquisição do último meio século, é por isso que os Royal Marines estão sendo sacrificados”, disse o oficial ao Newsnight da BBC.

Os porta-aviões, que podem levar helicópteros Chinook, podem realizar “operações litorâneas” com fuzileiros navais, mas não conseguem lançar embarcações de desembarque, uma característica do Bulwark e Albion.

Perguntado sobre os navios de assalto, um porta-voz do Ministério da Defesa disse: “Nenhuma decisão ainda foi tomada e qualquer discussão sobre as opções é pura especulação”. Perguntado sobre os helicópteros Wildcat, um porta-voz disse: “Estamos contribuindo para a revisão do governo e olhando sobre a melhor forma de gastar o nosso crescente orçamento de defesa para suportar isso”.

Os cortes propostos

(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/RN-Cuts-1024x631.jpg)

http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/10/06/royal-navy-pode-ter-que-desativar-navios-anfibios-e-helicopteros-wildcat/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 07, 2017, 01:23:06 pm
A Coisa está a ficar preta para a RN, e, esta situação de cortes em meios Humanos e materiais, em parte é motivada pelos custos dos dois Novos Porta Aviões !!!

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/further-cuts-to-the-fleet-in-the-year-of-the-royal-navy/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 09, 2017, 11:38:57 am
As consequências dos futuros cortes da RN, já começam a acontecer !

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/senior-royal-navy-officer-resigns-royal-navy-faces-drastic-cuts/

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 11, 2017, 09:34:32 pm
HMS Severn bound for final visit to affiliated city prior to decommissioning


The Royal Navy’s second River-class patrol vessel HMS Severn is set to visit her affiliated city of Newport one last time before she decommissions by the end of October.
Severn will be berthed at Alexandra Docks with the ship’s crew exercising Freedom of the City, parading through the city centre with bands playing, flags flying and bayonets fixed.
The parade will take place on Saturday, October 14. The Newport City Council has invited the public to line the route of the parade to show their support for the crew of HMS Severn who have been affiliated to the city since 2003.

“We are sad HMS Severn which has patrolled the shores of the UK for many years is now being decommissioned,” councillor Debbie Wilcox, leader of Newport City Council.

HMS Severn was built by Vosper Thornycroft and entered service in July 2003. Her place in the fleet will be taken by the first of the Batch 2 River-class offshore patrol vessels – HMS Forth. Severn’s sister ships HMS Mersey and HMS Clyde are scheduled to be decommissioned in 2019.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/10/11/hms-severn-bound-for-final-visit-to-affiliated-city-prior-to-decommissioning/

Começa a saga dos abates na RN, este Patrulha tem catorze anos de serviço !!
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Outubro 14, 2017, 09:55:18 am
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/uk-committed-24-british-f-35s-onboard-hms-queen-elizabeth-2023/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/uk-committed-24-british-f-35s-onboard-hms-queen-elizabeth-2023/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social)
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In addition to 24 F-35Bs, the carrier air wing of HMS Queen Elizabeth will also feature around 14 helicopters with numbers depending on operational requirements.

Captain Jerry Kyd, commander of HMS Queen Elizabeth, commented on the initial deployment and the gradual increase in air wing numbers:

“We’re constrained by the F-35 buy-rate even though that was accelerated in SDSR in 2015, so initial operating capability numbers in 2020 are going to be very modest indeed. We will flesh it out with helicopters, and a lot depends on how many USMC F-35s come on our first deployment in 2021.
(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Merlins-HMS-Queen-Elizabeth.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 14, 2017, 09:58:58 am
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/uk-committed-24-british-f-35s-onboard-hms-queen-elizabeth-2023/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/uk-committed-24-british-f-35s-onboard-hms-queen-elizabeth-2023/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social)
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In addition to 24 F-35Bs, the carrier air wing of HMS Queen Elizabeth will also feature around 14 helicopters with numbers depending on operational requirements.

Captain Jerry Kyd, commander of HMS Queen Elizabeth, commented on the initial deployment and the gradual increase in air wing numbers:

“We’re constrained by the F-35 buy-rate even though that was accelerated in SDSR in 2015, so initial operating capability numbers in 2020 are going to be very modest indeed. We will flesh it out with helicopters, and a lot depends on how many USMC F-35s come on our first deployment in 2021.
(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Merlins-HMS-Queen-Elizabeth.jpg)

Saudações

ou seja, durante os primeiros cinco a seis anos de operacionalidade do Navio a sua operacionalidade de combate está muitíssimo reduzida, a montanha pariu um rato !!!
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: HSMW em Outubro 14, 2017, 02:34:47 pm
Até ia sugerir colocar provisoriamente uns Harrier mas parece que já foram todos encostados...  :-\
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Outubro 14, 2017, 03:09:47 pm
Até ia sugerir colocar provisoriamente uns Harrier mas parece que já foram todos encostados...  :-\

Ah pois é, agora vão ser os F-35 do USMC que vão manter a "escola", enquanto os bifes não têm os seus... ???
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Outubro 15, 2017, 06:20:02 pm
E para lixar mais o orçamento: https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/much-will-cost-fix-type-45-destroyer-fleet/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/much-will-cost-fix-type-45-destroyer-fleet/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social)
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The cost of fixing the propulsion issues on the Type 45 Destroyer fleet has now been confirmed.

A contract to fully rectify issues within the Type 45 Destroyer fleet will be awarded in 2018 it has been confirmed.

Asked by Flick Drummond, Member for Portsmouth South:
“To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when he plans to award contracts for the Power Improvement Project for the Type 45 destroyer class.”
Answered by Harriett Baldwin, Parliamentary Under-Secretary for the Ministry of Defence:
“On current plans, we anticipate that the Ministry of Defence will be able to award the contract for the Power Improvement Project for the Type 45 Destroyer class in early 2018.”

A staggered refit was also announced, which will involve cutting into the ships’ hulls and fitting additional diesel generation capacity, this has become known as Project Napier.

According to the Royal Institute of Naval Architects:

Project Napier will cost £280 million, according to Government figures.

The reliability issues with the intercooler lead to occasional near-complete power generation failures, temporarily disabling not only propulsion, but power generation for weapons, navigational systems, and other purposes, leaving the ships vulnerable to “total electric failure”.
(https://ukdjstatic-b4d.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/45158449-1021x580.webp)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 20, 2017, 05:26:46 pm

Royal Navy names another River-class OPV in Scotland

The second in a batch of five new Batch 2 River-class patrol vessels has been named in a ceremony in Scotland.
Future HMS Medway was named on Friday by Wendy Fallon, wife of UK defense secretary Michael Fallon.

The Royal Navy has previously named the first and third ship in the class.
While being the second of the Royal Navy’s OPVs, HMS Medway is the tenth vessel to bear the name since the 1690s.

“This year we have already named our second aircraft carrier, two Type 26 frigates and the first in the offshore patrol vessel class,” defense secretary Sir Michael Fallon said. “It is a privilege to see yet another ship named for the growing Royal Navy. Named after Kent’s main river, my family has taken a particular interest in HMS Medway over the course of its construction and this is a proud day for all involved.”

The 90-metre ship is expected to enter service with the Royal Navy in 2019 and will go on to deploy across the globe on counter-terrorism and anti-smuggling operations.
All five of the new Batch 2 River class OPVs are expected to be in service before the end of 2020, with the first of class, HMS Forth, currently on sea trials.
The ship has a crew of 58 and is equipped with a 30mm cannon and flight deck capable of accommodating a Merlin helicopter. Displacing around 2,000 tonnes, she has a maximum speed of around 24 knots and can sail 5,500 nautical miles without having to resupply.

HMS Medway is officially affiliated with the Medway district through an association with Medway Council.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/10/20/royal-navy-names-another-river-class-opv-in-scotland/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Outubro 26, 2017, 09:20:43 am
O que vale é que Políticos Comediantes não é só por cá, também os Bifes os têm...  ::) :o

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/government-edit-claims-royal-navy-growing-first-time-since-second-world-war-press-releases/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/government-edit-claims-royal-navy-growing-first-time-since-second-world-war-press-releases/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social)
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Recent Government and MoD press releases regarding the Royal Navy made claims that the Royal Navy is “growing for the first time since the Second World War”, those claims have now vanished.

In one of the most notable releases republished across a few government pages regarding the naming of HMS Medway (the cached original can be found here), the Government claimed:

“The OPV programme is sustaining around 800 jobs in Scotland at BAE Systems and is maintaining the vital skills needed to build the new cutting-edge, anti-submarine warfare frigates, the Type 26s, for a Royal Navy growing for the first time since the Second World War.“

However, in the most recent version, that claim has rightfully been edited out and only a quote by Fallon remains making a similar albeit not as outlandish claim.

We even tweeted about this earlier in the Month.
(https://ukdjstatic-b4d.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/45151415-1021x580.webp)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 26, 2017, 02:47:41 pm
UK reportedly mulls selling frigates and amphibious ships to Brazil and Chile

Several UK and international reports said the UK defense ministry is considering selling a number of its frigates and two amphibious ships to the navies of Brazil and Chile.
Previous reports indicated that the two Albion-class landing platform docks were likely to be sold due to the UK defense ministry’s funding gap.
Previously unreported were talks of the possible sale of two or three Type 23 frigates.
According to IHS Jane’s Navy International, officials in Brazil and Chile said they had been notified of the potential availability of Royal Navy frigates and amphibious ships.
The defense ministry has denied any talks with either Brazil or Chile regarding possible frigate sales, a report in The Times said adding that insiders noted options to sell up to three frigates were still being considered.
The UK defense ministry has already started cutting costs by reducing the Royal Navy fleet. Currently, the amphibious assault ship HMS Ocean is on its final deployment before being decommissioned and sold. The ship’s reported price tag is around £80 million.
Mine hunters HMS Atherstone and HMS Quorn were scrapped last month, according to The Times. Other cost cutting means considered include a reduction in numbers of soldiers and Royal Marines and equipment funding.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/10/26/uk-reportedly-mulls-selling-frigates-and-amphibious-ships-to-brazil-and-chile/

PS : Os MCMV lá foram p'ra sucata .

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 29, 2017, 10:33:56 am
Exercício faz muito bem, corram um pouco, saiam dos Cockpits meus senhores...........  ::) ::)

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/02/17/lynx_wildcat_has_no_tactical_data_link_royal_navy/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 29, 2017, 02:43:32 pm
Mais um navio que sai do activo da RN,.
Com apenas, 14 anos de serviço ainda nos fazia uma perninha nos próximos vinte anos !

https://navaltoday.com/2017/10/29/royal-navy-decommissions-first-river-class-opv-hms-severn/

Royal Navy decommissions first River-class OPV HMS Severn

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/924/pWGZY0.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/popWGZY0j)

The Royal Navy has decommissioned River-class patrol vessel HMS Severn after fourteen years of service.
The decommissioning ceremony took place at HM Naval Base Portsmouth on Firday, October 27.
The ship’s company and guests gathered at South Railway Jetty for a final inspection and service of thanksgiving for her crew and the safe completion of her commission.
HMS Severn has now reached the end of her planned service life, and the majority of her 45 personnel will remain within the squadron.
Although Severn is the second of three vessels in her class, she is the first to be decommissioned. Sister ships Mersey and Clyde are set to serve until 2019 before the decommission.
Severn was the first of the Royal Navy’s offshore patrol vessels ever to undertake North Atlantic patrol duties in the Caribbean, a task usually undertaken by a destroyer or RFA vessel, taking her away from her usual work as part of the Fishery Protection Squadron.
Amongst their final duties were a visit to Newport a fortnight ago, the city to which HMS Severn was affiliated. HMS Severn was awarded the freedom of the city in 2006, and her company marched through Newport one last time as well as welcoming friends, families and guests from her affiliates onboard.
HMS Severn and her sister ships are being replaced by a new generation of River class vessels, the first of which, HMS Forth, will enter service later this year.

https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-and-latest-activity/news/2017/october/27/171027-hms-severn-decommissions-after-14-years-of-servisse

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/924/vEfjzJ.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/povEfjzJj)

http://www.portsmouth.co.uk/news/defence/lucky-severn-retires-after-14-years-helping-to-protect-the-nation-1-8218501

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 02, 2017, 12:28:36 pm
É a crise.

http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/11/01/canibalizacao-de-navios-na-royal-navy-aumenta-50-em-cinco-anos/ (http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/11/01/canibalizacao-de-navios-na-royal-navy-aumenta-50-em-cinco-anos/)
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O Ministério da Defesa do Reino Unido aprovou mais de 3.000 casos de retirada de peças de navios da Royal Navy e outros equipamentos para dar a outros navios em necessidade mais urgente, revelou o National Audit Office.

Uma revisão em canibalização de equipamentos publicada hoje descobriu que a prática, que se destina a ser usada apenas quando nenhuma outra alternativa está disponível, aumentou 49% nos últimos cinco anos, com um total de 3.230 casos envolvendo 6.378 partes.

Segundo os auditores, cerca de 40% dos navios e submarinos que receberam peças canibalizadas precisavam deles para que pudessem estar prontos para operações ou treinamento. Nestes casos, a canibalização de equipamentos corrigiu problemas que teriam reduzido a capacidade operacional de navios e submarinos. Os 60% restantes de navios e submarinos não precisavam das peças para operações ou treinamento, mas eram necessários para, por exemplo, completar o trabalho de manutenção planejado para agendar e custear.

A auditoria constatou que 71% das peças canibalizadas com base na necessidade operacional eram de baixo valor, com a maioria custando menos de £ 5.000 e menos de 1% avaliados em mais de £ 500.000.

No entanto, descobriu que o MoD não monitora rotineiramente o uso, as causas e o impacto da canibalização de equipamentos em toda a Marinha, ao invés disso, enfocando os tipos de navio, e também não sabe com que frequência o custo de substituição de peças canibalizadas excede o valor da peça sendo substituída. Sua própria análise, que abrange 146 canibalizações de equipamentos das Type 23 em 2012, mostrou que, em 50% desses casos, o custo da canibalização do equipamento era igual ou superior ao valor da peça. Em um quarto dos casos, foi quatro vezes maior. Embora a canibalização do equipamento tenha aumentado, o ministério não atualizou ou ampliou sua análise.

O relatório afirmou que o uso de peças canibalizadas quando houve novas substituições de equipamentos indisponíveis pode refletir problemas mais amplos com o processo de obtenção de peças sobressalentes e o problema é exacerbado tanto pela falta de informações sobre quando as peças serão entregues quanto por atrasos na recepção de peças na hora. Em março de 2017, o centro de operação dos navios do órgão de contratação do Defence Equipment & Support do Departamento de Defesa contou com 55% das demandas de peças de tripulações de navio e submarinos até a data requerida. Isso foi contra um alvo de 75%, enquanto o centro operacional submarino atendia 63% das demandas (com alvo de 80%).

Um corte de 92 milhões de libras esterlinas no orçamento de apoio marítimo em 2015-16 e 2016-17 poderia levar a um aumento adicional na necessidade de canibalizar peças, afirmou o relatório.

Respondendo ao relatório, um porta-voz da Royal Navy disse que menos de meio por cento das peças que ela usa vem de componentes emprestados de outros navios, e isso foi feito apenas “quando é absolutamente necessário retirar os navios do porto e voltar às operações mais rapidamente”.

A crescente complexidade dos navios pode significar que faz sentido tomar um componente existente de um navio que não é necessário naquele momento e colocá-lo em outro que é necessário de volta ao mar.

“Continuamos a fazer melhorias em como gerenciamos essa prática há muito estabelecida”, acrescentou.
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/F231-HMS-Argyll-005-1024x554.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Novembro 02, 2017, 01:25:47 pm
É a crise.

http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/11/01/canibalizacao-de-navios-na-royal-navy-aumenta-50-em-cinco-anos/ (http://www.naval.com.br/blog/2017/11/01/canibalizacao-de-navios-na-royal-navy-aumenta-50-em-cinco-anos/)
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O Ministério da Defesa do Reino Unido aprovou mais de 3.000 casos de retirada de peças de navios da Royal Navy e outros equipamentos para dar a outros navios em necessidade mais urgente, revelou o National Audit Office.

Uma revisão em canibalização de equipamentos publicada hoje descobriu que a prática, que se destina a ser usada apenas quando nenhuma outra alternativa está disponível, aumentou 49% nos últimos cinco anos, com um total de 3.230 casos envolvendo 6.378 partes.

Segundo os auditores, cerca de 40% dos navios e submarinos que receberam peças canibalizadas precisavam deles para que pudessem estar prontos para operações ou treinamento. Nestes casos, a canibalização de equipamentos corrigiu problemas que teriam reduzido a capacidade operacional de navios e submarinos. Os 60% restantes de navios e submarinos não precisavam das peças para operações ou treinamento, mas eram necessários para, por exemplo, completar o trabalho de manutenção planejado para agendar e custear.

A auditoria constatou que 71% das peças canibalizadas com base na necessidade operacional eram de baixo valor, com a maioria custando menos de £ 5.000 e menos de 1% avaliados em mais de £ 500.000.

No entanto, descobriu que o MoD não monitora rotineiramente o uso, as causas e o impacto da canibalização de equipamentos em toda a Marinha, ao invés disso, enfocando os tipos de navio, e também não sabe com que frequência o custo de substituição de peças canibalizadas excede o valor da peça sendo substituída. Sua própria análise, que abrange 146 canibalizações de equipamentos das Type 23 em 2012, mostrou que, em 50% desses casos, o custo da canibalização do equipamento era igual ou superior ao valor da peça. Em um quarto dos casos, foi quatro vezes maior. Embora a canibalização do equipamento tenha aumentado, o ministério não atualizou ou ampliou sua análise.

O relatório afirmou que o uso de peças canibalizadas quando houve novas substituições de equipamentos indisponíveis pode refletir problemas mais amplos com o processo de obtenção de peças sobressalentes e o problema é exacerbado tanto pela falta de informações sobre quando as peças serão entregues quanto por atrasos na recepção de peças na hora. Em março de 2017, o centro de operação dos navios do órgão de contratação do Defence Equipment & Support do Departamento de Defesa contou com 55% das demandas de peças de tripulações de navio e submarinos até a data requerida. Isso foi contra um alvo de 75%, enquanto o centro operacional submarino atendia 63% das demandas (com alvo de 80%).

Um corte de 92 milhões de libras esterlinas no orçamento de apoio marítimo em 2015-16 e 2016-17 poderia levar a um aumento adicional na necessidade de canibalizar peças, afirmou o relatório.

Respondendo ao relatório, um porta-voz da Royal Navy disse que menos de meio por cento das peças que ela usa vem de componentes emprestados de outros navios, e isso foi feito apenas “quando é absolutamente necessário retirar os navios do porto e voltar às operações mais rapidamente”.

A crescente complexidade dos navios pode significar que faz sentido tomar um componente existente de um navio que não é necessário naquele momento e colocá-lo em outro que é necessário de volta ao mar.

“Continuamos a fazer melhorias em como gerenciamos essa prática há muito estabelecida”, acrescentou.
(http://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/F231-HMS-Argyll-005-1024x554.jpg)

Saudações

Boas

tinha lido a noticia noutra fonte .

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=70&page=4

E fiquei mesmo muito admirado pelo estado da RN ainda mais porque um dos seis destroyers o HMS Dauntless que serve de Navio de treino está a ser usado como doador de peças para os restantes cinco navios da classe.
Estão mesmo de rastos daí as vendas de saldo que se vão iniciar e a que nós uma vez mais vamos deixar passar ao lado perdendo a oportunidade de deitar a mão a uns quantos helis.

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Novembro 03, 2017, 11:21:55 am
GMB: UK should not open FSS construction to foreign shipbuilders

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/924/Bn9eMv.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/poBn9eMvj)
MARS FSS design. Photo: UK-NDP

UK worker union GMB has slammed the UK government’s decision to put up an international tender for the construction of three Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels, saying the decision “udermined the national interest”.

The union further said that all Royal Navy and RFA ships should be built domestically and has called for cross-parliamentary support of MPs as well as shipbuilding employers to join workers and their communities and demand “an end to this tragic missed opportunity for UK shipbuilding”.

The ships in question are the 40,000-ton fleet solid support ships which will be supplying UK aircraft carriers and other frontline warships with ammunition, food and spares.

The four tankers which will be supplying the Royal Navy fleet with fuel are built in South Korea and outfitted in the UK.

GMB says all Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels must be built in UK yards.

The union is calling for cross-parliamentary support of MPs as well as shipbuilding employers to join workers and their communities and demand an end to this tragic missed opportunity for UK shipbuilding.

“The RFA contracts are the key to unlocking the country’s massive shipbuilding potential and transforming the fortunes of our shipbuilding communities,” Jude Brimble, GMB National Secretary, said.

“But Ministers’ refusal to put the UK’s interests first will mean that instead of a massive programme of shared economic and employment re-distribution, our shipbuilding firms will be competing against each other for slivers of complex warship work.”

The UK defense ministry has initiated an assessment phase to acquire the three MARS fleet solid support ships and under current plans has targeted main contract award by 2020.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/11/03/gmb-uk-should-not-open-fss-construction-to-foreign-shipbuilders/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 03, 2017, 12:34:49 pm
GMB: UK should not open FSS construction to foreign shipbuilders

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/924/Bn9eMv.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/poBn9eMvj)
MARS FSS design. Photo: UK-NDP

UK worker union GMB has slammed the UK government’s decision to put up an international tender for the construction of three Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels, saying the decision “udermined the national interest”.

The union further said that all Royal Navy and RFA ships should be built domestically and has called for cross-parliamentary support of MPs as well as shipbuilding employers to join workers and their communities and demand “an end to this tragic missed opportunity for UK shipbuilding”.

The ships in question are the 40,000-ton fleet solid support ships which will be supplying UK aircraft carriers and other frontline warships with ammunition, food and spares.

The four tankers which will be supplying the Royal Navy fleet with fuel are built in South Korea and outfitted in the UK.

GMB says all Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessels must be built in UK yards.

The union is calling for cross-parliamentary support of MPs as well as shipbuilding employers to join workers and their communities and demand an end to this tragic missed opportunity for UK shipbuilding.

“The RFA contracts are the key to unlocking the country’s massive shipbuilding potential and transforming the fortunes of our shipbuilding communities,” Jude Brimble, GMB National Secretary, said.

“But Ministers’ refusal to put the UK’s interests first will mean that instead of a massive programme of shared economic and employment re-distribution, our shipbuilding firms will be competing against each other for slivers of complex warship work.”

The UK defense ministry has initiated an assessment phase to acquire the three MARS fleet solid support ships and under current plans has targeted main contract award by 2020.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/11/03/gmb-uk-should-not-open-fss-construction-to-foreign-shipbuilders/

Abraços

Será que a restante classe Bay vai ficar disponível. Esse é que era...  ;) :) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay-class_landing_ship (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay-class_landing_ship)

(http://www.seaforces.org/marint/Royal-Navy/Amphibious-Ship/L3009-RFA-Cardigan-Bay_DAT/L3009-RFA-Cardigan-Bay-012.jpg)
(http://www.seaforces.org/marint/Royal-Navy/Amphibious-Ship/L3009-RFA-Cardigan-Bay_DAT/L3009-RFA-Cardigan-Bay-010.jpg)
(http://www.seaforces.org/marint/Royal-Navy/Amphibious-Ship/L3006-RFA-Largs-Bay_DAT/L3006-RFA-Largs-Bay-002.jpg)
(http://u0v052dm9wl3gxo0y3lx0u44wz.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/RFA-Mounts-Bay-2.jpg)
(https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/-/media/royal-navy-responsive/images/units-and-equipment/ships-and-surface-fleet/royal-fleet-auxiliary/landing-ship-dock/rfa-lyme-bay/images/rfa-lyme-bay.jpg?mh=447&mw=980&thn=0&hash=CAF953A3FA2247FCB72D39DD35DC8C5BD50ED20C)
(https://i1.wp.com/blog-imgs-49.fc2.com/c/r/u/cruise313/Remote-Control-Cruise-Ships-3.jpg)


Saudações


Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Novembro 03, 2017, 03:04:20 pm
Para mim, mais valia vir o RFA Fort Victoria e 8 Wildcats.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 04, 2017, 10:47:15 am
Para mim, mais valia vir o RFA Fort Victoria e 8 Wildcats.

O Fort Victoria supostamente está  a receber o Upgrade para suporte aos Porta-Aviões da classe Queen Elisabeth.  Se pudesse ser modificado para levar alguns veículos na popa e uma ou outra lancha de desembarque seria uma boa opção para Portugal, desde que os bifes o queiram vender. ;)
(https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/-/media/royal-navy-responsive/images/news/rfa/fort-victoria/160526-fort-victora/md160013020ppt.jpg?mh=447&mw=980&thn=0&hash=4B8B7C7EBA69D2DD7D91D51880382E8378A3605E)
(http://www.bharat-rakshak.com/NAVY/Galleries/177-2/Picture+013.jpg)
(http://www.shipspotting.com/photos/middle/7/5/7/1598757.jpg)
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-UBM2J8oPORM/Us_lQ43L8nI/AAAAAAAAPNA/XwHVIWuzfmQ/s1600/IMG_5656_2014-January-9-12.53.37+-+RFA+Fort+Victoria.jpg)
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http://dougie-coull-photography.blogspot.pt/2014/01/rfa-fort-victoria-loch-striven.html (http://dougie-coull-photography.blogspot.pt/2014/01/rfa-fort-victoria-loch-striven.html)
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/yes-hms-queen-elizabeth-aircraft/ (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/yes-hms-queen-elizabeth-aircraft/)
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HMS Queen Elizabeth has various types of aircraft ready for her, she just isn’t ready to operate them yet.

Many of you might have taken note of the surreal coverage of HMS Queen Elizabeth entering harbour to claims on national TV that she has no aircraft, despite aircraft sitting on her deck.

Merlin helicopters were the first aircraft to begin flying from HMS Queen Elizabeth and they will soon be followed by other helicopter types and eventually F-35s in around 11 months.
(https://ukdjstatic-b4d.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/a2-1021x580.webp)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Novembro 04, 2017, 08:53:32 pm
Onde é que viste isso do upgrade para dar suporte aos PA? Se é o que esta na página do MOD, soa mais a propaganda para inglês ver (pun intended)  ;D
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 04, 2017, 11:56:50 pm
Onde é que viste isso do upgrade para dar suporte aos PA? Se é o que esta na página do MOD, soa mais a propaganda para inglês ver (pun intended)  ;D
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RFA_Fort_Victoria_(A387) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RFA_Fort_Victoria_(A387))
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In July 2017, Fort Victoria returned to the UK following an extended 26-month deployment, much of which was spent East of Suez in support of anti-piracy operations. This included three months in the Aegean Sea in April 2016, taking over from RFA Mounts Bay.[22] Following her return, the ship is now undergoing a series of modifications intended to allow her to support HMS Queen Elizabeth, and meet current tanker anti-pollution hull requirements upon her entry into service.

Em 2015, até Janeiro de 2016 já recebeu um upgrade de 50 milhões: http://navaltoday.com/2016/01/28/royal-navys-rfa-fort-victoria-supports-allies-in-the-gulf/ (http://navaltoday.com/2016/01/28/royal-navys-rfa-fort-victoria-supports-allies-in-the-gulf/)
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Following a £50m refurbishment, the Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship Fort Victoria left Birkenhead, UK for the Arabian Gulf in support of international coalition forces operating in the region.

E a 4 de Setembro regressou a Birkenhead. http://www.historicalrfa.org/rfa-fort-victoria-ship-information (http://www.historicalrfa.org/rfa-fort-victoria-ship-information)
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4 September 2017 at sea off the Island of Anglesea. Later berthing at Birkenhead

Saudações


Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Novembro 05, 2017, 05:56:40 am
Esse parágrafo da wiki não tem referência externa a confirmar, pelo que se pode considerar, no mínimo, especulativo. Os outros dois links também não confirmam nada relativamente aos upgrades específicos para suporte aos QE.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Novembro 05, 2017, 07:15:37 am
Se algum dia a nossa MdG, tivesse este Navio a operar dois 101's, e em simultâneo, era um autentico porta helicopteros !!!  ;)


(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/922/gzd6W3.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pmgzd6W3j)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 05, 2017, 02:26:30 pm
Esse parágrafo da wiki não tem referência externa a confirmar, pelo que se pode considerar, no mínimo, especulativo. Os outros dois links também não confirmam nada relativamente aos upgrades específicos para suporte aos QE.

Confirma uma actualização de 50 milhões de libras e uma nova entrada em Setembro no mesmo sítio ( a "refit" dos navios da RFA dura até 2018)  . Depois basta ir ver onde o navio se encontra. E se está acostado no mesmo sítio onde levou uma reforma de 50 milhões à menos de 2 anos é porque alguma coisa está a fazer, e que pode ser desde reparações, correcções até simplesmente estar acostado à espera do futuro (segundo a actualização "ficara" em serviço mais 15 anos).

https://www.marinetraffic.com/pt/ais/home/shipid:184838/zoom:13 (https://www.marinetraffic.com/pt/ais/home/shipid:184838/zoom:13)
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image: https://www.marinetraffic.com/img/flags/png40/GB.png

United Kingdom
FORT VICTORIA
Replenishment Vessel

Velocidade/trajeto:
0kn / 0°
Calado:
9m


Tendo em conta que os substitutos ainda estão em processo de concurso, é provável que estes sejam novamente actualizados e cumpram as funções até os próximos entrarem em serviço. É especulativo? Pode ser, assim como toda a RN nos últimos anos, que vende navios da classe River com 14 anos para fazer o "batch2" que são dos OPV mais caros a nível mundial, que coloca na reserva um Type 45 (os tais sem tubos de turpedos asw) e que prepara-se para vender a maior parte dos navios de desembarque anfíbio para cortar verbas (vamos ver se o HMS Prince of Wales também não bate os costados na reserva, algo que já chegou a ser falado) . Portanto, tendo em conta a realidade da Royal Navy o Fort Victoria, tanto pode receber nova actualização e estar ao serviço mais uns 15 anos, como ser desactivado amanha. Não é a primeira vez e face ao estado de incerteza e cortes no orçamento da Marinha dos "Bifes", certamente não seria a última. Basta ver os Wildcats... ;)

http://www.naval-technology.com/news/newsuk-royal-navys-rfa-fort-victoria-completes-50m-refurbishment-4474551/ (http://www.naval-technology.com/news/newsuk-royal-navys-rfa-fort-victoria-completes-50m-refurbishment-4474551/)
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The refit programme is claimed to be the largest ever undertaken by Cammell Laird since the start of a five-year life support deal, signed in 2008, to maintain nine of the 13 vessels in the RFA flotilla.

The deal has now been extended to 2018.

RFA Fort Victoria commanding officer captain Shaun Jones said: "Fort Victoria’s refit has been an immense project that will guarantee at least another 15 years of service to the Royal Navy and wider defence."

(http://image.digitalinsightresearch.in/uploads/imagelibrary/Archive/nri/naval/news/Victoria-refit-1.jpg)

(https://www.clbh.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/FV-Leave.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Novembro 05, 2017, 03:49:26 pm
É especulativo porque o que a wiki refere é nada mais nada menos do que uma cópia a papel químico do site do MOD (apesar de não referir a origem da referência). O upgrade de há 2 anos foi algo programado com grande antecedência e é irrelevante para o caso, pois nunca é referida nenhuma medida em particular que tenha a ver com a especificidade dos QE. Onde o navio se encontra também me parece irrelevante quando, mais uma vez, não se sabem detalhes do tal novo upgrade — só generalidades num comunicado de PR (Public Relations) com o provável intuito de tentar justificar a manutenção do navio no activo, quando há uma enorme pressão político-financeira para reduzir meios, que tem na sua génese, precisamente, os tais QE.

É por demais evidente que, após todos os cortes dos últimos 30 anos, a RN já não tem estaleca para manter navios do tamanho dos QE, mas ainda assim está disposta a abdicar de alguns dos seus magros recursos para justificar os QE. Nem quero imaginar no que se vai tornar a RN quando o programa Dreadnought/Trident começar em força — possivelmente, vão vender um, ou até os dois, QE à Índia, ou ao Brasil.

Uma informação interessante num dos links que postaste é o tamanho da guarnição. Nesse link refere o número 89 quando, normalmente, todas as outras fontes referem 134 (mais 154 para o grupo aéreo, que deve ser um número variável em função da quantidade de helis transportados).
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Novembro 05, 2017, 03:53:01 pm
Se algum dia a nossa MdG, tivesse este Navio a operar dois 101's, e em simultâneo, era um autentico porta helicopteros !!!  ;)


(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/922/gzd6W3.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pmgzd6W3j)

E o hangar leva três! Se, hipoteticamente, a RN puser este navio à venda por mais de 20 milhões é provável que os gajos do Restelo digam que se trata de capacidade excessiva para as nossas necessidades.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 05, 2017, 07:04:34 pm
É especulativo porque o que a wiki refere é nada mais nada menos do que uma cópia a papel químico do site do MOD (apesar de não referir a origem da referência). O upgrade de há 2 anos foi algo programado com grande antecedência e é irrelevante para o caso, pois nunca é referida nenhuma medida em particular que tenha a ver com a especificidade dos QE. Onde o navio se encontra também me parece irrelevante quando, mais uma vez, não se sabem detalhes do tal novo upgrade — só generalidades num comunicado de PR (Public Relations) com o provável intuito de tentar justificar a manutenção do navio no activo, quando há uma enorme pressão político-financeira para reduzir meios, que tem na sua génese, precisamente, os tais QE.

É por demais evidente que, após todos os cortes dos últimos 30 anos, a RN já não tem estaleca para manter navios do tamanho dos QE, mas ainda assim está disposta a abdicar de alguns dos seus magros recursos para justificar os QE. Nem quero imaginar no que se vai tornar a RN quando o programa Dreadnought/Trident começar em força — possivelmente, vão vender um, ou até os dois, QE à Índia, ou ao Brasil.

Uma informação interessante num dos links que postaste é o tamanho da guarnição. Nesse link refere o número 89 quando, normalmente, todas as outras fontes referem 134 (mais 154 para o grupo aéreo, que deve ser um número variável em função da quantidade de helis transportados).
Especulação é a palavra mais actual na RN de hoje. Tudo é possível, até porque praticamente tudo já foi visto. Recordo que os Harrier e o último Invencible, depois de actualizações e reformas acabaram na sucata. O HMS Ocean, também não à muito saiu de refit e ao que parece vai ser vendido. Não existem garantias de nada, apenas informações, umas mais credíveis que outras, da mesma forma que por cá assim que se soube que o HMS Albion vai em princípio ser vendido, por exemplo o Pássaro de Ferro tem tentado justificar a sua aquisição pela Marinha como a "ultima possibilidade de termos um LPD". Ora, lá porque postei a noticia não quer dizer que acredite nela ou que ache o navio viável para Portugal (deve acabar é no Brasil ou Chile). O mesmo se passa com o folhetim Fort Victoria, que o mais certo é ir nos cortes e ser encostado ou vendido. Agora, quando a RFA tem 13 navios, a meu ver já acho poucos quanto mais 12.
(https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-iT0j1ALlNgg/WfEHz96Jz4I/AAAAAAAAD2Q/zJeZSxUHfWMDwZSBArTTYysHsCf0a-kiQCLcBGAs/s640/s22812851_1587715611285417_660620839_o.jpg)

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Os navios polivalentes logísticos  ou Landing Platform Dock em inglês (LPD) serão os dois da classe Albion actualmente ao serviço da Royal Navy (HMS Albion e HMS Bulwark), que a Royal Navy estará a considerar colocar no mercado, na sequência de reestruturações orçamentais daquele ramo das Forças Armadas britânicas, relacionadas com a entrada em serviço dos dois novos porta-aviões da classe HMS Elizabeth II.

Portugal mantém a pretensão de equipar a sua Marinha com um navio polivalente logístico deste tipo, desiderato que esteve perto de se realizar em 2015, com o Siroco francês. O negócio contudo não se concretizaria, alegadamente por incompatibilidade de operação com os helicópteros EH101 Merlin da Força Aérea Portuguesa.

O Siroco acabaria por ser adquirido pelo Brasil, incorporado na Marinha Brasileira com o nome NDM Bahia. O mesmo país está actualmente em negociações com o Reino Unido para a aquisição do porta-helicópteros HMS Ocean britânico, por uma verba a rondar os 90M EUR, um valor próximo ao atribuído ao negócio do Siroco.

A confirmar-se a disponibilidade dos navios da classe Albion, a Marinha Portuguesa poderá estar perante uma nova oportunidade para adquirir o tão ambicionado LPD, inscrito nas sucessivas Leis de Programação Militar, mas cuja concretização se tem arrastado.

Além das capacidades militares, um navio deste tipo permite fazer face a situações de resgate em larga escala em crises humanitárias.

http://www.passarodeferro.com/2017/10/royal-navy-coloca-navios-polivalentes.html (http://www.passarodeferro.com/2017/10/royal-navy-coloca-navios-polivalentes.html)o


Quem conhece o percurso da Royal Navy nos últimos 50 anos acredita em justificações para alguma coisa? A RN é uma verdadeira balda, lança programas extensos e caros, para depois cortar onde pode para os sustentar colocando em causa alguma capacidade operacional. Não se sabe qual o próximo navio a ser produzido ou entrar em estaleiro para reforma, justificando postos de trabalho  e se o mesmo quando sai vai para venda ou para a sucata. São vendidos navios novos, substituídos por outros mais caros como forma de sustentar a industria naval do país, e só quando o dinheiro é menos ou falta mão de obra é que se vai construir além mar, como último recurso. Nem tão pouco acredito que os Queen Elisabeth entrem em serviço como Porta-Aviões com a Ala Aérea completa (então com os problemas do F35B), muito menos que os Type 45 resistam ou que o caminho da marinha bife não seja reformar o que ainda existe dos tempos de boa construção para manter alguma capacidade real de combate. Aliás, se as vendas dos navios de desembarque anfíbio se manterem, a projecção de força da frota fica seriamente comprometida, e não é um mono de 65 000t que só dá para um tipo de caça mais helicópteros que vai repor essa capacidade. E isto se não acabar algum, vendido, na reserva ou por acabar, conforme a política mude, bem espelhado por este artigo em que cada cabeça sua sentença, enquanto a frota possui na realidade 19 navios com alguma capacidade de combate. E a tendência é o número encolher de futuro...
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jun/30/new-aircraft-carrier-hms-queen-elizabeth-royal-navy (https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jun/30/new-aircraft-carrier-hms-queen-elizabeth-royal-navy)
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Today it has 77 commissioned ships in all, only 19 of which (six destroyers and 13 frigates) can be described as significant surface combatants. Of course, the navy in 1955 still lingered as an imperial fleet, and in any case many  its ships were mothballed “in reserve”. Even so, in an age of terrorism, piracy and growing refugee and migrant flows, the British fleet seems remarkably small – enfeebled by the drain of money into the giant carrier project and the vast costs associated with the renewal of the Trident submarine fleet. Its personnel now number fewer than 30,000.

What is the point of HMS Queen Elizabeth and her sister – what is the vision? The former first sea lord Baron West of Spithead said in 2004 they were “crucial for expeditionary warfare”. The present defence secretary, Michael Fallon, says they will enable the UK “to tackle multiple and changing threats across the globe”. The ship’s commander, Captain Jerry Kyd, says: “We are an island nation, absolutely dependent on trade by sea – and law and order on the world’s sea routes … an aircraft carrier sends a real message to allies – and potential enemies – that we mean business.”
(https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/673f1210c57611712d7548a0ad12856af1cdccb1/1_0_2559_1535/master/2559.jpg?w=860&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=b1a338300d671a1a6908883084bcac6e)

Cumprimentos 
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 08, 2017, 03:28:15 pm
Publico primeiro uma foto do Navio Espanhol em questão e depois do Inglês.  :P ::)

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Ced8ZwCW4AE8Kut.jpg)
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(https://ukdjstatic-b4d.kxcdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/scimntargib-1021x580.jpg)

Spanish warship forced away from Gibraltar by patrol boat HMS Scimitar

HMS Scimitar intercepted the Infanata Elena yesterday morning and forced the corvette away from British waters off Gibraltar.

A spokesman said:

“We can confirm that a Spanish Navy vessel incurred in British Gibraltar Territorial Waters on November 7.

The Royal Navy challenges all maritime incursions in BGTW and did so again on this occasion. We will be protesting to the Spanish authorities.”

Saudações e salutar esta boa disposição para a comédia dos "Bifes"  ;D :jok:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Novembro 20, 2017, 09:20:45 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Novembro 22, 2017, 10:35:17 pm
Minister refuses to confirm that there are ‘no current plans’ to decommission amphibious vessels early

By George Allison -  November 21, 2017

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/923/SrfczE.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pnSrfczEj)

A letter written by Minister for Defence Procurement Harriet Baldwin in January had denied there are any ‘current plans’ to retire the Albion class amphibious warfare vessels early.

However, the Minister refused to confirm that was still the case during a debate today in Westminster Hall prompting fears this has changed.

The letter deposited in the House of Commons Library in January, was written after the question of the future of HMS Albion and HMS Bulwark was raised on the Floor of the House of Commons.

She said at the time:

“There are no current plans to decommission the ships early, and I can reassure you that their out of service dates are 2033 and 2034 respectively.”

The January letter.

Baldwin, when asked if this was still the case, appeared to entirely dodge the question:

“I can indeed confirm that I not only wrote those words but that I also I recall writing them.”

She later added:

“The work of the National Security Review is ongoing and no decisions have been put to Ministers.”

It would appear that decisions have not yet been made.

Recently Lord West of Spithead, a Former First Sea Lord, has argued that Britain’s security and prosperity requires amphibious capability.

Writing in Politics Home, the former naval chief argues for the retention of the vessels that rumours say may be axed.

He states:

“Under fire particularly, it seems, is our invaluable amphibious capability. So what exactly is this amphibious capability? Britain’s security and prosperity requires unimpeded maritime access and transit. As an island nation, the country needs a broadly maritime strategy – one that has sea control at its core, but which enables power and influence to be projected inland.

Indeed, being an island, all operations beyond our shores are expeditionary and demand theatre entry. Strike carriers and amphibious forces are the enablers for this theatre entry capability. The true fighting power of a navy is its ability to ensure entry around the world using carrier air and amphibious forces and to cause sea denial using carrier air and SSNs.
Since 1945 this entry capability has been used over 10 times including Korea, Suez, Kuwait (1962) pre-empting Iraqi planned invasion, Brunei, Falkland Islands, Sierra Leone and the Al Faw. And the Royal Marines have been in almost continuous operations consisting of 30 different campaigns.”

It was recently reported by multiple sources that Brazil and Chile have been given notice of “potential availability” of Royal Navy warships.

Most notably reported by IHS Jane’s Navy International, it has been claimed by the outlet that Brazil and Chile have “quietly been given notice of the potential availability of RN frigates and amphibious ships”.
Janes report that UK officials have “discreetly advised” that some of the frigate fleet in addition to the two Albion class landing platform docks could become available due to budget cuts.
Even the Americans have weighed in on the matter with Colonel Dan Sullivan reportedly saying cuts to the Royal Marines and the loss of two amphibious assault ships could impact the defence relationship between the US and UK.

The Ministry of Defence is reportedly examining options aimed at  the manpower available to the Royal Marines or cutting HMS Bulwark and HMS Albion.

The Times reported him as saying:

“My message is to articulate how important having that capability in our partner is and how damaging I think it would be if our most important coalition partner potentially takes the hits that are projected right now.

If you want to be decisive you have to be able to project power ashore at some point. From a military standpoint as the UK continues to diminish and as the Royal Marines in particular take a hit, I think that our view of what we will be able to do together in the future changes.”

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/no-current-plans-decomission-hms-albion-hms-bulwark-early-says-minister/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Crypter em Novembro 22, 2017, 11:30:17 pm
Se algum dia a nossa MdG, tivesse este Navio a operar dois 101's, e em simultâneo, era um autentico porta helicopteros !!!  ;)


(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/922/gzd6W3.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pmgzd6W3j)

E o hangar leva três! Se, hipoteticamente, a RN puser este navio à venda por mais de 20 milhões é provável que os gajos do Restelo digam que se trata de capacidade excessiva para as nossas necessidades.

2 em 1 com 27 anos?! Era o melhor que nos podia acontecer!  ;D

Ainda por cima com este upgrade que está a sofrer?!  :jok: :jok:

Keep dreaming..  blx2x1
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Novembro 23, 2017, 10:48:29 am
É preciso 325 almas para guarnecer aqueles navios... onde é que a Marinha tem eles?!
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Novembro 23, 2017, 02:36:55 pm
Nao sei de onde vêm os 325 (talvez dos Albion). Mas quanto ao Fort Victoria na foto, tiras 154 do grupo aéreo, porque nunca iríamos embarcar quatro Merlins (e se calhar a FAP nem precisaria de tantos elementos para operar esse inúmero de helis) e ficas com 134, que ainda é menos que uma fragata. Mais, de acordo com um site que o mafets colocou aqui, a guarnição do Victoria anda à volta dos 89.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: LM em Novembro 23, 2017, 02:55:58 pm
Tendo em conta as todas as "condicionantes" da Marinha (orçamento, conjuntura política, sociedade civil, etc) começo a desconfiar que custo/ benefício o ideal é mesmo algo deste tipo, em especial com a capacidade de 2 (3) helis pesados - se houver capacidade para embarcar uma companhia (+) de fuzileiros e um hospital é, para mim, o ideal.

Já não tenho ilusões de LPD + AOR - e, se vierem, é menos recursos para o resto que fica e o resto já está no osso...     
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 24, 2017, 10:33:29 am
Existiam dúvidas?  ::)

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/british-f-35b-order-may-reduced-due-budgetary-concerns/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=socia (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/british-f-35b-order-may-reduced-due-budgetary-concerns/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=socia)
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British F-35B order may be reduced due to budgetary concern

Despite an earlier commitment to buy 138 F-35B jets, it has been suggested that the overall number could eventually fall.

Lieutenant General Mark Poffley, deputy chief of the UK defence staff, told MPs today that he was “sympathetic” to the idea that the overall number could decrease.

Stephen Lovegrove, a senior civil servant at the MoD, revealed that the cost of the first tranche of 48 could rise from £9bn in 2025 to £13bn in 2048.

Julian Lewis MP commented “we are going to have to adjust the numbers of these aircraft that we order.”

He later added:

“What’s clear then is that the 48 are safe, secure, done and dusted as it were as far as the financial cost is concerned, but after that there is inevitable uncertainty, that’s what you are telling us?”

“That’s the reality of the world we are living in,” Pofley replied.

(https://ukdjassets-b4d.kxcdn.com/2017/11/F35UK-1021x580.jpg)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Novembro 27, 2017, 04:01:02 pm
Continuando com a saga dos cortes na RN:

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/922/XLS1RK.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pmXLS1RKj)

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/withdrawing-albion-class-end-british-amphibious-capability-says-former-defence-secretary/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 29, 2017, 10:55:58 am
https://www.facebook.com/portaaviones/?hc_ref=ARQCyjlAtc1dvjsa51XIjOUqriXyVo4EAMAo72OK1OxHDBWmCCjvAJCmDs9f_v7AQ6M&fref=nf&pnref=story (https://www.facebook.com/portaaviones/?hc_ref=ARQCyjlAtc1dvjsa51XIjOUqriXyVo4EAMAo72OK1OxHDBWmCCjvAJCmDs9f_v7AQ6M&fref=nf&pnref=story)
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Un navío británico entra en Ferrol para no perder un helicóptero Wildcat-noticia defensa.com
La cubierta de vuelo del RFA Argus fue escenario del incidente de un helicóptero AW159 Wildcat de la Real Marina británica, que a punto estuvo de caer al mar,…
DEFENSA.COM
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DPqiis9W0AImxU0.jpg)
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DPKLeltXcAA4lmU.jpg)
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DPKLdDTX4AAzVOY.jpg)


https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/new-tanker-rfa-tidespring-enters-service/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/new-tanker-rfa-tidespring-enters-service/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social)
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RFA Tidespring is the first of four Tide Class tankers and a dedication service took place in Portsmouth to officially welcome her into the fleet.

RFA Tidespring’s Commanding Officer Captain Simon Herbert said he was looking forward to taking the helm of the vessel:

“Sailing the first class of any ships is an immense privilege and I am extremely proud to be able to bring this highly modern, capable ship into Portsmouth Naval Base.”

The Tide class tanker is a class of four fast fleet tankers that will enter service with the Royal Fleet Auxiliary. The 37,000 tonne ships will provide fuel, food, fresh water, ammunition and other supplies to Royal Navy vessels around the world.

(https://ukdjassets-b4d.kxcdn.com/2017/11/MW170013003-1021x580.jpg)
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DPqCSjDWAAEd1hm.jpg)
(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DPqdaAiXkAALbMF.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Dezembro 07, 2017, 12:14:04 pm
LIVE: HMS Queen Elizabeth is commissioned




 

The Royal Navy is live streaming the grand ceremony in which Her Majesty the Queen is set to commission HMS Queen Elizabeth – the first of two new Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers.

The fleet flagship is being commissioned at its home base of Portsmouth in a ceremony attended by UK navy and government officials, distinguished guests and VIPs.

The Royal Navy formally accepted the vessel this morning from the Aircraft Carrier Alliance, an organization comprised of BAE Systems, Thales UK, Babcock and the UK defense which is responsible for delivering HMS Queen Elizabeth and sister ship HMS Prince of Wales.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/12/07/live-hms-queen-elizabeth-is-commissioned/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: kikotur em Dezembro 07, 2017, 04:33:26 pm

 http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Dezembro 09, 2017, 01:00:13 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Dezembro 20, 2017, 12:30:12 pm
(https://i2-prod.mirror.co.uk/incoming/article11723359.ece/ALTERNATES/s615b/NUMBERED-VERSION-Navy-Numbered.jpg)
The Royal Navy's 6 Type 45 Destroyers in port together (Image: Phil Harris/Daily Mirror)

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In 1985 the Navy had four aircraft carriers, two assault ships, 15 destroyers and 41 frigates.

Today, it has one aircraft carrier which leaks, has no planes and does not come into service until 2020, and a second which is being built and which critics fear may never enter service.

Two assault ships face being scrapped, the six destroyers are all in dock and 13 ageing frigates, which start to be retired in 2023.

 :arrow: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/six-royal-navys-type-45-11722210
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Dezembro 20, 2017, 01:35:49 pm
HMS Ocean returns from final deployment as commissioned Royal Navy ship

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/924/51TzEc.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/po51TzEcj)
HMS Ocean alongside at naval base Devonport

Royal Navy helicopter carrier HMS Ocean returned home to naval base Devonport on December 19, concluding her final deployment as a commissioned Royal Navy ship.

The ship was scheduled to enter Devonport on December 20, welcomed by families and friends, but a forecast of thick fog brought her final operational homecoming forward by a day.

Ocean, which will be decommissioned next year, left Plymouth at the end of August to serve as flagship of NATO’s Standing Maritime Group 2 in the Mediterranean.

The ship was re-tasked and diverted from her NATO duties at the beginning of September to take vital humanitarian aid to British Overseas Territories hit by hurricane Irma before returning to resume her role as the NATO group flagship and take part in multi-national exercises.

On board during her deployment were Royal Marines from Taunton-based 40 Commando, helicopters from 820, 845 and 847 Naval Air Squadrons based in Culdrose and Yeovilton, and RAF Chinook helicopters.

The crew of HMS Ocean are now on leave to celebrate Christmas.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/12/20/hms-ocean-returns-from-final-deployment-as-commissioned-royal-navy-ship/

Related:

https://navaltoday.com/2017/03/29/reports-hms-ocean-offered-for-sale-to-brazilian-navy/

https://navaltoday.com/2017/11/15/turkey-emerges-as-potential-buyer-of-uk-helicopter-carrier-hms-ocean/


Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: jpthiran em Dezembro 20, 2017, 08:44:19 pm
(https://i2-prod.mirror.co.uk/incoming/article11723359.ece/ALTERNATES/s615b/NUMBERED-VERSION-Navy-Numbered.jpg)
The Royal Navy's 6 Type 45 Destroyers in port together (Image: Phil Harris/Daily Mirror)

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In 1985 the Navy had four aircraft carriers, two assault ships, 15 destroyers and 41 frigates.

Today, it has one aircraft carrier which leaks, has no planes and does not come into service until 2020, and a second which is being built and which critics fear may never enter service.

Two assault ships face being scrapped, the six destroyers are all in dock and 13 ageing frigates, which start to be retired in 2023.

 :arrow: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/six-royal-navys-type-45-11722210
...ao menos as nossas fragatas não nos fazem passar estas vergonhas!...
...muito antes pelo contrário!...
...cumprem lindamente!...
...apesar dos nossos magros orçamentos!...
...parabéns à nossa marinha!...
...que compra navios fiáveis!...
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Viajante em Dezembro 20, 2017, 09:25:14 pm
Então quando chegar a factura do Brexit de 45 mil milhões de euros, vai ser duro.....
E se a Escócia escolher o "divórcio" e dividirem os poucos tarecos......
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Dezembro 22, 2017, 10:50:46 am
Isto é que vai para aqui uma açorda...  :P 8)

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/former-first-sea-lord-makes-case-retaining-older-offshore-patrol-vessels/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=UKDJPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/former-first-sea-lord-makes-case-retaining-older-offshore-patrol-vessels/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=UKDJPage&utm_campaign=social)
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Lord West of Spithead has urged the government to retain the about to be replaced Offshore Patrol Vessel fleet.

Lord West of Spithead said dureing a House of Lords debate on UK border surveillance:

“My Lords, the Minister makes rather light of the real problem. There is no doubt whatever that all the departments and assets looking after our territorial seas and exclusive economic zone are not being co-ordinated at the moment.

I know that there are plans to move forward, but it is not being done. The intelligence from the NMIC, which was established some five years or so ago, is very good but we are not co-ordinating assets, and we do not have enough assets. However, my question relates to our British Overseas Territories, each of which has territorial seas and exclusive economic zones.

Indeed, we have responsibility for the largest area of ocean of any country in the world. In that circumstance, does it not make sense not to get rid of the offshore patrol vessels, which are relatively new, when the new ​ones come online, and to use those to look after these vast areas of ocean that at the moment are not being properly protected?”

Baroness Williams of Trafford responded, incorrectly:
The noble Lord makes a valid point about our offshore patrol vessels—and there are no plans to get rid of them. However, my point, which I hope I was not making lightly, was that the most effective work we can do at the border is intelligence-led work that is successful at pinpointing areas of high risk.

Recently retired HMS Severn is being replaced with a new batch River class offshore patrol vessel after only 14 years of service, all of her sister ships will be too.

New Offshore Patrol Vessels were ordered to fill a gap in orders after the second carrier and before the Type 26 frigates begin construction. Critics, the UK Defence Journal included, have raised concerns that they’re severely overpriced and lack important features, such as a helicopter hangar that other, cheaper vessels of the same type have.

 

The order and construction of the new OPV’s helped sustain hundreds of skilled jobs on the Clyde until the Type 26 build begins, ensuring that the yards remain viable.

The new Offshore Patrol Vessels were also described at a Defence Select Committee meeting a vessels “the Royal Navy does not want or need”.

The vessels will be used by the Royal Navy to undertake various tasks including border protection roles, including anti-smuggling, anti-piracy, fisheries patrols, and immigration law enforcement.

(http://www.seaforces.org/marint/Royal-Navy/Patrol-Vessel/P281-HMS-Tyne_DAT/River-class-002.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Dezembro 23, 2017, 05:43:21 pm
Prince of Wales floats out ahead of schedule
Kate Tringham - Jane's Defence Weekly  22 December 2017

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/924/1GOvVr.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/po1GOvVrj)
The UK's second Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carrier, Prince of Wales , is floated out on 21 December. Source: BAE Systems

The UK Royal Navy’s second Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carrier was officially launched on 21 December, achieving another milestone for the construction programme.

The future HMS Prince of Wales , originally planned to launch in 2018, was floated out ahead of schedule during a ceremony held at BAE Systems’ Rosyth facility in Scotland, officials said.
Under current plans, sea trials for the 65,000-tonne ship are expected to start in 2019.

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=70&page=4

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Janeiro 08, 2018, 10:10:11 am
Babcock announces industry team for Type 31 frigate bid

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/miVWHs.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pomiVWHsj)

Babcock's Arrowhead frigate design is a 120 meter general-purpose frigate the company believes it can build for the Royal Navy under the £250 million price limit set by the defense ministry.

UK defense contractor Babcock will be leading a team of industry partners in a bid for the Royal Navy’s new £1.25 billion Type 31e general purpose light frigate program, the company announced on Monday.

According to the announcement, Babcock and Thales have joined forces with BMT, Harland & Wolff and Ferguson Marine to form ‘Team 31’.

Babcock will act as the overall program lead, whilst Thales will have overall responsibility for the development of the mission system solution. Babcock and BMT will use their experience in the development of designs for both naval and commercial vessels to produce a Type 31 design.

Babcock said the make-up of the team would  ensure that the economic benefits of the program are shared across the UK. Ferguson Marine on the Clyde, Harland & Wolff in Belfast and the Babcock facilities in Fife and Devon will all have key roles to play, while much of the equipment provided by Thales and others will support jobs across the UK.

“Team 31 will allow Babcock and Thales to take forward the key lessons from the Aircraft Carrier Alliance and apply them in a new and highly capable team with Harland & Wolff, BMT and Ferguson Marine,” Babcock CEO Archie Bethel said.

“Thales UK is delighted to be working with Babcock and our partners as part of Team 31. We recognise the diversity of roles anticipated for Type31e and, together, we will create and exciting, innovative and flexible capability for the Royal Navy based on the best of UK and international technologies in an open-system architecture that will ensure long term value for money,” Victor Chavez, CEO of Thales UK said.

The defense ministry expects the first ships to be in service by 2023, built under a price cap of £250M each for the first batch of five frigates.

The Type 31 frigate will replace five of the Royal Navy’s Type 23 frigates. The other eight Type 23s are already set to be replaced by the upcoming Type 26 class.

https://navaltoday.com/2018/01/08/babcock-announces-industry-team-for-type-31-frigate-bid/

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/babcock-thales-bmt-harland-wolff-ferguson-marine-join-forces-type-31-frigate-bid/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lightning em Janeiro 12, 2018, 10:01:21 pm
Mais possíveis cortes para os Britânicos, várias Fragatas e Navios anfíbios podem sair de serviço.

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DTUQ2WAW4AAv9Vw.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Janeiro 12, 2018, 10:12:12 pm
Mais possíveis cortes para os Britânicos, várias Fragatas e Navios anfíbios podem sair de serviço.

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DTUQ2WAW4AAv9Vw.jpg)

Como o Brasil já está com a mão na massa, HMS Ocean, e o HMS Albion será encostado daqui a uns anos, tudo indica que a opção a ser escolhida será a III, quanto a mim a menos gravosa das três, mas a que não prevê a desativação dos Wildcats que nos interessam.

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lightning em Janeiro 12, 2018, 10:19:38 pm
Nós é que podíamos tentar por a mão a um desses navios anfíbios e uns lynx navais modernos...
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Janeiro 17, 2018, 10:39:18 am
Normalmente quando recebem Upgrade são vendidos ou desmantelados...  ::) :o https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/rfa-fort-victoria-commences-refit-birkenhead/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=UKDJPage&utm_campaign=social (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/rfa-fort-victoria-commences-refit-birkenhead/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=UKDJPage&utm_campaign=social)
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One of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary’s largest vessels, the combined fleet stores ship, RFA Fort Victoria has begun its latest refit in Merseyside. 

The refit will be conducted by Cammell Laird supported by a number of local and national contractors including interior specialists Trimline Ltd. of Southampton. This is the third refit in a row for this vessel to be led by Cammell Laird, the last occurring three years ago. The main highlight of the refit will be the installation of a double-hull which will improve her international compliance and upgrades to allow her to better replenish and support the new Queen Elizabeth class carriers. These upgrades continue plans to keep the vessel in service until the late 2020s.
(https://ukdj.imgix.net/2018/01/12000931_10153051692995404_8014133073899812731_o.jpg?auto=compress%2Cformat&fit=crop&h=580&ixlib=php-1.1.0&q=80&w=1021&wpsize=td_1021x580&s=fc984983f20b6be261dd78f980a5d4fd)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Janeiro 29, 2018, 12:54:41 pm
Construction of First Type 26 / City-class Frigate Progressing Well
Posted On Saturday, 27 January 2018 18:57


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/4kGQ5E.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/po4kGQ5Ej)
 Guto Bebb MP, the recently appointed UK Minister for Defence Procurement, visited BAE Systems’ Clyde shipyards and witnessed progress on the Type 26 programme as production started on the second hull section of GLASGOW, the first of the City Class frigates.


BAE Systems has commenced manufacture on the second hull section of the future HMS Glasgow. This will house the main machinery space, aviation stores for embarked helicopters and a recreational area for the ships’ 59 senior rates. BAE Systems picture.

 Manufacture of the first Type 26, GLASGOW, began in July 2017 and is progressing well with production starting on the second zone of the ship. The first hull section is already taking shape at the Govan yard and the second houses the main machinery space, aviation stores for embarked helicopters and a recreational area for the ships’ 59 senior rates.

 With a cutting edge platform design and the ability to adapt to the requirements of different navies, the Type 26 design has been proposed for the Australian Government’s anti-submarine warfare frigate programme (SEA5000) and the Canadian Surface Combatant programme (CSC).

 The Type 26 is an advanced Anti-Submarine Warfare frigate that will provide essential protection to our nuclear deterrent and aircraft carriers, building on the pedigree of the Royal Navy’s current Type 23 frigates.

 Its flexible design will allow its weapon systems to be adapted throughout its lifespan to counter future threats. The Type 26 benefits from the latest advances in digital technologies, including 3D and virtual reality, which ensures that the ship’s design is refined earlier in the process.

 The Type 26 will replace the UK’s Type 23 frigates, with the first set to enter service in the early 2020s and the last remaining in service beyond the middle of the century.

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=70&page=6

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Janeiro 31, 2018, 11:54:21 am
Os Russos não percebem nada disto. Já é um milagre sair do porto, depois só com o Wildcat na função ASW, vai ser um mimo para os submarinos da Rússia ...  :jok: :nice:
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British Destroyer HMS Duncan has sailed through the Bosphorus Straight and into the Black Sea, a move described by Russian media recently as 'clear provocation'.

https://www.facebook.com/ukdefencejournal/?hc_ref=ARRTL6EYNXap-L0IXiOh9Jyh0zSc79fmdfpj_U8QANGGFwrRddGEPCyCO32BNIrI6e4&fref=nf&pnref=story (https://www.facebook.com/ukdefencejournal/?hc_ref=ARRTL6EYNXap-L0IXiOh9Jyh0zSc79fmdfpj_U8QANGGFwrRddGEPCyCO32BNIrI6e4&fref=nf&pnref=story)

(https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/-/media/royal-navy-responsive/images/news/ships/duncan/120905-duncan-sea/120905-duncan-sea-(1).jpg?mh=447&mw=980&thn=0&hash=D864EA44A3A43F0C75EE729DDA24AFE76E20AB2E)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Janeiro 31, 2018, 02:15:33 pm
Não sejas mauzinho e não te esqueças que é inverno, pelo que os motores dos D estão no seu ambiente natural  :mrgreen:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Fevereiro 09, 2018, 04:16:15 pm
Já estão os Nuestros Hermanos em sentido...  :D ;)

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hms-queen-elizabeth-hms-somerset-arrive-gibraltar/?no_cache=1 (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hms-queen-elizabeth-hms-somerset-arrive-gibraltar/?no_cache=1)

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Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said:

“As the Rock casts its shadow over the flight deck of our world-class aircraft carrier, Gibraltar rightfully marks HMS Queen Elizabeth’s first overseas stop as she refuels and takes on supplies before continuing her sea trials. I’m sure our friends in Gibraltar will be proud to see our future flagship sail through British waters into their famous port.”

Captain Jerry Kyd, the Commanding Officer of HMS Queen Elizabeth, said:

“It is a great privilege for me to be bringing our new aircraft carrier into Gibraltar for her first ever overseas port visit.

Gibraltar is the perfect stop for HMS Queen Elizabeth as we conduct our flying trials in the waters off the Iberian Peninsula. And our visit also underlines the incredibly rich history and special relationship the Royal Navy and Royal Marines share with Gibraltar.

I am personally very lucky to have visited the Rock many times in my naval career, but well over a quarter of my sailors have not yet experienced what, for the Royal Navy, is something of an iconic run ashore.”

(https://ukdj.imgix.net/2018/02/hmsqnlzgib1.jpg?auto=compress%2Cformat&fit=crop&h=580&ixlib=php-1.1.0&q=80&w=1021&wpsize=td_1021x580&s=42f3f178f4fa679ae76856585fa2d793)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Fevereiro 21, 2018, 12:08:53 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Vitor Santos em Março 07, 2018, 08:37:36 pm
(https://cdn1.defesaaereanaval.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/astute-grafico.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Março 08, 2018, 09:37:43 am
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hms-cattistock-clears-mines-around-norwegian-capital-oslo/?no_cache=1 (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hms-cattistock-clears-mines-around-norwegian-capital-oslo/?no_cache=1)

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HMS Cattistock found more than ten mines and torpedoes from the Second World War during a search for unexploded wartime bombs as part of a NATO task group.

According to a press release:

“Norway was occupied by the Nazis between April 1940 and the war’s end, with the RAF making repeated attempts to disrupt shipping between Oslo and Germany – an operation codenamed ‘gardening vegetables’, with Oslofjord itself also given the cover name ‘onions’.

Twin-engine Hampden bombers, or four-engine Lancasters and Halifaxes dropped between one and two dozen mines at a time, just one or two seconds apart from a mere 600ft over the fjord. Around 1,500 British ‘A’ mines were sown in the fjord and its many inlets – some triggered by a ship’s magnetic field, others by the noise vessels made as they passed overhead.”

Leading Diver Karl Atkin said:

“The environmental conditions were incredibly challenging – water temperatures down to freezing, often causing the formation of ice, and air temperatures consistently well below freezing. So diving operations were unusually demanding. We often went down to 60 metres in zero visibility and had to identify the mines by touch.

The deep dives bring a heavy decompression penalty too – we had to conduct ‘stops’ at various depths on the way up. When we do, we’re motionless in the water column and get very cold very quickly! The cold also forced the ship to abandon the last two miles of hunting due to thick sea-ice closing the bay.”

(https://ukdj.imgix.net/2018/03/180307-Cattistock-Oslo-mines-1.jpg?auto=compress%2Cformat&fit=crop&h=580&ixlib=php-1.1.0&q=80&w=1021&wpsize=td_1021x580&s=74fe14861be982b727d2231d721b5fdd)

Saudações

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Março 13, 2018, 06:03:27 pm
Fifth River-class OPV officially named

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/922/AfJMZ8.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pmAfJMZ8p)
Photo: BAE Systems

Trent, the third of five River-class offshore patrol vessels (OPV) being built for the Royal Navy, has been named.

The naming ceremony took place in Govan, Glasgow on March 13, BAE Systems Maritime informed.

Trent is now set to take to the water for the first time and make the short journey across the Clyde from Govan to Scotstoun where she will be fitted out for sea trials.

‘This is another landmark moment for the River Class OPV Programme and an important day that honours the traditions of the RoyalNavy” Iain Stevenson, BAE Systems Naval Ships managing director, commented.

Trent is expected to take part in counter-terrorism, combating piracy, halting smuggling and defending UK waters. The River-class OPV is the sixth Royal Navy vessel to bear the name.

The five ships in the class are called Forth, Medway, Trent, Tamar and Spey. They are being built at BAE Systems’ Clyde shipyards as part of a £348 million contract.

HMS Forth, the first of five vessels from the batch, joined the navy in January this year. Medway, the second of class, was named in October 2017.

https://navaltoday.com/2018/03/13/fifth-river-class-opv-officially-named/


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/923/TQVNiH.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pnTQVNiHj)

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/new-offshore-patrol-vessel-hms-trent-named-glasgow/


Pelos custos apresentados para os cinco River, 78,5 milhões de euros por Navio, e, diga-se de passagem que em quase tudo são navios semelhantes aos nossos NPO's, por exemplo sem hangar e com 30mm como armamento principal, conseguíamos construir os dez NPO's/NCO's inicialmente previstos, e ainda sobravam uns milhões, £ 348 M = € 392,5 M ! ;) ;)
 
Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Março 13, 2018, 06:30:36 pm
Há que ter em conta a diferença salarial entre Portugal e o RU e, mais importante, que este programa não passa de um subsídio à BAE para manter os seus estaleiros ocupados — não me admirava que parte significativa desse dinheiro tenha servido para manter técnicos qualificados em casa até a construção dos Type 26 ter entrando em velocidade de cruzeiro.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Março 13, 2018, 07:27:03 pm
Há que ter em conta a diferença salarial entre Portugal e o RU e, mais importante, que este programa não passa de um subsídio à BAE para manter os seus estaleiros ocupados — não me admirava que parte significativa desse dinheiro tenha servido para manter técnicos qualificados em casa até a construção dos Type 26 ter entrando em velocidade de cruzeiro.

Foi isso mesmo que aconteceu, desse modo mantiveram os melhores especialistas ocupados sem o receio de irem para outras paragens, digo estaleiros, construir na concorrência, mas, isso tem custos que a médio/longo prazo trazem benefícios enormes neste caso para a construção naval Britânica, apesar de eu preferir mais a construção naval Alemã, Dinamarquesa e até Holandesa á Britânica, vá-se lá saber porquê .........  ;)

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: LM em Março 14, 2018, 11:21:11 am

Pelos custos apresentados para os cinco River, 78,5 milhões de euros por Navio, e, diga-se de passagem que em quase tudo são navios semelhantes aos nossos NPO's, por exemplo sem hangar e com 30mm como armamento principal, conseguíamos construir os dez NPO's/NCO's inicialmente previstos, e ainda sobravam uns milhões, £ 348 M = € 392,5 M ! ;) ;)

Este custo é para o "batch 2", correcto? Tinha ideia que eram (apesar do armamento principal) algo diferentes nos "detalhes" dos nossos NPO e que esses "detalhes" justificavam a diferença de custo (alterações da versão original => https://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2016/06/thoughts-batch-2-river-class/ (https://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/2016/06/thoughts-batch-2-river-class/))... estou errado?
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Março 14, 2018, 12:29:47 pm
Há que ter em conta a diferença salarial entre Portugal e o RU e, mais importante, que este programa não passa de um subsídio à BAE para manter os seus estaleiros ocupados — não me admirava que parte significativa desse dinheiro tenha servido para manter técnicos qualificados em casa até a construção dos Type 26 ter entrando em velocidade de cruzeiro.

Foi isso mesmo que aconteceu, desse modo mantiveram os melhores especialistas ocupados sem o receio de irem para outras paragens, digo estaleiros, construir na concorrência, mas, isso tem custos que a médio/longo prazo trazem benefícios enormes neste caso para a construção naval Britânica, apesar de eu preferir mais a construção naval Alemã, Dinamarquesa e até Holandesa á Britânica, vá-se lá saber porquê .........  ;)

Abraços

Os alemães, agora também não lhes tocava :) Navios que adornam, custos exorbitantes, submarinos parados. Há algo de podre no reino da Prússia.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Março 22, 2018, 10:15:05 am
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/three-river-class-offshore-patrol-vessels-may-be-retained-should-they-be-needed-to-control-uk-waters/?no_cache=1 (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/three-river-class-offshore-patrol-vessels-may-be-retained-should-they-be-needed-to-control-uk-waters/?no_cache=1)

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Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Defence, Guto Bebb has revealed that £12.7M had been allocated from the EU Exit Preparedness Fund to preserve the three Batch 1 River class ships, should they be needed to control and enforce UK waters and fisheries following the United Kingdom's withdrawal from the European Union.

(https://ukdj.imgix.net/2017/12/45153648_river_class.jpg?auto=compress%2Cformat&fit=crop&h=580&ixlib=php-1.1.0&q=80&w=1021&wpsize=td_1021x580&s=1efade0e3999a725dff68b37a89b3ae3)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Março 23, 2018, 06:07:20 pm
Final cure for Type 45 destroyer propulsion problems announced

In a modest ceremony held on board HMS Diamond in Portsmouth today, BAE Systems, BMT Defence Services and Cammell Laird signed a contract with the MoD to deliver the Type 45 Power Improvement Project (PIP). Significant propulsion problems have hampered the operation of the six destroyers since their construction and it is encouraging that a permanent cure has now been agreed upon.

The RN has paid a high price for pioneering Integrated Electric Propulsion (IEP) in a major warship. The principles are sound but the selection by government, against the advice of the builder BAE Systems, of an unproven Gas Turbine design has left a painful legacy. Problems with the intercooler-recuperator fitted to the Type 45’s WR-21 gas turbine engines have caused complete propulsion failures. (We covered the complex story of these issues in detail in one of our most widely read articles back in 2016.)

Some media coverage has given the impression that all the Type 45s have been permanently stuck in port for years, but this is far from the truth. Sailing with some workarounds and operating restrictions, developed under the Equipment Improvement Plan (EIP), has allowed them to successfully deploy, including to the warm waters of the Arabian Gulf.

It would be too difficult to replace the Gas Turbines so instead, the PIP plan is that the two existing diesel-generator sets will be replaced by 3 more powerful sets. The Type 45 will then change its standard operating procedure to cruise on its diesels and only use the GTs for higher speeds.

£280M of funding for the PIP was set aside in the 2015 SDSR. The competition for the contract was split into two parts, comprising procurement, design and integration of the solution, and the physical installation and replacement of equipment onboard the Type 45 vessels. The alliance of BAES, BMT and CL won both parts of the contract, with work set to begin immediately.

(http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/HMS-Diamond-generator-install.jpg)

The existing diesel generators could be replaced using access paths designed into the ship without cutting the hull open. Seen here in 2015, a replacement Wärtsilä 12V200 diesel generator set is prepared to be lowered into place aboard HMS Diamond. (Photo: BAE Systems)

The cutting open of the hulls to remove the old generator sets and inserting the new plant will be done at Cammell Laird’s shipyard in Birkenhead sustaining more than 100 jobs. CL have large dry docks and years of ship repair and conversion experience appropriate to this kind of work. BAE Systems already has the maintenance contract for the Type 45s in Portsmouth and has the technical experience needed to and support them re-entering the fleet after the conversion.

At this time there is no definite indication which ship will be first to be taken in hand for the PIP in 2019. HMS Daring is currently laid up as a “harbour training ship” in Portsmouth and is a likely candidate. HMS Dauntless has already begun a major refit, HMS Defender has just completed refit and the other 3 ships are active. The first conversion should be completed in 2021, 12 years after the first Type 45, HMS Daring was commissioned in 2009.

As the original shipbuilder, BAE Systems was always in pole position to win this contract. The announcement will be a blow to Babcock who had bid, needing continuity of work for Rosyth and Devonport. It is interesting to note a deepening alliance between Camell Laird and BAE Systems who are also competing for the Type 31e project.

http://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/final-cure-for-type-45-destroyer-propulsion-problems-announced/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Março 28, 2018, 12:03:03 pm


Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Março 30, 2018, 03:16:31 pm
 The third of four new support tankers to be delivered to the UK has arrived in Cornwall for customisation and trials before entering service with the Royal Fleet Auxiliary and being deployed on operations with the Royal Navy.

 The arrival of RFA Tidesurge comes just weeks after her sister ship, RFA Tidespring, met up at sea with aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth for the first time.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/vCVbbs.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/povCVbbsj)

 The 39,000-tonne tankers can carry up to 19,000 cubic metres of fuel and 1,400 cubic metres of fresh water in support of Royal Navy operations all over the world.

 The detailed customisation work to prepare RFA Tidesurge and her sister ships for operations is being undertaken at the A&P shipyard in Falmouth, sustaining around 300 jobs.

 Minister for Defence Procurement Guto Bebb said: “The arrival of RFA Tidesurge in Cornwall marks another key milestone in the Tide Class programme. Tidesurge will soon join her sister ships in providing the integral support which powers our warships and helps our Royal Navy maintain a truly global presence.”

While in Falmouth RFA Tidesurge will be fitted with UK specific armour, self-defence weaponry and communications systems, with the total UK work content, including A&P, in the Tide Class programme worth around £150 million and sustaining further jobs at 27 UK-based companies.

 The customisation work is expected to take around four months after which RFA Tidesurge will begin final sea trials before entering service in Autumn this year.

 Meanwhile, RFA Tidespring, which was preparing to conduct a Replenishment at Sea (RAS) refuelling when it met with HMS Queen Elizabeth in February, is currently acting as the training tanker for the Navy’s Flag Officer Sea Training (FOST) and will take part in exercise Joint Warrior in the Spring. RFA Tiderace, which is currently docked at A&P Falmouth, is undergoing preparations for her capability trials which are expected to commence in early April.

 Sir Simon Bollom, Chief of Materiel (Ships) at Defence Equipment and Support, the MOD’s procurement organisation, said: “I’m proud to say that the delivery of the tanker programme will provide vital support for the Royal Navy, providing it with fuel and fresh water, while also being able to undertake a wide range of maritime operations, including humanitarian relief.”

The fourth of the Tide Class vessels - RFA Tideforce - is expected to be delivered later this year.

 A&P Group has held the contract to support and maintain RFA ships at home and abroad since 2008. Under the Cluster Support Programme, A&P Group provides maintenance support to groups of MOD vessels, which include RFA Argus and the RFA Bay Class vessels Mounts Bay, Cardigan Bay and Lyme Bay.

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=70&page=8

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Abril 13, 2018, 03:07:12 pm
HMS Forth enters service

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/923/PLklw5.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pnPLklw5j)
Photo: BAE Systems

HMS Forth, the first of Royal Navy’s five new Batch-2 River-class offshore patrol vessels, entered service in a ceremony held at her Her Majesty’s Naval Base Portsmouth, on April 13.

At the ceremony, the ship’s Lady Sponsor, Rachel Johnstone-Burt, was joined by UK government and defense officials, as well as the families of the ship’s company.

Forth is the first of five vessels in her class, designed and built by BAE Systems. The ship arrived at its Portsmouth homeport on February 26, 2018, after being launched at BAE Systems’ Glasgow construction site in August 2016.

The remaining four ships are expected to arrive in Portsmouth by 2020. The Batch 2 OPVs are four knots faster than their predecessors at 24 knots, have an increased range of 5,500 nautical miles. They are equipped with a 30mm automatic cannon as their main armament instead of a 20mm gun, two Miniguns and four machine-guns.

Each ship has an extended flight deck to operate up to Merlin size helicopters and accommodation for up to 50 embarked Royal Marines for boarding and supporting operations ashore if required and each carries two Pacific 24 sea boats.

The new OPVs will be supported at Portsmouth Naval Base by BAE Systems under the terms of the Maritime Services Delivery Framework (MSDF) contract. It was awarded to the company in 2014 to manage Portsmouth Naval base and to support the Royal Navy’s Portsmouth-based surface fleet.

The next major milestone for HMS Forth will be to undertake her first naval deployment, which is anticipated to take place later this year.

https://navaltoday.com/2018/04/13/hms-forth-enters-service/

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Abril 17, 2018, 07:36:22 am
Royal Navy ‘keen’ to keep batch one River class ships

By George Allison -   April 17, 2018

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/923/BAwbM6.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pnBAwbM6p)

Rear Admiral Chris Gardner, assistant chief of naval staff, said that the Royal Navy is “keen” to keep the ships.

Speaking to The News here, Rear Adm Gardner said:

“At the moment no decision has been taken about what their future could be. I’m keeping the ships in a state of operational readiness which means that as the future becomes a bit clearer post-Brexit, and as our requirements are more broadly understood, we will be able to make decisions about whether or not we will seek to retain and operate them as additional units in the Royal Navy or find some other solution.”

Recently, Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Defence, Guto Bebb has revealed that £12.7M had been allocated from the EU Exit Preparedness Fund to preserve the three Batch 1 River class ships, should they be needed to control and enforce UK waters and fisheries following the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union.

Peter Dowd Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury asked:

“To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 March 2018, Spring Statement, HCWS 540, if he will publish a list of where the £12.7 million allocated to his Department to realise the opportunities from EU exit will be spent.”

Guto Bebb, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence, responded:

“The Ministry of Defence has now been allocated £12.7 million in 2018-19 for essential EU exit preparations. This will fund preserving three Off-Shore Patrol Vessels, should they be needed to control and enforce UK waters and fisheries. It also includes some EU Exit preparedness funding for UK defence bases in Europe. As with all HMT Reserve funding, finalised allocations will be confirmed at Supplementary Estimates 2018-19 in early 2019.”

Earlier in the year, Bebb revealed the running cost of the Batch 1 vessels in response to a written question:

“The cost of operating a River Class Offshore Patrol Batch 2 Vessel will be determined by the specific operational programmes of the ships when they enter service. We have used the cost of the current in service Batch 1 Offshore Patrol Vessels as the basis of our planning which is £6.5 million per year.”

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/royal-navy-keen-to-keep-batch-one-river-class-ships/

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Abril 19, 2018, 07:03:37 pm
Union warns UK shipbuilding jobs at risk if support ship contract goes overseas


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/u8dPB9.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pou8dPB9p)

The Ministry of Defence is to put the order for Royal Fleet Auxiliary support ships out to international tender at the end of this month, diminishing hopes that they will be built in the UK.

Keeping the work in the UK could create or secure 6,700 jobs, including 1,800 shipyard jobs, and support a further 4,700 in the supply chain, say union GMB.

Ross Murdoch, the GMB’s national officer for shipbuilding, claimed:

“It would be a gross betrayal of the spirit of the ‘red, white and blue Brexit’ that Theresa May promised if this crucial contract is awarded outside of the UK and jobs here are lost as a result. We have a highly skilled shipbuilding workforce in the UK that is more than capable of making these ships at a fair market price.”

Current government policy is that Royal Navy warships are built in the UK but orders for Royal Fleet Auxiliary ships can go overseas as they’re not ‘complex warships’. According to the ‘National Shipbuilding Strategy’ document, there are three tenets regarding UK shipbuilding policy that impact on the build location of contracts:
1.For reasons of national security, all Royal Navy warships (destroyers, frigates and aircraft carriers) will continue to have a UK-owned design, and, will be built and integrated in the UK. Warship build will be via competition between UK shipyards. But international partners will be encouraged to work with UK shipyards and other providers to produce the best possible commercial solution.

2.All other naval ships should be subject to open competition (provided that there are no compelling national security reasons to constrain a particular procurement to national providers). Integration of sensitive UK-specific systems will be done in the UK, where possible after competition between UK providers.

3.Defence will take account of wider factors (including the impact on UK prosperity) when making these procurement decisions.

Support vessels like the solid support ships are eligible to be constructed outside the UK as only ‘complex warship’ construction (such as destroyers and frigates as outlined above) must stay within UK borders.

Babcock International, which announced 400 job losses at Rosyth was reportedly among a number of firms from the UK and abroad to attend an industry day in relation to the deal.

An article in The Herald recently claimed that shipbuilding on the Clyde has “been dealt a blow” as new support vessels aren’t going to be built there. The problem? The were never going to be, BAE aren’t even bidding for them. The headline seems to set the tone for the rest of the article with a glaring error, “Clyde yards suffer new blow as Royal Navy orders set to go abroad”, they’re not Royal Navy, they’re for the RFA.

The article even says “unions had hoped the vessels would be constructed in yards across the UK and leave the specialist yards on the Clyde to built complex warships“, support vessels are not complex warships by any definition and the unions appear well aware of the fact that the Clyde is at capacity with the Type 26 Frigate build and had no intention of bidding for this work. The 40,000 tonne support vessels wouldn’t even physically fit on the slip alongside the Type 26 Frigate builds.

The unions are advocating that the build stay in the UK, not that it be done on the Clyde and this is something we agree with.

Jude Brimble, GMB National Secretary, said:

“The Royal Fleet Auxiliary contracts are the key to unlocking the country’s massive shipbuilding potential. But Ministers refusal to put the UK’s interests first will mean that instead of a massive programme of shared economic and employment re-distribution, our firms will be competing against each other for slivers of complex warship work. It beggars belief that the Government wants to give this golden opportunity away to foreign competitors when working class communities up and down the country are crying out for decent work.”

The article which also appeared in The Evening Times also points out that unions are demanding the vessels are built in the UK, as seeking an international tender “undermines the national interest” however none of them are advocating for the 40,000 tonne support vessels be built on the Clyde which is expected to be at capacity until into the 2030’s, long after the date the vessels will be required.

We spoke to a contact at the BAE yard in Govan, who told us that the article was a bit surprising as no one at BAE expected the vessels would be built on the Clyde:

“Calling this a blow is a very strange choice of words. It [the article] came as a surprise frankly, I don’t think anyone here considers this any sort of blow especially as we were never going to be building them and BAE have no intention of bidding for them. They’ll be going to South Korea like the tankers as I don’t think any UK yard is considering a bid for them, we certainly aren’t.”

An MoD spokesperson said:

“There will be an international competition to build the ‘Fleet Solid Support’ supply ships, which UK companies will be able to enter, with a separate UK-only competition for customisation work and trials. This approach ensures the best value for money for taxpayers.”

The Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 confirmed that three new large Military Afloat Reach and Sustainability (MARS) Solid Support Ships would be acquired for the Royal Fleet Auxiliary, to replace the single-hulled RFA Fort Victoria, which entered service in 1994, and RFA Fort Rosalie and RFA Fort Austin (both dating from the late 1970s). The Solid Support Ship is designed to carry a wide range of stores to support other ships with ammunition, food and explosives to replenish naval ships at sea.

They will have extensive aviation facilities, with 2 flight decks, one at the stern and one spot on top of the hanger. They will have the ability to to replenish at sea via 6 replenishment stations, three on each side as well as using helicopters for vertical replenishment.

The ships are expected to enter service in the mid 2020s.

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/union-warns-uk-shipbuilding-jobs-at-risk-if-support-ship-contract-goes-overseas/

....E dizia eu no thread do NPO2000 para a futura corveta, ainda há quem defenda as industrias de construção Naval nacionais, nem de propósito !!!!!

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Abril 28, 2018, 06:09:26 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Maio 03, 2018, 03:19:10 pm

MoD deny plans underway to sell Royal Navy Type 23 Frigates to Chile

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/923/XDfVUg.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pnXDfVUgp)

Late last year, some reported that Chile had been given notice of “potential availability” of Royal Navy warships.

Most notably reported by IHS Jane’s Navy International, it has been claimed by the outlet that Brazil and Chile have “quietly been given notice of the potential availability of RN frigates and amphibious ships”.

Janes reported that UK officials have “discreetly advised” that some of the frigate fleet in addition to the two Albion class landing platform docks could become available due to budget cuts.

Douglas Chapman, Shadow SNP Spokesperson, asked:

“To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether the Government has concluded a deal to sell any Royal Navy frigates to the Chilean Government.”

Guto Bebb, The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence, replied:

“There are no negotiations with the Chilean Government about the sale of Royal Navy Frigates.”

An MoD spokesperson said:

“We can categorically confirm that there has been no engagement with either Chile or Brazil in respect of early sale of Type 23 Frigates or the two LPDs.”

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/mod-deny-plans-underway-to-sell-type-23-frigates-to-chile/


Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Maio 06, 2018, 01:34:49 pm
ups...  ::)

https://www.maritime-executive.com/article/bae-systems-acknowledges-defects-aboard-hms-forth#gs.gD0GrzI (https://www.maritime-executive.com/article/bae-systems-acknowledges-defects-aboard-hms-forth#gs.gD0GrzI)
Citar
BY MAREX 2018-05-02 22:03:00

The Royal Navy's first-in-class patrol vessel HMS Forth was delivered with multiple deficiencies, including broken bolt heads that had been reaffixed with adhesive, according to a report obtained by Scottish paper The Herald.

The first new Batch II River-class OPV, which just entered service last month, was found to have over 100 defects on board. While it is not unusual for a new ship to undergo a shakedown period after delivery, especially if it is the first in its class, some of the defects were of an unusual nature. Prominent errors included flawed work on life raft davits, where bolt heads were found "to have been cut off and glued in place."

In an internal document provided to the paper, shipbuilder BAE Systems called on its staff to improve their work. “Our reputation has seriously deteriorated on the back of recent business-wide operational performance and we all need to take action to improve this,” the memo said. “We need everyone in Naval Ships to consider what the barriers are to right first-time performance in your area and identify solutions that you and your team can apply.”

In a statement, BAE said that “we are aware of an issue with a limited number of bolt fastenings on board HMS Forth. These did not present a risk to the mechanisms that secure the life rafts to the ship.”

(https://www.maritime-executive.com/media/images/article/Photos/Navy_Govt_CoastGuard/HMS-forth-two-sailors.0abe86.jpg)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Maio 06, 2018, 01:38:32 pm
ups...  ::)

https://www.maritime-executive.com/article/bae-systems-acknowledges-defects-aboard-hms-forth#gs.gD0GrzI (https://www.maritime-executive.com/article/bae-systems-acknowledges-defects-aboard-hms-forth#gs.gD0GrzI)
Citar
BY MAREX 2018-05-02 22:03:00

The Royal Navy's first-in-class patrol vessel HMS Forth was delivered with multiple deficiencies, including broken bolt heads that had been reaffixed with adhesive, according to a report obtained by Scottish paper The Herald.

The first new Batch II River-class OPV, which just entered service last month, was found to have over 100 defects on board. While it is not unusual for a new ship to undergo a shakedown period after delivery, especially if it is the first in its class, some of the defects were of an unusual nature. Prominent errors included flawed work on life raft davits, where bolt heads were found "to have been cut off and glued in place."

In an internal document provided to the paper, shipbuilder BAE Systems called on its staff to improve their work. “Our reputation has seriously deteriorated on the back of recent business-wide operational performance and we all need to take action to improve this,” the memo said. “We need everyone in Naval Ships to consider what the barriers are to right first-time performance in your area and identify solutions that you and your team can apply.”

In a statement, BAE said that “we are aware of an issue with a limited number of bolt fastenings on board HMS Forth. These did not present a risk to the mechanisms that secure the life rafts to the ship.”

(https://www.maritime-executive.com/media/images/article/Photos/Navy_Govt_CoastGuard/HMS-forth-two-sailors.0abe86.jpg)

Cumprimentos

Do melhor !!!!!
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Maio 06, 2018, 09:13:35 pm
Gastaram uma pipa de massa para manter esta força de trabalho 'especializada'. Mais valia não terem construido os navios, despedir a actual força de trabalho e contratar técnicos competentes quando fosse necessário para os novos programas.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Maio 12, 2018, 06:53:56 pm
(https://scontent.flis3-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/32078658_1716479975100968_3040629372877799424_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&oh=107638ff87298ef0254c20073dbc307f&oe=5B806CA1)
Citar
2007: em um exercício o submarino canadense (SK-878)" classe upholder aproximou-se do porta-Aviões " Hms Illustrious (R-06)", demonstrando que poderia ter afundado O porta-Aviões. Foto tirada a partir do periscópio para demonstrar que se encontrava dentro dos parâmetros de ataque...

https://www.facebook.com/portaaviones/ (https://www.facebook.com/portaaviones/)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Maio 14, 2018, 08:45:34 am
Defence secretary gives go-ahead for £2.5bn spend on submarines

Gavin Williamson to announce contract to build the latest nuclear hunter-killer sub has been signed with BAE Systems

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/lscCsu.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/polscCsup)
 HMS Astute, one of the British Royal Navy’s nuclear hunter killer submarines Photograph: Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images

 Defence secretary Gavin Williamson is set to give the go-ahead for £2.5bn in spending on the UK’s submarine programme, including its nuclear fleet.

 The work had already been agreed in principle but Williamson will confirm the Ministry of Defence has signed a £1.6bn contract with BAE Systems to build the seventh and last of the Astute hunter-killer submarines, to be named Agincourt. It is scheduled for handover to the Royal Navy in the mid-2020s.

 He will also confirm that a further £960m worth of contracts has been signed for the next phase of construction of four Dreadnought submarines to replace the four Vanguard submarines that make up the UK’s nuclear fleet, carrying the Trident weapons system.

 The contracts will cover work over the next 12 months.

 The Dreadnoughts, work on the first of which began in October 2016, are not due to enter service until the 2030s, and are predicted to remain operational at least through to the 2060s.

 The UK’s parliamentary spending watchdog, the public accounts committee, on Friday warned of a £21bn shortfall: in other words, the Ministry of Defence does not have enough money to buy all the equipment it says it needs. It singled out for criticism spending on the four Dreadnoughts.

 In spite of the huge squeeze on the ministry’s budget, the nuclear deterrent and the rest of the submarine programme has been ring-fenced.

 Williamson is scheduled to make the announcement at BAE Systems in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, where the Astute submarine is to be built.

 Williamson will say: “Agincourt will complete the Royal Navy’s seven-strong fleet of hunter-killer attack subs, the most powerful to ever enter British service, whilst our nuclear deterrent is the ultimate defence against the most extreme dangers we could possibly face.”

Cliff Robson, BAE Systems submarines managing director, said: “Securing this latest funding for our submarines programmes is excellent news for BAE Systems and the 8,700 employees in our submarines business, as well as our local community in Barrow and the thousands of people across our UK supply chain who help deliver these nationally important programmes for the Royal Navy.”

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=70&page=8

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Maio 16, 2018, 03:51:46 pm
Meet HMS Agincourt, the new Astute class nuclear submarine


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/923/4nsNYb.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pn4nsNYbp)
HMS Agincourt and her Astute class sisters are the largest, most advanced and most powerful attack submarines ever operated by the Royal Navy, combining world leading sensors, design and weaponry in a versatile vessel.

Confirmation of the build of the seventh Astute class nuclear submarine, HMS Agincourt, and a £2.5 billion pounds investment was announced earlier today.

Agincourt will have provision for up-to 38 weapons in six 21-inch torpedo tubes. The submarine will be capable of using Tomahawk Block IV land-attack missiles with a range of 1,000 miles and Spearfish heavyweight torpedoes.

For detecting enemy ships and submarines, the Astute class are equipped with the sophisticated Sonar 2076, an integrated passive/active search and attack sonar suite with bow, intercept, flank and towed arrays. BAE claims that the 2076 is the world’s best sonar system. All of the Astute-class submarines will be fitted with the advanced Common Combat System.

The manufacturer say that no other attack submarine is as technologically advanced. In the words of BAE, the Astute class is “designed and engineered to be the stealthiest submarine of her type, equipped with the latest and most powerful sonar suite and secure communications facilities, while exhibiting a low noise signature and optimum detection avoidance characteristics”.

The seven Astute class nuclear powered submarines will have the capability to circumnavigate the globe without surfacing, limited only by their food storage capacity. Able to deploy rapidly, they are powered by a nuclear reactor that can run for their 25 year lifespan without refuelling.


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/922/eWMb5O.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pmeWMb5Op)
Courtesy of BAE, we’ve also been able to publish an interesting list of trivia. Did you know…
•Astute class submarines are the UK’s largest and most powerful attack submarines and can strike at targets up to 1,000km from the coast with pin-point accuracy.
•Astute submarines are the first nuclear submarines to be designed entirely in a three-dimensional, computer-aided environment.
•Design and construction of an Astute submarine has been described as ‘more complex than that of the space shuttle.’
•If the cables on board an Astute Submarine were laid out end-to-end, they would stretch from Barrow to Preston.
•An Astute submarine’s 90-day dived endurance is only limited by the amount of food that can be carried and the endurance of the crew.
•Astute submarines are the first Royal Navy Submarine not to be fitted with optical periscopes – instead the vessel employs high specification video technology.
•Astute submarines will be the quietest ever operated by the Royal Navy.
•The Devonshire Dock Hall is BAE Systems Maritime-Submarines main build facility, standing 51m high, 58m wide and 260m long.
•The first submarine for the Royal Navy was built in Barrow, and every submarine currently in service was also built there, Holland 1.
•Astute class submarines are designed not to require refuelling throughout her projected 25-year life.
•10-week patrol the 98-strong crew of a Astute will get through (on average): 18,000 sausages and 4,200 Weetabix for breakfast.

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/meet-hms-agincourt-the-new-astute-class-nuclear-submarine/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Maio 18, 2018, 01:44:49 pm
Royal Navy selling former minehunter as potential “stylish restaurant or floating bar”


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/922/q7P9SV.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pmq7P9SVj)
Former HMS Walney is currently moored in Portsmouth

The Royal Navy is selling its decommissioned minehunter HMS Walney and is advertising the vessel as a “one of a kind opportunity” for potential buyers.

Announcing the potential sale of the vessel, the navy said Walney has potential to be turned into “a houseboat, a stylish restaurant, a floating bar or even an office-space packed with individuality”.

The former Sandown-class minehunter was decommissioned in October 2010 and is no longer in running condition, as her engines and most of the equipment have been removed.

Walney is safe for towing however and is currently moored in Portsmouth from where it will be sold. The navy’s guide price is £30,000.

This is the second time the Royal Navy is trying to sell the vessel after it failed to attract buyers for the vessel in 2014.

https://navaltoday.com/2018/05/18/royal-navy-selling-former-minehunter-as-potential-stylish-restaurant-or-floating-bar/

PS : Entrou ao serviço em 1993 e foi desativado em 2010, com 17 anos......... e outras três outras unidades vendidas á Estónia já há alguns anos, e nós a precisar deste tipo de Navios e a dormir na forma !!

https://www.naval-technology.com/projects/sandown/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Maio 23, 2018, 09:24:32 pm
Royal Navy frigate fleet may be expanded hints Defence Secretary


By George Allison -  May 23, 2018

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/923/2gw17F.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pn2gw17Fp)

The Ministry of Defence is looking at the size and composition of frigate fleet as part of the Modernising Defence Programme, hinting that there could be more than 5 Type 31e frigates with some even having ASW capabilities.

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said at a Defence Select Committee meeting, when asked about any intention on expanding the number of Type 31e Frigates to be built:

“We’re looking at that as part of the Modernising Defence Programme. If there’s opportunities going forward to expand on that [the fleet size] we’d look at that as part of the Modernising Defence Programme.”

Plans to acquire a new class of “more affordable” Type 31 Frigate were announced as part of the 2015 Strategic Defence and Security Review.

It is understood that the Type 26 Frigate will primarily support carrier task group operations while the Type 31 is to be deployed for a range of less high-tempo operations.

The original planning assumption for the Royal Navy was for thirteen Type 26 Frigates (eight Anti-Submarine Warfare and five General Purpose variants), replacing the Type 23 frigate fleet like-for-like. However, it was later announced during the November 2015 Strategic Defence and Security Review by then Prime minister David Cameron that only the eight anti-submarine warfare Type 26 frigates would be ordered. The funding for the remaining five general purpose Type 26 frigates is instead to be spent on developing a new class of lighter and more affordable general purpose frigates.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/922/uvSa86.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pmuvSa86p)
This general purpose frigate has been designated the Type 31 frigate.

Babcock and BMT recently signed a cooperation agreement which could see the Type 31e Frigate built in Rosyth, Scotland and Appledore, Devon if their bid is successful.

Babcocks ‘Arrowhead’ design for the Type 31e programme.
 
Recently it was reported that Babcock International was keen to challenge BAE Systems dominance and is interested in bidding for the £2Bn Type 31e contract. We understand that Rosyth in Scotland and Appledore in Devon are the preferred build and assembly locations for the joint bid.

Babcock were originally offering the ‘Arrowhead 120 while BMT were offering the Venator 110, the companies now say that they will be exploring both available designs to determine the best possible option. The companies say that arrangement draws on the combined strengths of Babcock and BMT and will deliver ‘innovative, capable, affordable and flexible customer solutions, within a fast changing and increasingly demanding environment’.

Babcock say that the Arrowhead design lends itself equally to either a single build strategy, or a cross–site build strategy bringing together modules – an approach used for aircraft carrier assembly at Rosyth.

BAE Systems also announced it would partner with Cammell Laird, who would ‘Prime, build and assemble’ the vessels at their Merseyside facility while the Clyde will focus on the Type 26 Frigates.Cammell Laird would be main contractor with BAE providing design and combat systems.


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/921/LsDoaC.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/plLsDoaCp)
A BAE concept design for Type 31e.
 
BAE say the move will allow them to ‘appropriately support the National Shipbuilding Strategy’ whilst ensuring the delivery of the five Offshore Patrol Vessels and the first three City class Type 26 frigates currently on contract, ‘to time, budget and to the highest quality standards.’

The option to build the Type 31e frigates in blocks reflects how the biggest ship ever built for the Royal Navy, HMS Queen Elizabeth, was constructed. The aircraft carrier was built in blocks by over 10,000 people in six main British cities.

Tony Douglas, the Chief Executive Officer of DE&S, said,

“The Type 31e programme will drive the change that is needed through the entire system, because we have set tough time and cost constraints.

The collective challenge for DE&S and industry is to deliver Type 31e in a different, more innovative way than has gone before. I want this to be a transformation in the way we do business – not just in ships and acquisition but across the entire defence equipment and support portfolio.”

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/royal-navy-frigate-fleet-may-be-expanded-hints-defence-secretary/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Julho 12, 2018, 04:56:05 pm
É qualidade a montes...  ;D ;D

https://www.naval.com.br/blog/2018/07/06/destroieres-type-45-passaram-76-do-ano-de-2017-no-porto/ (https://www.naval.com.br/blog/2018/07/06/destroieres-type-45-passaram-76-do-ano-de-2017-no-porto/)
Citar
Destróieres Type 45 passaram 76% do ano de 2017 no porto

Foram obtidas mais informações sobre a disponibilidade dos destróieres Type 45 da Marinha Real Britânica (Royal Navy).

Os destróieres da classe “Daring” ficaram atracados a maior parte do ano de 2017, gastando 76% do ano no porto (1.671 dias em porto, do total de 2.190 dias).

A disponibilidade em 2018 também não está muito melhor. Os dados foram divulgados pelo MoD sob a Lei de Liberdade de Informação (FOI).

Os destróieres da classe “Daring” projetados e construídos pela BAE Systems foram afetados por problemas de disponibilidade ligados ao sistema de propulsão elétrica do navio de guerra, e um dos navios teve que retornar para casa após um desdobramento no Oriente Médio em 2017, após um problema técnico com um eixo de hélice.

(https://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Type-45-destroyers.jpg)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Julho 12, 2018, 05:46:25 pm
Mas se olharmos de um ponto de vista mais positivo, em caso de conflito ou emergência, estão prontos a intervir rapidamente :mrgreen:
Título: Navios de guerra em segunda Mão
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 14, 2018, 08:01:15 pm
Achei interessante este artigo:

https://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/sailing-under-a-different-flag-former-royal-navy-vessels-serving-with-other-navies/

Pelo que li o NRP Bérrio era suposto ter sido substituido em 2005 !!

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/921/I9XmXR.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/plI9XmXRj)
Ex-RFA Blue Rover was sold to the Portuguese Navy in 1993 and renamed NRP Berrio. The Portuguese Navy is currently examining possible replacements for this ship that they only originally planned to keep in service until 2005.



Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 24, 2018, 05:36:29 pm
Epá, o que é que aconteceu para suspenderem este programa !!??
Parece que não há interessados em construir as Type 31 por 250 milhões !! ::) ::) ::) ::)

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/type-31e-frigate-programme-suspended/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 24, 2018, 05:46:25 pm
Back to the drawing board for Type 31e project
24th July 2018 - 15:48 GMT | by Beth Maundrill in London

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/922/i9g2hv.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pmi9g2hvp)

While the UK continues to pop the champagne over its Australia success with BAE Systems' Type 26 design win, the programme for the smaller Type 31e light frigate has fallen at the first hurdle.

As the UK Defence Minister, Gavin Williamson, spent last week showcasing UK shipbuilding capabilities in Glasgow to his Australian counterpart, London has decided to put a pause to the Type 31e programme.

First reported by Jane's and confirmed to Shephard by the UK MoD, the current competition for the Type 31e light frigate will be ‘restarted due to insufficient compliant bids received for an effective and robust competition’.

In a statement the MoD said: ‘Making this decision now and starting a new procurement is the right thing to do to deliver the best outcome. We will present plans for a new streamlined procedure imminently.’

Although it could be seen as detrimental to the tight deadline industry has been given for the project, with a first ship delivered by 2023, the MoD appears to believe this is still an achievable goal despite the disruption to proceedings.

‘There have been no changes in our plans to procure a first batch of five new Type 31e frigates to grow our Royal Navy. We still want the first ship delivered by 2023 and are confident that industry will meet the challenge of providing them for the price tag we’ve set.

‘This is an early contract in a wider procurement process, and we will incorporate the lessons learned and begin again as soon as possible so the programme can continue at pace,’ the statement said.

Merseyside shipbuilder Cammell Laird meanwhile said that the UK's National Shipbuilding Strategy 'required a new approach' from the MoD and industry, while it remained confident that the company 'will deliver a world class frigate' should it win the competition 'in due course'.

Cammell Laird had partnered with BAE Systems to propose its Leander platform, itself heavily based on the Khareef corvettes currently in service with the Royal Navy of Oman.

It is understood that industry is being encouraged by the MoD not to engage with the media and Babcock, which is offering its Arrowhead 140 design (pictured), declined to comment.

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/type-31e-frigate-programme-suspended/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Julho 30, 2018, 10:44:26 am
Contest to build a ‘budget frigate’ on hold as MoD runs out of funds

Deborah Haynes, Defence Editor
July 25 2018, 12:01am,
The Times

(https://www.thetimes.co.uk/imageserver/image/methode%2Ftimes%2Fprod%2Fweb%2Fbin%2F2c350542-8f6f-11e8-8c1a-b63727488402.png?crop=1500%2C844%2C0%2C78&resize=685)
The freezing of the Type 31e follows a cut in the number of new Type 26s, top right
STELLAR SYSTEMS

Government plans to buy a “budget frigate” within five years have been thrown into chaos after a competition to build the warship was suspended amid a funding crisis.

Sources warned last night that the Type 31e frigate may never materialise. It is a serious blow for the Royal Navy, which needs at least five of the ships to maintain the size of its surface fleet.

Shipbuilders and yards in the running for the £1.25 billion contract were taken by surprise when the Ministry of Defence announced the freeze on Friday, just as they prepared to finalise their respective ship designs. Defence Equipment and Support, the branch of the MoD in charge of buying kit, claimed that there had not been enough “compliant bids”.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/contest-to-build-a-budget-frigate-on-hold-as-mod-runs-out-of-funds-wgvvkq0p3#
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 30, 2018, 05:14:38 pm
HMS Tyne reactivated due to issues with replacement ship
By George Allison - July 29, 2018

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/922/pno5l2.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pmpno5l2p)
HMS Tyne appears to have been reactivated after photos emerged showing her flying the White Ensign in Portsmouth this week.

The White Ensign is an ensign flown on commissioned Royal Navy ships and shore establishments. This is despite Tyne sailing into Portsmouth in May flying her paying-off pennant before her scheduled decommissioning.

On Monday 21st May 2018, HMS Tyne made what the Royal Navy called her final entry into Portsmouth Dockyard.

“HMS Tyne has been in service for 15 years and will bow of her active career on Thursday where a formal decommissioning ceremony will take place which will be witnessed by friends and families, official dignitaries and see the ensign lowered for the final time.”

Recently however, we reported that issues with new Offshore Patrol Vessel HMS Forth meant that HMS Tyne would not decommission. According to a contact in the fleet earlier in the year:

“As Forth is a long way from being ready and with these new problems, Tyne is being reactivated and the other OPV which was decommissioned is going into refit. Safe to say its all very political and no quick way to solve the issues. The whole OPV Batch 2 project has now been delayed to the quality issues.”

HMS Forth had been found to have more than 100 defects, including electrical and safety issues. Forth was the first of the five new Offshore Patrol Vessels being built to replace the current River Class vessels. The vessels had been ordered to fill a gap in orders after the second carrier and before the Type 26 frigate build started.

For other interesting photos around Portsmouth, I recommend following Steve here.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/921/HXAPo9.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/plHXAPo9j)
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1069886919836571&set=a.343978949094042.1073741826.100004458196410&type=3&theater

Our contact, currently serving in the Royal Navy and involved with the programme, told us that Forth had been handed back to BAE due to “the very poor standard of build”, BAE however advise that this has not happened. We were told:

“For example bolt heads glued back on (thousands over tightened) high voltage switchboard very dangerous, life rafts failed to launch, wiring sub standard, galley not secured… list is huge. It’s much worse than what they released.

Captain of the ship and higher rankers had a meeting with BAE, MoD etc. I’m surprised nothing has been said else where with it being first of class. They reckon 3 months to rectify, I reckon much more.”

We were also told by our contact that the entire Batch 2 River class programme has been set back due to this, with the second vessel in the class having supposed to have started sea trials in October last year but is currently still alongside at the BAE yard in Scotstoun, Glasgow.

A BAE spokesman said:

“We are actively supporting the Royal Navy to resolve issues around a limited number of bolt fastenings and the electrical system on HMS Forth. These are unrelated issues and investigations for each are now underway to ensure that we resolve any potential impact and establish the cause. We are committed to delivering equipment that meets rigorous safety and quality standards.”

An MoD spokesman added:

“It is normal for us to work with industry partners to make some rectifications to ships once they have been handed to the Royal Navy BAE Systems is already at work on some areas as we work together to ensure HMS Forth goes on to tackle piracy, safeguard our fishing stocks and protect our coastline.”

HMS Forth had been earmarked to replace half-sister HMS Clyde as the Falkland Islands guardship and is currently alongside in Portsmouth undergoing repair work.

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hms-tyne-reactivated-due-to-issues-with-replacement-ship/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: jpthiran em Julho 30, 2018, 06:01:30 pm
de mal em pior os Ingleses...
já nem um navio patrulha conseguem fazer...
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 30, 2018, 06:33:06 pm
de mal em pior os Ingleses...
já nem um navio patrulha conseguem fazer...

Olha se alguém se lembrasse de propor a construção, cá no burgo, AKA WestSea, de uns patrulhas oceânicos, e baratinhos, para a RN, isso é que era bom mas...........a ver a banda passar !!

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: jpthiran em Julho 30, 2018, 08:59:16 pm
de mal em pior os Ingleses...
já nem um navio patrulha conseguem fazer...

Olha se alguém se lembrasse de propor a construção, cá no burgo, AKA WestSea, de uns patrulhas oceânicos, e baratinhos, para a RN, isso é que era bom mas...........a ver a banda passar !!

Abraços
dada a quantidade grande de espaço livre existente nos nossos NPO as possibilidades de adaptação ás necessidades dos clientes são grandes,,,

pelo que os NPO parecem-me uns navios com enormes possibilidades de vender lá fora...
pelo preço que são feitos cá e pelas qualidades que tem podiam dar muitas vendas...
para a missão que tem de fazer, todos os  países da Europa precisam de navios deste género...
é a só a Marinha e a West Sea unirem esforços e promoverem o navio lá fora - acho que poderia ser um caso de sucesso...

só os últimos BAM espanhóis custam 166,5 milhões cada!...
e os River class ingleses custam 348 milhões de libras e não podem andar no mar alto!...
pelo que se fossemos um bocadinho mais dinâmicos com esta concorrência era chegar, ver e vencer...ou quase!... :)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 30, 2018, 09:15:49 pm
de mal em pior os Ingleses...
já nem um navio patrulha conseguem fazer...

Olha se alguém se lembrasse de propor a construção, cá no burgo, AKA WestSea, de uns patrulhas oceânicos, e baratinhos, para a RN, isso é que era bom mas...........a ver a banda passar !!

Abraços
dada a quantidade grande de espaço livre existente nos nossos NPO as possibilidades de adaptação ás necessidades dos clientes são grandes,,,

pelo que os NPO parecem-me uns navios com enormes possibilidades de vender lá fora...
pelo preço que são feitos cá e pelas qualidades que tem podiam dar muitas vendas...
para a missão que tem de fazer, todos os  países da Europa precisam de navios deste género...
é a só a Marinha e a West Sea unirem esforços e promoverem o navio lá fora - acho que poderia ser um caso de sucesso...

só os últimos BAM espanhóis custam 166,5 milhões cada!...
e os River class ingleses custam 348 milhões de libras e não podem andar no mar alto!...
pelo que se fossemos um bocadinho mais dinâmicos com esta concorrência era chegar, ver e vencer...ou quase!... :)

Expliquei-me mal, eu dizia fazer, por cá os Classe River, não tenho dúvidas que eram melhores construídos, e ficavam bem mais baratos, mesmo a 70 ou 80 milhões de euros por unidade !!!!!

Abraços

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Julho 31, 2018, 11:04:59 am
Vai à fisga...  ;D 8)

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/british-frigate-fleet-lack-anti-ship-missiles-around-2030/ (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/british-frigate-fleet-lack-anti-ship-missiles-around-2030/)
Citar
Royal Navy ships will lose anti-ship missile capability in 2020 when the Harpoon missile is withdrawn with a replacement not due until ‘around 2030’.

While the Royal Navy will still have an anti-ship capability via the submarine fleet and embarked helicopters, this will still be a significant capability gap and even then, no Royal Navy helicopters will have anti-ship missile capabilities until 2020.

(https://external.flis5-1.fna.fbcdn.net/safe_image.php?d=AQCnprsYqtE_x7Ds&w=540&h=282&url=https%3A%2F%2Fukdj.imgix.net%2F2017%2F12%2Fperseus.jpg%3Fauto%3Dcompress%252Cformat%26ixlib%3Dphp-1.1.0%26q%3D80%26s%3Db592ef856f2475f9380ef334b583dbc7&cfs=1&upscale=1&fallback=news_d_placeholder_publisher&_nc_hash=AQCIL0NYlYZ9CReJ)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: nelson38899 em Agosto 01, 2018, 10:50:18 am
de mal em pior os Ingleses...
já nem um navio patrulha conseguem fazer...

Olha se alguém se lembrasse de propor a construção, cá no burgo, AKA WestSea, de uns patrulhas oceânicos, e baratinhos, para a RN, isso é que era bom mas...........a ver a banda passar !!

Abraços
dada a quantidade grande de espaço livre existente nos nossos NPO as possibilidades de adaptação ás necessidades dos clientes são grandes,,,

pelo que os NPO parecem-me uns navios com enormes possibilidades de vender lá fora...
pelo preço que são feitos cá e pelas qualidades que tem podiam dar muitas vendas...
para a missão que tem de fazer, todos os  países da Europa precisam de navios deste género...
é a só a Marinha e a West Sea unirem esforços e promoverem o navio lá fora - acho que poderia ser um caso de sucesso...

só os últimos BAM espanhóis custam 166,5 milhões cada!...
e os River class ingleses custam 348 milhões de libras e não podem andar no mar alto!...
pelo que se fossemos um bocadinho mais dinâmicos com esta concorrência era chegar, ver e vencer...ou quase!... :)

Conheces o conceito, manter os impostos em casa?

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Agosto 01, 2018, 02:02:28 pm
de mal em pior os Ingleses...
já nem um navio patrulha conseguem fazer...

Olha se alguém se lembrasse de propor a construção, cá no burgo, AKA WestSea, de uns patrulhas oceânicos, e baratinhos, para a RN, isso é que era bom mas...........a ver a banda passar !!

Abraços
dada a quantidade grande de espaço livre existente nos nossos NPO as possibilidades de adaptação ás necessidades dos clientes são grandes,,,

pelo que os NPO parecem-me uns navios com enormes possibilidades de vender lá fora...
pelo preço que são feitos cá e pelas qualidades que tem podiam dar muitas vendas...
para a missão que tem de fazer, todos os  países da Europa precisam de navios deste género...
é a só a Marinha e a West Sea unirem esforços e promoverem o navio lá fora - acho que poderia ser um caso de sucesso...

só os últimos BAM espanhóis custam 166,5 milhões cada!...
e os River class ingleses custam 348 milhões de libras e não podem andar no mar alto!...
pelo que se fossemos um bocadinho mais dinâmicos com esta concorrência era chegar, ver e vencer...ou quase!... :)

Conheces o conceito, manter os impostos em casa?

Pois, é por essa e por outras, que temos a Agência da NATO a cobrar balúrdios de dinheiro nas nossas compras de equipamento/material de guerra !!

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: nelson38899 em Agosto 01, 2018, 04:02:01 pm
de mal em pior os Ingleses...
já nem um navio patrulha conseguem fazer...

Olha se alguém se lembrasse de propor a construção, cá no burgo, AKA WestSea, de uns patrulhas oceânicos, e baratinhos, para a RN, isso é que era bom mas...........a ver a banda passar !!

Abraços
dada a quantidade grande de espaço livre existente nos nossos NPO as possibilidades de adaptação ás necessidades dos clientes são grandes,,,

pelo que os NPO parecem-me uns navios com enormes possibilidades de vender lá fora...
pelo preço que são feitos cá e pelas qualidades que tem podiam dar muitas vendas...
para a missão que tem de fazer, todos os  países da Europa precisam de navios deste género...
é a só a Marinha e a West Sea unirem esforços e promoverem o navio lá fora - acho que poderia ser um caso de sucesso...

só os últimos BAM espanhóis custam 166,5 milhões cada!...
e os River class ingleses custam 348 milhões de libras e não podem andar no mar alto!...
pelo que se fossemos um bocadinho mais dinâmicos com esta concorrência era chegar, ver e vencer...ou quase!... :)

Conheces o conceito, manter os impostos em casa?

Pois, é por essa e por outras, que temos a Agência da NATO a cobrar balúrdios de dinheiro nas nossas compras de equipamento/material de guerra !!

Abraços

Acredita que essas agências devem custar bem menos, que o custo de todo o processo de impugnação dos contratos, feitos pelos concorrentes que perderam.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Agosto 03, 2018, 03:42:51 pm
Second Tide-class tanker RFA Tiderace enters service

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/922/7taGVw.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pm7taGVwj)
RFA Tiderace alongside Portland Harbour. Photo: Royal Navy

The Royal Navy has commissioned its second Tide-class tanker RFA Tiderace in a dedication ceremony in Portland.

In a half-hour ceremony, attended by the 39,000-tonne ship’s sponsor, Lady Anita Lister, the head of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary Commodore Duncan Lamb and crew, RFA Chaplain the Rev Mike Hills welcomed the new tanker to the naval service.

Commanding officer Captain Sam Shattock RFA said the efforts put in by the first ship’s company to get the tanker through her trials and training had laid solid foundations “for a long future in the RFA, supporting operations for the next 30 years.

“I am immensely proud to have command of this new ship and the responsibility for completing trials and bringing her into service.”

Cdre Lamb said the previous generation of Tide-class ships introduced into service 65 years ago had revolutionized the way the Royal Navy was supported around the world – and their namesakes would do likewise.

Each of the four vessels in the 21st-Century generation of Tides can deliver more than 1,500 cubic meters of fuel every hour – nearly 400,000 gallons, or 1½ million liters.

The lead ship in the class, RFA Tidespring, is already heavily engaged supporting operations and training around the UK; Tidesurge is being fitted out in Falmouth and Tideforce is on her delivery voyage from South Korea ready to receive British military communications kit and weaponry.

All four ships are designed to be at the heart of a carrier strike group, supporting HMS Queen Elizabeth or Prince of Wales, a Type 45 destroyer, Type 23 or 26 frigate and an Astute-class hunter-killer submarine.

“Today’s Tiderace is a most welcome and fitting addition to the modern Royal Fleet Auxiliary,” Cdre Lamb said.

“Bringing a new ship into service is a demanding endeavor which relies on a diverse, multi-skilled team, strong leadership and unflinching determination.

“Tiderace bears testimony to this and I pay tribute to the men and women in the UK and around the globe, military and civilian who have contributed to this project and made today possible.”

The dedication marks the end of a busy week for the tanker, which started off Plymouth with her maiden helicopter trials when a Merlin Mk2 from 814 Naval Air Squadron touched down on the flight deck for the first time.

Merlins – or the Fleet Air Arm’s smaller Wildcats – will be expected to ferry supplies to and from Tiderace (or one of her three sisters) in giant string sacks slung beneath the helicopters (known as VERTREP, or vertical replenishment).

And aside from being the mainstay of carrier operations, providing fuel for HMS Queen Elizabeth and the rest of her battle group, the Tides will also be expected to conduct operations in her own right, with Merlins or Wildcats and specialist boarding teams – RFA ships have been used to this end extensively in the Indian Ocean.

https://navaltoday.com/2018/08/03/second-tide-class-tanker-rfa-tiderace-enters-service/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Agosto 07, 2018, 08:29:04 am

BAE Systems, Cammell Laird launch Leander frigate website

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/NHgY9o.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/poNHgY9oj)
Photo: BAE Systems/Cammell Laird

BAE Systems and Cammell Laird have launched a new website for the Leander frigate design they are pitching for the Royal Navy’s Type 31 frigates.

The website is a result of a partnership between Cammell Laird as shipbuilder and BAE Systems as designer.

The site was launched August 6, despite the fact that the Type 31 competition was brought to a halt last month due to what was termed as a lack of “compliant bids”.

Though no specific official information has been released, the UK Mod will now likely redraw tender specifications and requirements and the launch of the website indicates that BAE Systems and Cammell Laird are ready to take part in a new competition process.

As explained by the Leander team, the design is available in four sizes — 99m, 102m, 117m, and 120m. The frigate is also configurable, meaning the customer can selecting weapons, preferred combat management systems, power and propulsion arrangements, platform equipment and habitability standards.

The team further said the Leander was designed with a range of future roles in mind, including anti-submarine warfare, incorporation of autonomous systems, energy weapons, and cyber roles.

The low-cost Type 31 frigate program is intended to replace five of the Royal Navy’s Type 23 frigates. Prior to last month’s suspension, the ships had been expected to be in service by 2023, built under a price cap of £250M each for the first batch of five frigates.

In late July, the UK defense ministry suspended the program due to what is referred to as the lack of “compliant bids”. The only other known contender was a Babcock-led team with the Arrowhead 140 design which was based on the Iver Huitfeldt-class frigates OMT designed for the Royal Danish Navy

https://navaltoday.com/2018/08/07/bae-systems-cammell-laird-launch-leander-frigate-website/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Agosto 08, 2018, 12:19:57 pm

New tanker RFA Tiderace joins the fleet
 
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/922/OFhRwj.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pmOFhRwjp)

In a half-hour ceremony, the head of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary Commodore Duncan Lamb welcomed RFA Tiderace to the naval service.

“Today’s Tiderace is a most welcome and fitting addition to the modern Royal Fleet Auxiliary,” Cdre Lamb said.

“Bringing a new ship into service is a demanding endeavour which relies on a diverse, multi-skilled team, strong leadership and unflinching determination. Tiderace bears testimony to this and I pay tribute to the men and women in the UK and around the globe, military and civilian who have contributed to this project and made today possible.”

Each of the four vessels in the 21st-Century generation of Tides can deliver more than 1,500 cubic metres of fuel every hour – nearly 400,000 gallons, or 1½ million litres… enough to fill the tanks of more than 27,000 family runarounds.

Four Tides have been built for the Royal Navy – Tidespring is already heavily engaged supporting operations and training around the UK; Tidesurge is being fitted out in Falmouth and Tideforce is on her delivery voyage from South Korea ready to receive British military communications kit and weaponry.

All four ships are designed to be at the heart of a carrier strike group, supporting HMS Queen Elizabeth or Prince of Wales, a Type 45 destroyer, Type 23 or 26 frigate and an Astute-class hunter-killer submarine.

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/new-tanker-rfa-tiderace-joins-the-fleet/

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Agosto 16, 2018, 03:55:28 pm
UK restarts Type 31 frigate program competition

After halting a competition for the construction of five Type 31 frigate late July, the UK defense ministry has now relaunched the process.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/qHHiph.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/poqHHiphj)

The program was halted on July 24 due to what the defense ministry identified as inadequate competition prior to awarding competitive design phase (CDP) contracts.

On August 14, the UK MOD issued a notice saying the competition was once again open. The announcement stated that the five frigates for the Royal Navy are to be built “for a total cost not to exceed £1.25 billion inclusive of Government Furnished Equipment (GFE).”

The amount of government furnished equipment that would be made available to the successful bidder was not specified. It is known that some of the equipment from Type 23 frigates is expected to be transferred to Type 26 and 31 ships.

The new competition process will consist of a pre-qualification questionnaire, competitive design phase contracts, and finally, a single design and build contract.

Interested bidders will be able to submit their expressions to participate by August 20.

Bidders whose participation was confirmed for the previously-canceled process were a team composed of Cammell Laird and BAE Systems with a design proposal known as Leander, and a Babcock-led team with the Arrowhead 140 design which was based on the Iver Huitfeldt-class frigates. A third unconfirmed team reportedly taking part in the competition were Atlas Elektronik UK and Thyssenkrup Marine Systems.


https://navaltoday.com/2018/08/16/uk-restarts-type-31-frigate-program-competition/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Agosto 16, 2018, 03:57:02 pm


https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/type-31e-frigate-programme-being-restarted/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Agosto 21, 2018, 06:45:57 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Agosto 25, 2018, 01:52:15 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 12, 2018, 06:02:52 pm

Astute boats 4-7 now more than £800m over budget


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/923/UZdyCG.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/pnUZdyCGp)
The Ministry of Defence (MoD) has revealed that boats 4-7 of the Astute Class submarine are now £838 million over budget. The news came in their annual Finance and Economics Bulletin.

The Astute class are the largest and most advanced attack submarines ever operated by the Royal Navy, combining world leading sensors, design, and weaponry in a versatile vessel. It is the replacement for the Trafalgar-class that entered service in the 1980s.

The class has frequently been cited as one of the most advanced submarines ever made. Indeed during HMS Astute’s sea trials in 2012, Commander Iain Breckenridge said he had “never before experienced holding a submarine at the range we were holding USS New Mexico. The Americans were utterly taken aback, blown away with what they were seeing”

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/923/0FQ2eS.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pn0FQ2eSj)

According to the MoD UK Maritime Power doctrine, the Astute class:

‘provide the principal sea denial capability due to having both anti-submarine and anti-ship systems. When combined with an appropriate land attack missile, such as the Tomahawk, SSNs have a power projection capability of considerable range and penetrability, with important uses for deterrence and coercion’

In the MoD annual Finance & Economics Bulletin (found here), it was evident that boats 4-7 were well over-budget.

An MoD communications officer quoted the current costs for boats 4-7 to me as:
‘At approval, expected forecast cost to completion: £5,859M
 Current forecast cost to completion: £6,697M’

That’s a 14% increase. For the purpose of perspective, the £838m over-budget sum could pay for 3 Type 31e frigates at the £250m per ship requirement price.

It should be noted that whilst the Astute class is over budget, it remains cheap in comparison to other similar classes:
• US Virginia class: £2.0B
• French Shortfin Barracuda class: £2.4B

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/astute-boats-4-7-now-more-than-800m-over-budget/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 25, 2018, 06:32:56 pm
‘At least two’ Type 23 Frigates reportedly to be axed in new cuts
September 25, 2018

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/AbEpwE.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/poAbEpwEp)

It has been reported that while assault ships HMS Albion and HMS Bulwark have been saved, at least two Type 23 frigates will have to be axed.

The Sunday Times has reported that at least two Type 23 frigates will have to be axed. Luke Pollard, Labour MP for Sutton and Devonport, was quoted as saying:

“We need to be aware there are capability gaps in our armed forces. We can cope if there is a plan to cover those. We are still in the same place we were months ago on cuts to the Royal Marines and the amphibious ships.

This is yet more speculation about the cuts. Because the government can’t agree on how much to spend on defence, it has pushed these decisions into the long grass, and that continues to erode confidence.We need a fully funded and capable military. That means no more cuts and proper decisions about base-porting.”

An MoD spokesperson said in a statement:

“The Prime Minister, Chancellor and Defence Secretary will continue to work closely throughout the next phase of the Modernising Defence Programme and will keep the House updated as decisions are made. We will be in a position to share more detailed conclusions over the Autumn.”

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/at-least-two-type-23-frigates-reportedly-to-be-axed-in-new-cuts/

Abraços

PS Lá irão parar ou ao Brasil ou ao Chile.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Setembro 27, 2018, 01:20:14 pm

PS Lá irão parar ou ao Brasil ou ao Chile.

Mais que certo...
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Setembro 28, 2018, 01:49:45 pm
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/first-f-35-jets-land-on-hms-queen-elizabeth/?no_cache=1 (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/first-f-35-jets-land-on-hms-queen-elizabeth/?no_cache=1)

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F-35 jets have landed on aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth for the first time.

This event marks the first time an F-35 has ever landed on a non-American vessel and it helps bring an end to the eight-year hiatus since a British aircraft carrier last operated a fast jet from its deck.

The first landing took place on Tuesday, the 25th of September but has only now been made public. More information will be published as and when we receive it.

The aircraft that have landed on the supercarrier belong to the Joint Operational Test team. The team’s mission is to build confidence in the aircraft towards helping clear the F-35 to make the legally mandated advance from Low Rate Initial Production to Full Rate Production. The RAF’s No 17 (Reserve) Test and Evaluation Squadron comprises ten percent of the test programme in the JOTT.

The reason that the aircraft are American isn’t some scandalous outrage or sign of something terrible, it’s simply that most of the F-35Bs in Joint Operational Test team are American. Just watch how some papers report this, though.

After speaking to one of the pilots in the test programme, we understand that the UK only has three (BK1, 2 & 4) test jets that are “orange wired” to take data for post-flight analysis, the rest being operational aircraft. It is understood that the two ‘orange wired’ F-35 test aircraft, belonging to the Integrated Test Force will now conduct 500 take offs and landings during their 11-week period at sea.

(https://scontent.flis5-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t45.1600-4/cp0/q90/c0.16.1200.627/s552x414/42464202_6101431093179_2996482731187109888_n.png.jpg?_nc_cat=104&efg=eyJxZV9ncm91cHMiOlsibm9fc2FmZV9pbWFnZV9mb3JfYWRzX2ltYWdlIl19&oh=72c98fb28c9db47791b3a6309714ba65&oe=5C59A7BC)

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Outubro 03, 2018, 03:05:35 pm

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/f-35-conducts-first-night-sorties-on-hms-queen-elizabeth/?no_cache=1 (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/f-35-conducts-first-night-sorties-on-hms-queen-elizabeth/?no_cache=1)

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It has been confirmed that the first F-35B night sorties from HMS Queen Elizabeth took place just two days after the first landing.

The news is indicative of the ‘high confidence and safety designed into the F-35B and [the] Queen Elizabeth Class Carriers’ according to Wing Commander Scott Williams.

(https://external.flis5-1.fna.fbcdn.net/safe_image.php?d=AQDGOrU3eDSoP7Fq&w=540&h=282&url=https%3A%2F%2Fukdj.imgix.net%2Fc90694400bca54c46948f4ca90d36bd0_%2Ff35qe.jpg%3Fauto%3Dcompress%252Cformat%26ixlib%3Dphp-1.2.1%26q%3D80%26s%3Da704dadc1bb528067580f1a603cc933e&cfs=1&upscale=1&fallback=news_d_placeholder_publisher&_nc_hash=AQD-htmVD2O_u9dx)

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Outubro 05, 2018, 01:16:16 pm
https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-and-latest-activity/news/2018/october/03/181003-f35-night-landings-qe (https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-and-latest-activity/news/2018/october/03/181003-f35-night-landings-qe)
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Aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth has reached another milestone in her flight trials with the first night-time landings of F-35 Lightning jets.

Britain’s biggest warship is currently conducting flight testing off the east coast of the United States and part of that is practicing landing in darkness.

These tests were carried out with and without the aid of night-vision technology, with the pilots and aircraft handlers successfully guiding the fast fighter jets onto the flight deck.

Pilots initially flew in using only ambient light and the lights on the carrier’s deck before later conducting landings using the night-vision capability in their helmets.

(https://scontent.flis3-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/43067688_10156744513308205_7423962322458116096_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&oh=e5748e58c99e7b07cbb05d580076da14&oe=5C5FAC50)

(https://scontent.flis3-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/43101756_10156744513323205_6857273509811322880_n.jpg?_nc_cat=104&oh=9a705df825ac3dc1c7e81b8841f4151f&oe=5C4DEF2C)

(https://scontent.flis3-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/42993677_10156744513463205_2676398897588338688_n.jpg?_nc_cat=103&oh=62b6737e8e76658bd0648f61307d26f8&oe=5C4D27F6)

(https://scontent.flis3-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/43087798_10156744513403205_5084507749589450752_n.jpg?_nc_cat=108&oh=f448c48f7e3ce892a6ecc7fe73886da4&oe=5C612936)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Outubro 17, 2018, 05:04:57 pm
BAE Systems launches fourth River-class OPV Tamar


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/923/Lqi9Zg.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pnLqi9Zgj)
BAE Systems has launched HMS Tamar – the fourth of five Batch 2 River-class offshore patrol vessels – lowering it into the water at its Govan yard.

Tamar was then towed three kilometers downstream to the firm’s Scotstoun facility, where fitting out takes place.
There she joins the third ship in the class, HMS Trent, and the second, HMS Medway, which are both being fitted out.
Medway is days away from completion, according to the Royal Navy, and is due to get underway for her maiden voyage in November.

The lead ship in the class, HMS Forth, is also at the yard undergoing rectification work after problems were identified with the ship’s electrical systems and marine fixings. HMS Forth’s crew are expected to move back on board in November with trials resuming in the second half of January.

The 90 meter OPVs have a range of 5,500 nautical miles and a maximum speed of 24 knots. The new OPVs are four knots faster than their Batch 1 predecessors, have a 30mm automatic cannon as their main armament instead of a 20mm gun, two Miniguns, four machine-guns and are equipped with two Pacific 24 sea boats.

https://navaltoday.com/2018/10/17/bae-systems-launches-fourth-river-class-opv-tamar/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Vitor Santos em Outubro 17, 2018, 09:23:23 pm

PS Lá irão parar ou ao Brasil ou ao Chile.

Mais que certo...

Tomara que seja ao Brasil. Precisamos!
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Novembro 01, 2018, 10:34:29 am
Ao estado de falta de unidades combatentes de superficie que a RN chegou, um OPV para escoltar uma fragata Russa !!! ::)

https://navaltoday.com/2018/11/01/hms-tyne-escorts-russian-frigate-months-after-returning-to-service/

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/921/7KrDAy.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pl7KrDAyj)

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Barlovento em Novembro 01, 2018, 12:14:16 pm
Ao estado de falta de unidades combatentes de superficie que a RN chegou, um OPV para escoltar uma fragata Russa !!! ::)

https://navaltoday.com/2018/11/01/hms-tyne-escorts-russian-frigate-months-after-returning-to-service/

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/921/7KrDAy.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pl7KrDAyj)

Abraços

Es una mas de las misiones de un OPV, no se necesita una fragata para eso y mas en el British Channel. Creo además que UK tiene un buen número de fragatas y pronto va a tener más.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 06, 2018, 04:23:33 pm
(https://scontent.flis5-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/37167352_1801527359929562_2016367397488820224_n.jpg?_nc_cat=107&_nc_ht=scontent.flis5-1.fna&oh=15730ca771a256cabb008650cb05f499&oe=5C750BFA)

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"HMS Kent (F-78)" 🇬🇧

Is a Type 23 Duke class frigate of the British Royal Navy.

Was launched on 28 May 1998 and commissioned on 8 June 2000. She was the first ship to enter Royal Navy service in the 21st Century.

In late 2016, Kent entered the Frigate Refit Complex in Devonport for an extensive refit which will include the fitting of the SeaCeptor missile system in place of Sea Wolf. After the refit, she was recommissioned in Portsmouth on 5 October 2018... "

=68.ARBi2gbV5OZRY7lqbl-5inyYbWGc20zMiSWhxvlFGU5Pi-k8U2Y8TtOV5cN5_z9dkSikry_TzZXBaeaENJBI1flNbfAqjgUBP01bl8DadbSC2C1l5EKH8jcsJyrB-Oqx7akjKAuhgR0yaTfKSmDfT52stQsoKITZb774zKgZmBOeUZv4PuRTV2RK_SfJtQ4IwL-yRRo8vE0dp9ovvvnaopR6AME&__tn__=k*F&tn-str=k*F]https://www.facebook.com/carrieraircraftwar/?__xts__[0]=68.ARBi2gbV5OZRY7lqbl-5inyYbWGc20zMiSWhxvlFGU5Pi-k8U2Y8TtOV5cN5_z9dkSikry_TzZXBaeaENJBI1flNbfAqjgUBP01bl8DadbSC2C1l5EKH8jcsJyrB-Oqx7akjKAuhgR0yaTfKSmDfT52stQsoKITZb774zKgZmBOeUZv4PuRTV2RK_SfJtQ4IwL-yRRo8vE0dp9ovvvnaopR6AME&__tn__=k*F&tn-str=k*F (https://www.facebook.com/carrieraircraftwar/?__xts__[0)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Novembro 13, 2018, 10:25:31 pm

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/923/SaxwFB.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pnSaxwFBj)

http://www.navalanalyses.com/2018/11/fleets-22-royal-navy-of-future.html

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 16, 2018, 10:42:40 am
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/744-naval-air-squadron-reformed-to-bring-crowsnest-into-service/?no_cache=1&fbclid=IwAR32dhPSZiylJYkyXN_Jd_SwZ9lSLQZOfw-fHC6p4Qcshoho6boU_7QV8Jk (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/744-naval-air-squadron-reformed-to-bring-crowsnest-into-service/?no_cache=1&fbclid=IwAR32dhPSZiylJYkyXN_Jd_SwZ9lSLQZOfw-fHC6p4Qcshoho6boU_7QV8Jk)
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744 Naval Air Squadron will be instrumental in introducing the Crowsnest Merlin to front-line service over the next 18 months, say the Royal Navy.

In addition, they will also work with the RAF’s upgraded Chinook Mk5s and Mk6s.

The Royal Navy say that it’s the squadron’s later role in testing, evaluation and development which was prompted its 21st Century rebirth under the motto ‘nemo solus satis sapit’ – no one individual knows enough on their own.

The re-formed squadron’s first Commanding Officer Commander Jonathan Bird said 744 Squadron “brings together the operational experience from the majority of defence’s front-line aircraft types and weaponry, to ensure that new aircraft, weapons and upgrades to existing platforms are safe and as fit for purpose as possible.”

“It is an even bigger privilege to be at the helm when the squadron re-commissions – exactly 62 years to the day that the previous commanding officer flew his final squadron sortie before the unit was disbanded at RAF St Mawgan.”

In 2017, Lockheed Martin was awarded a £269m contract to deliver the Royal Navy’s Crowsnest Airborne Surveillance and Control (ASaC) programme.

As the prime contractor, Lockheed Martin is responsible for the overall design and development of Crowsnest, which will provide a vital surveillance capability to support the Royal Navy’s new Queen Elizabeth Class carriers.

Crowsnest uses a high power radar to provide long-range air, maritime and land tracking capabilities that will ensure early detection of potential threats for the fleet.

This capability will be role fitted onto the Merlin Mk2 helicopters and deployed in support of various Royal Navy vessels including the fleet flagships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales.

Crowsnest incorporates an updated version of a Thales Searchwater radar and Cerberus Mission System which are deployed as role fit kits along with the Merlin Mk2 helicopters. This will allow the Royal Navy to adjust the configuration of the airframe depending on the mission.

(https://external.flis5-1.fna.fbcdn.net/safe_image.php?d=AQAjHz9-6INvPfIn&w=540&h=282&url=https%3A%2F%2Fukdj.imgix.net%2F219429ba3c635c34fd41277679b72b81_%2Fthales_crowsnest_merlin.jpg%3Fauto%3Dcompress%252Cformat%26ixlib%3Dphp-1.2.1%26q%3D80%26s%3Dc049a09ab57d65968c6564456f03899a&cfs=1&upscale=1&fallback=news_d_placeholder_publisher&_nc_hash=AQCQTiwkbydsfOTn)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Novembro 18, 2018, 02:00:40 pm
Eles andem aí..  ;D ;)

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/british-frigate-escorts-russian-cruiser-and-her-tug-through-the-english-channel/?no_cache=1&fbclid=IwAR1xAiN-GQiI4LvEMaMt3-tmnqkHVuB5zX-2CsEaE3DduTKfVRXzJFyA8zo (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/british-frigate-escorts-russian-cruiser-and-her-tug-through-the-english-channel/?no_cache=1&fbclid=IwAR1xAiN-GQiI4LvEMaMt3-tmnqkHVuB5zX-2CsEaE3DduTKfVRXzJFyA8zo)

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Type 23 Frigate HMS St Albans has escorted a Russian cruiser through the English Channel.

The Royal Navy announced this morning that the Type 23 frigate, currently tasked with protecting UK waters, has been tasked to keep watch on Russian Slava-class cruiser Marshall Ustinov.

The Russian vessel – accompanied by an auxiliary ship and tug say the Royal Navy – recently left the Mediterranean and has been tracked by French warships through the Bay of Biscay.

Recently, the UK Defence Journal reported that Spain had refuelled the cruiser, despite fresh sanctions against Russia.

Commander John Cromie, the Commanding Officer of HMS St Albans, said in a news release:

“As the fleet ready escort, HMS St Albans is held at high readiness to respond to any foreign warship that might represent a potential threat to the integrity of UK waters.

In this instance the interaction between St Albans and Marshall Ustinov has proven both cordial and professional, reflecting the mutual understanding of customs that exist between professional mariners.

My crew are however trained to the very highest standard and are prepared to respond to any eventuality.”

HMS St Albans reportedly deployed her Merlin helicopter to observe the movements of the task group as they navigate along the south coast of the UK.

(https://ukdj.imgix.net/38798c7976a78454d17f55d44eb36da2_/MA180044050.jpg?auto=compress%2Cformat&crop=top&fit=crop&h=580&ixlib=php-1.2.1&q=80&w=1021&wpsize=td_1021x580&s=4ce0cba70599819e47354721947ec860)

Aproveitando o embalo. ;)

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/rfa-fort-victoria-finishes-major-refit/ (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/rfa-fort-victoria-finishes-major-refit/)

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The supply ship RFA Fort Victoria is now heading for Faslane after leaving Birkenhead as her sailors prepare for renewed front-line duties, say the Royal Navy.

In July 2017, Fort Victoria returned to the UK following an extended 26-month deployment, much of which was spent East of Suez in support of anti-piracy operations. This included three months in the Aegean Sea in April 2016, taking over from RFA Mounts Bay.

Following her return, the ship underwent a series of modifications at the Cammell Laird yard near Liverpool intended to allow her to support HMS Queen Elizabeth, and meet current tanker anti-pollution hull requirements upon her entry into service.

According to a Royal Navy release:

“Since January, shipwrights and technicians have fitted extra protective hulls to the fuel tanks – used to re-supply smaller vessels than the carriers which have dedicated Tide-class tankers to ply them with black gold (two refuels of Queen Elizabeth would effectively empty Fort Vic’s tanks). More importantly, the support ship has 3,377 cubic metres of space for ammunition – from small arms up to air-to-air missiles and Paveway laser-guided bombs for the F-35 Lightning stealth fighters – plus 2,941 cubic metres of space for dry stores (spare parts, replacement engines, food).

If you brain doesn’t work in cubic metres, that’s enough ammo to nearly fill 102 shipping containers, and dry stores for more than 85 of the 20ft boxes. The rigs which are used to transfer the ammo/stores by jackstay have been adapted so they can be used with the new carriers.”

Crew moved back onboard in early August to begin preparing to take Fort Victoria back to sea, having to prove to assessors from the Flag Officer Sea Training organization that they could operate the ship safely and deal with any emergencies and casualties on board.

(https://ukdj.imgix.net/0f69bb5a46760954298c7ab0b3454432_/MD160022066.jpg?auto=compress%2Cformat&crop=top&fit=crop&h=580&ixlib=php-1.2.1&q=80&w=1021&wpsize=td_1021x580&s=26edb56df21fe82935717a397e8efea9)

Cumprimentos
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Novembro 23, 2018, 06:49:49 pm
Royal Navy to keep older River class vessels, almost doubling OPV fleet


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/FgLcFx.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/poFgLcFxp)

Originally, the plan was to replace the Batch 1 River class  Offshore Patrol Vessels with the newer Batch 2 vessels. However, it has now been announced that all vessels will be retained.

Last year we reported that Rear Admiral Chris Gardner, assistant chief of naval staff, said that the Royal Navy is “keen” to keep the ships.

Speaking to The News Portamouth last year, Rear Adm Gardner said:
“At the moment no decision has been taken about what their future could be. I’m keeping the ships in a state of operational readiness which means that as the future becomes a bit clearer post-Brexit, and as our requirements are more broadly understood, we will be able to make decisions about whether or not we will seek to retain and operate them as additional units in the Royal Navy or find some other solution.”

Last year, then Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Defence, Guto Bebb revealed that £12.7M had been allocated from the EU Exit Preparedness Fund to preserve the three Batch 1 River class ships, should they be needed to control and enforce UK waters and fisheries following the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union.

Peter Dowd Shadow Chief Secretary to the Treasury asked:
“To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Written Statement of 13 March 2018, Spring Statement, HCWS 540, if he will publish a list of where the £12.7 million allocated to his Department to realise the opportunities from EU exit will be spent.”

Guto Bebb, then Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence, responded:
“The Ministry of Defence has now been allocated £12.7 million in 2018-19 for essential EU exit preparations. This will fund preserving three Off-Shore Patrol Vessels, should they be needed to control and enforce UK waters and fisheries. It also includes some EU Exit preparedness funding for UK defence bases in Europe. As with all HMT Reserve funding, finalised allocations will be confirmed at Supplementary Estimates 2018-19 in early 2019.”

Earlier in the year, Bebb revealed the running cost of the Batch 1 vessels in response to a written question:
“The cost of operating a River Class Offshore Patrol Batch 2 Vessel will be determined by the specific operational programmes of the ships when they enter service. We have used the cost of the current in service Batch 1 Offshore Patrol Vessels as the basis of our planning which is £6.5 million per year.”

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/royal-navy-to-keep-older-river-class-vessels-almost-doubling-opv-fleet/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitan em Novembro 27, 2018, 05:58:59 pm
Dramatic moment 17 Russian fighter jets swarm around a Royal Navy warship in a Black Sea raid dubbed an act of 'brazen hostility'

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6429859/Fleet-17-Russian-fighter-jets-swarmed-Royal-Navy-warship-Black-Sea.html

Incredible footage has captured the moment a Royal Navy warship was 'buzzed' by 17 Russian fighter jets off the coast of Crimea.

A new Channel 5 documentary captured the dangerous moment as HMS Duncan led a Nato fleet through the Black Sea in May.

'Buzzing' is when an aircraft flies fast and low past a building or another vehicle and the Russian fighters were so close to the Type 45 destroyer their electronics could have been scrambled by the ships, which could have caused a crash.

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson described the incident as 'brazen hostility' from Russia while he praised the work done by the flagship, worth around £1billion, and her crew. 
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Dezembro 26, 2018, 12:10:55 pm
https://news.sky.com/story/special-forces-storm-cargo-ship-after-migrants-threatened-staff-11588563?fbclid=IwAR0ZaWmHoEcKeFdQHcxkyHLLdj-iZHPuQOzRUoOZkpUj_a55jdelnDzi0ME (https://news.sky.com/story/special-forces-storm-cargo-ship-after-migrants-threatened-staff-11588563?fbclid=IwAR0ZaWmHoEcKeFdQHcxkyHLLdj-iZHPuQOzRUoOZkpUj_a55jdelnDzi0ME)

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By David Mercer, news reporter

Four men have been arrested after special forces stormed a cargo ship off the UK's coast, where a group of stowaway migrants had threatened staff on-board.

Special Boat Service (SBS) operatives from Sabre Squadron fast-roped from helicopters on to the ship, which had been sailing in the Thames Estuary, sources told Sky's defence and security correspondent Alistair Bunkall.

The operation lasted around 25 minutes and no one on board was injured.

(https://e3.365dm.com/18/12/1096x616/skynews-essex-cargo_4526977.jpg?bypass-service-worker&20181222105738)
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Grimaldi Lines said four stowaways with iron bars demanded to be navigated closer to the coast

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Janeiro 04, 2019, 10:26:31 am
Ameaçam? Diria que já vem afundando desde os anos 60...  ::) ::) ::) ::)

https://www.naval.com.br/blog/2019/01/03/submarinos-nucleares-ameacam-afundar-o-orcamento-de-defesa-do-reino-unido/?fbclid=IwAR2sH6iveswuSh6FMxf49xJzZr-MTQqqkHZjbc48U1Eb4c6HW_7DaeGoZh4 (https://www.naval.com.br/blog/2019/01/03/submarinos-nucleares-ameacam-afundar-o-orcamento-de-defesa-do-reino-unido/?fbclid=IwAR2sH6iveswuSh6FMxf49xJzZr-MTQqqkHZjbc48U1Eb4c6HW_7DaeGoZh4)

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Escritório Nacional de Auditoria alerta para uma lacuna de financiamento de 15 bilhões de libras em programas de equipamentos

(https://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/dreadnought-nuclear-missile-submarine-programme-1024x683.jpg)
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Concepção do submarino de mísseis balísticos Dreadnought

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Major Alvega em Janeiro 31, 2019, 09:50:28 am
https://www.navalnews.com/news/2019/01/tkms-wins-royal-navys-type-31e-frigates-design-contract/?fbclid=IwAR0H-xN0Wy8cDDTPRnL_1INykowjOF5tJMaNAoYU0uajyIvlQt4Y6PA-8cg (https://www.navalnews.com/news/2019/01/tkms-wins-royal-navys-type-31e-frigates-design-contract/?fbclid=IwAR0H-xN0Wy8cDDTPRnL_1INykowjOF5tJMaNAoYU0uajyIvlQt4Y6PA-8cg)

TKMS Wins Royal Navy’s Type 31e Frigates Design Contract
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Stalker79 em Fevereiro 03, 2019, 07:28:36 pm
https://www.navalnews.com/news/2019/01/tkms-wins-royal-navys-type-31e-frigates-design-contract/?fbclid=IwAR0H-xN0Wy8cDDTPRnL_1INykowjOF5tJMaNAoYU0uajyIvlQt4Y6PA-8cg (https://www.navalnews.com/news/2019/01/tkms-wins-royal-navys-type-31e-frigates-design-contract/?fbclid=IwAR0H-xN0Wy8cDDTPRnL_1INykowjOF5tJMaNAoYU0uajyIvlQt4Y6PA-8cg)

TKMS Wins Royal Navy’s Type 31e Frigates Design Contract

E vão bem servidos! Quem nos dera a nós que quando chegar a altura podermos ter essa sorte e fazer logo 5 iguais!
Era é faze-las cá sob liçenca da tkms.
 :-P
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Fevereiro 06, 2019, 02:22:14 pm
O Maduro pensa que é do Donald Truuump.  :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/no-rfa-mounts-bay-isnt-about-to-invade-venezuela/?fbclid=IwAR0ynPoWmZ_Cp5jonC7151ox82gwcGm6yoxBdNHPMgu1-tuNycDpuu8vwPA (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/no-rfa-mounts-bay-isnt-about-to-invade-venezuela/?fbclid=IwAR0ynPoWmZ_Cp5jonC7151ox82gwcGm6yoxBdNHPMgu1-tuNycDpuu8vwPA)
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Newspaper ‘The Morning Star’ has astonishingly suggested that RFA Mounts Bay is in the Caribbean to take part in an invasion of Venezuela.

The outlet acknowledges in the article that the Royal Navy claims the vessel is working on counternarcotics operations with the US Southern Command,  however, it then creates a very tenuous link to any potential action, referring to the work with US Southern Command, saying “it is this branch of the Pentagon that would lead any attack on Venezuela”.

(https://external.flis5-1.fna.fbcdn.net/safe_image.php?d=AQBL88NZTUdm8AfS&w=540&h=282&url=https%3A%2F%2Fukdj.imgix.net%2F0c0b5b2002b5bb740970f56e941da428_%2FMS180039086.jpg%3Fauto%3Dcompress%252Cformat%26ixlib%3Dphp-1.2.1%26q%3D80%26s%3D88b33b3ae88b1d029e91dddd2cdef537&cfs=1&upscale=1&fallback=news_d_placeholder_publisher&_nc_hash=AQDZ3rejTogcAOHw)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Fevereiro 13, 2019, 04:24:34 pm
Royal Navy eyeing development of new “littoral strike ships”

(https://navaltoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/royal-navy-eyeing-development-of-new-littoral-strike-ships.jpg)

The Royal Navy could possibly get a fleet of two new “Littoral Strike Ships” for operations close to the shore, UK defense secretary Gavin Williamson announced during a speech at the Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies on February 11.

Research into the feasibility of the new ships will be financed from a Transformation Fund which is designed to bring capabilities to the armed forces “as quickly as possible”.

The new Littoral Strike Ship concept revolves around globally deployable, multi-role vessels capable of performing both crisis support and war-fighting missions.

The defense secretary envisions these ships to form part of two Littoral Strike Groups complete with escorts, support vessels and helicopters. One would be based East of Suez in the Indo-Pacific and one based West of Suez in the Mediterranean, Atlantic and Baltic.

The ships could join the Royal Navy aircraft carriers, amphibious assault ships, and Bay-class landing ships can come together in one amphibious task force should need be, the defense minister noted.

“This announcement to accelerate the concept and assessment stages of future littoral strike ships brings us one step closer to realising our ambitions for the future commando force,” Major General Charlie Stickland, Commandant General Royal Marines, said.

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Designed to support the unique capabilities of @RoyalMarines Future Commando Force, FLSS offer a dramatic increase in the range, mass & lethality of forces that can be projected from sea to land, delivering decisive military effect anywhere in the world, at a time of our choosing pic.twitter.com/ctrDWNgGML — First Sea Lord (@AdmPhilipJones) February 11, 2019

https://navaltoday.com/2019/02/11/royal-navy-eyeing-development-of-new-littoral-strike-ships/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: MATRA em Fevereiro 13, 2019, 05:01:39 pm
Parece uma cópia do "não tão secreto" M/V Ocean Trader usado pelas operações especiais americanas.

(http://imagesvc.timeincapp.com/v3/foundry/image/?q=60&url=https%3A%2F%2Fs3.amazonaws.com%2Fthe-drive-staging%2Fmessage-editor%252F1549908650840-ocean.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Fevereiro 20, 2019, 01:25:08 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Fevereiro 22, 2019, 10:35:19 am
Ups... :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/8473830/hms-queen-elizabeth-short-of-crew/ (https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/8473830/hms-queen-elizabeth-short-of-crew/)

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Britain’s new flagship £3bn aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth’s is devastated by a damaging row – its commanders say it doesn’t have enough crew.

The very first Commander of the new £3bn carrier found the ship to be 70 sailors light when she first went to sea.

(https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/NINTCHDBPICT000437736025.jpg?w=960)

Saudações
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: goldfinger em Março 08, 2019, 07:02:31 am
Royal Navy £1bn carrier shipbuilding deals could go to Spain

pain are favourites to win a lucrative £1billion contract to build three new support ships for the Royal Navy's mighty new aircraft carriers HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales, it's claimed.

A new batch of vessels forming naval sidearm the Royal Fleet Auxiliary are required to ferry vital supplies to the Solent powerhouses - the biggest in the fleet's history.


But there's fears growing amongst the nation's senior defence ranks that the huge construction project may slip through the fingers of Britain's shipyards and instead be picked up by foreign firms - chiefly in Spain.

It comes amid growing tensions in Gibraltar over the control of British waters whipped up by Spanish warships.

Yet insiders claim Spain is 'at the front of the queue' to secure the major shipbuilding deal, The News, Portsmouth, reports.

Concerns reportedly came following a key conference with maritime chiefs in the south-east last month.

Both Plymouth and Portsmouth have already declared an interest in the mega money development.

(https://i2-prod.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/article1675850.ece/ALTERNATES/s615b/queenelizJPG.jpg)
The aircraft carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth (pictured) could be supported by vessels built in Spain
"The decision to not ring-fence the construction of the three new RFA ships to be built in British yards is a significant problem and one that is incredibly concerning,’ Councillor Gerald Vernon-Jackson, leader of Portsmouth City Council, said.

"These are highly complex ships carrying quantities of munitions, so they have to be very powerfully built, and be able to be in a war zone and yet the government are choosing to probably allow them to be built in Spain."

Spanish and UK tensions first bubbled to the surface on February 28 this year after OPV Infanta Cristina prowled British territory around the Rock.



https://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/news/plymouth-news/royal-navy-aircraft-carriers-spain-2615282?fbclid=IwAR3nT60Mw70FCzBy0riIE5edr0KOY99Q3uJDgaNxAtEtQWVyWnrrplP820M
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Março 10, 2019, 10:57:05 am
https://www.helis.com/database/news/wildcat-winter-training-19?fbclid=IwAR2Mg-Yui-VOIOzmTlr4hHA5Dgtcrfo4Ta_TLHbiQ10VZ3Hq_Tcp85JphcM (https://www.helis.com/database/news/wildcat-winter-training-19?fbclid=IwAR2Mg-Yui-VOIOzmTlr4hHA5Dgtcrfo4Ta_TLHbiQ10VZ3Hq_Tcp85JphcM)
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Royal Navy, March 09, 2019 - Commando Wildcat helicopters of 847 Naval Air Squadron have been proving their warfighting capability during sorties in the unforgiving valleys and mountains of the Arctic Circle.

The Yeovilton-based Commando Helicopter Force (CHF) squadron were involved in their largest helicopter assault force since the conflict in Afghanistan during the annual winter outing to Norway, Exercise Clockwork.

Based out of Royal Norwegian Air Station Bardufoss, 847 NAS worked alongside NATO allies, Norway and the United States, in a six-strong aircraft force to take troops into the heart of combat exercises and provide vital air support.

Flights to the Setermoen Ranges also meant the Wildcat crews could put the aircraft’s mounted .50 calibre M3M 12.7mm machine gun through its paces in the extreme cold – vital testing to ensure the weapon itself and the crews can handle freezing temperatures around -20°c.

“At the ranges we’ve been operating the M3M weapons system, qualifying our weapons operators in their annual competency,” said Petty Officer Aircrewman Paul Iche of 847 Naval Air Squadron, the Crew Served Weapons Instructor for the Wildcat Exercise Clockwork detachment.

“With the M3M fitted, the door of the aircraft has to be open. It brings in quite a wind chill and that then effects the operators’ ability to maintain the position behind the weapons system.

“We’ve been operating in temperatures as low as -20°c, so we have to monitor the operators for cold weather injuries.

“Due to the cold, certain parts of the weapons system expand and contract with the difference in temperature, but that has so far not effected the running of the system.”

Overall, the Wildcats of 847 NAS, on just their second foray to Bardufoss, have shown their versatility on a very fruitful mission to northern Norway.

They have forged and strengthened bonds with fellow NATO forces, the Army’s Apache attack helicopter – on its first venture to Exercise Clockwork – and, of course, with their familiar friends the Royal Marines.

During helicopter assault missions, the Wildcat provided an escort to four Bell 412s of 339 Squadron of the Royal Norwegian Air Force.

The Wildcats used their capability as a battlefield reconnaissance helicopter to clear landing sites, making way for the Norwegians’ twin-engine utility warbird to deliver troops to the frontline or extract them.

While supporting the Norwegian aircraft, the Wildcats provided crucial air support, communicating closely with embedded units from the United States Marine Corps, to guarantee ground units had sufficient cover.

Alongside the Royal Marines, the Wildcats trained with 30 Commando XI’s Surveillance and Reconnaissance Squadron, while work alongside the Apache of 656 Squadron also proved highly fruitful.

Together the two helicopters are becoming a deadly duo, with Wildcat finding targets using its reconnaissance abilities and Apache destroying it.

Before taking the fight into the cold, the Wildcats' crews first undertook qualifications to be able to operate in the Arctic freeze.

That was made up of ten sorties, including mountain flying, snow landings by day, night and using night vision goggles.

On top of that, the Wildcats flew in tactical formation and trained in underslung loads.

For some of the aircrew, this was their first time operating overseas and the difficult conditions of Norway proved challenging.

Lieutenant Mark Hanson, said: “Conducting snow landings at night using night vision goggles in a formation pair after a day of heavy snow proved to be challenging and a steep learning curve but, at the same time, was very rewarding.”

Completion of this phase was a significant achievement and meant the squadron could now operate in the Arctic effectively.


(https://www.janes.com/images/assets/422/78422/p1690315_-_main.jpg)

Cumprimentos

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Março 14, 2019, 11:08:59 am
Second River-class OPV Medway handed over to Royal Navy

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/msCM6u.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pomsCM6uj)
HMS Medway

The White Ensign was raised for the first time on the second of five Batch 2 River-class offshore patrol vessels, HMS Medway, as BAE Systems handed the ship over to the Royal Navy.

Medway was handed over as the crew of lead ship HMS Forth are in the final stages to resume trials and training, after the ship underwent post-delivery rectification work to solve problems with the ship’s electrical systems and marine fixings.

Forth is due to replace HMS Clyde in the Falklands. Meanwhile her sisters could find themselves on patrol in the Caribbean, Mediterranean or the Pacific rim operating from Singapore.

“We’re focused on taking Forth to sea before the end of March. We have belief and faith in the ship. Now it is time to test her at sea,” Commander Bob Laverty, HMS Forth’s commanding officer said.

Medway will be a couple of months behind Forth in going to sea for a second time. She is currently having military systems installed on the Clyde after her successful first spell at sea before Christmas. After more trials and training, she’s due to sail for Portsmouth in July.

In September she’ll have her commissioning on the river Medway. She will also exercise the Freedom of the Borough. After that there’s front-line training ready for her maiden deployment overseas at the turn of 2019/20.

Batch 2 River-class OPVs are 90 meters long and have a range of 5,500 nautical miles and a maximum speed of 24 knots. The new OPVs are four knots faster than their Batch 1 predecessors, have a 30mm automatic cannon as their main armament instead of a 20mm gun, two Miniguns, four machine-guns and are equipped with two Pacific 24 sea boats.

https://navaltoday.com/2019/03/14/second-river-class-opv-medway-handed-over-to-royal-navy/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Abril 10, 2019, 10:12:18 am
http://www.cavok.com.br/blog/primeiro-voo-do-helicoptero-merlin-britanico-com-o-sistema-crowsnest/?fbclid=IwAR3podSD-a5Xw26T2IiH4fbkTsub3nDTlklcVThsAW_-EYUszKdzOxSMbD0 (http://www.cavok.com.br/blog/primeiro-voo-do-helicoptero-merlin-britanico-com-o-sistema-crowsnest/?fbclid=IwAR3podSD-a5Xw26T2IiH4fbkTsub3nDTlklcVThsAW_-EYUszKdzOxSMbD0)

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O primeiro helicóptero Leonardo Merlin HM.2 equipado com o sistema Crowsnest Airborne Surveillance and Control (ASaC) completou seu primeiro voo. A empresa contratada pela Lockheed Martin UK confirmou que a aeronave de testes designada decolou da instalação da Leonardo Helicopters em Yeovil equip...

(https://i2.wp.com/www.cavok.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/pic_0.jpg?resize=600%2C295)

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Abril 20, 2019, 10:51:05 pm
Type 26 já em construção


https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hull-of-first-type-26-frigate-hms-glasgow-taking-shape/

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/2fUMN5.png) (https://imageshack.com/i/po2fUMN5p)

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Maio 09, 2019, 03:03:56 am
Como já anteriormente tinha postulado, o valor de 250 milhões de libras era completamente irrealista. Vamos ver se o valor que previ de 500 milhões de euros (430 milhões de libras) por unidade não vai ser ultrapassado.

MoD recognises the £250M price cap for Royal Navy Type 31e Frigate is unworkable.

https://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/mod-recognises-the-250m-price-cap-for-royal-navy-type-31e-frigate-is-unworkable/ (https://www.savetheroyalnavy.org/mod-recognises-the-250m-price-cap-for-royal-navy-type-31e-frigate-is-unworkable/)

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It has emerged that the MoD has accepted that it will have to provide additional funds to make the Type 31e a credible frigate that can defend itself in the face of modern threats. Here we take a brief look at the implications.

Yesterday the Daily Telegraph published an article with a very misleading headline “MoD to scrap cut-price frigates plan” but the rest of the piece then correctly went on to say that the price cap for the ships has effectively been abandoned. The Type 31e project is not being scrapped but the MoD will somehow have to find more cash.

Adjustments to the terms of the Type 31 contract will see the winning bidder build the platform for around £250M but the MoD will provide a greater part of the equipment fit. It had always been understood that some Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) could come directly from the Type 23 frigates as they are decommissioned. This could possibly include major items such as Sea Ceptor missile system, 4.5″ gun, Artisan radar, and hull-mounted sonar. This will require Type 23 frigates to be withdrawn to remove these systems, then time to install and integrate them on the new ships in time to avoid a reduction in frigate numbers. There are also many other modern weapons, sensors, communications, decoy systems and electronics that a credible Type 31 might need, the Type 23 is not a completely compatible donor and cannot provide everything.


Whatever might be transferred from the Type 23s, the MoD will have to purchase significant extra kit. It is also agreeing to underwrite more of the financial risk which could come from changes in FOREX rates and inflation. It would probably be more sensible and honest to accept the real price each Type 31 will be around £350M and this is becoming a more ‘normal’ procurement process.

Seen in the context of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, this development could be the death knell for attempts to stimulate exports with the offer of a “cheap frigate”. The UK was always going to have an uphill struggle to sell the Type 31e, competing in a crowded market with more established European warship exporters and cheap competition from China. Alternatively, a more honest offer for a low-mid range frigate might attract a few new customers who are looking for a warship with a realistic price tag. Unfortunately, many nations that can afford mid-range frigates may have their own, or want to develop, a sovereign construction capability and are not interested in buying from overseas.

Along with many others, we predicted the £250M price was not viable for a credible frigate as far back as 2015 so it seems extraordinary that this issue was not recognised and resolved a long time ago. It is also strange timing, given that the project is now well into the competitive design phase to start moving the goalposts. Either this was another ‘conspiracy of optimism’ to get Type 31 through the 2015 SDSR or a tactic to drive the price right down, with an unspoken acceptance that the figure would always rise in the long run. The Telegraph article suggests that the temporary suspension of the project in the Summer of 2018 was caused by industry concerns about the price rather than an intellectual property rights issue as many had thought.

The Type 31 has clearly blown its £1.25Bn budget and more funds will have to be found from somewhere. Everyone agrees the MoD’s future equipment plan is unaffordable to varying degrees and finding something in the region of £500M will be another problem lying in wait for the new Defence Secretary, Penny Mordaunt. The new minister is expected to be even more sympathetic to the needs of Navy than her predecessor and this will be an interesting examination of her priorities.

Sources inside the Navy say they remain “relaxed” about progress with the Type 31e project and still expect the project to deliver on time. The winning bid will be announced in December this year and the first steel will be cut in 2020.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Maio 23, 2019, 10:00:20 am
https://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/royal-navy-special-forces-join-2887002.amp?fbclid=IwAR1s6zDN_YY6yuRvFHCCuoT3tfZVatuFmQUSwO5Ha6fe7knK5wP6KtU-yz4 (https://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/royal-navy-special-forces-join-2887002.amp?fbclid=IwAR1s6zDN_YY6yuRvFHCCuoT3tfZVatuFmQUSwO5Ha6fe7knK5wP6KtU-yz4)

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Royal Navy Special Forces 'join US strike group ready to repel Iran'
Special Boat Service has reportedly  flown  to Persian Gulf to counter potential Iranian attacks on UK merchant shipping


(https://i2-prod.plymouthherald.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/article2873155.ece/ALTERNATES/s615/0_pemborke.jpg)

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Maio 26, 2019, 12:36:51 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Lusitano89 em Junho 05, 2019, 04:23:05 pm
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Julho 06, 2019, 12:05:38 am
UK MOD awards £85M contract to Rolls-Royce to boost Type-23 fleet capabilities

https://navaltoday.com/2019/07/05/uk-mod-awards-85m-contract-to-rolls-royce-to-boost-type-23-fleet-capabilities/ (https://navaltoday.com/2019/07/05/uk-mod-awards-85m-contract-to-rolls-royce-to-boost-type-23-fleet-capabilities/)

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The UK Ministry of Defence has signed an £85 million contract with engineering company Rolls-Royce to maintain the engines of the Royal Navy’s Type-23 frigate fleet.

The contract includes a comprehensive support package to Spey gas turbines, including the overhaul of engines, provision of spares, as well as engineering and safety support.

As explained, updates to the turbines are vital as they boost propulsion in the Type-23 frigates. They are also key pieces of equipment for anti-submarine warfare.

The Type-23 frigate is able to carry out a wide variety of operations, from securing the UK’s vital maritime trade routes East of the Suez Canal to safeguarding British interests in the South Atlantic.

Defence Minister Stuart Andrew announced the contract at HMNB Devonport where he saw Thursday War training which prepares the Royal Navy for war-fighting, humanitarian relief and emergency situations through a variety of drills and exercises.

“This £85m contract demonstrates the UK’s commitment to modernisation through the maintenance of our formidable Type-23s,” Minister Andrew said.

The contract will see Rolls-Royce overhaul thirty Type-23 engines from the UK and NATO partners Belgium, Portugal and the Netherlands.

The contract is expected to deliver a £35 million increase in savings to the MOD over the next eight years, by incentivising Rolls-Royce to improve repair schemes, minimise unnecessary work and procure spares at a lower cost. This will result in shorter, less expensive overhauls, the MOD said in a statement.

Rolls-Royce will project manage the support contract, while the main overhaul and repair work will be carried out by RWG based in Aberdeen.

“The Type 23 frigate is central to Royal Navy operations around the world and keeping it at the forefront of operations is critical,” Defence Equipment and Support Chief of Materiel Ships Vice Admiral Chris Gardner noted.

(https://navaltoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/d-o1dxtw4aafwhj-768x512.jpg)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 16, 2019, 04:46:40 pm
Royal Navy’s Martlet missile debuts on Type 23 frigate HMS Sutherland

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/921/yFAIXg.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/plyFAIXgj)

https://navaltoday.com/2019/07/16/royal-navys-martlet-missile-debuts-on-type-23-frigate-hms-sutherland/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Julho 16, 2019, 05:29:19 pm
Uma boa solução.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Julho 16, 2019, 06:43:38 pm
Uma boa solução.

A ideal para uma classe de Patrulhas que dá pelo nome de Tejo, digo eu !

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Julho 24, 2019, 02:14:05 pm
Para o Golfo em força só se for de canoa...  :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/half-navy-s-gulf-defence-ships-out-of-action-9wxw9rdpz?fbclid=IwAR0sl07T7WnfjRIX31T6rY1F-Jdl8dqedDAx6Mn96sqOyjUcOnLgdyBX9ZY (https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/half-navy-s-gulf-defence-ships-out-of-action-9wxw9rdpz?fbclid=IwAR0sl07T7WnfjRIX31T6rY1F-Jdl8dqedDAx6Mn96sqOyjUcOnLgdyBX9ZY)

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Almost half of the Royal Navy’s fleet of frigates and destroyers is inactive because of long-term repairs.

The Ministry of Defence has admitted that six of its 13 Type 23 frigates and three of its six Type 45 destroyers are in scheduled upkeep and therefore cannot be deployed.

The frigates are undergoing engine upgrades and work to extend their lifespan because delays to their replacements mean their use must stretch beyond the intended 20 years.

(https://www.thetimes.co.uk/imageserver/image/methode%2Ftimes%2Fprod%2Fweb%2Fbin%2Ff64cf678-ad7d-11e9-b657-11944f524f2a.jpg?crop=4080%2C2295%2C0%2C212&resize=685)

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Julho 31, 2019, 07:10:17 pm
Royal Navy: Metade dos navios de escolta está fora de ação
29 de julho de 2019

(https://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Type-23-e-Type-45-1024x711.jpg)

Quase metade da frota de fragatas e destróieres da Marinha Real está inativa por causa de reparos de longo prazo.

O Ministério da Defesa admitiu que seis das suas 13 fragatas Type 23 e três dos seus seis destróieres Type 45 estão em manutenção programada e, portanto, não podem ser utilizados.

As fragatas estão passando por atualizações de motores e trabalham para prolongar sua vida útil, pois atrasos em suas substituições significam que seu uso deve se estender além dos 20 anos pretendidos.

Os destróieres, que custaram 1 bilhão de libras esterlinas cada, estão recebendo uma séria manutenção, depois que os chefes de defesa reconheceram que não conseguiriam operar em águas quentes depois de problemas no Golfo.

A regra normal permite que um terço de uma determinada frota esteja em manutenção programada. Isso significa que as opções abertas à Marinha Real para proteger o transporte comercial e reforçar sua presença na região, na qual o Irã apreendeu um petroleiro de bandeira britânica recentemente, são limitadas porque as 19 fragatas e destróieres são os principais navios de guerra que fornecem segurança a navios mercantes.

(https://www.naval.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Royal-Navy-Surface-Escorts-Snapshot-20-July-2019-1024x1390.jpg)

FONTE: The Times

https://www.naval.com.br/blog/2019/07/29/royal-navy-metade-dos-navios-de-escolta-esta-fora-de-acao/
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: typhonman em Agosto 04, 2019, 10:53:02 pm
Já devem ter chegado a conclusão que a RN ficou curta demais.... :bang:
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Agosto 05, 2019, 01:15:51 pm
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/08/05/royal-navy-has-decimated-irans-insolence-shows-britain-must/?hootPostID=2ceff51c66a1cf71136558cd65aa605f&fbclid=IwAR23uTDA4WQrAjqFGZnMZTixR5W1a0DDffQXfpTmKXjr7fraKbL57OSAS9k (https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/08/05/royal-navy-has-decimated-irans-insolence-shows-britain-must/?hootPostID=2ceff51c66a1cf71136558cd65aa605f&fbclid=IwAR23uTDA4WQrAjqFGZnMZTixR5W1a0DDffQXfpTmKXjr7fraKbL57OSAS9k)

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The Royal Navy has been decimated, but Iran's insolence shows why Britain must still rule the waves

CHARLES MOORE


Our best-known patriotic song is based on the idea that “Britannia rules the waves”. Not the world; the waves. Until quite recently, it was axiomatic that Britain’s greatness was sea-borne. The Army mattered greatly, but only sometimes. The Royal Navy mattered all the time.

(https://www.telegraph.co.uk/content/dam/news/2019/07/23/TELEMMGLPICT000203421399_trans_NvBQzQNjv4BqyuLFFzXshuGqnr8zPdDWXiTUh73-1IAIBaONvUINpkg.jpeg?imwidth=1400)

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: goldfinger em Agosto 21, 2019, 01:07:07 pm
Proyecto de la española Navantia para el reemplazo de los buques de la Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA)’s Solid Support Ships, RFA Fort Austin and RFA Fort Rosalie.

(https://www.navalnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Navantias-Fleet-Solid-Support-ship-design.jpg)

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You are at :Home»Event News»DSEI 2019»Navantia & BMT to Unveil FSS Design Proposal at DSEI 2019
 
Navantia & BMT To Unveil FSS Design Proposal At DSEI 2019

Spanish shipbuilding company Navantia will be exhibiting at DSEI 2019 and is set to unveil its design proposal for the UK Ministry of Defence 's Fleet Solid Support (FSS) programme alongside its partner, BMT.

Xavier Vavasseur  19 Aug 2019

Navantia will be displaying its latest shipbuilding innovations, and providing details of some of the most significant projects that the company is involved with. These include: The recently signed contract for the next generation Spanish frigate, F-110; the S-80 AIP submarine, and the two Royal Australian Navy vessels currently under construction in Spain.
Navantia’s Fleet Solid Support ship design


Working with suppliers from across the UK, Navantia has submitted a proposal to the UK Ministry of Defence for the Fleet Solid Support (FSS) programme.  As part of its offer, Navantia is looking to grow the UK supply chain for this, and other new build programmes.  Navantia and its partner, BMT, will unveil the design of their FSS on Tuesday 10 September. Navantia will also be holding a UK Supplier Event during the show to explore opportunities for future collaboration with British industry.
The future FSS ships are set to replae the Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA)’s Solid Support Ships, RFA Fort Austin and RFA Fort Rosalie. The FSS will be tasked with supplying dry stores (ammunition, explosives, food…) to Royal Navy ships at sea.
On 16 May 2018, a contract notice was placed for two solid support ships, with a probable option of a third later. The requirements call for:
a total cargo capacity of up to 7,000 m3 (250,000 cubic feet)
a sustained speed of 18 knots (33 km/h; 21 mph)
the ability to deliver non-bulk logistic material whilst underway at 12 knots
the ability to transfer single loads of up to 5 tonnes
Early in the process, competitors for the FSS program included:
A British consortium (Babcock, BAE Systems, Cammell Laird, Rolls-Royce)
Navantia
Fincantieri
Japan Marine United
Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering
Navantia’s booth will be located at Excel South pavilion, booth S9-270
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: mafets em Agosto 21, 2019, 05:24:19 pm
https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/uk-to-purchase-two-littoral-strike-ships-for-special-forces/?fbclid=IwAR3BK4o0jNg97skcIZD22NhNcV9tRKIzpj_YGNk2BIlmpONJgW9Ag4AdR2s (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/uk-to-purchase-two-littoral-strike-ships-for-special-forces/?fbclid=IwAR3BK4o0jNg97skcIZD22NhNcV9tRKIzpj_YGNk2BIlmpONJgW9Ag4AdR2s)

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The UK is set to acquire two Littoral Strike Ships with the ability to launch troops and their equipment via helicopters and boats.

Defence Secretary at the time, Gavin Williamson, earlier confirmed that the UK will purchase the vessels:

(https://ukdj.imgix.net/0fe165382a6a15e4190b832a970a571f_/DzIa-7XQAAIuQI.jpg?auto=compress%2Cformat&crop=top&fit=crop&h=580&ixlib=php-1.2.1&w=1021&wpsize=td_1021x580&s=1f33fb0417f98fde154a3cb04d1169d7)

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Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: MATRA em Agosto 21, 2019, 05:41:06 pm
Parece uma cópia do "não tão secreto" M/V Ocean Trader usado pelas operações especiais americanas.

(http://imagesvc.timeincapp.com/v3/foundry/image/?q=60&url=https%3A%2F%2Fs3.amazonaws.com%2Fthe-drive-staging%2Fmessage-editor%252F1549908650840-ocean.jpg)
Aí está o M/V Ocean Trader dos ingleses.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Agosto 21, 2019, 05:55:41 pm
Wartime Operations – Employing the Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carriers

(https://ukdj.imgix.net/e43592680ab7c8f45d75ecb676c92a11_/18P00149_004.jpg?auto=compress%2Cformat&ixlib=php-1.2.1&s=83f07b91743acc68485b9b1964e17e9e)

https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/wartime-operations-employing-the-queen-elizabeth-class-aircraft-carriers/ (https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/wartime-operations-employing-the-queen-elizabeth-class-aircraft-carriers/)

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The months of June and July 2019 witnessed four significant events which are a portent for the future of UK carrier aviation.

The thirty-seventh anniversary of the Argentine surrender marking the end of the Falklands War was commemorated on the 14th of June. Exactly two days later Royal Air Force F-35B Lightning aircraft operating from RAF Akrotiri in Cyprus completed their first armed overwatch mission over Syria marking their operational debut in UK service.

Denoting a significant step towards initial operating capability, on the 17th of June HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH sailed from Portsmouth for a final round of sea trials before departing for the USA in Autumn for the next round of trials with the F-35B. The final and ominous event occurred on the 20th of July with the seizure of the British flagged tanker Stena Impero by Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRCG) in the Strait of Hormuz using fast inshore patrol craft.

The successful prosecution of the Falklands War lies in stark contrast to the ease with which the Iranians captured the British tanker and marks the steep decline in Britain’s maritime capabilities. Regeneration of the UK’s naval capability is marked by the construction of HMS QUEEN ELIZABETH and HMS PRINCE OF WALES (PoW) – collectively designated the QUEEN ELIZABETH CLASS (QEC).

BUILDING A CARRIER FORCE – CATOBAR OR STOVL?

In the light of lessons acquired from the Falklands conflict and both Gulf Wars it became apparent that vessels larger than the Invincible class light carriers would be needed to successfully prosecute any future conflict.

The decision to build two large aircraft carriers also took into account that future aircraft would be larger and heavier and would require a sizeable flight deck for their efficient operation. Before settling on the QEC design one of the alternatives considered was a 40,000 ton carrier configured for Catapult Assisted Take Off But Arrested Recovery (CATOBAR) operation. With respect to this proposal it is pertinent to consider the French Navy’s 42,500 ton FS CHARLES DE GAULLE (CdG).

Particularly telling are photographs of the CdG participating in Exercise Fanal 2019. These demonstrate both the strengths and weaknesses of the design. The carrier’s strengths are immediately obvious. Arrayed on the flight deck are thirty Dassault Rafale M fighters, two Northrop Grumman E-2C Airborne Early Warning And Control (AEW&C) aircraft, and two helicopters. Also evident are the 4 × 8 cell A-43 Sylver launchers for the MBDA Aster 15 surface-to-air missile (SAM). However, despite this apparent imposing impression of both offensive and defensive firepower limitations of the design are also evident. Carrying a mix of thirty-four aircraft and helicopters the flight deck is decidedly crowded, a fact which restricts the launch and recovery cycle and the refuelling and re-arming of aircraft.

Moreover, while the CdG is inherently advantaged given that it is a CATOBAR design, the carrier’s size means that it equipped with two 75m C13‑3 steam catapults, a shorter stroke version of the catapults installed on the substantially larger USN supercarriers. As aircraft weights inevitably rise, these catapults will prove inadequate and questions have already arisen concerning the suitability of the CdG for F-35C operations. Another factor weighing against a 40,000 ton CATOBAR design was the RN’s experience in the Falklands War.

Arguments have surrounded the outcome of the war had the CATOBAR equipped HMS ARK ROYAL been available. Larger than the CdG and carrying an equivalent air wing, on paper the capabilities provided by the ship far outstripped those of HMS HERMES and HMS INVINCIBLE. However, given the appalling weather conditions in the South Atlantic and the poor availability rate of the Phantoms and Buccaneers its impact on the outcome remains debatable. The experience of successfully operating Harrier aircraft, despite the weather and high sea states, demonstrated the flexibility of carriers configured for the operation of Short Take-Off and Vertical Landing (STOVL) aircraft. Additionally, HERMES was decidedly overcrowded carrying a mix of twenty-one Sea Harriers and Harriers plus helicopters, but remained fully operational principally because she was a STOVL carrier.

On the 25th of July 2007, the then Defence Secretary Des Browne, announced the order for two new carriers. This was preceded by a December 2006 statement that the UK’s intention was that it would acquire 138 F-35Bs designed for STOVL operation. In May 2010 the Cameron government announced that the Prince of Wales (PoW) would be converted to Catapult Assisted Take Off But Arrested Landing (CATOBAR) configuration, a plan abandoned in May 2012 after it had been determined that the cost of the modification would be over £1BN.

Being an all-electric ship the PoW would have been equipped with the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) and the Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG).

These have had significant problems, described by the Office of the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation in January 2019 as suffering from ‘poor or unknown reliability’. In hindsight, given that the F-35C will not be operational on all USN aircraft carriers until 2027 the UK’s decision to persist with the F-35B now appears sensible, particularly in light of the fact that both the RAF and United States Marine Corps (USMC) have undertaken combat operations with this variant. The latter flew one hundred missions against both the Taliban and ISIS, many of them kinetic.

THE AIR WING

The F-35 is a fifth generation low observable aircraft which operates as a ‘system of systems’ using its open architecture software, avionics, integrated electronic sensors, displays and communications systems to collect data and present it in a ‘fused’ form to the pilot.

The data can also be automatically shared via secured datalinks, the Multifunction Advanced Data Link (MADL) and Link 16, with external platforms such as a Typhoon or Type 45 destroyer. The primary sensor, the Northrop-Grumman AN/APG-81 active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar has a maximum tracking range of 250km (135nm) for an airborne target of one square metre Radar Cross Section (RCS) and a maximum detection range of 400km (216nm) with the radar in search mode. The radar can identify and track 23 targets in 9 seconds while engaging 19 of them in 2.4 seconds.

The radar operates together with the Electro-Optical Targeting System (EOTS), the AN/ASQ-239 Barracuda electronic warfare suite and the Northrop Grumman electro-optical AN/AAQ-37 Distributed Aperture System (DAS) to provide the aircraft with 360 degrees situational awareness (SA). The DAS has six sensors distributed over the aircraft which act as a missile warning system, report missile launch locations, detect and track approaching aircraft, and it also replaces traditional Night Vision Goggles (NVGs).

Demonstrating a unique capability, a DAS sensor mounted in a test platform detected a two-stage ballistic missile launch 1,300 kilometres away. The radar can operate in the electronic attack mode, the electronic warfare suite having proved capable of detecting and jamming radars, including the F-22’s extremely sophisticated AN/APG-77.

Demonstrating yet another unique capacity the aircraft can operate as non-traditional intelligence, surveillance, target acquisition, and reconnaissance (ISTAR) platform. Its capabilities were demonstrated in early 2017 by an Israeli F-35I Adir which gathered new intelligence during a single flight that other reconnaissance and intelligence gathering systems would have taken weeks to gather. Together, therefore, the F-35B is more than the sum of all its parts and its capabilities outweigh anything found in any previous fighter.

With the small numbers of F-35s available these factors are critical.

The Leonardo HM2 Merlin is the other main offensive/defensive component of the carrier air wing (CVW). Learning from the lack of Airborne Early Warning (AEW) in the Falklands conflict, five Merlins will provide Airborne Surveillance and Control (ASaC).

The Crowsnest system consists of the Thales Searchwater 2000 Radar which has a range of 150nm (278km) and can track 400 targets simultaneously and the Cerberus mission system which can monitor 600 tracks simultaneously. These figures are an improvement over those of the Sea King ASaC7 but pale in relation to the 300+nm (556km) radar range of the Lockheed Martin AN/APY-9 radar fitted to the Northrop Grumman E-2D Hawkeye.

However, the Merlin will be supplemented in its ASaC role by the F-35’s AN/APG-81 radar, which via secure data links will provide a comprehensive radar picture out to a greater range. In addition to the ASaC Merlins, an additional eight Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) HM2s will be part of the CVW. Merlins in RN service are not utilised to their full potential in comparison to those of the Italian Navy Aviation (Aviazione Navale) which in addition to the ASW role uses it in the Anti-Surface Warfare (ASuW) role.

With a radius of action of 450nm (834km), extendable by Helicopter In-Flight Refuelling (HIFR), and carrying two MBDA Marte ER 54+nm (100+km) range missiles, the Merlin would have a very effective means of attacking both ships and land targets at extended range.

This is an extremely useful capability given the potentially small numbers of F-35s available.

DEFENDING THE QUEEN ELIZABETH CLASS

Given experience in the Falklands War, when an inordinate amount of resources were committed to preventing a successful attack on HERMES and INVINCIBLE by Exocet missiles fired from Super Étendards the lack of weapons for self-defence mounted on the QEC is, in my personal view, a grievous oversight. They carry three Phalanx Close-In Weapons Systems (CIWS), a totally inadequate defensive capability particularly given the development of supersonic, hypersonic and ballistic missiles.

The addition of the ‘Sea Ceptor’ would provide a self-defence capability against ‘leakers’ which penetrate the air defence umbrella provided by the goalkeeper destroyers and frigates.

The Sea Ceptor has inherent qualities: it is already in RN service; it requires no dedicated tracking radar only cueing from the Artisan radar with which the QEC is already equipped; and, it is cold-launched by a compressed air-driven piston before the rocket motor ignites minimising the effect from smoke and toxic fumes.

The RN has recently (July 2016) successfully trialled the similar Thales Martlet Lightweight Multi-role Missile (LMM) fired from a five missile mounting attached to a DS30M Mark 2 remotely operated 30mm cannon turret fitted to HMS SUTHERLAND.

The QEC have four of these mountings. Fitted with both HVM and LMM, the latter available with both laser and infra-red guidance, would provide the carriers with a high degree of anti-air and anti-surface capability, especially if they are to be operated in the confines of the Persian Gulf or the Arabian Sea where threats are posed by drones and fast inshore attack craft operated by the IRCG.

Another defensive layer could be provided via electronic attack. The effectiveness of an electronic warfare and directed energy weapon was demonstrated when on 18 July 2019 the USMC’s Light Marine Air Defense Integrated System (LMADIS) mounted on the USS BOXER brought down an Iranian drone.

THE QEC AT WAR

Consecutive UK governments have overseen the drastic reduction in the number of warships available to the Royal Navy largely based on an assumption that the UK’s armed forces could rely on its NATO allies should a serious conflict break out. In such circumstances it could be assumed that an Royal Navy carrier would be operating as part of a larger allied taskforce.

As an indication of such operations, on the QE’s first operational deployment to the Pacific she will carry a mix of British and US F-35s and be accompanied by a Dutch air warfare destroyer.

However, it cannot be assumed that the UK will have the support of the US in any future conflict given the current trend of that nation’s non-interventionist policies, or policies which prioritise US interests over those of its allies. Reflecting this stance and speaking in respect to the seizure of the Stena Impero, the US Secretary of State said on 22 July 2019 that ‘The responsibility in the first instance falls to the United Kingdom to take care of their ships’.

An instance where the UK’s armed forces were required to operate with minimal support from the US was the NATO led 23 March – 31 October 2011 intervention in Libya in which the principal responsibility for airstrikes fell to France and the UK.

This was an intervention for which the RN was ill prepared, largely due to the Cameron government’s short-sighted 2010 Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR) decision to withdraw the Harrier GR9/9As from service, thus depriving the navy of any carrier strike capability.

The only strike capability available to the UK came by way of five British Army Apache AH1 helicopters operating off HMS OCEAN. The Apaches flew 22 missions for a total of 49 combat sorties. In contrast the Italian Navy Aviation (Aviazione Navale) deployed eight AV-8B Harrier IIs on the light carrier ITS GIUSSEPE GARIBALDI.

These carried out armed reconnaissance sorties using LITENING targeting pods while armed with AIM-120 AMRAAMs and AIM-9 Sidewinders and dropped 160 precision-guided bombs during 418 sorties and 1,221 flight hours. The other carrier deployed was the CdG.

It operated with an air wing which included ten Rafale and six Super Étendard Modernisé (SEM) fighters and gives an insight into what capability could have been provided had one QEC carrier been available. By August 4 2011, of the 6745 sorties flown by NATO aircraft France had flown 2225, over half of them coming from CdG. The CdG’s air wing conducted a total of 1,350 missions comprising 840 strike, 390 Rafale reconnaissance, 120 Hawkeye AEW&C and 240 buddy refuelling sorties.

These figures are important to understanding the QEC carriers’ capacity to contribute to an air campaign because both the British and French carriers are designed to generate the same number of sorties per day.

Additionally, despite the usual derisory note adopted by commentators with respect to reality that the QEC class will have a normal complement of twelve F-35Bs, the impressive figures achieved by the CdG’s air wing demonstrates that the number of aircraft on board is not the only determinant to the CVW’s effectiveness. Both the RN and MN place an emphasis on the number of sorties generated rather than the number of aircraft in the CVW.

The GdG’s planes flew 3,600 hours in theatre with an average flight time of 2 hours and 20 mins. In contrast, aircraft flying from Gioia del Colle flew 90 minutes before reaching Libya’s coast, while the RAF’s initial strikes flown from RAF Marham involved an eight hour 3,000mi (4,800km) round trip relying on four air-to-air refuelling brackets. The ability of carrier-borne aircraft to generate a greater proportion of missions and a superior Time Over Target (TOT) was thus demonstrated again.

The folly of disbanding the UK’s Harrier force demonstrated that the lessons of the Falklands War had been forgotten. In contrast to the Libyan operation where a ‘carrier strike’ capability managed to generate only 22 Apache missions in 1982 the RN’s Sea Harrier’s (SHAR) were able to generate an exceptional mission rate, a critical factor given the few aircraft available. A total of 1,435 combat sorties were flown during the 45 days of air combat operations beginning 1 May 1982. Having an availability rate of over 90% each SHAR flew an average of 1.41 sorties per day.

During the Falklands conflict the SHARs attained air superiority shooting down twenty Argentine aircraft for no loss (a kill-loss ratio only bettered by the F-15 Eagle). The RN was ill equipped for the Falklands conflict yet was required to unilaterally engage in the only Air-Sea war fought since World War II. The task force possessed only twenty SHARs at the start of the conflict, augmented later by a further eight SHARs and fourteen RAF Harrier GR3s. This number of aircraft proved insufficient to provide total air superiority.

While of a magnitude greater in capability than the first-generation Harriers thirty-six F-35s is an inadequate number to undertake all the missions required if either the QE or PoW was committed to a peer or near peer conflict. This reality is exacerbated by the UK’s slow F-35 buy-rate which will see only forty-eight available by 2025, barely enough to equip one CVW.

If thirty-six F-35s were available, the CARRIER would rely on generating a maximum 110 sortie rate per day or up to 420 sorties over five days to compensate for the low numbers. These ambitious figures could only come by way of repeating the 95% availability rate achieved by the six Lightnings deployed to Cyprus over the six week period from 21 May 2019.

Given current tensions in the Persian Gulf it is worthwhile assessing any role a QEC carrier could have, particularly given that commentators have criticised the RN for concentrating on procuring high end assets rather than destroyers and frigates. Operation Corporate to retake the Falklands would not have been possible without carrier airpower, conversely an aircraft carrier is not a suitable vessel for escorting tankers through the Straits of Hormuz. However, the carrier can provide a presence and capabilities not available via the deployed escort ships. The CSG can provide armed overwatch of British ships sailing in the Gulf. In the absence of a large number of escorts the Merlins could rappel Royal Marines on to ships should they come under threat. Support from F-35s would be an overwhelming deterrence to any threat to British flagged vessels.

No other asset can react as effectively and proportionately to any asymmetric threat from IRCG fast patrol craft through to ballistic missiles. Given their proliferation in the Gulf region, the F-35’s DAS ability to detect ballistic missiles designed to take out a carrier would be crucial in providing data linked information to Type 45 destroyers equipped with Aster 30 Block 1NT and Block 2BMD anti-ballistic missile missiles.

CONCLUSION

The Royal Navy has learnt the costly lessons of the Falklands conflict, but unfortunately has not applied them all. The F-35B Lightning is a fighter far beyond the capabilities offered by the SHAR. With more available aircraft equipped with Meteor AAMs sustained combat air patrols (CAPs) and even total air dominance are possibilities not available in the Falklands War. Moreover, the QEC carriers will have Merlin ASAC helicopters on board, a capability missing in 1982.

However, despite these achievements in re-generating big carrier aviation some capabilities are decidedly lacking, particularly in the area of insufficient defensive weapons.

This needs to be addressed by examining whether the carriers are equipped with an adequate number of self-defence weapons systems.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: P44 em Agosto 24, 2019, 03:32:25 pm
Despite their fearsome-sounding name, the littoral strike ships in fact just merchant vessels featuring several key modifications allowing them to support landing craft and vertical-launching aircraft.

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/royal-navy-plans-acquire-two-so-called-littoral-strike-ships-75751
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 12, 2019, 10:25:40 am
A Type 31 está escolhida !


https://navaltoday.com/2019/09/12/babcock-announced-as-royal-navy-type-31-frigate-competition-winner/

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Setembro 12, 2019, 02:40:36 pm
(https://cdn-statics.defesaaereanaval.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Babcock-Arrowhead140.jpg)

(https://cdn-statics.defesaaereanaval.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Shortlist_of_the_Type_31e_frigate_competitors_for_the_UK.jpg)

Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: LM em Setembro 19, 2019, 02:21:44 pm
Mais detalhes da fragata Type 31 da Royal Navy vem a tona (https://www.defesaaereanaval.com.br/naval/mais-detalhes-da-fragata-type-31-da-royal-navy-vem-a-tona)
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 25, 2019, 09:46:08 am
Arrowhead Wins Cost Battle in U.K. Type-31 Frigate Competition

By: Jon Rosamond September 23, 2019 1:11 PM • Updated: September 23, 2019 6:58 PM

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/924/hGerCd.jpg) (https://imageshack.com/i/pohGerCdj)
Type-31 frigate design concept. Babcock Image

The following post has been updated to correct the cost of the Type-31 program. The U.K. plans to pay $1.6 billion for all five hulls, not $1.6 billion for each hull.

LONDON — The victory of the Babcock/Thales Arrowhead 140 design in Britain’s bargain-basement Type 31 frigate competition will give the Royal Navy a heavyweight fighter in the maritime security arena.

Displacing around 5,700 tons and measuring 456 feet in length, the new platform is much larger than both the light frigate originally envisioned and the aging Type 23s it will replace in service.

The rival contenders proposed by BAE Systems/Cammell Laird (an enlarged Khareef-class corvette) and Atlas Elektronik/TKMS (MEKO A-200 frigate) came in at about 3,700 tons and 393 feet.

By acquiring five Arrowheads for just $1.6 billion for all the hulls, the Ministry of Defence (MoD) and Royal Navy are getting a lot of more tonnage for their money. The payoff, however, is a comparatively lightweight weapons and sensor fit intended for constabulary operations rather than high-end offensive warfare.

Babcock’s win was announced by the British government during this month’s DSEI defense industry expo in London. Having secured preferred bidder status, the company will now enter detailed discussions with the MoD and supply chain partners before contracts are signed later this year.

It will be an exceptionally rapid procurement program by recent U.K. standards, with construction expected to start in 2021, launch of the lead-ship planned for 2023 and completion of the final vessel in 2027 or 2028.

The timings are being driven by the retirement schedule for the Royal Navy’s five Type 23 general purpose frigates: the first of the existing ships (HMS Argyll) was due to decommission in 2023 but delays in the Type 31 competition mean it will have to stay in service for another year or so.

Based on the Danish navy’s successful Iver Huitfeldt-class frigates, the Arrowhead 140, “is engineered to minimize through-life costs whilst delivering a truly leading-edge ship, featuring an established, proven and exportable combat management system [CMS]”, according to Babcock.

Key features include a vertical launch system with 24 Sea Ceptor anti-air missiles, Bofors 57mm Mk 110 gun (already in U.S. Navy service), two Bofors 40mm Mk 4 guns (instead of the widely-expected Phalanx close-in-weapon system), four boat bays, a flight deck and hanger for a Merlin helicopter or two Wildcats, and a mission space beneath for four 20ft containers.

Thales is providing its Tacticos Baseline 2 CMS, making the Royal Navy the 26th country to utilize Tacticos, as well as electronic warfare equipment. The main radar will be either Thales’ NS110 3D or NS200 active electronically scanned array sensor.

Four diesel engines rated at 32.8MW, in two separate compartments, and two shafts will permit a maximum speed of at least 29 knots and range of 9,300 nautical miles at 18 knots.

The platform’s generous size means that the 117-strong ship’s company can be accommodated in relative comfort, although berths will be provided for up to 165 personnel in total.

The space margins also allow the possibility of significant future upgrades in sensors and weapons (some commentators have suggested strike-length Mk 41 missiles, a towed array sonar or multiple unmanned vehicles), if and when the government loosens the purse strings that for a decade or more have resulted in significant cuts to all of Britain’s armed services.

The Type 31s will be assembled at Babcock’s Rosyth dockyard in Scotland, using capacity freed up by the completion of the two Queen Elizabeth-class aircraft carriers (the second carrier, Prince of Wales, left the yard on Thursday ahead of initial sea trials). The company intends to erect a covered construction hall, allowing work on two frigates to proceed simultaneously.

The government hopes the Type 31 will prove a hit on the export market, building on recent wins for the larger Type 26 Global Combat Ship/anti-submarine warfare frigate in Australia and Canada. The Royal Navy is acquiring eight Type 26 frigates to replace the same number of ASW-optimised Type 23s currently in service.

Admirals are desperate to avoid further cuts to the UK’s surface combatant force, which at just 19 hulls (13 frigates and six destroyers) is the bare minimum required to sustain existing commitments worldwide.

Numbers will be even more critical if escorts are to be provided for the planned carrier strike and amphibious task groups on a routine and sustainable basis.

http://www.thefifthcolumn.xyz/Forum/viewthread.php?tid=70&page=20

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Setembro 25, 2019, 03:10:07 pm
Com a venda das 03 VdG, mais os 120 ou 130 milhões previstos para os upgrades, ainda comprávamos um destes cascos, talvez até um casco e meio. Com jeitinho chegava-se às 03 unidades. Quanto ao armamento logo se via, como parece ser prática corrente na Marinha. Mas ao menos tínhamos navios novos e não andávamos a queimar dinheiro em navios com 30 anos. Só isto.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: LM em Setembro 25, 2019, 04:57:23 pm
"lightweight weapons and sensor fit intended for constabulary operations rather than high-end offensive warfare."

Tem metade dos misseis AAW e não tem Mk41 VLS... não tem um canhão principal 5", mas o 57mm (+40mm) talvez seja superior em ataques múltiplos (mas perde em suporte terrestres, etc)... no radar não sei se perde ou ganha (se for o NS200)... mas "constabulary operations" não será algo forçado?     
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: tenente em Setembro 25, 2019, 05:12:32 pm
Com a venda das 03 VdG, mais os 120 ou 130 milhões previstos para os upgrades, ainda comprávamos um destes cascos, talvez até um casco e meio. Com jeitinho chegava-se às 03 unidades. Quanto ao armamento logo se via, como parece ser prática corrente na Marinha. Mas ao menos tínhamos navios novos e não andávamos a queimar dinheiro em navios com 30 anos. Só isto.

NVF, se as VdG valessem 130 milhões + os 120 milhões dos upgrades, + o valor do NPL que não vai ser construído, os tais 300 milhões, já tínhamos 550 milhões .
Então não era de aproveitar e avançar para um dos consórcios existentes, o das novas M, ou as novas MEKO, ou este dos Bifes ??

Só não vê quem não quer, mas assim deve ser melhor estoirar umas centenas de milhões em upgrades da treta, em cinco fragatas quando o que se devia fazer era avançar para unidades novas, se ao menos as duas BD ficassem como as Holandesas/Belgas, mas nem isso e falam eles em as BD ficarem aptas para conflitos de alta intensidade, deviam era ter vergonha e investir á séria na Defesa Nacional !!

Abraços
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: NVF em Setembro 25, 2019, 08:55:11 pm
LM — tanto o NS100 como o NS200 são superiores ao Artisan (especialmente o 200). Não só são melhores como são mais versáteis, pois na mesma montagem podem incluir o Scout 3 e o Gatekeeper.
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: LM em Setembro 25, 2019, 10:16:18 pm
LM — tanto o NS100 como o NS200 são superiores ao Artisan (especialmente o 200). Não só são melhores como são mais versáteis, pois na mesma montagem podem incluir o Scout 3 e o Gatekeeper.

Também tive essa ideia - aliás é de realçar que as type 26 ficam com um radar inferior ( o que mesmo sendo um projecto mais antigo...)  - daí  estranhar a frase "intended for constabulary operations rather than high-end offensive warfare."
Título: Re: Royal Navy
Enviado por: Cabeça de Martelo em Novembro 13, 2019, 12:52:58 am