Royal Navy

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mafets

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Re: Royal Navy
« Responder #300 em: Junho 27, 2017, 09:10:55 am »
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-40402153
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The Royal Navy's new aircraft carrier has left its home port for the first time.
HMS Queen Elizabeth - one of two new carriers being built at Rosyth dockyard in Fife at a cost of more than £6bn - is to begin sea trials.
The ship passed under the Forth Bridge just before midnight.
It is the largest warship ever built for the Royal Navy. The flight deck alone is the size of three football pitches.
Once in service the ship can operate with a crew of 1,000 and 40 aircraft.
The 65,000 tonne warship is the Royal Navy's first aircraft carrier since HMS Ark Royal was scrapped in 2010.



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perdadetempo

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Re: Royal Navy
« Responder #302 em: Junho 29, 2017, 04:38:45 pm »
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ussian Military Hits Back Over Fallon's Jibe (excerpt)
(Source: Reuters; published June 29, 2017)
By Dmitry Solovyov
Russia's defense ministry snapped back on Thursday over comments by British Secretary of Defense Michael Fallon who mocked Moscow's aircraft-carrying cruiser and said the Russians would look with envy on Britain's new warship.

Fallon's comment exposed his "utter ignorance of naval science," ministry spokesman Igor Konashenkov said, and dismissed Britain's HMS Queen Elizabeth carrier as "a convenient oversized target at sea".

"When you saw that old, dilapidated Kuznetsov sailing through the Channel a few months ago, I think the Russians will have looked at this ship with a little bit of envy," British media quoted Fallon as saying this week.

Fallon was referring to Russia's Soviet-era Admiral Kuznetsov and comparing it to HMS Queen Elizabeth, Britain's most advanced and biggest warship which set out on its maiden voyage from its dock in Scotland on Monday.

"These ecstatic statements ... about the supremacy of the beautiful exterior of the new aircraft carrier over the Russian aircraft-carrying cruiser Admiral Kuznetsov expose Fallon's utter ignorance of naval science," Konashenkov said in a statement.

Fallon unnerved Russia's military in January by dubbing the mammoth Russian cruiser "a ship of shame" as it passed through waters close to the English coast on its way back from bombing raids in Syria. (end of excerpt)


Click here for the full story, on the Reuters website.


(EDITOR’S NOTE: Given that the UK doesn’t have any fixed-wing aircraft to put on the HMS Queen Elisabeth, and that none will be available before 2023 unless the US Marine Corps decides to ship aboard, Russia’s response to Fallon’s jibe was remarkably civil, given that many have derided Britain having spent £6 billion on what are, for now, the world’s biggest helicopter carriers.)

http://www.defense-aerospace.com/article-view/release/184902/f_35-reliability-getting-worse%2C-risking-increase-to-operating-costs.html

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-russia-britain-aircraft-idUSKBN19K0XT

 

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Re: Royal Navy
« Responder #303 em: Junho 30, 2017, 02:04:44 pm »
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Cyber Security at Sea – Microsoft XP on Carriers, Hacking Tridents & Spoofing GPS

June 29, 2017 by Rick Spilman
The 65,000-tonne HMS Queen Elizabeth, the Royal Navy’s largest ever warship, puts to sea for the first time, June 26, 2017. Photo: Royal Navy

When reporters were recently being given tours of the Royal Navy’s new “supercarrier,” HMS Queen Elizabeth, some were surprized to see a distinctive logo on several computer screens on the bridge and in control rooms. The logo was for Windows XP, the Microsoft computer operating system introduced in 2001. The ship itself was under construction for over eight years and the many of the procurement lead times were even longer. The reporters were told that the software was ordered in 2004, when XP was the latest and greatest version of the operating system.

Other than being slightly embarrassing that the brand new £3.5 billion aircraft carrier is running outdated software, why is this a problem? The problem is that the older operating systems are much more vulnerable to security breeches.  In May, a worldwide ransomware attack was launched, which created havoc in networks in 99 counties around the world.  (A new wave of ransomware cyber-attacks has hit within the last day. This time, port operations were also impacted, including Moller-Maersk and others.)

During the May attacks, the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) was hit very hard. Across Great Britain computer networks at at least 48 hospitals were shut down by the malware. How did the malware break into the networks? Most suspect it gained access through a flaw in Windows XP, which roughly 90% of British hospitals still use, to one extent or another.

Microsoft stopped supporting Windows XP in 2014 and they are clear about the risks of using the outdated system. On their page, “Windows XP support has ended,” they state: “If you continue to use Windows XP now that support has ended, your computer will still work but it might become more vulnerable to security risks and viruses.”

So, having an aircraft carrier whose networks have known cyber-security risks is a real concern, notwithstanding assurances from the Ministry of Defense that everything is under control.

On the other hand, there may be more to worry about than a hacked aircraft carrier.  The British American Security Information Council (BASIC), a think-tank, recently released a paper titled, “Hacking UK Trident, a Growing Threat.”  They discuss what they consider to be the increasing risk of a cyber-attack on the UK’s Vanguard-class submarines
armed with nuclear-tipped Trident II D-5 ballistic missiles.”  The report’s Executive Summary begins:

A successful attack could neutralise operations, lead to loss of life, defeat or perhaps even trigger the catastrophic exchange of nuclear warheads (directly or indirectly). But the very possibility of cyber-attack and the growing capability to launch them against SSBNs, could have a severe impact upon the confidence of maintaining an assured second-strike capability and therefore on strategic stability between states. Recent suggestions that the fleet is vulnerable have sometimes been met with complacency and claims that the isolated ‘air-gapped’ systems cannot be penetrated. Whilst we recognize that it is important not to be alarmist, these claims are false. 

The reference to the threat of “catastrophic exchange of nuclear warheads” is sufficiently alarming that one might overlook the statement that subs, while isolated and not often connected to networks, can indeed by hacked, at least according to the authors of the report. The Ministry of Defense has denied that such a vulnerability exists.

While not as scary as nukes or a hacked carrier, as merchant ships become more integrated into global networks, there is an increasing risk of cyber-attacks on ships at sea. In 2013, a group of researchers from the University of Texas demonstrated how a ship might be taken over remotely when they “spoofed” the GPS navigation system on the $80 million yacht, White Rose of the Drachs.  The yacht captain had no idea that the boat’s GPS system was sending false information to the autopilot.

While spoofing GPS is scary, there could be far worse to come. Hackers on land have given us a hint of what could be possible. In 2015, two hackers took control of a standard Jeep Cherokee through its communications system. From roughly ten miles away, they remotely turned the windshield wipers on and off, blasted the air conditioning and took over control of the radio. Finally, they disabled the accelerator and shut the car down. Chrysler had to recall 1.4 million vehicles to fix the vulnerability.

Something similar could happen to a modern merchant ship. Imagine pirates taking control without having to climb boarding ladders. Just as the hackers carried off a remote-controlled car-jacking with the Jeep, it may be possible to take over a ship through “spoofed” navigation and hijacked bridge and engine controls. This seems unlikely, yet may not be completely far-fetched.

Networking and automation solve many problems but can also create new risks. As some ship owners work toward remote-controlled or even autonomous ships, these risks could increase dramatically. One day, guarding against cyber-attacks may be thought of as just as much a part of ship operations as avoiding collisions and keeping off the rocks.

http://gcaptain.com/cyber-security-sea-microsoft-xp-carriers-hacking-tridents-spoofing-gps/

nota: Não deixa de ser irónico que após justificarem as  suas decisões sobre aquisição de equipamento militar com as suas preocupações com a segurança e a soberania nacional, se tome a decisão de usar um sistema operativo proprietário já obsoleto e em que dificilmente se terá acesso ao código fonte. Talvez fosse altura dos governos preocuparem-se menos com os brinquedos e preocuparem-se mais com o que os faz funcionar.

Cumprimentos,
 
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NVF

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Re: Royal Navy
« Responder #304 em: Julho 01, 2017, 08:18:22 pm »
Algo semelhante se passa com o F-35, com o sistema operativo e outros sistemas a necessitarem de actualização, apesar de o aparelho ainda não se encontrar 100 % operacional. E atenção que não estou a falar de meras 'tapes', mas de actualizações profundas. É um problema que advém de o desenvolvimento destes projectos demorar muito tempo, mas a determinada altura os requisitos e as características têm que ser 'trancadas' sob pena de os projectos nunca andarem para a frente — já para não mencionar os aspectos financeiros inerentes.

No caso do QE, o sistema informático começou a ser desenvolvido em 2004 e o SO escolhido para alguns sistemas foi o XP. Se há uns 4 ou 5 anos tivessem decidido reescrever todo o código (certamente com vários milhões de linhas), seria mais que garantido que o navio ainda não estaria a navegar. E quando o novo código estivesse pronto também já estaria desactualizado. Pode-se, com certeza, criticar a escolha original, mas este tipo de inconveniências é de esperar em projectos desta escala. Desde que se tratem de sistemas desconectados da rede não há risco de maior. De qualquer modo, parece que está previsto substituir o XP na próxima década, durante uma manutenção prolongada.
 

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tenente

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Re: Royal Navy Type 26 Frigates
« Responder #305 em: Julho 03, 2017, 01:20:37 pm »
Multi-billion deal: Royal Navy orders three new Type 26 frigates

Photo: Royal Navy

The first of the Royal Navy’s next-generation frigates will be laid down before the month is out after a £3.7 billion order was placed for three Type 26s.

Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon yesterday announced the contract with BAE Systems to deliver the first batch of global combat ships.

They will be the first three of eight vessels to replace the equivalent number of specialist submarine-hunting Type 23 frigates currently in service.

Shipbuilding yards on the Clyde will be responsible for building and fitting out the trio, with the first of the as-yet-unnamed class entering service in the mid-2020s.

The work will support and sustain 3,400 jobs – half in the shipyards, half in the supply chain providing parts.

First Sea Lord Admiral Sir Philip Jones said: “For an island nation, dependent on maritime trade, a strong Royal Navy is essential for our national security and economic prosperity.

“Today there are over 500 submarines in the world operated by 40 navies. As one of the quietest and most potent submarine-hunters of any Navy, the Type 26 will have a crucial role to play to protect the nuclear deterrent and our two new aircraft carriers.

 “Although designed to fight and win in the most demanding scenarios, they will also work alongside our international partners to protect and promote the United Kingdom’s interests around the world.”

These world-class warships will protect the nation’s nuclear deterrent and the Royal Navy’s new aircraft carriers, the first of which, HMS Queen Elizabeth, has recently taken to sea for the first time.

The ships specialise in anti-submarine warfare, protecting the UK’s overseas territories and interests across the globe. The flexible design will allow the capabilities to be adapted throughout its lifespan to counter future threats.

The Type 26 frigates are 60ft longer and 2,000 tonnes heavier than their predecessors, equipped with bow and towed array sonar, Sea Ceptor air defence missiles and a 5ins main gun.

The ships are also equipped with a mission bay for plug-in containers carrying equipment for specific tasks, such as disaster relief, and a flight deck big enough to take a Chinook – though the Fleet Air Arm’s Merlin and Wildcat helicopters will be more common.

In due course, the Type 26’s firepower will be bolstered by the future offensive surface weapon – the missile currently being developed to replace the Harpoon.

Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon said: “The Type 26 Frigate is a cutting-edge warship, combining the expertise of the British shipbuilding industry with the excellence of the Royal Navy. We will cut steel on the first ship later this month – a hugely significant milestone that delivers on our commitment to maintain our global naval power. These ships will be a force to be reckoned with, there to protect our powerful new carriers and helping keep British interests safe across the world.

“Backed by a rising defence budget and a £178 billion equipment plan, the Type 26 programme will bring vast economic benefits to Scotland and the wider UK. The contract is structured to ensure value for taxpayers’ money and, importantly, now designed to protect them from extra bills from project overrun. The investment will secure hundreds of skilled jobs at BAE Systems on the Clyde for the next twenty years, and thousands of jobs in the supply chain across Britain. “

Typically just 157 men and women – 30-40 fewer than a Type 23 – will run these ships, but there will be space aboard for up to 208 souls.

Today’s deal also reaffirms the commitment made by the Government in the 2015 Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR15) to build eight Type 26 ships.

The contract for the second batch of five ships is expected to be negotiated in the early 2020s, paving the way to sustain further jobs in Scotland and across the wider supply chain for many years to come.

https://navaltoday.com/2017/07/03/multi-billion-deal-royal-navy-orders-three-new-type-26-frigates/
« Última modificação: Julho 03, 2017, 01:39:12 pm por tenente »
 

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mafets

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Re: Royal Navy
« Responder #306 em: Julho 10, 2017, 11:53:55 am »
lol  ::)  https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/hms-daring-removed-active-service-become-harbour-training-ship-due-manning-issues/?utm_source=FB&utm_medium=FacebookPage&utm_campaign=social
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HMS Daring removed from active service to become harbour training ship due to manning issues

Earlier fears that HMS Dauntless would spend the rest of her career tied up alongside have now been calmed, but only because HMS Daring has taken her place as harbour training ship.

It should be noted that the vessel has returned home from a lengthy deployment and likely would not go to sea again for sometime regardless of her usage in this role.

It is understood that HMS Daring, the first Type 45 Destroyer constructed, is currently in number 3 Basin in Portsmouth where she’s expected to remain for two years as a harbour training ship.

The vessel she replaced, HMS Dauntless, will enter refit and subsequently rejoin the active fleet. Information regarding the refit of HMS Dauntless came to light via a response to a question asked by Lord West of Spithead in the House of Lords:

“To ask Her Majesty’s Government when the refits of HMS Dauntless and HMS Lancaster will commence.”

The answer came from Earl Howe:

“On current plans, the refit for HMS LANCASTER will commence in mid 2017 and the refit for HMS DAUNTLESS is scheduled for the end of 2017.”

A very detailed fleet status diagram from SaveTheRoyalNavy.org showing the status of every Royal Navy escort vessel can be found in this in-depth article at the site.

HMS Daring has had a busy couple of years, In 2016 Daring deployed to the Persian Gulf to assist in Operation Inherent Resolve, the campaign against Islamic State. In 2017, after being relieved East of Suez by HMS Monmouth, Daring transited The Bosphorus for exercises in the Black Sea with the Romanian Navy. She is now in Portsmouth for routine maintenance before taking on the harbour training ship role.


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"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

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Lusitano89

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Re: Royal Navy
« Responder #307 em: Julho 16, 2017, 02:37:40 pm »
 

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mafets

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Re: Royal Navy
« Responder #308 em: Julho 17, 2017, 10:58:42 am »
https://www.facebook.com/royalnavy/?hc_ref=ARS4uHcMuifyA1mm3qB5fcFfG7M4jvuuL-Bfjf4mgaYjYFqQ-Pn8jow7YdMnaa_Wb2M&pnref=story
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Little meet Large. Very Large!

Two of the smallest vessels in the Royal Navy were positively dwarfed by the largest, brand-new carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth when they paid a fleeting visit to her in the Moray Firth.

Patrol boats HMS Dasher and Pursuer are 1,200 times smaller - by displacement - than the future flagship, which is on her third week of sea trials in the North Sea.



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"Nunca, no campo dos conflitos humanos, tantos deveram tanto a tão poucos." W.Churchil

http://mimilitary.blogspot.pt/
 

 

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