Brexit

  • 265 Respostas
  • 24562 Visualizações
*

Viajante

  • Analista
  • ***
  • 806
  • Recebeu: 187 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 117 vez(es)
  • +22/-5
Re: Brexit
« Responder #240 em: Maio 15, 2017, 03:27:28 pm »
 

*

Cabeça de Martelo

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 13764
  • Recebeu: 581 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 623 vez(es)
  • +41/-11
Re: Brexit
« Responder #241 em: Junho 07, 2017, 05:52:22 pm »
An Ignorant American's Guide to the UK Election
OSCAR RICKETT
Jun 7 2017

A Brit explains who Jeremy Corbyn is and why everyone is so mad at him all the time.

To many Americans, the UK is like an alternate reality where there is a Parliament and a Queen and everyone cares a great deal about baking. (It sounds pretty nice, to be honest.) But though British politics resembles the US version in some way—the Conservatives (Tories) and Labour are rough analogues of the Republicans and Democrats, respectively—there are a bunch of structural differences between the systems that make it tricky for Yanks to grasp what's going on in the UK, which is set to have an election this Thursday.

The UK's parliamentary system is in some ways simpler than the American model. If a party wins a majority of the seats in Parliament, it gets to control the government and its leader becomes prime minister. (If no party has a majority, the Tories or Labour would have to create a coalition government with minor parties—we'll get into that.) The UK is supposed to have an electoral calendar like the US does, but Prime Minister Theresa May, the Conservative leader, cast that aside and got Parliament vote to call a fresh election.


On the eve of the election, we emailed Oscar Rickett, a writer and journalist who has covered politics on both sides of the Atlantic, to sort out some of the issues at play when Britons head to the polls.

Continuação : https://www.vice.com/en_uk/article/an-ignorant-americans-guide-to-the-uk-election
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

*

Cabeça de Martelo

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 13764
  • Recebeu: 581 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 623 vez(es)
  • +41/-11
Re: Brexit
« Responder #242 em: Junho 08, 2017, 12:28:08 pm »
Investidores fogem do Reino Unido e dos EUA, mas zona euro fica a salvo
Leonor Mateus Ferreira

As eleições no Reino Unido e a audição do ex-diretor do FBI James Comey no Senado norte-americano estão a criar instabilidade nos mercados, mas a Europa continental parece estar imune aos receios após ter afastado as ameaças anti-euro.

http://www.jornaleconomico.sapo.pt/noticias/investidores-fogem-do-reino-unido-e-dos-eua-mas-zona-euro-fica-a-salvo-169017
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

*

Lusitano89

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 7897
  • Recebeu: 253 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 175 vez(es)
  • +12/-3
Re: Brexit
« Responder #243 em: Junho 14, 2017, 04:12:36 pm »
Parlamento Europeu pede clareza e rapidez a Londres


 

*

Lusitano89

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 7897
  • Recebeu: 253 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 175 vez(es)
  • +12/-3
Re: Brexit
« Responder #244 em: Junho 27, 2017, 01:27:51 pm »
Barnier exige a May maior nível de proteção dos cidadãos


 

*

Cabeça de Martelo

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 13764
  • Recebeu: 581 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 623 vez(es)
  • +41/-11
Re: Brexit
« Responder #245 em: Julho 14, 2017, 11:28:05 am »
Brexit bill to cause constitutional clash with Scotland and Wales

Great repeal bill rejected by Nicola Sturgeon and Carwyn Jones over concerns about human rights and Westminster ‘power grab’

Theresa May appeared to be heading for an explosive constitutional clash over Brexit after the Scottish and Welsh governments said they could not support the great repeal bill – the key proposals drawn up to extricate Britain from the EU.

The historic legislation, formally known as the European Union (withdrawal) bill, came under sustained attack after it was published on Thursday, with MPs and human rights campaigners, as well as leaders in Edinburgh and Cardiff, dismissing it as a Westminster power grab.

Just hours after the government published the 66-page bill that will repeal the European Communities Act of 1972, and bring decades of EU law on to the UK statute book, the Scottish and Welsh leaders, Nicola Sturgeon and Carwyn Jones, rejected it.

Campaigners and parliamentarians raised a series of other concerns about the legislation, including the risk that human rights could be undermined and the threat that ministers could seize sweeping powers to tweak laws without full parliamentary scrutiny.

In a joint statement, Sturgeon and Jones said: “We have repeatedly tried to engage with the UK government on these matters and have put forward constructive proposals about how we can deliver an outcome which will protect the interests of all the nations in the UK, safeguard our economies and respect devolution.

“Regrettably, the bill does not do this. Instead, it is a naked power grab, an attack on the founding principles of devolution and could destabilise our economies.”

The government confirmed that it would seek the backing of Holyrood and the Welsh assembly for the aspects of the legislation that affect devolved powers, through a “legislative consent motion”. But Sturgeon and Jones made clear they would not offer their approval unless the legislation was substantially redrafted.

The government could still insist on pressing ahead – but doing so would underline the divisions within the United Kingdom, just as May battles to shore up her position and present a united front in Brussels.

Catherine Barnard, professor of European law at the University of Cambridge, said: “The legal position is one thing, and the political position is quite another, particularly with a weakened prime minister.”

It is becoming increasingly clear that the government faces a series of tough parliamentary hurdles at home, as well as the prospect of difficult negotiations in Brussels, before Brexit can be achieved.

Europhile Conservative backbenchers are calling for a clear signal that May has softened her approach to Brexit – and regard the election of two centrists, Nicky Morgan and Tom Tugendhat, to chair the Treasury and foreign affairs select committees respectively as a signal that the makeup of the House of Commons has shifted decisively.

The Broxtowe MP, Anna Soubry, said: “How many times do people like me have to tell them this? It’s all changed since 8 June. If [May is] going to stay and see this through, she’s got to step up. She’s got to get herself fully briefed; and she’s got to put David Davis back in his box and listen to Greg Clark, Amber Rudd, Philip Hammond. They should be giving the directions.”

One signal that the government may be moving towards a more conciliatory position came in a written statement from the Brexit minister Lady Anelay acknowledging that Britain would continue to have financial obligations to the EU after Brexit. The statement said: “The UK has obligations to the EU ... that will survive the UK’s withdrawal – and that these need to be resolved.”

That appeared to contradict a remark by the foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, earlier in the week that the EU could “go whistle” if it expected Britain to pay a hefty divorce bill. May has always said she would honour any obligations as Brexit takes place, but the new statement appeared to go further – and to be aimed at averting a row over the issue when negotiations resume in Brussels next week.

Davis himself struck an emollient tone on Thursday, seeking to reassure MPs about the scope of the so-called Henry VIII powers, which will allow ministers to make changes to any laws necessary to achieve Brexit – and for two years afterwards.


He told the BBC that the powers would be used for “technical changes to make the law work,” adding: “It’s up to the House of Commons. If a statutory instrument is placed in front of the House of Commons, then the Commons decides if it debates or votes on it.”

Human rights groups Amnesty International and Liberty joined Labour and the Liberal Democrats in urging the government to give further reassurances that human rights will not be undermined and, in particular, to incorporate the EU charter of fundamental rights into UK law.

Kerry Moscogiuri, Amnesty’s campaigns director?, said: “It is now vital that Parliament ensures our hard-won human rights don’t diminish after Brexit. The broad powers that the repeal bill grants ministers to change our laws are dangerously vague; they must not be used to roll back human rights that are in place to protect us all.”

The legislation makes clear that “the charter of fundamental rights is not part of domestic law on or after exit day”. Government lawyers believe that will make little difference in practice, as the charter sets out rights that are already enshrined elsewhere in EU law and will brought into domestic law.

But Emmy Gibbs, of the anti-trafficking charity ATLEU, who used the charter to bring a case about mistreated workers in foreign embassies to the supreme court, said: “It is not right that the removal of the charter under the great repeal bill will make no difference to workers.

“Without the charter, our clients – who complained of unlawful discrimination and breach of working time regulations – would have been left without any remedy, because the UK’s state immunity law prevents them enforcing those rights in the employment tribunal.”

Asked about the risk of a constitutional clash over the devolution aspects of Brexit, May’s spokeswoman said there was no plan for what might happen if Scotland or Wales refused legislative consent.

“That’s very pessimistic. We’re optimistic,” she said of such a scenario. Pressed on whether there was a contingency plan for this, she said: “Not that I’m aware of, no.”

This idea was, she stressed, still a long way off: “We’ve set out the bill today for the first time. It has to go through a process now. Within that process we will continue talking to the devolved administrations, who we hope will get behind it.”

Since you’re here …
… we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading the Guardian than ever but advertising revenues across the media are falling fast. And unlike many news organisations, we haven’t put up a paywall – we want to keep our journalism as open as we can. So you can see why we need to ask for your help. The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism takes a lot of time, money and hard work to produce. But we do it because we believe our perspective matters – because it might well be your perspective, too.

I appreciate there not being a paywall: it is more democratic for the media to be available for all and not a commodity to be purchased by a few. I’m happy to make a contribution so others with less means still have access to information.
Thomasine F-R.
If everyone who reads our reporting, who likes it, helps to support it, our future would be much more secure.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/jul/13/scotland-wales-brexit-great-repeal-bill-naked-power-grab-nicola-sturgeon-carwyn-jones
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

*

Lusitano89

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 7897
  • Recebeu: 253 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 175 vez(es)
  • +12/-3
Re: Brexit
« Responder #246 em: Julho 15, 2017, 03:50:24 pm »
Tony Blair diz que Reino Unido deve ponderar não sair da União Europeia


O antigo primeiro-ministro britânico Tony Blair afirmou que o Reino Unido deve manter em aberto a opção de permanecer um Estado-Membro da União Europeia para que o Brexit possa ser cancelado caso a opinião dos eleitores se altere durante este período de negociação de dois anos.

“A consideração racional das opções incluiria sensivelmente a hipótese de negociar que o Reino Unido permaneça dentro de uma Europa preparada para se reformar e encontrar-nos a meio caminho” escreveu Tony Blair num ensaio enviado pelo seu gabinete, de acordo com a agência Bloomberg.

O texto divulgado este sábado revela ainda que, segundo o ex-governante britânico, o prejuízo para a economia e para os meios de subsistência causados ​​por uma ruptura com o bloco de 28 países está a tornar-se mais claro à medida que os processos de divórcio continuam. Nesse sentido, um compromisso com a comunidade única não deve ser descartada.

“Tendo em conta o que está em jogo e o que, diariamente, estamos a descobrir sobre os custos do Brexit, como é que se pode estar deliberadamente a tirar a mesa a opção de um compromisso entre o Reino Unido e a Europa para que o Reino Unido permaneça?”, questiona-se Tony Blair sobre a saída do país que liderou do projeto europeu.

Através deste texto, Tony Blair reitera esforços para implementar reformas ao país que governou durante dez anos, entre 1997 e 2007, que disse estar “a perder o equilíbrio e estar a tropeçar, mas aparentemente sem qualquer escolha a não ser cambalear”.


>>>> http://www.jornaleconomico.sapo.pt/noticias/tony-blair-diz-que-reino-unido-deve-ponderar-nao-sair-da-uniao-europeia-185465
 

*

Lusitano89

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 7897
  • Recebeu: 253 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 175 vez(es)
  • +12/-3
Re: Brexit
« Responder #247 em: Julho 19, 2017, 02:15:33 pm »
 
Os seguintes utilizadores agradeceram esta mensagem: Cabeça de Martelo

*

Viajante

  • Analista
  • ***
  • 806
  • Recebeu: 187 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 117 vez(es)
  • +22/-5
Re: Brexit
« Responder #248 em: Julho 25, 2017, 11:05:59 am »
Deutsche Bank vai transferir 300 mil milhões do seu balanço para Frankfurt (retira de Londres)

A transferência de operações e activos para Frankfurt implicará a deslocação de centenas de traders e as contas de pelo menos 20 mil clientes.



O alemão Deutsche Bank poderá transferir cerca de 300 mil milhões de euros do balanço da sua unidade de Londres para Frankfurt, na sequência da saída do Reino Unido da União Europeia, que levará a instituição a migrar uma parte das operações de corretagem e activos para aquela cidade da Alemanha, avança a Bloomberg.

No final da semana passada, John Cryan, CEO do Deutsche Bank, já havia informado os funcionários, através de uma mensagem em vídeo, que a instituição se estava a preparar para o "hard" Brexit, e que deveria transferir grande parte dos seus serviços de Londres para Frankfurt.

"Assumiremos o pior cenário", admitiu o responsável. "E é provável que o pior seja pior do que as pessoas imaginam".

"Ainda há muitos detalhes por resolver e acordar; dependendo das alterações das regras e regulamentos, tentaremos minimizar as perturbações para os nossos clientes e para os nossos próprios funcionários", garantiu ainda o responsável, acrescentando que terão de ser "transferidos" ou pelo menos "acrescentados" cargos em Frankfurt, por causa da saída do Reino Unido da UE.

Fontes citadas pela Bloomberg referem que a transferência de operações e activos para Frankfurt implicará a deslocação de centenas de traders e as contas de pelo menos 20 mil clientes.

A migração deverá ter início em Setembro de 2018, a seis meses do Brexit. O banco pretende começar a avisar os clientes em Setembro deste ano de que as suas contas serão transferidas.

Grande parte das operações de corretagem do Deutsche Bank na Europa são feitas através de Londres, uma cidade que ganhou dimensão para o banco sob a liderança dos antecessores de Cryan, Anshu Jain e Josef Ackermann.

http://www.jornaldenegocios.pt/empresas/banca---financas/detalhe/deutsche-bank-vai-transferir-300-mil-milhoes-do-seu-balanco-para-frankfurt
 

*

Lusitano89

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 7897
  • Recebeu: 253 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 175 vez(es)
  • +12/-3
Re: Brexit
« Responder #249 em: Julho 26, 2017, 07:35:15 pm »
'Brexit' trava crescimento da economia britânica


 

*

Lusitano89

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 7897
  • Recebeu: 253 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 175 vez(es)
  • +12/-3
Re: Brexit
« Responder #250 em: Agosto 28, 2017, 09:12:21 pm »
UE pede mais clareza e seriedade a Londres


 

*

Lusitano89

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 7897
  • Recebeu: 253 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 175 vez(es)
  • +12/-3
Re: Brexit
« Responder #251 em: Setembro 09, 2017, 12:35:10 am »
Presidente da Geórgia teme que Brexit desacelere o alargamento da UE a leste


 

*

Cabeça de Martelo

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 13764
  • Recebeu: 581 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 623 vez(es)
  • +41/-11
Re: Brexit
« Responder #252 em: Setembro 20, 2017, 02:56:31 pm »
Theresa May oferece 20 mil milhões de euros para sair da União Europeia

A primeira-ministra britânica, Theresa May, vai oferecer esta semana pelo menos 20 mil milhões de euros na sequência da saída do Reino Unido da União Europeia, avança o jornal britânico Financial Times.

De acordo com o jornal, a chanceler alemã, Angela Merkel, é uma das líderes europeias que já foi informada de que o discurso de May em Florença, na sexta-feira, vai incluir uma proposta de envelope para selar financeiramente o 'divórcio' entre o Reino Unido e a União Europeia.

A equipa da líder britânica espera que esta oferta possa desbloquear as negociações, que estão num impasse há três meses, e permita "avançar para uma segunda fase e abrir as discussões sobre um futuro acordo de comércio com a UE", escreve o FT.

O valor de 20 mil milhões de euros representa o valor necessário para que nenhum Estado membro tenha de pagar mais ou receber menos para compensar a saída do Reino Unido, entre 2018 e 2020, o último ano já orçamentado.

Na notícia, o FT esclarece que vários responsáveis britânicos mostraram-se "surpreendidos" pela possibilidade de algumas capitais europeias já terem conhecimento de detalhes do discurso de sexta-feira, uma vez que só na quinta-feira está prevista uma reunião do gabinete de May sobre o discurso de Florença.

O artigo do jornal britânico surge também poucos dias depois de o ministro dos Negócios Estrangeiros, Boris Johnson, ter escrito um artigo no qual defende que o Reino Unido não devia pagar qualquer valor à UE para poder aceder ao mercado comum depois de um período transição.

http://24.sapo.pt/economia/artigos/theresa-may-oferece-20-mil-milhoes-de-euros-para-sair-da-uniao-europeia

20 mil milhões!... :o
7. Todos os animais são iguais mas alguns são mais iguais que os outros.

 

*

Viajante

  • Analista
  • ***
  • 806
  • Recebeu: 187 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 117 vez(es)
  • +22/-5
Re: Brexit
« Responder #253 em: Setembro 20, 2017, 04:52:38 pm »
Theresa May oferece 20 mil milhões de euros para sair da União Europeia

..............

20 mil milhões!... :o

Não é muito dinheiro, nos últimos anos, o Reino Unido já pagava por ano quase 16,5 mil milhões de euros para fazer parte da UE (na realidade pagava 22,5 mil milhões e tinha um retorno garantido na época de Thatcher de cerca de 6 mil milhões de euros: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/0/how-much-do-we-spend-on-the-eu-and-what-else-could-it-pay-for/)

Portanto aquilo que oferecem é pouco mais de 1 ano de contribuições e ainda querem ficar com os aspectos positivos da UE, que é o total acesso ao mercado único!

Quem tem mais a perder, são os países pequenos e com pouco poder negocial como é o nosso caso. Os grandes países como a Alemanha, nada tem a temer do RU (economicamente falando), porque não estou a ver as empresas inglesas imporem-se às empresas alemãs que até são mais fortes. Também para os maiores contribuintes da UE, como é mais uma vez o caso da Alemanha, não estou a ver que esta vá compensar a saída do RU e passar a transferir mais dinheiro para a UE. Não acredito que os alemães aceitem isso.

Já para os pequenos países, vão ser duplamente penalizados:
Em primeiro lugar porque a UE perde um contribuinte líquido (de subsídios) para os países mais carenciados. São "só" 16,5 mil milhões de euros por ano que entrava vindo do RU;
Em segundo lugar, porque o RU quer pagar para continuar no mercado único, ou seja, as empresas do RU continuam a vender para a UE sem serem tributadas extraordinariamente, como acontece com as nossas importações de fora da UE! A Noruega por exemplo não faz parte da UE, e paga por ano 900 milhões de euros só para fazer parte do mercado único! (se pagam é porque não perdem dinheiro!!!!!).

Por isso resta-nos estar muito atentos, porque só temos a perder com estas negociações, para além de que não estou mesmo a ver a Alemanha que já paga 25 mil milhões por ano para a UE, pagar também os 16,5 mil milhões do RU!!!!!
 

*

Lusitano89

  • Investigador
  • *****
  • 7897
  • Recebeu: 253 vez(es)
  • Enviou: 175 vez(es)
  • +12/-3
Re: Brexit
« Responder #254 em: Outubro 04, 2017, 05:53:28 pm »
May (quase) preparada para todas as eventualidades


 

 

Brexit: repercussões militares?

Iniciado por olisipoQuadro Mundo

Respostas: 3
Visualizações: 938
Última mensagem Julho 19, 2016, 12:02:23 pm
por olisipo